Hand-Drawn Animation: The Beginner's Guide to Animating with Procreate | Smitesh Mistry | Skillshare

Hand-Drawn Animation: The Beginner's Guide to Animating with Procreate

Smitesh Mistry, Illustrator & Designer

Hand-Drawn Animation: The Beginner's Guide to Animating with Procreate

Smitesh Mistry, Illustrator & Designer

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10 Lessons (44m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:48
    • 2. Project

      1:23
    • 3. Walkthrough

      3:26
    • 4. Timing and Spacing

      4:15
    • 5. Ease in and out

      7:46
    • 6. Squash and Stretch

      5:35
    • 7. Texturising

      7:07
    • 8. Staging

      7:47
    • 9. Exporting

      3:29
    • 10. Conclusion

      1:11
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About This Class

Ever wanted to try out animation, but don't know where to start? Are you interested in taking your digital skills to the next level? This class is for you!

In this class, you will learn a few basic principles of animation including, timing and spacing, squash and stretch, ease in and ease out, and staging. I will also cover a few illustrative tools that will come in useful to you.

This class is perfect for the beginner who is just starting off with animation within procreate. However, it is also perfect for someone in the creative industry who wants to expand their skill set. You don't need to have any prior animation knowledge in order to take this class.

Whether you are a student beginning in animation or a graphic designer or illustrator wanting to learn a new skill, you will be able to apply what you learn in this class to either create stand-alone animations or using the skills to add motion to your work.

Materials needed for this class:

  • Ipad
  • Stylus
  • Procreate.

Other:

Meet Your Teacher

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Smitesh Mistry

Illustrator & Designer

Teacher

Hey, I'm Smitesh Mistry a Graphic designer and Illustrator. I like to create content that is fun and abstract that conveys a message. 

During the day i am at work designing all sorts for stuff from online to print, In my spare time I enjoy learning new skills, drawing or planning my next video for my youtube and instagram page.

I plan to make many more skillshare classes on how to get started in certain aspects of design for the beginner or the intermediate wanting to improve your skills.

If you'd like to find out more, please do 'follow' my Skillshare profile, and if enjoy my content and you've got ideas for classes that you'd find useful, drop me a message/email and I'll see what I can do

