How Design Banner/Logo with Illustrator (Easily).I Bet you can do this. | Md Jaforullah | Skillshare

How Design Banner/Logo with Illustrator (Easily).I Bet you can do this.

Md Jaforullah, Dont Stop learning

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22 Lessons (1h 30m)
    • 1. What is Adobe Illustrator

      1:23
    • 2. Bitmap vs Vector

      4:27
    • 3. Fills and Strokes

      4:40
    • 4. Selections and Stacking Order

      6:26
    • 5. Isolation Mode

      4:07
    • 6. Creating New Documents

      4:12
    • 7. Illustrator Templates

      2:56
    • 8. Anatomy of a Document

      3:36
    • 9. The Control Panel

      3:15
    • 10. Rulers and Guides

      7:07
    • 11. Smart Guides

      3:01
    • 12. Guides and the Grid

      3:48
    • 13. Saving Documents

      2:16
    • 14. Align Panel

      3:20
    • 15. Hide/Show Edges

      3:02
    • 16. Document Navigation

      5:51
    • 17. Bounding Box

      2:47
    • 18. Workspaces

      4:10
    • 19. Preview and Outline Modes

      2:41
    • 20. Understanding Paths

      3:37
    • 21. Multiple Artboards

      7:13
    • 22. Working with Panels

      5:38

About This Class

This course is taught by Md Jaforullah, Train Simple and is a quick start course to get you comfortable with the basics of Adobe Illustrator CC. Learn how to create documents and understand what vector graphics are. Illustrator us the industry standard vector drawing application used in print production, graphic design, and web design.

What are the requirements?

  • Basic computer skills

What am I going to get from this course?

  • Learn the basics of Illustrator

What is the target audience?

