Halloween Watercolor Marshmallow Pops: Sweet & Whimsical | Daniela Mellen | Skillshare

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Halloween Watercolor Marshmallow Pops: Sweet & Whimsical

teacher avatar Daniela Mellen, Artist & Author

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

22 Lessons (1h)
    • 1. Halloween Watercolor Marshmallow Pops

      1:45
    • 2. Class Supplies

      0:55
    • 3. Using the Template

      2:43
    • 4. Ghost Background

      4:02
    • 5. Enhancing the Shadows

      3:28
    • 6. Painting the Face

      1:49
    • 7. Painting Count Dracula

      2:28
    • 8. Painting the Costume

      4:27
    • 9. Painting the Hair

      3:48
    • 10. Painting the Bowtie

      2:04
    • 11. Painting the Face

      2:12
    • 12. Painting the Marshmallow Candy Corn

      1:38
    • 13. Enhancing the Shadows

      2:20
    • 14. Painting the Yellow Layer

      2:06
    • 15. Painting the Orange Layer

      3:17
    • 16. Painting the Face

      1:49
    • 17. Painting the Marshmallow Jack O'Lantern

      5:13
    • 18. Adding a Glaze

      3:11
    • 19. Painting the Face

      2:37
    • 20. Painting the Stripes

      1:48
    • 21. Class Wrap Up

      1:38
    • 22. Bonus Class

      5:26
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About This Class

Marshmallows are sweet and squishy treats that can be molded into unexpected and festive shapes. Today’s class combines the beauty of watercolor, some Halloween inspired characters, and the candy marshmallow to create paintings of marshmallow pops: ghost, candy corn, jack o’lantern, and Count Dracula. All are reminiscent of traditional Halloween images, but with an aesthetic of a marshmallow. We’ll combine classic Halloween imagery with the rounded features of a puffy marshmallow on a stick. 

Class includes a template to sketch out all 4 images, plus a Class Supply List. Sketch your images, Paint along with me, and then share your photos. This class is for beginners and we will explore wet on wet techniques and focus on gradual blending of colors. We’ll also create a glaze layer to intensify already painted color in Chapter 18. We’ll work on controlling shapes, but still letting the watercolors flow. Also included is a fun Bonus Class for a marshmallow without a costume.

Meet Your Teacher

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Daniela Mellen

Artist & Author

Teacher

I'm an artist and author living in coastal Florida and surrounded by plants, animals, marine life, and the warm sun - all things that inspire me.

I am drawn to creating things and love to get lost in projects. Each day is a opportunity to learn something new, build on existing skills, and branch out to new ones. I was formally trained as a educator which is my passion and incorporating art into teaching makes my life complete.

I upload art classes every Friday, here on Skillshare. You'll see handmade books, memory keeping, watercolor, acrylic paint, unique art supplies, and photography composition. Thanks for joining me and I look forward to seeing your work.