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Learning hand-drawn animation can be daunting. Trying to understand frames, how they work, and even if what you pictured will work out in the end. I like to create simple, looping animations of objects, or to add another dimension to my illustrations. Hey, I'm a Smitesh Mistry, graphic designer, illustrator, and self-taught animator. In today's class, we are going to be covering the basics of hand-drawn animation through creating a bouncing ball. I'll say this class is perfect for the beginner. Maybe you're starting off with animation or maybe you're animating for a while, or even if you're a graphic designer or an illustrator who wants to start adding motion into your work, I'd say it's a perfect class to get started with that. Learning hand-drawn animation is always useful skill to have in your toolbox, whether you're going to create a stand-alone animation or whether you're going to add movement to an illustration to provoke a certain emotion on mute. A benefit of using Procreate to learn animation is that's it's simple and easy to get started. It has a bunch of tools and features which I found very helpful, especially when starting up with animation. But also because I use Procreate as my primary tool when creating illustrations, it's super simple for me to add animation to existing illustrations. The main sections of this project will include: giving you a walk-through of the animation assist feature within Procreate, going over some of the principles of animation, including timing and spacing, squash and stretch, slow in, slow out, and staging, and then finally ending by exploring our project. I'm excited to teach this class not because I'm a pro, but because I was in a similar situation where I knew nothing about animation. But through experience and watching multiple tutorials and experimenting, I broke it down into steps which helped me in order to get you animating. By the end of the class, we'll have you well on your way, creating your own hand-drawn animations, giving you the confidence to start projects from an idea to your completion. So let's grab your iPads and your pencils, and let's get to it. 2. Project: Today's project will be to create a leaping animation of a bouncing ball within an environment of your choice. The reason why I've chosen this project is because this was the first project that I learned when I started off with animation. I really got to grips and understand the fundamentals of creating a ball to bounce, and I feel like it set me up really nicely for creating much more complex and much more difficult projects. So within this class, I've broken it down into simple and easy steps to follow, especially if you're just starting off with animation. Initially, I'm going to start off by walking you through the animation assist features within Procreate. Then moving on to timing and spacing, followed by ease in and ease out and squash and stretch which will give your animation a sense of realism and then finally we end it off by stylizing your animation through adding shading and texture and then adding a background to the animation. Then finally we'll be ending off with exporting your animation so you can share it down in project panel below or on social media. To set yourself up for this class, I'd recommend after each lesson, really take some time to practice what the lesson covers to give you a better foundation and which will overall give you a good result at the end. So you want to grab your Apple pencils and the iPads and let's get to making these ball ball. 3. Walkthrough: In this first lesson, I'm going to give you a quick walk through of the animation series features within Procreate starting off by how two turn it on, how to access a new certain options such as onion skinning and the frames per second and then just showing you all the tools that we'll be using within this class. By the end of this class, you'll have a good understanding of the animation assist feature and where certain tools are. Let's open procreate. When you open it for the first time, this is the screen you're presented with. Obviously, I've created projects before that's why you can see other projects here. But for this class, we're going to create a new project by clicking the plus icon in the top right corner and then selecting screen size, regardless of which iPad you have, screen size will be there. Let's tap that. To begin, I'm just going to give you a brief overview of where everything is. On the left-hand side here, this is where we have our brush controls, where the top one is where you control the brush size and then the bottom one is where you control the brush opacity, so how see-through the brush is. Up here at the top is your settings. This is where we will be turning on our animation assist and then over here on the right, this is where you select your brush tool, your erase tool, your layers, and your colors. To get into it, we're going to be turning on our animation assist first. So see this, we're going to be clicking on the Wrench on the top-left, making sure on canvas and then here on animation assist we're going to be turning that on and then as you turn that on, you will see this bar appears at the bottom. So a few of these features within the animation assist that we'll be using during this class are the settings and add frame. When whilst we are doing the animation, I'll be walking you through this, but just a brief overview. To add a frame there is two ways in which you can do it. One is by clicking add frame down here and as you do so, you