  • Everyone

Transcripts

1. What is Adobe Illustrator: Welcome to Adobe Illustrator CS six Fundamentals in this course were to be taking a look at adobes, Premier Vector based drawing application illustrator. When you create artwork in Illustrator, it's infinitely scalable because it's based on vectors. We're gonna be taking a look at the basics of the program in this course to get you comfortable so you can start creating your own artwork. Adobe Illustrator is used by a wide variety of professionals from print Web in mobile designers. You'll find that you'll create artwork in Illustrator and use it in other creative suite applications. It's not uncommon to take content, created an illustrator and use it for titling sequences. And after effects or premiere, you'll integrate your artwork that you create an illustrator and bring it over to photo shop. It's not uncommon to create content in illustrator and animated for the Web in Adobe Flash . Additionally, if you are a Web designer, there's a great possibility you want to use illustrator toe mock up content before coating it. With that being said, throughout this course, we're gonna be taking a look at the fundamentals of the program so you can start using illustrator effectively in your work 2. Bitmap vs Vector: before we get started inside of Illustrator, I want to review the differences between vector based artwork and bit map based artwork. You'll notice I'm working with the document called Vectors versus pixels dot ai. Now this files available to you inside the Chapter one folder off the Class Exercise Files folder. If you have access to our website on the class page, you'll notice that there's an exercise files tab. If you go ahead and click on it, you will then see a link called course files. Go ahead and click it. It'll download the exercise files, place him on your desktop so they're in a nice central location. Additionally, as we work inside of Illustrator, we're gonna be working with different pieces of artwork and graphics. I just want to point out that a lot of this content is courtesy of my friends at shutter stock dot com. They were nice enough to allow me to use their library of content for examples throughout this course. So if you have a need for not only stock photography but stock or work, shutter stock dot com is a great resource. So coming back into illustrator, we have these two pieces of artwork. A one is vector based. One is bit not based vector graphics or created with vector points, and those points are connected mathematically because they're connected mathematically. The end result is nice, crisp edges all over the artwork. This gives you the ability to take this logo and put it on something as small as a business card or something as large as a billboard without having to worry about quality digression . That's not the case with bit map based images Bit. Map based images are constructed of little squares of color information called pixels. Bit mapped images traditionally lend themselves to images with great tonal range like photographs. The limitation there, however, is your limited to the amount of pixels that are currently within that image. If you have to increase the size of the image, the pixels spread out, the computer has to come up with new pixel information to fill those holes, and the end result is an image of lower quality with a vector image. You're just changing the vector points locations and then you're re calculating how to connect them. Additionally, the way that you work inside of illustrator is very different than a program like Photoshopped. If you wanted to change the color of an element inside a photo shop, you have to select those pixels. Well, that's not the case inside of Illustrator. Illustrator is object based. So if you wanted to change the color of, say, this text, you could simply click it and change the color. We'll take a look at that in just a second. But if we go ahead and zoom in to these images, the image on the right you'll notice immediately begins to lose quality. And this is the bit map version. Additionally, because it's based on pixels, which are squares, you'll notice it has a lot of trouble creating curves. But if we look at the vector version, everything is nice and crisp. Like I was saying earlier, Illustrator is object based. So if we decided we wanted to change the color of this text, all we would have to do is select the text, come up to the Options bar and choose a different color, and you'll notice that the text is immediately updated again. In the bit map version, you'd have to make a selection off all the pixels within that text and then change the color. But of course, it's not that easy because, as you see bit mapped, images create transition pixels between the foreground color and the background color. That complicates making a selection to change its color because you have those intermediate pixels. So hopefully that brief explanation gives you some idea as to the differences between vector images and bit map images. It's not to say that vector images or superior in every application, they're definitely not. But you can see they definitely have their advantages in certain situations over there bit map counterparts. 3. Fills and Strokes: before I go into the nuts and bolts of the illustrator interface, I just want to give you some basic concepts and skills so you can start using Illustrator right away. At this point, we understand the differences between bit map and vector artwork, and we also understand the concept of paths inside of Illustrator. I'm working with the document called Fill in stroke dot ai, which is available inside the Chapter one folder. It's essentially the same document that we were working with in the last movie, So if you have that document open, really, there's no need to open this document. But what we want to talk about here is how fills and strokes work inside of Illustrator. So what I'm gonna do is come over here and highlight the selection tool with the selection tool highlighted. If you click on one of these open paths that we're talking about in the last movie, when you selected if you take a look at the control panel up here towards the top, we can see that we have a black stroke applied to this path. If we open this up, you'll notice that there's all sorts of different color options. But over here, to the top left hand corner, there's an option called None. If you go ahead and select that one to selected, it looks like the path disappears. And for most purposes it does. You don't see it on screen. If you were to print this, there's really nothing to print. But that doesn't mean that the path doesn't exist. It does. There still the anchor points, and they're still connected together. If you hover around this empty space, eventually you'll find your path. If you're having trouble finding the path, you can always click and drag a marquee around the general area, and it will select that path so you can have a path with no style. So obviously, if you create a path, you want to apply some type of style to it. So with its selected again in the control panel, you can come over here and choose whatever color you want. So if I got in select this blue, you'll notice that the path is now stroked with that blue. Additionally, there are some other appearance options and they're located up here towards the top in the control panel. Right now, we have this stroke weight, which is essentially the thickness. You can access this drop down menu, and you can choose a different point size. If you didn't select something like seven, you'll notice it becomes a lot thicker. And there's some additional options here, for example, we have the variable with profile, and these are things that will get into a little bit later on. But you can go ahead in select one, and it changes the appearance of the stroke. On the path this looks a little bit more like a brush stroke. There's also this drop down menu, which allows you to change the definition of the brush so you have a lot of options in terms of the appearance of a particular path. Again, we can come over here and select this open path, and if we want, we can change the thickness. We can change the color. You have all these options available to you for modifying the appearance of the path, so it's important to understand that the path is inherently separate from the appearance. We can come over here and select one of our closed paths, and with one of these selected again, you have all the same options for changing the appearance of the path. You can change the color. You can change the weight. All those options are available to you, but because it's a closed path, you have the additional option of changing the fill. The Phil is the interior color of the shape you'll notice next to the stroke inkwell. There's also a fill inkwell. If you click that it will open up that same swatches panel, you can go ahead and choose a color. Or, if you want, you can choose one of these radial Grady INTs or linear Grady INTs. You can even choose one of these patterns, so there's a lot of options here in terms of changing the appearance of either an open or closed path. Again, we can come over here and select this oval with the oval. You can change the appearance of the stroke, and you can also change the appearance of the fill. So there's a lot to this in terms of really controlling the appearance of your objects. But that's the basics, and that'll get you pretty far inside of illustrator. The key concept here is to remember that a path is separate from its appearance so you can have a path, but you won't see it in print or on screen until you apply some type of an appearance to it through either stroke properties or fill properties. 4. Selections and Stacking Order: in this movie. What I want to take a look at is exactly how you can go about selecting content inside of Illustrator. We were exposed to that a little bit in the last movie, but I want to elaborate on that. In this movie you let us. I'm working with a document called Selections dot Ai, which is available inside the Chapter one folder. Here we have three different cars in three different boxes. What we want to do is understand exactly what happens when you make a selection with the Black Arrow tool, which is referred to ask the selection tool or the direct selection tool, which is the white arrow. So what we want to do is look at all of these objects. And if you mouse over these objects with the selection tool or the direct selection tool for that matter, you get outlines of its different parts. In this case, where we're looking at the car, the car is comprised of several different parts, and you can verify that by mousing over it. Now, when you create an illustration like this, it's not uncommon. Toe want to move all of these elements together so often times What you do after creating all this content is you selected all a new group it. So all of these individual elements are now part of a larger group. What that gives you the ability to do with the selection tool is click on the car and have the car be treated as one element. At this point, if you click and drag, you can simply move the car to a different location. However, you will run into situations where you need to select a certain aspect of the car. One way to do that is with the direct selection tool, which is, of course, the white arrow with the direct selection tool. If you mouse over the car, you can see it's different parts and individual anchor points. Now, what's interesting about the direct selection tool is if you're not hovering over a specific anchor point and you click, you'll select that entire path the whole object of that path. At that point, if you wanted to move it, you could click and drag, and you'll notice I remove that part of the car. I'm gonna go ahead and undo that Command Z or control Z on Windows something else that's interesting. When you're working with selection tools is you can easily toggle between the selection tools. All