Check out my blog for additional info on my website danielamellen.com or my YouTube Channel for additional c... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Halloween Watercolor Marshmallow Pops: Marshmallows are the classic candy treat enjoyed at the holidays around campfires, and gently melting in a cup of cocoa. Because of the soft texture, marshmallows can be molded into unexpected shapes and best of all, drenched in chocolate. And that's where today's class comes in. Watercolor, marshmallow pops, Sweden, whimsical. Is it beginner level watercolor class creating for illustrations inspired by Halloween, will create an adorable ghost, a candy corn inspired pop, a traditional jacket lantern, and the Classic Halloween villain, Count Dracula, all made to look like marshmallow pops, complete with stick base and oblong shapes. In class I include a template with four illustrations to help you make your sketch, as well as a class supply list showing the exact colors used in class. Each of the sketches can be modified further. And I'll show you how I do this in Chapter 3. Then we'll practice wet on wet techniques to make the ghost appear as if it was made from white chocolate, as well as making shadows in Dracula, his face and costume will pay attention to details like highlights and outlines. And then create simple but lovable faces so that our pops are more treats than tricks. So gather your supplies and let's get started. 2. Class Supplies: Here are the class supplies for our watercolor marshmallow pops painting. I have some five by seven watercolor pieces of paper. And I'll paint each one of these pops on a piece of paper. I have my template which you can download and print out. And we'll use this in the next chapter to trace our images. I have a pencil and an eraser to do that tracing. I have some watercolor brushes, a six and a number two. And then I have some assorted watercolor pigments, and I'll include in a separate download a list of the pigments we use in class today, but use any that you're comfortable using. And I will also use a water jug and some paper towels. In the next chapter, we'll go over using the template with a light source. You can use the light from a window and I'll use a light pad. 3. Using the Template: So here I have my light source, and this is just a light pad that illuminates replicating a window or light coming in from a window. Now what I do is I take each of these images here on the template and I trace them right onto watercolor paper so that I have each one traced. You can modify your images by tilting them and elongating the tracing. Now for example, this image here, which is like a candy corn, are reminiscent of a candy corn. I'll show you how I trace it and then how I modify it. And you could do this technique with any of the existing images here. So I set my template down and my light source, and if I was using a window, I just tape it down. And then I have my light coming through it. And then I put my paper on top of my image. And from here I decide where I want to trace it, where I want it to placed on my paper. So once I have that image somewhat centered, I'll just lightly sketch. I don't want to etch the paper with my pencil, so I'm just doing a light tracing. And there I have the image traced on to my paper from the template. Now if I want to modify it further just to make it unique or my own, I'll do that. So if I want this to look more like candy corn, I plan on painting it Candy Corn colors. I'll just kind of create a different shape, more of a rounded triangle. So I'll just come around here creating that triangle. It'll still look like a marshmallow pop, but just more triangular shaped the shape of candy corn. And I can just play around with this as well until I get the right shape that I like. Once I have that, I'll erase the pencil marks that I don't need. And there I have a candy corn shape. I want it to be a little more three-dimensional. I'll just add a little backing here. Again, I erase the pencil marks I don't need. And I have my sketch ready to paint. In the next chapter, we'll start our painting by painting our marshmallow ghost. 4. Ghost Background: So now paint my ghost. I'm going to create a very light image right around all these lines here that we've created with our pencil. And I want it to be a very light color, just a shadow, because I want the ghost to look white. So with a clean brush and clean water, I'll just create a little bit of a perimeter around the lines here. Just the silhouette of this shape. And then I'll mix the color. I'll take a little certainly in blue and a little Prussian blue right on my palette. And then I'll just water that down. And then I'll make a second puddle with whatever's left on my brush and take a little purple. Just for some variation. I'll switch to my small brush, my number two brush, and I'll pick up that blue. And I'm going to just barely reach that pencil mark. I don't want to paint over it because I want to erase it later. But I'm just bringing my pigment right near it. And I'll start by creating the outline here. I'll just go in a few spots, leaving other spots bear rinsing my brush and just blending out those edges. And as I blend out those edges, I'm combining those spots that I made. I'll pick up a little more of that blue and continue the same technique. And I'll just gently pull those colors together. And I'll go over the area I've already painted. I want to keep cleaning my brush and blending out those edges so that the center of our ghost is very light. There's no harsh lines. It's all just a nice gradual fade to white. I'll turn my paper around and continue all the way around bringing that pigment right up to the pencil mark but not over it. Rinsing my brush and blending that color out. Continuing my way around. It will dry lighter than it is, and with the introduction of more water, it will even fade out further. So once I have that perimeter done, I went to come up here and go on the backend of these little folds of the ghost. Guam both sides. Again, right up to the pencil mark but not touching it, not over it. And then with a clean brush, blending that out to get a nice gentle fade. But it come back in with a little bit of that purple and just dabbing it on certain areas. Couldn't randomly around the ghost to give a little bit of variation. And I could come over here as well. On that fold. I'm going to re-wet with clear water, the inside of this folder and take a little bit of blue and leaving a nice little gap between my pencil mark. I'll continue all the way around as well. Once I have that perimeter done, rinse my brush so it's nice and clean and blend everything out. I'll go all the way around, pick up a little purple, drop that in a few spots. And I'll let this layer completely dry. I do want to make sure that I have no harsh edges. So if I see any folders go in there with a clean brush and blend them out. Let this dry and we'll come back and add our next layer. 