see another frame pops up, or the second way to do it is on your layers; if you add a new layer, a new frame will be made. Layer three there and then as you saw in another one popped up and the more you do, you can see that layers pop-up. Then under here on the settings, this is where we can control the animation, the way it plays. Whether we want the animation to leap, whether we wanted to ping-pong, or whether we want it in one shot and then down here, you've got the frames per second to this determines how fast you want the animation to play. So how many frames you want to play it per second. Down here is skinning. This is where you can control all the layers that you have. How many of the previous or the frames to come that you want to see. Then here is the opacity of the unions can ink. So dependent how many layers that you want to be seen will depend on the opacity of those layers and then for the sayings, we won't be using that in this class, but that's sum to now omega into later on. Before we begin the next class, I'd recommend familiarizing yourself with the interface, especially if this is the first time using it. In the next lesson, I'll be teaching you timing, spacing and the animation path. Give you a deeper understanding of how the spacing and timing of your frames will affect the motion speed and then the animation path which will guide the objects which were aimed to move. 4. Timing and Spacing: In this lesson, I'll be explaining timing, and spacing, and the animation path. Explaining to you how the animation path is like skeleton for your animation and showing you how to set it as a background so it's visible on each frame, wealth anime ink. Then secondly, the timing and spacing explaining to you this affects the speed of your animation, whether you want the object to move fast or the object move slow. I'll be giving you demonstrations and showing you examples of what I mean in this lesson. First I'm going to show you a few simple animation puffs that can be used before we get into creating the one that we're going to be using. Here we have this straight, a wavy, and the zigzag path. As you can see, each ball is moving differently, but it's all following the path which we applied, which I'll be showing you shortly. To begin plotting our animation path, we're going to start by going to the brush tool and then selecting a hard brush. I've created a separate folder but for this lesson, we're going to want to calligraphy and then select monoline. Then to change the color, I'm going to use a darker color, so I'm going to tap on the color icon on the top right, and then I'm going to drag all the way into black. I'm going to make sure my past Ceylon full and then my brush size is a little smaller. To begin, I'm going to hold the pen on the screen, drag it down. While I stick my pen on this screen and as you can see, is snapped to a straight line. I'm going to hold my finger down, so it snaps vertically. Then I'm going to let go of my pen. This is going to be on one layer. I've not turned on my animation assist yet. Then I'm going to start by putting one indicator at the top, one indicator at the bottom. Then I'm going to go through in half each section, so I'm going to do one here, one here, here, and I'm just going to half it again. Each section I'm just going to half. Now we've plotted this, so what I'm going to do is I'm going to turn on my animation assist, just like we did earlier. Now we've created this, I'm going to add a new frame so we can start in the ball. On the layer that we just created, I'm going to tap on that, set it as a background. What this allows us to do is to draw frames above it whilst this being in the background uninterrupted. Now I'm going to tap on the layer again that we just created. I'm going to start using each indicator as a center point of a circle. We're going to draw a circle for each indicator that we've drawn, making sure the shape is closed, trap the dot onto the shape we just drawn. I'm going to repeat this for each one, so I'm going to add another frame. As you can see, it's shown where our previous frame is, this will come in handy later on. But for now we're just going to draw a circle, try and keep the circle the same size for each indicator. I'm just going to quickly do this to all of them, and then once we've finished, I'll show you the end result. We've finished that, then to see what we've created before we press play, I'm going to go on settings, making sure it's on loop, then I'm going to tap play. As you can see, I've got a ball moving down the screen. If you wanted to go back up again, I'm going to go on settings and select ping-pong. As you can see, it's like the ball ping-ponging between the two points, the bottom and the top. One tip that I would recommend with this part of animation is really get to grips with understanding how the speed works, whether you want an object to be fast or if you want an object to move slow. I'd recommend really do play around with this before moving onto the next lesson. Just get to grips with if you want an object to move fast, what you need to do, and if you want an object to move slow, what you'd need to do. Just a quick recap of this lesson. I showed you how to create a guide and set it as a background, so you can use that throughout your animation. Then secondly, I showed you how timing and spacing work to create speed within your animation. In the next lesson, I'll be teaching you slow in and slow out. Combine what we learned in this lesson together, having an object moving from a fast speed to a slow speed. I'll see you in the next class. 