you have to do is hold down the command key. It would be the control key on Windows Notice. Right now, the direct selection tool is the active tool. If I hold down the command key here on the Mac, it turns into the Black Arrow, meaning If I come over and click somewhere on the car, I'll select the entire object. So that's one way of creating a selection. Of course, in the last movie, I showed you how you could click and drag a more key around, some content to select it. You can also select individual anchor points again. We saw this in the last movie. All you have to do is hover over one of the anchor points and click. So now the difference is on Lee. This anchor point is selected, opposed to clicking somewhere outside of an anchor point. You'll select the entire path, the entire object of that path. The difference is when you click on the anchor point, you're selecting just that anchor point. So in this case, if I use the arrow keys on the keyboard. I'm just going to move that one anchor point, Okay? None do that. Something else that's important to understand when you're working with objects inside of Illustrator is that there's a stacking order associated with these objects. So right now we have six objects within the document. Each of these objects has its own level within the stacking order. One way to look at the stacking order is to take a look at the layers panel. The layers panel is available over here on the right hand side. If you don't see this little icon, you can always go to the window menu and under the window menu, you can choose layers. So here, inside the layers panel, we can see we only have one layer. But because we have multiple objects within this layer, there's a stacking order associate ID with this layer. And if you expand this little triangle, you'll see that we have the three paths, which are those squares. Then we have the three groups, which are the cars. You can further expand a car to see all the individual elements that make up that car, so right now we can see that the blue square is the top most sub layer. Then we have this red square and then we have the Yellow Square. What that means is, if I come over here and select the Red Square notice I'm using the selection tool. If I click and drag in, place this on top of the Yellow Square. It appears on top of the Yellow Square. Likewise, if I come over here and select this blue square and I click and drag, it will appear on top of both the Yellow Square and the Red Square had moved the yellow square over a little bit. I'm just using the arrow keys on the keyboard to move it. I'm gonna hold down the shift key while using the arrow keys and you move it in larger increments. So now if we wanted to change the stacking order, we have a couple different options. One option is to come over here to the layers panel, select the particular sub layer and just click in dragon above the other sub layers. Now you'll notice that this object appears on top of the other boxes. Additionally, you can come up to the object menu and under the object menu, you can choose a range, and you have several different options. In this case, if we choose, send backwards. What it will do is send it backwards one step within the sub layers so it will appear behind the blue sub layer or the blue box on the document but above the red box, and you can see that that's the case. Whereas if we come up to the object menu and we choose a range and choose scent of back, it becomes the bottom most sub layer. So now it's underneath, not on Lee, the other two squares, but also all of the cars. So understanding how you can select objects obviously is very important inside of Illustrator. Additionally, you have to be aware of this stacking order when you're working with multiple objects inside the program. 5. Isolation Mode: continuing with our discussion about selections, I want to point out something called isolation mode Inside of Illustrator. I'm working with the document called Isolation dot ai, which is available in the Chapter one folder. So in the last movie, we essentially learned that you can select an object with the selection tool, but you can select individual components with the direct selection tool. And if we take a look at this logo, we can see that it's made up of several different parts. And like the last movie where we were looking at the cars because it's made up of several different parts, the artists grouped all of those parts together. Under the object menu, you'll notice that there's a group command. All you have to do is have several different objects. So in this case I'm drawing out a couple different shapes with each of these shapes selected. So in this case, all three shapes. You would just come up to the object menu, and from there you would choose group when you group them together, no matter which one of these shapes, you select your essentially selecting all three. Go ahead and delete that, but what I want to point out, like I said, is something called isolation Mood. You'll notice. Right now I have the selection tool highlighted. Let's say we wanted to select these mountains. We know if we click once, were just selecting the group object. However, if we double click when we double click, we enter into isolation mode. At this point, you can see that were inside the group. So what does that mean? Well again, I still have the selection tool highlighted, but you'll notice I can select individual components off this piece of artwork. But what I'm interested in doing is changing a particular component. Let's say these mountains well, with these mountains selected. If I really wanted to go in and modify this, of course, you could come over and choose the direct selection tool. But better still is to double click it again. When you double click it again, you're isolated just to that object, and you can see that up here towards the top that we're now inside of another group. And if I click on the mountains, we've isolated just that portion of the logo. Isolation mode is very similar to working with symbols inside a flash. Of course, if you don't use flash, that's not a very helpful reference. But nevertheless, you have the ability to drill down into specific components of a larger piece of artwork to get back to where you were. You have a couple different options. You can step through step by step by clicking this back one level button notice. Right now, I'm in the nested group. But if I click this button on back to the original group and of course, I can click again to get back to the main document again, if you go ahead and double click, you enter the group. If you continue to double click on specific elements, you drill down further into those elements. If you want to go directly back to the document, you can do that simply by clicking on the document here within this bread crumb structure. One thing that I do want to point out new users sometimes will be confused by this structure, and what I mean by that is they'll double quick by accident and in this case, there in isolation mode for the overall grouped element. If they start creating additional artwork thinking that they're within the document will cost problems because they're really inside of this group. So when you're working with grouped objects and you're working in isolation mode, just be extra careful to be aware of where you are inside of the document, make sure you're not drilled down into a group if your intention is to create artwork within the main document. 6. Creating New Documents: creating new documents inside of Illustrator is something that you'll be doing all the time when working inside of the program. That's why it's important to understand the options inside the new document dialog box. Let's go ahead and take a look at how we can create a new document. What you want to do is come up to the file menu in under the file menu, you can choose new. The keyboard shortcut is command, and here on the Macintosh, it would be control in on the Windows side. Once you choose the new command, the new document Dialog box will open. First of all, you can name the new document. Don't call it my first Doc. This will be the file name off the document. Of course, if you leave it blank, you have the option of providing a name when you save the document. But you can save a little bit of time by filling in the name here inside this dialog box. Now there's several different profiles that are available to you. Right now. We're looking at the print profile, but you'll notice that there's options for Web devices, video and a few others. Monica hadn't leave it set to print. Regardless of the profile. You have options for the number of art boards that you want to work with, and we'll talk about working with multiple art boards in just a bit. But here you can specify the number of our boards. You can also set the size of the document. You'll notice we have some fairly standard sizes here. We have letter, legal tabloid and some international standards as well. Don't leave it. Sent a letter. You can specify the with in the height for the document, and you can also change the unit of measurement. Right now, it's set to points, but if you prefer working in pikers or inches, those options are available. If I go ahead and select inches, you'll notice everything is updated. Once you make a modification to the default values, you'll notice that the profile switches to custom. Now there are bleed options as well. A bleed is essentially values that control the with of the print area for items that extend beyond the Arc board. If you're gonna be working with a professional printer, you would ask them for the bleed values. Additionally, there are advanced options here, you'll notice that there's a color mode option because we selected the print profile. It automatically defaults the color mode to see em like a, which is the four color ink process used in professional printing. Cm like a of course, stands for saiyan, magenta, yellow and black. There's also options for raster effects when we talk about live effects inside of Illustrator. Many of those are raster based effects, which means they're based on pixels, and you have to decide how much resolution you want dedicated to those effects. Because you selected the print profile, the option is set too high, so let's go ahead and change the profile. You can change the profile by using this menu in selecting something else. Let's go ahead and choose something like Web. When you select Web, it sets up a new default size. It changes the default unit of measurement two pixels because when you're working with graphics to displayed on screen, you're typically measuring in pixels. Additionally, the color mode is set to RGB. The raster effects are set to screen or 72 PP. I because you don't need as much resolution for content to appear nicely on screen, whereas if you use something low like this for print, it really wouldn't print all that well. It would look somewhat pixelated when you're working with an onscreen delivery profile like Web or mobile devices, it's a good idea to align new objects to the pixel grid. This will ensure that your content lands on a whole value within the pixel grid to avoid any blurring when you export out the content. So once you're happy with these settings, you can come over and quick. Okay, Once you click, OK, the new document is created. 