5. Enhancing the Shadows: So now our first layer is dried. I want to go in there with my eraser and just erase the pencil marks around the perimeter of this ghost. So now when I'm happy with the way that looks, I want to come in with my small brush and I want to take a little more purple right on my palette. Mixing a little of whatever blue I have remaining, just to tone it down. And then I'm gonna make a very faint outline of the ghost. And I'm going to start here just on this little white area. And with a gentle hand, I'm just going to outline this fold here. Flip this around, rinse my brush, and just blend the edges somewhat, just so there's a little soft blend. Again, I'll pick up that purple and I'll continue all the way around the perimeter of the ghost. Again, a very thin line. Take my clean, wet brush and blend out some areas just to soften it a bit. Now I'll take a little bit of blue and deposit it. And again, blending that out, I want the perimeter to be slightly darker than the main body of the ghost. And also take a little of that blue. Just fill in this area here. Wet my brush, blend out those colors. And when I'm happy with how this looks, that I have nice soft blends everywhere. I'll let this layer dry. But while I'm here, I want to work on my stem a little bit. Going to take a little more blue first here and just deposited at the base of this ghost. This little fold here. Make sure it blends out. And then I'm gonna take a little of this Payne's gray mixing a little blue with that. Still want it to be gray, but just with a hint of blue. And I'm going to just trace over these pencil marks for the stem. Clean my brush and the damp brush. I'll just add some water in between. Soften the edges slightly. Now I'll come back in with a little of that Payne's gray and create a shadow just at the top of that ghost. I'll pull it down on one side. And I'll let this layer completely dry. 6. Painting the Face: So now our ghost is dry. I just want to finish up the face, going to start with my smallest brush and I'll take more of that Payne's gray, mix it right on my palette. So I have a nice well to work with. I'm going to start by outlining the eyes, creating that rounded shape. And then I want to fill in that shape, but I like to leave a little white speck here of a highlight. And then I'll repeat that on this other eye over here. I create my circle. Week, my highlight, and fill in the eye. I'll take some more of this Payne's gray and gently make that mouth following the curve. Now I could stop there. But because it's a cute little ghost, I want to add a little bit of pink cheeks. I'll add some brilliant pink. Just whetted here with maybe a little perylene red. Then with a clean brush. Let's just wet. I'll make some rounded cheeks and they can drop in that pigment into those shapes just so it's very soft. And there I have our marshmallow pop ghost. Next chapter, we'll do our Count Dracula, pop. 7. Painting Count Dracula: So to paint the Dracula pop, I have my image here that I traced onto my paper. I'm going to start with this face. I want the face to be a purple, but kinda very subtle. So we'll just a wet, clean brush. I'm gonna go over here and wet the face. I'm going to avoid the teeth, but the rest of the areas if I cover with water, That's okay. I'm not too worried. I'm going to color them in darker. And wedding my face so that it will blend nicely. By wetting it, it helps with the blend. And so I'll mix my color, my palette. I'll mix a polar water and take some of this purple. They'll mix a small amount of Prussian blue in with that, just to tone it down somewhat. Now once I'm happy with that, I'll wet my brush, clean it, and pick up a little more pigment. And then I'll go around the hairline here. And I'm going to create a thick swatch of this purple. I'll go halfway down the face. Rinse my brush clean, blended out. Then I'll pick up my purple again and do the same on the other side of the face. Start right at the hairline. Go down here and bring that all the way down the face. Come up and connect the two parts of the hair. Dabbing pigment around the edge. Then I'll rinse my brush and blend it out. So there's a soft blend. I'll take a look at this. I'm really happy with the way he looks, but I'm going to come in here with a little bit more pigment on my small brush and just control it around the edges. Just to get more purple right around the edge, be a little darker, creates a little bit of shadow that way. But we still have a nice purple face for our Count Dracula. Going to take a clean brush, soften any edges. And then I'll let this layer completely dry. 8. Painting the Costume: So now that our face has dried, I want to work on the Cape. Could take my small brush just because it's a small detail work that a wet it and mix my color first can take some perylene read, write on my palette, make a nice red cape. And I'll mix a little deep green in with that. Then I want to make a second puddle with a little Payne's gray. So now I'll clean my brush and I'm going to start with the inside of the cape here. I want to keep that line, that pencil lines separating the fold of the Cape. A little barrier of white. So I'm just going to go in there with some clear water and I'll start on the right-hand side here and wet inside that cape. And then I'm going to deposit pigment. And as you can see, Wix right to the remaining area that's wed going to create just a small little border between the face and the cape. And I'm going to drag this down here. Again, I'm avoiding that pencil line on the side here of this fold. And up top here, I'm going to create that perimeter. And I can go over the pencil line up top if I want. Want to come back in, deposit more pigment to make it nice and vibrant. I don't mind a little white showing in the center here. Now I pick up a little of that Payne's gray and just deposited at the base. So that would be where our shadow would be. While I'm here, I'm going to