5. Ease in and out: In this lesson, I will be teaching you slow in and slow out. This is where we'll be altering the spacing between certain sections of the animation path to give the illusion that the ball is speeding up or slowing down compared to the linear motion which we created in the previous lesson. I'll be showing you different demonstrations of how different types of spacing can give you different motions where that's quite cartoony or quite realistic. I'll be walking you through the steps of how to create this and by the end of this lesson, we'll have the ball bouncing in a realistic motion. Here I have two examples. One with slow in and slow out applied and then one with linear intervals like we did in the previous lesson. I'm going to play this to just to show you the difference. Both of these balls, they both have the same amount of key frames and the same amount of intervals. But all I've done is alter at the space in between them. As you can see with the one on the right with the slow in side, it goes a lot faster than the center of a movement and it slows down towards the ends where it changes direction. Whereas linear one, it looked very robotic in the way that it moves. These are the two animation pathway created. As you can see here, the spacing between these have row pretty much uniform, whereas these ones here, this is a lot smaller compared to this. As we want the ball to be moving fast here and the ball to be moving slow here. This can be applied in other parts of animation, but for this class, this would become an important step when we're producing our bouncing ball. Before again to show you how I plot this, let me show you another example how changing up the ratios can add a bit of character and exaggeration to the animation. As you can see here in these two examples, one is fairly very moderate, but then the other one is a lot more exaggerated, where the ball is moving extremely fast in the center and then a lot slower towards the edge. I've done this by grouping the key frames towards the edges of the path where the ball is changing direction. This can be used to help good character to your animation and exaggerate certain features. Whether it's like a ball slowing down as we'll be doing, or depending on where else you want to make. To begin our project, we're going to be starting by drawing animation path with the slower and slower indicate is marked on. To start, let me draw a center line, keeping the pen on the screen, typing with one finger to snap it and then let go. I'm going to start with the two end points as this where we want the ball to come to a stop, and this is where we want our ball to bounce. The way I'm going to do this is we want the ball to be slowing down a little at the top and then slightly at the bottom when it changes direction once it hits the surface. I'm going to be doing three points for the ball to be moving, having these fairly space out, and because we want the ball to be moving a lot slower towards the top, I'm going to be adding a lot more key frames. In between these two points, I'm going to be doing one in between. Again the closer I get to this point, I'm going to be adding more frames in. I'm going to go a bit closer. Then a bit closer again, and then another one and then right at the top. Could zoom in for this. I'm going to do one more. These ones are very bunched together. When at the bottom, I'll explain this later, but am only going to have one key frame there. When we come to the next lesson, we're going to be adding something called squash and stretch, which will add in all the key frames, but we will we do that through the movement. I was pinch marking to snap it to the full screen again. Now that we've played out our animation path, we're going to start by drawing our ball now. I'm going to create a new layer. Then only animation path that we created, we want to bring that to the front. Am going to uncheck background, I want to drag it in front of the new layer we've just created. I'm going to tap on that and then select foreground. Then click back on the layer that we created. Now I'm going to select the color at the ball I want for this project. I have created a pole here, which I'll put in the description down below with the codes which you can type in here. I'm going to select the green, and then I'm going to make sure that the brush is on the mono line one which comes into calligraphy. Then I'm going to go in and start drawing the ball. I want a decent sized ball so we can see it. I drew the circle, close the shape, and then I kept my pen on the screen. I'm going to tap with one finger to make it a circle and then let go the pen, I'm going to edit my shape, and then I'm going to bring it roughly to the center of the top mark that we create. I'm happy with that. I'm going to drag the dot onto the shape and then fill it. I'm going to do the same to each one of these. To duplicate this, to make sure that the ball stays the same size, I'm going to go to my LED panel up here on the top right, swipe left on the layer and then tap "duplicate". You can see it duplicates that layer, and if I added another frame down here, clicking on my slept function, and I'm going to drag it down ever so slightly, just to match the next frame. As you can see, there's a shadow behind, but just to increase our shadow, we are going to reduce [inaudible] skinning to three, and then bring up the opacity just so we can see the previous frame. Now I'm going to do this for each frame. Again, layer, swipe, duplicate, click on the select, drag it down ever so