7. Illustrator Templates: in this movie. What I'd like to do is show you how you can use some of the illustrator templates as a starting point for your projects. Now I know a lot of graphic designers don't like the idea of templates, but some of these templates are incredibly useful, and they don't necessarily contain pre defined artwork. So let's go out and take a look at these templates. You can access the templates by coming up to the file menu and under the file menu, you can choose new from template. What that will do is open up the new from template dialog box. It'll put you into the templates directory, and you'll notice that there's several different categories for these templates. If we go ahead and open up tack, you'll notice that there's several different template files. Now you'll notice that the extension is dot ai T for Adobe Illustrator Template. You're not opening up the template file, but rather creating a new document based on this template. So if we go ahead and select something like brochures and click new, it's gonna go ahead and open up a new document, and as you look at it, you'll see that there's several different art boards. If I hold down the space bar to access the hand tool, I can click and drag to see all of the art boards. You probably won't use this particular file in your project, but what it does do is it begins to make you think about using Illustrator in a slightly different way. In this case, we have a multi page document now, not suggesting using illustrator over in design. But for some smaller projects you might find that illustrator is the ideal solution. Like I said, because there's artwork inside of this template, it may not be something that you will use, but there still are several useful templates available to you. Let me show you what I mean. If we come back to the file menu under the file menu, we can choose New from template again, it reopens the new from template dialog box in the Templates directory. What I want you to do this time is come over to the Blank Templates Directory and inside the Blank Templates directory, there's a file called banner ads dot ai T. If you go ahead and select that and you click new it creates a new document, and you can see all of these art boards. They're already pre defined to industry standard banner ad sizes for 68 by 67 28 by 90. So if you had a campaign you had to put together, this is incredibly helpful because you have all the art boards pre defined to the appropriate dimensions. So I just want to quickly point out that the templates inside of Illustrator are useful, even if you're a seasoned graphic designer and you have no need for templates. As you can see, some of these blank templates can be terrific starting points. 8. Anatomy of a Document: Now that you have a thorough understanding of the new document dialog box, let's go ahead and create a new document and look at some of the things that you'll be seeing within a document inside of Illustrator. So let's come up to the file menu and under the file menu, you can choose new inside the new document dialog box. What I want to do here is set up some bleed values. The reason why I'm doing this is so you can see all of the potential lines around the art board so I can explain what those lines represent. So for our purposes, you want to come over and select this option right here, which will make all of the settings the same meaning. If you come into the top text field and you type in 20 you'll notice twenties applied to the bottom left and right as well. So with that set up, go ahead and click. OK, it creates the new document now, in order for us to see everything associated with this document in terms of potential guides, if you will, what I want you to do is come up to the View menu and under the View menu, you can choose show print tiling, so I'll explain exactly what we're looking at here with the new document in just a second. But first, I want you to take a look at the tab up here towards the top. This tab is giving you some important information. First of all, it's telling you the file name because I didn't provide a name within the new document dialog box, and I haven't saved this document yet. It's set to untitled in his case. Seven. It's also showing the current magnification, which right now is set to 76%. It's also displaying the color mode of the color space that I'm working with. In this case, it's CM like a and then this option here is the preview mode, and there's a couple different preview modes. Right now we're in preview, but there's also outline over print, and there's also pixel preview. If you're working with proof colors, that information will also show up here on this tab. So what are we looking at in terms of all of these lines with the document? First of all, you can't see all of the dash lines because we see the art board border, and what we want to do is turn that off. So if you come to the view menu under the View menu, you can choose hide art boards. When you do that, now you can see all of the dotted lines. So what do these dotted lines represent? The innermost set of lines represents the actual printable area, and this takes into account the printers non printable margins at the edge of the paper. It's controlled by the specifications set up in the print set up dialogue box. This second set of dashed lines or dotted lines is the paper size, and then finally, we have this red line. The red line defines the Bleed Region, which we specified in the new document Dialog box. Again, you would typically get these parameters from your print shop. They can be modified in the document set up dialogue box and the print dialog box. For now, I want to turn the visibility of art boards back on, so we're gonna come back to the View menu and under the View menu, we can choose show art boards now, Like I said in a previous movie, you're not limited to just one art board per document. So in the next movie, what we'll do is take a look at how we can work with multiple our boards. 9. The Control Panel: As I mentioned towards the end of the last movie, there's a very important component in the illustrator interface called the Control Panel, and it's located up here towards the top. Now it's not the very top. This is the application bar, but just underneath it. This horizontal panel, it's called the control panel. Now you may hear some people refer to it as the options bar on. I'm pretty sure I've done that in the past, and that's because this same panel exist within other Creative Street applications, like Photo Shop and in those programs it's referred to as the Options Bar. But nevertheless, this panel is critically important because it changes based upon what you have selected and what you're working with inside of the document you let us. Right now I have the selection tool highlighted. If I come into the document and I make a selection, for example, if I click right here, I can see inside the control panel that this is a group. If I come over here and quick on this ribbon, I can see that this is a path. Furthermore, I get options for modifying that path. Not only am I getting feedback about its current fill color. But I have the option of opening up this panel in choosing a completely different fill color. If I wanted to apply, a stroke on we have to do is click on this button toe. Access the swatches panel four strokes. Go ahead and choose a color, and then you can modify the stroke. Wait. You can modify the with profile. You can modify the brush definition, the opacity. All these options are available in the control panel, and the control panel is intelligent. It will display the most important options on the left, and as it progresses through on the right hand side, the options are considered less and less important, at least based upon the Adobe engineers. And you can customize this panel in the far right hand side. There's a button that gives you a menu of all the different options that can appear in the control panel. Now, the options that you're seeing now may not include all these that are selected. Your screen resolution will ultimately dictate how many of these options you see as I record this. My screen resolution is a little bit smaller, so I'm not seeing as many options as you probably are on your screen. You also have the ability to dock the control panel down towards the bottom. Go ahead and select the doctor bottom command, and you'll notice it's now available down below. For the purposes of this course, I'm gonna leave it set to its default top position. So gonna come back to this menu. I'm gonna choose Doctor Top. Now, for some reason, you don't see the control panel. The control panel is available through the window menu. All you have to do is go to the window menu under the window menu. You can choose control. So the control panel, like I said, is critically important because it changes based upon the selected object within the document. And not only do you get feedback about it's current appearance properties, you also have the ability to change those appearance properties 10. Rulers and Guides: as we talk about the interface inside of Illustrator, I thought it would be important to point out some of the built in tools that will help you create content inside the program. Those tools that I'm talking about, or the rulers and the guides. Now, if you work with other adobe products, you probably think you have a handle on how to work with rulers and guides, and for the most part, you probably do. But there are some unique characteristics associated with these two tools inside of Illustrator, so it's probably worth your time toe watch this movie unless I'm working with a document called letterhead dot ai, which is available inside the Chapter two folder. And this document has multiple art boards, and it just so happens that I used the art board tool to reposition some of the art boards . What that ended up doing is changing the 00 reference point of the rulers. Let me show you what I mean. If you come up to the view menu under the view menu, you can choose rulers. Then you can choose show rulers. When you do that, rulers will appear along the top and left side of the document window. Now the 00 reference point you'll notice right now starts over here kind of in the inner quarter. Off the document. If you're trying to make a measurement, that could be pretty difficult. So what you want to do is reset the 00 point. To do that, you want to place your cursor in between the horizontal and vertical guides, then simply click and drag. And when you do, you have the ability to reset that 00 point. Just move the cross hair to the top left hand corner of the art board. In fact, you'll kind of feel it snap into place there, and when you let go with a mouse, you'll notice that 00 points are updated Now. There is one problem with this, especially when working with multiple our ports. If you come over to the business card in, select the logo, it's very difficult to use the ruler to come up with a measurement, and that's because 00 point is set to the top left hand corner of this main art board. So what you can do is come up to the View menu and under the view menu. You can choose rulers, and from there you can choose Change toe Art board rulers. Once you do that, you'll notice that the 00 point changes based upon the active Art board, in this case, the business card. If I come over here and make a selection within the envelope, if you take a look on the left hand side, you'll see the zero point move down again. If I select something here in the letterhead, you'll notice that the 00 point is the top left hand corner of this art board. Another nice thing about the rulers if you decide that you need to zoom in for any reason, the tick marks are updated so they get more sensitive or less sensitive based upon your magnification. When you're working with rulers, often times you're going to be working with guides as well. To create a guide, all you have to do is place your cursor within a ruler either the horizontal or vertical ruler, and simply click and drag out a guide as you click and drag. If you decided that you really wanted the opposite guide, meaning in this case I have a horizontal guide, but I want a vertical guide. All you have to do is hold down the option key on the Mac Altan windows and you'll notice it flips around. And that's really a toggle. So once you release the key, it returns back to its original orientation. So once you let go the mouse, the guides in place. Now, that's not to say that you can't create a vertical guide by simply clicking in the ruler vertically and dragon. You certainly can. So now you have