slightly, and then again, duplicate. I'm going to quickly do this and I'll catch up with you shortly. If we make sure we go in settings and then tap this two ping-pong and then press play. We should have a bouncing ball where it goes slow the top, it bounces and then sheets back-up as you can see. In the next lesson, we are going to be building up upon this free squash and stretch, where we'll be changing the shape of this ball ever so slightly, Just to add to the movement. Quantified recommend with slow in its law is really understanding how the spacing works, where you have it tight together at the top are quite spaced out down. The fastest part in motion, as this part is what gives a realism to your animation as objects in your life don't move linearly, they generally move slowly into fast motion and then slow down, or they would start off slow and then end quick. Understanding this part of animation will really add a sense of realism to your projects. This was slow in and slow out. Really get to grips on understanding how the spacing can affect the mood of the animation whether you want to be quite dramatic and exaggerated, or you want to be quite realistic. In the next lesson we'll be covering squash and stretch. This is where we will be assigning a material to the ball, whether we want our ball to be quite stiff or whether we want our ball to be quite lasting. I'll see you in the next lesson. 6. Squash and Stretch: In this lesson, we're going to be covering squash and stretch. This is where we alter the shape of the ball during certain parts of the motion. But also by doing this. It's going to give the ball a material of some sort. Whether depending on how stiff or how elastic we want the ball will depend on how much we alter the shape of the ball. Let's get to it. Before I get into showing you how to add squash and stretch to animation that we're doing, here are two examples where you can see one ball is extremely squishy, looks like it's made from rubber or other squishy materials. Then on the other side, you can see that it's a lot more harder, where the ball isn't changing shape much just because it gives the effect that, that ball is made from a harder, more solid or stiff material. Maybe like a ping pong ball or something similar. The reason we do the squash and stretch is because it adds another sense of realism to the animation, giving the effect from still images that the ball is moving, whether we want the motion to be fast, slow, or the material to be hard or soft. However, one important tip is that we need to make sure that the volume of the shape stays the same, as this will be what makes it convincing. If we have a ball falling through the air, it's not going to increase in volume or decrease in volume as it's going through the motions. So before we get into adding squash and stretch to our animation, I'm going to show you a quick example of how you can make sure that you're keeping the same volume. So say we have a ball or we have a circle. This is when the ball is still. Let's say whilst it's stretched, it allows its move through the motions. We need to make sure it keeps the same volume. Here's an example of what you shouldn't do. So whilst stretching it, you don't want to stretch the ball just like this and then leave it. As you can see, this has increased massively because it's kept the same width. But instead what we should be doing is, I duplicate that and put it next to this one. We should, yes, be stretching it, but then we should also be making the ball a bit more narrow just so it matches the volume of this shape. Now let's apply the squash and stretch to our animation. So at the top here, we want to keep the frames as they are, as the ball isn't moving fast or bouncing off a surface. So by dragging this along, we can choose the frames that we want to squash and stretch. So going to start by going to the fourth frame along. I got my selection tool, making sure that Free Form is selected, and I drag this ever so slightly down and inwards, ever so slightly, like so. Then I'm going to go to my next layer, down and then do the same. So stretch it a tiny bit more, and then a tiny bit more in, like so. Then I'm going to repeat this for the other two. I'm going to stretch this one a bit more, and again dragging it slightly in. Then for this one, we want to stretch it a lot more as this will be the fastest part of the ball's motion, but making sure that we're keeping the volume the same. Then finally, for this bottom one, we want to be making the ball squish. So we're going to be squishing the ball. Move this up so you can see it. So I'm going to be squishing the ball, but because we squished it this way, we now need to widen the ball, like so. Now one final thing I'm going to do is, I'm going to duplicate this layer, and then I'm going to squish it even more, making it look like the ball is really bouncing off the surface. So now that we've done this, if we go back and play it you'll see what we've done. As you can see, it looks like the ball is made from a squishy material and it's using that energy to bounce up and down, coming to a stop at the top and then going through its motions. One tip I'd recommend with squash and stretch. If you're struggling with squashing and stretching the ball straight away, maybe try it with squares or rectangles where you can get a better understanding of how to make the ball narrower and longer while still keeping the same volume. As keeping the same volume of the object is what will make the animation the most convincing. As a quick recap, we covered squash and stretch. I showed you where and how to squash or alter the shape of the ball, depending on which part of the path the ball is at. Also, how the speed of the ball would determine whether you squash or stretch the object. So in the next lesson, we're going to be covering texturising. I'm going to show you how to add a moving texture to the animation, giving the ball another sense of realism by making the ball look 3D. Okay, I'll see you in the next lesson. 7. Texturising: In this lesson, we're going to be covering texturizing. I'm going to be showing you how to add texture and shadows to the ball, frame by frame, giving the illusion of a meeting texture whilst the ball is bouncing. We're going to start by removing the animation path so you can see what we're doing first. I'm going to tap over here on the foreground, turn off the foreground, and then I'm going to go up here to my layers, and then swipe and delete. So now we have our ball just as is. We're going to be adding a textured shadow to the ball, layer by layer, just to give another form of movement to the animation. To do this, there's two ways that you can do it,. There's one way you can use an [inaudible] , or there's another way we're going to use a clipping mask. For this lesson, we're going to be using a clipping mask. So we're going to start off on the top layer first, we're going to be adding a new layer just above them, and then tapping on "Clipping mask." Then what I'm going to do after that is I'm going to select them both by swapping right on it this time and then grouping it, and then we minimize that. I'm going to do this for each layer. I'm going to tap on it "New layer," "Clipping mask," and then swipe right, and group. I'm just going to go through and do the same for all the rest. Now, we're here, we've grouped all of our frames, as you can see, and on the bottom, you can see that only the frames that you can see is still the ball. The reason for this is because we've created is as a group, each group now acts as one frame. So if we play this through, it still looks like we've just got the frames that we threw the ball on. So now what we're going to do is we're going to go through and in each group, we're going to add shading to each layer one at a time. I'm going to start for the top, open the group, click on clipping mask that we created, and I'm going to go in and start adding some shading. For this, I'm going to be using one of my personal brushes which I created, which will be linked down in the description. So we've selected my Grunge brush. But for this, to be honest, you can use any brush. You could use a soft brush which can be found up here in air brushes, just at the top, the soft brush. But for the texture, we need a bit pf texture. So now for column, I'm going to use is a dark blue, which, again, will be done in the description. Make sure the brush is selected. I'm going to adjust my brush size, just so it's big enough, and then making sure the opacity is on around half, and now I'm going to go into this frame and start adding shading. For this, we want the light to be coming from the top of the ball, so that will mean the bottom section of the ball will be darker. We want the shadow to be in an arc, like a smiley face almost. Go in and add the shading. We're going to go through layers panel, close that, open the next group, click on that, and then do the same. Again, open the group, tap on the layer, and then add the shading. When you add in the shading, I wouldn't say worry too much about making sure it's in exactly the same place. As long as it's roughly at the bottom part in the same shape, it'll look fine, and I think even if it's a little bit off, it's going to add a lot more coat to your animation. So one thing you need to note here is as the ball is changing shape, this shadow will have to follow the ball. As you can see, I didn't go here, I went towards the bottom section of the ball, as we want to make sure that the illusion of the ball stretching remains the same, making sure that we're keeping the shadow roughly in the same place. Most importantly, I'd say making sure that the shallow warps with the ball. Now, again, because the ball had been squished, we need to do the shadow according to the shape of the ball. Then finally, this bottom one, extremely squished, like so. Now let's see what we've created. So let's play that back, and if you look at that, it looks like the ball or the shading within the ball is moving along with it. So now, going to go back and do the same, but we're going to add a highlight to the top of the ball. So we're going to start on the ball, down the bottom. We're going to tap on ball, new layer, and you can see it's already added a clipping mask above the ball. I'm going to select a lighter shade. I'm going to go on the green. I'm going to add a lighter shade which I already created, making sure that the opacity is all the way to the top this time. Then I'm just going to add a little circle here at the top. So what I'm going to do it is I'm going to remove the onion skinning just so you can see the shadow more clearly. So I go in my settings, remove the onion skinning, and there we go. So onto the next frame, open that up, new layer, and then add a little glow. Here you go. Close that, open the next one, new frame, and a little shadow. So I'm just going to go through and add this to all the frames, and then we'll see you at the end. Let's play this back. We've got a nice bouncing ball, with a slight 3D effect now, with a highlight under shadow on the bottom. One tip I'd recommend is don't worry too much about trying to get the texture and the shadows in the same place each time. As long as roughly in the same place, it will give an added effect of the texture moving whilst the ball is bouncing. So as a quick recap for this lesson, I showed you how to texturize the ball through using clipping mask and turning each frame into a group where we added the texture. In the next lesson, we'll be covering staging. This is where I'll be adding a background to the current animation and adding a shadow to the ground for which the ball will be bouncing on. I'll see you in the next lesson. 