two guides. If you decide that you want to move the guide, you have that ability. Simply mouse over the guide and click and drag. Now, when you're dragging the guide, what's nice is you get this heads up display, telling you exactly where you're gonna be positioning this guide. Once you have the guides positioned where you want them, you may want to lock them down so they can't be moved by accident. All you have to do is go to the View menu and from the View menu, you can choose guides. Then you can choose lock guides. Another thing that you could do is you can temporarily turn off the visibility of a guide again come up to the view menu, and from there you can choose guides, and then you can choose hide guides. The keyboard shortcut is command semi colon or control semi colon on windows, and it acts as a toggle. So if they're not visible, command semi colon or control semi colon, we'll turn them back on. If they're on, it will turn them off. A nice feature inside of illustrator gives you the ability to make a guide out of any path if you come over and choose the rectangle tool with the rectangle tool good and select some type of stroke color and draw a square or a rectangle here within this document. Now, with its selected, you can come up to the view menu and from the View menu, you can choose guides. Then you can choose make guides. And now that shape is a guide, and this is incredibly powerful. Toe have the ability to create a guide from literally any shape. Now you may decide at some point that you no longer want that shape to be treated as a guide. Well, what you can do is you can release it in order for you to release it, though, you need to make sure that the guides are not locked. So again, under the view menu, select guides and then de select lock guides. At that point, you can go ahead in. Select that shape, which is now a guide. Come back to the view menu, select guides, and then you can choose release guides and you'll notice it's returned back to a path. Finally, if you want to get rid of the guides, you can do that by coming up to the view menu. And under the View menu, you can choose guides than you can choose clear guides. There's two more things I want to show you. First of all, you can change the unit of measurement for the ruler by right clicking or control clicking on one of the rulers and then selecting that unit of measurement from this contextual menu . I'll go ahead and select inches and you'll notice it's updated and is now displaying the ruler as inches. The last thing that I want to point out. If you click and drag out a guide, you'll notice that the guide spans across all art boards and you may not want that toe happen. I'm gonna go ahead and undo this tow. Avoid that. What you want to do is come over and highlight the art board tool. Select the art board that you want to create a guide for, then click and drag out a guide and you'll notice it's unique to that art board. If you come over and highlight the selection tool, it's preserved that way as well. So it doesn't span across multiple art boards, so guides in rulers ultimately will give you the ability to position your content precisely where you want it. 11. Smart Guides: I'm working with the document called Smart guides dot ai, which is available inside the chapter two folder. I just wanted to quickly point out how smart guides work and what benefits they can provide you when working inside the program. So what I have here are two squares and I want to point out what a smart guide is. We've seen smart guides, but I didnt explicitly point them out. At least not until this point. If you mouse over the object, you'll notice to get some information. For example, if you mouse over the edge of the path, you get a little piece of text that appears telling you that you're on a path. Furthermore, if you click to select the object and decide that you want to move it as you move it, you get thes smart guides giving you some readout displays about the location of where you're gonna be placing this object. In fact, if you drag it over here towards the left, once the left edge of the object on the right matches up with the right edge of the object on the left, you can see that a smart guide appears and it kind of snaps into place here. If I continue to drag, I'll get a smart guide position at the center point. So there's a lot of information that illustrators providing you with as you move content around. Now, depending upon your needs, you may need to customize the information that the smart guides are relaying. And if that's the case, you can click away from any object and with out anything selected within the document in the control panel, you can come over and choose preferences. Now, inside the Preferences Dialog box, you want to come over to smart guides and inside of the smart Guides section, you can change the color of the smart guides. You could determine what options it reveals as you drag content or move content. For example, we were getting measurement labels. If you didn't want those, you could de select those. If you wanted to transform tools, you could have those appear. You can also set up construction guides, which will automatically create guides its specific angles and divide them according to these values you plug in here. There's also a snapping tolerance, which is essentially the sensitivity of the snapping behavior. When you have these smart guides appear. So Those are the options you have for customizing smart guides. If necessary, I'm gonna go ahead and click. Cancel. Finally, If you don't feel that you need to use smart guides, you can turn them off. You can come up to the view menu and under the view menu, simply choose smart guides. The keyboard shortcut is command you. It would be control you on windows. Once you de select the smart guides As you click and drag the object around, you'll notice you're not getting any of that readout information. In all honesty, I do work with smart guides quite a bit, so I'm gonna leave them turned on for this course. So let's just come back to the View menu. And under the view menu, we can choose smart guides again to turn them on. 12. Guides and the Grid: since we're talking about different ways that you can position content inside of illustrator in some of the tools that are built into the program. To help facilitate that, I want to point out a couple of features associated with working with guides, and I also want to introduce you to the grid inside of Illustrator. So I'm still working with that same document, letterhead dot ai. You'll notice I'm zoomed in a little bit so we can see this logo a little bit more clearly . Here we have a guide, and I'll just click and drag it up a little bit by default when you grab an object. If you click and drag, you can have it snap to the guide as long as your cursor is intersecting with that guy. So you noticed that if I select just the bottom right edge here, if the bottom right edge and the cursor is on top of the guide, it snaps into place. Now that option is something called snap two point. If you come to the View menu under the View menu, you'll notice that snap two point is selected. If you de select that, the object will then snap to the guide independently of the cursor. So if we click and drag and place this down towards the guide, you'll notice it snaps into place. It'll snap into place in different sections of the image. So here's the center point. Here's the top of it. All of these areas. The object is snapping to the guide, so those two options can be incredibly helpful. Sometimes snap two point is helpful. Other times it's not. But those are your two options for snapping your artwork to guides. No, not only do you have guides and rulers to help you position your content, you also have something called a grid. If you come up to the view menu under the View menu, you can choose show grid. If you go ahead and select show grid, it looks like there's graph paper behind all of your artwork. Now you can customize this grid, and you can customize the guides. What you need to do is either not have anything selected and click the preferences button here in the control panel or on the Macintosh. You can come over to the illustrator menu and choose preferences and from preferences. You can choose guides and grid. If you're on the windows side, you would go to the edit menu and you choose preferences guides in grid and inside this dialog box notice you can change the color of the guides. You can change the style from lines. Two dots in the grid has a lot of customization features as well. Again, you could use lines or dots. You can also customize the color, and you can essentially change the overall size of these grid boxes by changing the grid, every text field and also the subdivisions tax field. If you go ahead and click OK, those changes, if you made any, will take effect now. One other thing that you can do is come up to the view menu and under the View menu, you can choose snap to grid. What that means is when you select an object and drag it around, it'll snapped all these intersecting grid lines so that could be incredibly helpful. One thing that some designers like to do is snap to the grid, but they don't necessarily want to see the grid. Well, that's okay if you come back to the View menu and under the View menu you choose hide grid . As long as snap to grid is still selected, you'll still get that behavior as you drag the object around within the document. So working with the guides and customizing the guides and using the grid when necessary can really help you position your content within your illustrator documents. 13. Saving Documents: saving a document inside of Illustrator is pretty much the same process in just about any application. But what I want to show you in this movie is how you can save metadata with your document to make it searchable, especially by programs like Adobe Bridge. So what I wanted to do is come up to the file menu and under the file menu, you can choose file info. What this will do is open up a dialogue box, and inside this dialog box you'll notice that there's several different tabs. The tab I'm mostly concerned with for this particular document would be the description tab . Obviously, something like the camera data tab doesn't have much value in this particular example. But the description tab does contain a lot of useful options for adding metadata to this particular document. And like I said, by adding this metadata, you make this document mawr searchable by programs like Adobe Bridge. And this could be incredibly useful. Not only can you contain the document title and information about the author, but more importantly, you can provide keywords for this document, and this can be incredibly helpful. Just imagine if you work with clients day in and day out years go by. A client needs you to find a particular document and make a small modification to it. Well, you're probably not going to remember the actual file name, but if you could put some type of description inside of this dialog box along with keywords , you increase your chances of finding this in programs like bridge. So when you need to find it, you have more options for search ability. So that was the key. Take away for this movie is that if you're going to save your documents, spend just a little bit of time by coming into this dialog box. In adding some metadata, this metadata gets injected into an XML based file, which gets attached to the headers of the dot ai file. So it's part of the illustrator document. 