8. Staging: In this lesson, we're going to be covering staging. This is where we want to direct the audience's attention whilst watching the animation. In our case, we're going to be using it through light and shadow by creating a shadow on a surface and adding a background to our animation, focusing the audience's attention on the ball. By the end of this lesson, we will have added a shadow to the ground and the background, given the illusion that the ball is now bouncing on a surface. We're going to be adding a shadow to the surface or to the floor that the ball is bouncing off. So since we're going to be using a similar structure to what we did in the previous lesson, where we created a new layer and then we're going to adding a shadow on the layer within the group of that frame. To begin with this, we are going to be starting with the frame on the bottom, so I'm going to minimize all the groups and then I'm going to select the ball when it's on the ground to give a point for us to reference. This is where the ball would be on the ground. On that group, I'm going to open it up, making sure you're on the top add a new frame and then I drag this underneath the ball. Now we've got a layer underneath the ball. I'm going to go through it and add a new layer underneath the ball first. Now that we've gone through and added in a layer underneath the ball, I'm going to scroll back to the bottom layer where the ball bounces off the ground and on the layer that we just created, I'm going to open it up, tap on the new layer and then I'm going to select another color which can be found in the description making sure my brush is back to the outline brush or the monoline brush, which can be found in the calligraphy. I'm just going to adjust the brush. Now, what we're going to do is we're going to add the shadow behind it. But because we've already created the layer behind this layer, it'll show up behind. So we're going to draw the shadow now, making sure that the shadow is a closed shape, holding the pen on the screen, tapping with one finger and then adjusting it. Then we're going to go add to Edit Shape. I'm just going to bring that in. It's just the same width as the ball. We're going to fill this in by dragging. It's now got a shadow. We're going to go layer by layer to the previous one. But for this we'll turn our onion screening back on so we can see where the previous shadow was. Now on the next layer, I'm going to close that group, open the next one, click on the layer underneath the ball that we created. Then again, I'm just going to draw the shape, but this time going to be a bit smaller. Just adjusting the shape. We're going to fill that again and we're going to go through and do the same for the rest slack in the bottom frame. But because the ball is much higher now, the shadow is going to be a lot smaller. So making sure that we're still within the same area. Just going to move the shape up making sure it's in the center line as well, you don't want the shadows moving right and left. As you can see, the higher the ball is getting, the smaller the shadow is getting. But we need to make sure that the amount that we're reducing the shallow by needs to be in proportion by the movement of which the ball has made. So if there's a bigger movement, there's going to be a bigger reduce in the shadow, while if there's a less movement, there's going to be at a lesser reduce in the shadow. Can zoom in for this one to see what I'm drawing. So now that we've added all the shadows, let's have a look at what we've made, so play this. As you can see, the shadow is moving with the ball. Now it looks like the ball is bouncing off a surface. What we're going to do now is we're going to add a background and some other, like a lighting element just to give some more realism and add more focus to the ball there because right now the ball is bouncing but nor really bouncing in anything or around anything. So we can add a background, a bit of texture. To do this, we're going to be going to the top, adding a new layer, and then with this layer we'll be dragging it all the way to the left like so. Then like we did at the beginning when we were tapping on it and selecting it as a background, so any changes we make to this layer is not going to affect our animation. So up here on the color palette, I'm going to select a light cream color. I'm just going to fill in the background with that and now what I'm going to do is, I'm going to change my brush. So there on the brush I'm going down to painting and then I'm selecting this one audio comes built in with pro craze it's called Nico role. Now I'm going to select a darker color. I'm just going to adjust the brush size, make it quiet big. Then I'm just going to do some rough strokes around the page and get a little bit darker at the top, then a bit lighter at the bottom. Having these lines really direct in the light, I'm just going in adding some few brush strokes. It's got a bit more just to add. Then what I'm going to do is I'm going to