14. Align Panel: So we look at guides and smart guides and rulers and all these tools that help you position content. One of the most basic commands inside of Illustrator when it comes to positioning content would be the align command or working with the Align panel. The line panel gives you the ability to make sure that content is evenly spaced. You want to make sure the relationship in terms of spacing between your different elements is accurate, and the align panel gives you that ability. For example, I'm working with this document called badges dot ai, which is available inside the Chapter two folder. If we wanted all of these badges to be aligned on the same horizontal plane, the Align panel would give us that ability. What if we wanted equal space horizontally between each of these elements again? The Align panel would be the tool to use inside of illustrator to achieve that. So what we need to do is open the Align panel. You can open the Align panel by going to the window menu and under the window menu, you can choose a line. Now the line panel has all these little icons and what's nice about these icons is for the most part, they're self explanatory in terms of giving you an idea as to how you're about to align or distribute these objects. And if you don't know what the little icons represent, all you have to do is hover over the icon, and a tool tip will tell you what it will do. So in this case, what we want to do is we want to make sure that all of these badges are aligned on the same horizontal plane. So in order for us to do that, we need to select all of them. And the quickest and easiest way to do that is to click and drag a marquee around all of these objects. Now, with all of them selected, you can choose how you want them to be aligned. In this case, we're gonna select vertical align center, so we're going to align them horizontally based upon their vertical center point. So if you go ahead and click that, you can see now that they're all aligned, but you can see that the spacing between them really isn't the best. And so what we can do is use the distribute objects section, and the distribute object section will take the first object in the last object and all the objects in between and evenly spaced them. But it won't move the first object or the last object, so it's only gonna move that content in between them to get this space to appear evenly. If you wanted this to span a greater distance, you would move either the first or last object over a little bit. Hopefully, that makes sense. But with all of them selected, what you can do is come over and click this button here, which is horizontal distribute center. When you do that, you'll notice now they're evenly spaced horizontally, even though they're evenly spaced horizontally, The distance between them vertically is equal, so it's a little bit confusing in terms of the terminology that they use. But as you use this align panel, it will make more and more sense. But really, this align panel is the quickest and easiest way to align multiple objects within your illustrator documents 15. Hide/Show Edges: I'm working with the document called Logo dot ai, which is available in the Chapter two folder. What I'd like to do in this movie is show you a helpful but sometimes confusing feature inside of illustrator, especially for new users. What I'd like to do is select one of the leaves within this logo. Now, if you click on it, you'll notice it's a part of a group. So if you double click, you'll enter isolation mode, and at that point you'll have the ability to select individual leaves. Now, when you're working inside of Illustrator on occasion is bounding box is somewhat distracting. A quick, easy solution for that is to come over and highlight the direct selection tool. When you do that, you just see the vector points highlighted. Now you have the ability to make any modifications that you want to this selected object. However again, sometimes this can be a distraction. And if that's the case, you can come up to the view menu and under the View menu, you'll notice that there's an option called hide edges that when you select that option, something somewhat confusing happens. It does what you asked it to do its hiding the edges. But as a new user, it may be misleading in terms of understanding what is and what isn't selected. Now we know it selected because we just clicked on it and we selected hide edges. But we also know it selected because if we look at the control panel, we can see that it reads path and we can see the fill color. If you want to make a modification to this, you can. I can come over here and change the color toe something else completely, and you'll notice it's updated so it is selected, even though you're not aware of it. Furthermore, if we come over here and select something else, you get that temporary highlight around the object. But once you mouse away from it, it doesn't look like it's selected anymore. But again it is. If we come over and choose a different color, you'll notice that the artwork is updated so it can be helpful if you find that the edges air distracting. But it can be confusing if you're not aware that hide edges is turned on and I bring this up, especially for Mac users. If you come over to the view menu. You'll notice that the keyboard shortcut is command H, and many Mac users will use Command H to hide the current application that they're in. So there can be times inside of illustrator, especially on the Mac, where you have hide edges enabled, but you don't realize it, so you may come over and make a selection and start scratching your head, thinking that you selected it. But it doesn't appear selected when in reality it is selected. You just have the hide edges command active, so if I turn show edges on, you'll notice now when you make a selection, it does, in fact, show those edges. So that's a fairly basic option inside of Illustrator. But I did want to point out what it does for you inside the program, but also how it can be a potential pitfall if you're not aware that hide edges is enabled 16. Document Navigation: I'm still working with postcard dot ai. This file is available in the Chapter two folder. Throughout this course, you may have watched me zoom into certain portions of a document and zoom out, and what I'd like to do in this particular movie is show you exactly how you can do that. There's several different techniques for navigating a document, and I'm sure I'm not gonna show you all of them. But I will show you probably the most useful in the most commonly used techniques for navigating a document. First of all, if you want to increase the magnification or decrease the magnification of the document, you can always go up to the view menu and under the View menu, you'll notice that there's zoom in and zoom out. There's associated keyboard shortcuts with that of command plus that would be controlled, plus on the windows side and command minus or control minus on the windows side. If you go ahead and choose something like zoom out, you'll notice that you zoom out of the document. You get a read out up here towards the top of the document window of your current magnification, and that is also available down here in the bottom left hand side of the document window. You'll also notice that there's a couple other options. Under the View menu, you can choose Fit Art Board in Window, which will fit the art board in the available space under the View menu. There's also fit all in window. In this case, nothing different will really happen because we don't have anything outside of the art board. But if we did, it would fit within the available space for the window. And then we also have actual size, which will set it to 100%. Now, if you want to zoom into the document, you can do that by using the zoom tool. Or you can use this drop down menu that's available here. You can go ahead and select a specific percentage for the magnification, or you can choose fit on screen. So if I hadn't said it 250% it zooms to 150%. But there's also the zoom tool Zoom Tool Z is the keyboard shortcut to access. It gives you the ability to click and zoom to a particular area. If you want to continue to zoom in. Just continue clicking in that area. You can zoom out by holding down the altar key on Windows. Option On the Mac, you'll notice that the little plus sign inside the magnifying glass icon turns into a minus sign. If you click, you start to zoom out. You can also zoom into a specific area at a much larger magnification than you would by simply clicking if you just click and drag a marquee notice. I've just dragged a marquee around a logo. So now essentially everything that was in that marquee is available within the document window, so that beats clicking a bunch of times. If you want to zoom out again, you can go ahead and click the zoom tool with the option key or the old key held down on the space bar. Now a common problem or a common thing that you may want to do once you're zoomed in is moved to a different location within the document, for example, were zoomed in here at 300% and I really want to take a look at the top left hand corner of the postcard. So traditionally, what you'd probably do is zoom out a bunch of times until you can see the entire postcard, Then zoom in a bunch of times to that specific location that you wanted to magnify. There's no need to do that. You can actually come over here and choose the hand tool. What the hand tool will do is not move artwork, but rather move the entire canvas. So now I'm just moving all of the content that canvas as I'm magnified, giving me the ability to get to a different location without changing the magnification. Now you don't have to come over here and choose the hand tool explicitly. If you have the zoom tool highlighted, you can always hold down the space bar on your keyboard to temporarily toggle to the hand tool, giving you the ability to move the canvas around. Now a common keyboard shortcut. Of course, toe access the magnification or zoom tool if you have a different tool selected. So if we come over here and highlight the selection tool. If you want to zoom in, you can hold down the space bar in the command key. That would be space bar control key on the windows side, and you'll notice that you temporarily activate the zoom tool. Now on the Mac, you're probably gonna change the order in which you press those keys on your keyboard. And it will work if you hold down the command key first than the space bar. But you'll also activate spotlight. That's a keyboard shortcut for the operating system, so you'll still get the zoom tool. But you also get this spotlight text field the pop up, which, quite honestly could be kind of annoying. But nevertheless, I did want to point that out, and if you wanted to zoom out, you can use the keyboard shortcut Space Command option on the Mac. That would be space control Ault on the windows side, and you temporarily activate the zoo mount tool. So those are a couple different ways that you can navigate your document. The last way that I want to show you is the Navigator panel. If you come up to the window menu under the window menu, you can choose Navigator. You'll get a little Navigator panel here. What you can do is zoom in and zoom out by using this slider, and as you slide your centrally viewing, the content within this red box. So as you drag the slider to the right, you'll notice that the red box gets tighter around your artwork. And if you place your cursor inside of the Navigator panel, you can click and drag that red box around, which is yet another way to navigate your document. You can also type in a percentage value here if you know you want to magnify toe a certain percentage, so those are your options for navigating your documents Inside of Illustrator, you're the zoom tool in the hand tool, and you also have several different options through menu commands and keyboard shortcuts to zoom in and out of the document. 17. Bounding Box: the default behavior with selection inside of illustrator gives you some immediate commands that are available to you that otherwise would be a separate command in other applications . I'm working with a document called Rafting badge dot ai, which is available inside the Chapter two folder I would Like You to do is come over and highlight the selection tool, which is the Black Arrow Tool. V is the keyboard shortcut. If you come over and click inside of this piece of artwork, you'll notice that the selection becomes active. But when you have an active selection, you have a bounding box around. The content in the bounding box has handles. In fact, it has eight handles. These handles give you the ability to resize the artwork. For example, if you want to increase the height, you could click and drag up. Or if you want to reduce it, you could click and drag down. You could do the same thing for the with. You can click and drag to the right to increase it or to the left to decrease it. If you want to change both the width and the height, what you can do is grab one of the corner handles. At that point, you can click and drag, and you'll notice you're changing both the width and the height, and the opposite corner is essentially anchored down. So in this case, the bottom left hand corner is the anger, and we're clicking and dragging both the within the height over here in the top right hand corner. Now you probably want to constrain its proportions. You don't want it to look like this ill gotten. Undo that. So what you can do is hold down the shift key, and when you do that, you do, in fact constrain the proportions, and you can scale it down. Or you could scale it up. And the same is true for any one of the resize handles. If you grab one of the side resize handles, whether it be on the right or left side or the top or the bottom. If you click and drag and hold down the shift key, you'll constrain the proportions of the artwork. Additionally, if you move your cursor outside one of the corner handles, you'll get a to a arrow, which is an indicator that if you click and drag, you'll rotate the artwork based upon the center point, which in this case is the center. And what's nice about this? If you have smart guides turned on, you get a little heads up display, giving you the read out in terms of how many degrees you're rotating the artwork. So if you want to rotate it 45 degrees, it's pretty easy to find that 45 degree mark with this little heads up display. So these tools, the ability to resize and rotate your artwork is built into illustrator. Any time you select a piece of artwork, you get the bounding box, and you have the ability to manipulate those properties. 18. Workspaces: when you're working inside of Illustrator. As you begin to work Maurin Mawr with the program, you'll find that you work with certain panels mawr than other panels. If that's the case, and if you find that you're configuring illustrator to best suit, you're working habits, it's probably worth taking. A look at something called Workspace is now. The default workspace inside of Illustrator is called Essentials. Up Here in the top right hand corner, you'll find a menu, which currently reads essentials, but you'll notice that there's all sorts of other options here. Basically, what these options will do is reconfigure the interface to display the panels and options that are suited to these particular disciplines. For example, if you're working with Web graphics, if you select Web, you'll notice that the interface changes to give you the options and panels that Web designers would use most often. If you come up to the workspace area and you choose something like typography, you'll notice yet again changes to give you panels that make sense for working with type, like the character panel, the character styles panel, etcetera. So, like I said, if you work inside of Illustrator quite a bit and you find that you customized the interface, meaning you have your own set of panels that you have open. And that's the way that you like toe work. You may consider saving a workspace. Let's just say, for example, we decided to come over to the window menu and under the window menu, we wanted to use something like the transform panel. The transform panel opens. If we decide that we use this a lot and we want it docked over here towards the right, we can go ahead and drag this whole panel set. I'm gonna docket right here. So those three icons now appear, giving you single click access toe all of those panels. So if you customize this up in the top right hand corner, you can choose new workspace. If you select new workspace, you can go ahead and name it. I'll call it mats workspace. Then you can go ahead and click. OK, once you quick. Okay, if someone else uses the computer or if you're working on a different project and you find that you're working in a different workspace, you can always move between the workspaces by selecting them here. But you can always recall that saved workspace. You'll notice it's right up here towards the top. If you got in, select that it's reconfigured to that saved workspace Now. Like I said, for the majority of people, essentials is just fine. And as a new illustrator user, you'll probably find that essential suits your needs if you do find that you have customized the interface, but not for any particular reason. You were just working and you found that you had to open and close certain panels, and you really want to get back to the way that the essentials workspace is configured by default. So let's say I come over here and close this panel and drank this panel over here and close it, and I end up docking this one over here to the left, and I make a real mess of the interface. You can always reset a workspace again by coming up to the top right hand corner and choosing reset in this case essentials and its re set to the default layout. Now, if you configure multiple workspaces, which is not uncommon a lot of times I'll create different work spaces for different projects. If I find that I'm done with a project I may no longer need that workspace. If you want to remove a workspace in this menu, you can choose manage workspaces. It will open up a dialogue box. Here you have the ability to change the name. You also have the ability to create a new workspace and name it, and you can also delete the workspace. If I go ahead and click the delete button the workspaces removed. If you click OK, you'll notice it's no longer available in this menu. So again, workspaces can help you save time by configuring illustrators interface with the panels and options that you need saving amounts of workspace, giving you the ability to recall it at any time. 19. Preview and Outline Modes: in this movie. I want to show you a feature that can be incredibly helpful when trying to look at content and possibly select and manipulate content. I'm working with this document called postcard dot ai, which is available inside the Chapter two folder. If we take a look at this postcard, we know that we can always come in and mouse over an object. And in this case, if we wanted to manipulate a particular object, let's say this logo weaken, double click it, and when you double click it, you enter isolation mode. Which is to say, this logo is now isolated from everything else within the document. And certainly that could be incredibly helpful when trying to change the appearance of certain elements. Within that object, however, you may run into other situations where you need to see a lot less detail. Maybe when you're working with a design, all of the detail will essentially get in the way and cloud your ability to make selections or minor adjustments. Well, fortunately, inside of illustrator, there's a couple different views available to you under the View menu. You can choose outline when you select outline. You'll notice that we're seeing all of the outlines for the paths and any text blocks that we have. We can see the two or three or four text blocks that we have, and then we have all of these path outlines. If you have a bit map, you'll notice that the bit map completely disappears because there's no vector information within a bit. Map Additionally, up here towards the top, you get the preview mode to appear in the tab of the document. In this case, we're working in outline view. You can toggle between outline and what's called preview mode by using the keyboard shortcut command. Why it would be control. Why on Windows. So what preview is trying to do is it's trying to give you the best representation of what this content will look like when it prints more. Of course, if you're working with on screen graphics, preview is essentially what the content will look like if you export it out as a image based file format like PNG, GIF or JPEG. So the key here is the toggle command Y or control. Why on Windows, it just gives you the ability to look at the paths and tax blocks within your document and again, this can be helpful when trying to make precise selections or small modifications to small details within your document. 20. Understanding Paths: Now that we have a clear understanding about the differences between vector based artwork and bit map based artwork, we can begin talking about another fundamental concept inside of illustrator called Paths. Paths are critically important to understand because all of your artwork inside of Illustrator will be based on paths. I'm working with the document called Paths dot ai, which is available inside the Chapter one folder. You'll notice that I have the direct selection tool highlighted. The direct selection tool is the white Arrow tool, located in the top right hand corner of the tools panel. So what we have here are four different paths appear towards the top. We have to open paths because they don't create a shape. Then down below. We have two closed paths because they do create shapes. So what we want to take a look at or how these paths are created. If we take a look at the straight line up here in the top left hand corner, this straight diagonal line, I suppose you'll notice that it consists of two anchor points and you can mouse over the ends of the line to see those anchor points. Additionally, illustrator will tell you it's precise, X Y coordinate. So we have an anchor point here, and then we have an anchor point up here towards the top. Now, if you go ahead and click on this anchor point, you'll select it when you select it. In this case, it becomes highlighted. Now what we have here is something called a corner anchor point. It's a corner anchor point because it draws a straight line from the center of the anchor point to its destination, which is this anchor point. If we take a look at this curved line, it too has to anchor points the differences. However, when you click on this anchor point, we have this control arm that appears this control arm dictates the direction of the path from that anchor point. This anchor point, however, is referred to as a smooth anchor point because you have the ability now to create smooth paths. So these are the two open paths. What about these two closed paths down here towards the bottom? Well, the rectangle consists of four corner points. If you click in the corner, you'll see the anchor point, and it simply draws a straight line from this anchor point to this anchor point, and it continues to do that until you have a closed path, which results in this rectangle. Believe it or not, this oval also contains four anchor points. However, the four anchor points used in this shape are smooth anchor points because we're controlling the direction in creating arcs between one anchor point to the other. So it's a fairly straightforward concept if you want to think about paths and how they work . But ultimately what you need to take away from this movie is that there's two types of paths. There's open paths and closed paths, which are somewhat self explanatory. But then there's also two different behaviors. When it comes to anchor points, we have corner anchor points, which draws straight lines from the center of the anchor point. And then we have smooth anchor points, and the key with the smooth anchor point is it has a control arm, and that control arm will ultimately control the direction of the path 21. Multiple Artboards: a great feature inside of Adobe Illustrator is having the ability to work with multiple art boards. This gives you the ability to have different pieces