change the brush color back to the lighter color again and reduce the opacity a bit. Then I'm just going to add a few lines of the light color to make it a bit lighter. Then on this bond there because the light is shining here, we want to make the bond surface a lot brighter. I'm going to add a bit more brightness to this bottom surface. Like so. Now play that back. Now it looks like there's a light shining down on the surface. This surface is a lot lighter. Then all this up here is a lot darker. Now also with the shadow that we've added, it gives that sense of realism and pause that. Let's finish this, so I'm just going to add a bit more darkness to this top part here. So just the color again, making sure the brush is on the texture one and I'm just going to add a few more strokes just to blend it up ever so slightly. So this was staging. We added the background and gave the illusion of a surface by adding a shadow underneath the ball as the ball is bouncing. In the next lesson, I'm going to be showing you how to export the animation we've created and how you can share it on different platforms. 9. Exporting: Let me show you how to export. When it comes to the end of animating the ball bouncing, we added the shadow, we added shading. Now you want to share it. Let me show you different formats in which you can export from Procreate. Now that we've created this final animation, we have got a background there and we've got our ball bouncing, we've added the shadow. We've added all of the other features like slow and slow up, squash and stretch. Now you want to share it. I'm going to show you the best way that you can export the animation that you made. I'm just going to pause that. Now to export your animation, we're going to go back up here to your wrench that we used at the beginning. I'm going to tap on that. Then I'm going to select "Share." Then here, we've got a bunch of options that we want. We're interested in these four down here. We've got GIF, PNG or MP4. For this, we're going either to do two separate ones. So I know my GIF is used as an image. So you can use it as an image in let's say your Instagram stories where you are the sticker, that's a GIF. Then MP4, that's a video file. Say for example, you want to share on Instagram. Instagram only allows you to upload other images or MP4's. So MP4 is the type of file. Say if you select Instagram, you'd do want to export as an MP4. Or if you're next one was GIF, you'd select GIF. Make sure you start with your GIF. When you start with GIF, it comes up with an example of what we'll be exporting, and it'll come up with the export options. You either got high resolution or web ready. Web ready will reduce the quality of the animation that you've made. For this, we're going to go on high resolution and we want to keep the frames per second the same. Otherwise, if you increase it, the animation can increase speed. Or if we decrease it, the animation is going to decrease speed. We want to keep on the 15 frames per second that we did initially. This shrink. You want to keep on. Refresh certain color palette, you're going to leave off. To export, you simply just tap the "Export" button, it exports the file for you. This may take some time depending on what version of the app that you do have. Once exported, you can save it to anyone. You can either share it. First, I'm going to save to images. Then to view. It's going to go on my photos. We have a GIF version of the animation we made. Now to export the video. We're going to do the same. So the wrench, share, and then animate at MP4 this time. You can see there's very few option with this one. It's just the speed of which you want to export the animations. Again, I'm going to leave it at 15 frames per second and then tap export and send them. I'm going to save it. This time it's save video because it's a video file. If I go back and view, here's now a video. As you saw, it only plays once because it is a video. This brings us to the end of this lesson. I showed you how to export your project, whether it's a GIF or an MP4, depending on the platform you're going to share it on. It's always good to know these different formats, as when you do go further and do your own personal projects, you'll know what formats for to export in. 10. Conclusion: That brings us to the end of this class. Well done, on creating this project, on animating the bouncing ball. In this class, we covered a few of the principles of animation, including timing and spacing, which can be combined with slow-in, slow-out, which determined the speed of the object, squash and stretch, which give the object and material, and then finally bringing it to live, through shadows and texture. If you were to take one thing away from this class, I would hope it would be that you'd gain a better understanding of the basics of hand-drawn animation and how learning these basic steps will set you up for future projects. Don't forget once you've exported your project, to share it down below in the project's panel, so I can see what you created, but also give you feedback. Though, this brings us to the end of the class. I hope you found it helpful. But don't worry too much, if you still haven't got grips of it. It took me a while worth practicing, I'll recommend the same to you, but mainly, have fun with the process of learning how to animate by hand. Before I head off, don't forget to follow me on my social channel, design-with-smit, this is where I'll post all my animations and illustrations that I create. If you do like what you see over there, don't forget to give me a follow.