of a campaign stored in a single document. I'm working with letterhead dot ai, which is available inside the Chapter one folder. And here's a perfect example as to how and when and why you would want to use multiple our ports. Here we have some letterhead and envelopes and a business card. It's all stored within this one document. Notice that the art boards are different sizes and they contain different names. If we come over to the art boards panel, you can see that we have the Business Card Art board. We have the Envelope Art Board and we have the letterhead art board. If you double click on any of these, you'll notice that that art board takes up the majority of the space within the document window. So let's go ahead and take a look at how we can work with multiple our boards inside of Illustrator. What I want you to do is come up to the file menu and under the file menu, you can choose new this will open up the new document dialog box for the profile. Go ahead and set it to print. We can change the number of art boards to four. When you set the number of art boards to something more than one, you have the arrangement options available to you. You can set up a grid by row, agreed by column You can arrange by row where you can arrange by a single column, so there's a lot of different options here. Go ahead and leave the first option selected, which is grid by row because we only have four art boards. Two columns makes sense, and you can also control the spacing between the art boards. Now, if you set up some bleed options, just be aware that that bleed will be applied to all four art boards. Individual art boards can't have individual bleed values with that. Go ahead and click OK. Once you click OK, the new document is created. So how can you control these art boards? Because based upon letterhead dot ai, there was a lot of different things happening with the SAARC boards in terms of sizing, spacing and also naming Well, let's come back to this document and take a look at how we can work with these art boards. First of all, you can open up the art boards panel over here on the right hand side. If you don't see the art boards panel, you can come up to the window menu and under the window menu, you can choose our boards. So, first of all, if you want to name the art board, you would go ahead and double click by double clicking. You can change the name of it, my art board, press enter or return to accept that. However, if you really want to control the art boards by changing the size or the position, or even create new or remove art boards, there's a great tool inside of illustrator giving you the ability to do that. First of all, most of the options that I'm showing you now are available in a couple of different places . If you did want to delete an art board or create a new art board, noticed that there's the new art board button and there's also the Delete Art Board button inside the art boards panel. You also have the ability to change the stacking order. In this case, it doesn't really matter. But if you wanted this art board to be moved down, you can click this button and it's moved down. As you click the art boards here in the art Boards panel, you'll notice they become selected. Go ahead and move this back up to the top. You can also select art boards by simply choosing the selection tool and clicking on a particular art board. When you do that, you'll notice you get a highlight. A dark border around that art board, and the selection is also reflected here in the art boards panel. But let's go ahead and take a look at a useful tool for working with art boards, and that is the art board tool. With that selected, you'll notice you can click on each of the art boards and they become active and you have a bounding box. So if you need to resize the art board, you have that ability. If you want to move the art board, you can do that. If you want to delete the art board, you can do that. Here is well by clicking this little box with the X and the art board is removed. Also notice. If you move the art board tool out here inside of the canvas and the canvas is this gray area you can store content in the canvas and it won't print as long as it doesn't intersect with an art board. And the canvas inside of Illustrator is pretty big. If I start zooming out, you'll see how large the canvas actually is. This box that we're seeing here is the canvas, so you have a ton of room toe, work with a good and zoom back into this. If you want to create a new art, bored with the art board tools simply click and drag, and there's your art board. There are additional properties available for the art, bored with it. Selected with the art board tool, you can come up here towards the top, and you can click this button. This button will open up the Art Board Options Dialog box. Here you can name it. You can set the with in the height, and it's X Y. Coordinate relative to the canvas, and you can also set its reference point. You can specify the orientation if you want to constrain proportions, you can do that as well. And there's also some additional display options for showing the center marker crosshairs or video safe margins. So if you're creating a title for a video production, you could make sure that you're gonna stay within the safe region of the video. So there are quite a few options inside of this dialog box. There are also several options inside the control panel, like naming the art board, creating a new our board, the leading the art board, changing the orientation. You could also set the X Y coordinate here and the width and the height. And there are also some additional options here for showing the center mark the cross hairs in the video safe areas. So a lot of the options in that dialog box are also available here in the control panel. If you want to duplicate the art board, you can do that. Simply hold down the altar key on Windows, option on the Mac, click and drag, and you've duplicated the art board. Now this could become incredibly helpful if you have artwork inside of the art board. If you come over here toe letterhead dot ai. If you wanted to create another business car, maybe you have a different design that you want to share. What you can do is select that art bored with the art board selected. Hold down the altar key or the option key. Click and drag and you'll notice you've duplicated it. At this point, you could come in and make minor modifications for a second version of that business card. So the ability to work with multiple art boards inside of Illustrator, as you can see, definitely has its advantages in working with multiple art boards is pretty easy, especially with this art board tool. 22. Working with Panels: I'm working with a document called infographic dot ai, which is available inside the Chapter two folder. What we want to do in this chapter is look at some of the components of the Adobe Illustrator interface. In this movie. I want to point out a couple of unique features to Mac OS, and then I want to review how the panels behave inside of Illustrator. Now, if you're comfortable with other creative suite applications, you'll feel right at home inside of Illustrator, as the behavior for the majority of the panels is the same. So first of all, for those Mac specific features by the fault illustrator will show the application frame. If you don't like the application frame, you can go to the window menu and under the window menu, you can de select application frame. What that will do is make the document a free floating window, which is kind of the way most Mac applications behave. But by turning on the application frame, you essentially isolate illustrator from everything else within the operating system. The behavior of the application frame makes illustrator on the Mac side behave almost exactly the same as it does on the Windows side for that purpose. I'm gonna be recording this course with the application frame active. So that's the first Mac only thing. I wanted to point out the other thing that I wanted to point out, which I'll mention over and over and over again. But any time we need to go to the Preferences Dialog box here on the Mac side, you'll go to the illustrator menu and under the Illustrator menu, you'll choose preferences Now on the Windows side. This preferences command in the sub menu is available under the edit menu, so that kind of clears up Mac Onley specific things. Four. Illustrator What I want to look at now is how the panels behaving operate inside of Illustrator. Now the screen resolution that I'm recording at is a little bit smaller than what you're probably using Illustrator and and because of that, some of my content is scrunched up a little bit. You'll notice that my tools panel is being viewed in a two column view, which is kind of the way illustrator would display tools back in its early days. But now that sometimes takes up too much screen space so often times people like to view this in a single column view, and you can access that single column view by clicking this little two way arrow right here , also known as a Chevron sign. If you click it, it collapses. A shortcut to that is just double clicking this top bar. You'll notice you can toggle. You can expand it or collapse it by doing that, so that's the first thing. The other thing that I want to point out is the way that you can interact with panels now by default. There collapsed and you'll notice the panel's over here. On the right are the panels that will give you additional options for whatever it is that you're working with inside of Illustrator. Now, if you're not familiar with what these little icons represent, you can hover your mouse over that icon in a tool tip will appear, and that tool tip will tell you what that panel represents. Additionally, you can click it, which will temporarily expand it. You can click it again to collapse it. Something else that you can do is click the little Chevron signs. When you do that, you get the expanded view for the panels and you'll notice that the panels are in what are called panel cents. There's several tabs, doc together. Now you have complete control over these panels. For example, if I wanted the color panel to be a free floating panel, well, you have that ability. Just click on the tab and drag it away from the doctor structure. Let go the mouse Now it's a free floating panel. You could always restore it back to its original panel. Set again. Grab the tab, click and drag in. Place it into that structure. Now, in this case, color guide appears in front of color. If you want to switch that back, simply click and drag, and you can change the sorting order of those tabs if you go ahead and collapse that again . So you're just looking at the icons. Some new users for illustrator may prefer a larger view, but not quite as large as the expanded view. If you place your cursor in between the document window and the actual panel pain, if you click indirect to the left, you'll notice Not only do you see icons, but you also see labels now, so it's giving you a little bit more information. Additionally, if you want to access particular panel and you don't see it available here, you can always go to the window menu and under the window menu. You can choose whatever panel it is that you're looking for now. If you select a panel that's currently collapsed, for example, the color panel by selecting the color panel from the window menu, all you're gonna do is expand it. Likewise, If it's expanded and you go to the window menu and choose color, it will just collapse it. So you have a lot of options in terms of how you can work with panels inside of Illustrator , and I'm sure I didn't cover all of the options. But those certainly are the most important options. There's one additional panel that I want to point out, and that's located up here towards the top. This is called the Control panel, and it's a unique panel inside of Illustrator that we're going to explore in much greater detail in the next movie.