wet the front fold of this cape. Bring it right down here to the top of the Bot. Come in here with my red, leaving a nice little border of white where that pencil is. And filling in that color. I'll go right halfway down here above the bow tie. And then I'll very carefully create the top of this fold. But leaving a nice little border between the back of the fold. It's a cape and the top. And then I can come in and deposit a little more pigment just to make that nice and vibrant, makes a little more color. Create that shape of that curved cape. Deposit a little more pigment on the inside as well. And then I'll repeat this procedure for this side of the cape. Going to turn my piece around, rinse my brush so it's clean and work on the inside of that cape. And wetting the area. And going in with that pigment. Avoiding that pencil mark. And leaving a little gap between the face and the cape. Come back in, deposit a little more pigment. Then I'll pick up a little that Payne's gray and deposit at the bottom. I'll work on the folder, the cape on this side. Winning the piece. And then bringing in that red of the cape. Carve out the shape on the outside, right to where it meets with the inside of the cape. And then very carefully, I'll paint up to that pencil mark. But I'm going to leave a little border. Come back in with a little more pigment. Just cause I like that vibrancy of that red cape. This side I'll go over any areas that may have dried, sharpen up any areas here. And I'll let this layer completely dry. 9. Painting the Hair: So now when I work on my hair piece up top here, because it's still like a marshmallow. It doesn't have to look completely realistic. I'm going to take a clean brush and I'm just going to wet the area, avoiding the pencil marks just to start to saturate that head piece. And then I'm gonna go in there on my palette and just mix some Payne's gray. I still have a little bit of dried purple on my palette. And I can mix that in with the Payne's gray. Because a nice little effect. I'm going to switch to my smaller brush just because I can control it better. And I'm going to pick up that Payne's gray with what we mixed on our palette. And I'm going to start here on the left-hand side of the face, going to start right up against the pencil mark, creating a nice wide border. I'll go very slowly just to create that shape. Then when I come down, I'll just use the tip of the brush to come right down and carve out that little side burn. I'll rinse my brush and just add a little water here to blend out the side burn. And I'll pick up more of my pigment. And I'll continue on the top here, creating that perimeter. And this is the top of the marshmallow. So once I have the top, put down the border for the top, I'll come back in with a clean wet brush and just blend it out gently. I don't want to bring that pigment up to that white line. I just want to blend it out nicely. And over here I'll blend it out as well. Tick pick up more of my pigment. Again. I just want to continue with the outline on this side, making that a little thicker as I go. Rinsing my brush and blending out the edge. And I'm going to create the outline here of a little area. The curved, heart-shaped face come up from the sideburns. Then I'll wet my brush and just blend out that edge right up to that pencil mark of the highlight. Take my brush, blend out any edges. And then I want to come back in as I look at my little marshmallow Dracula. And I want to just emphasize that outline. So I'll go in there with some more pigment all around the perimeter and letting it just really blend with the wet background that's already there. If there's any areas that have dried, I'll go in there and wet them again. And I'm doing this so that my head piece here, my little hair cap area isn't too overwhelmingly dark, creating that border. And then with a wet brush, I'm just allowing it to blend and do whatever watercolor likes to do in the situation. And when I'm happy with the way that looks, I'll just let that dry. 10. Painting the Bowtie: So now my hair pieces drives going to go in there and erase that pencil mark for that highlight that we have. That kind of creates the marshmallow shape. And now I want to work on the stem and the bow tie. So for the stem, I'm just going to take my small brush and I'll just wet in-between the pencil marks. Then I'll pick up a little of this Payne's gray and just gently go over those pencil marks just to deepen that stick that stem. And again, I'll just go up to the top here. Whatever's left on my brush deposit a little of that to create a little shadow from the bowtie. Drag it down the length of the stem, and then I'll come back in with some clear water and not only blended out, but lighten it up a little bit. This picks up some of the pigment, but yet it's indicative that there's a stem there. And now for the bow tie, I want to come in here, put a little water on my palette and take a little cerulean blue and a little Prussian blue. Similar to the colors we used for the ghost. Wanted to be very subtle. So I'll add a few brush moles of water. And then I'm just going to create a little bit of a shadow on the center of that bow tie. And then on the edges where it comes out from the center. Just like this, that will dry light and I can even come back in and just carve out a little more of a shape of the bow tie, echoing that shape. While I'm here. And it takes some of that dark color and I just want to create that knows. So I'll pick up that Payne's gray on my brush and just go over that knows. Just like that. I'll let this layer dry and we'll come back and finish up our bow tie, mouth and eyes. 11. Painting the Face: So now I'm gonna come in here and just finish up. I'll wet my brush and pick up a little more of this Payne's gray on my palette. And then just with a sharp point, we'll start by outlining this bow tie very lightly with a very light hand. Go all the way around. And I'll continue working my way up the piece. They just with a very light hand outline the teeth. I'll outline the mouth. And then I like to fill in the mouth. So we'll just go back in by more pigment to my brush and just fill in that area. After it's all filled in, I'll pick up some pigment and just apply it to the base of the mouth here. And then I'll take my pigment and I'll work on my eyes. Again. I create the shape and I fill them in, leaving a little bit of a highlight. And I try and match it on the second eye. And then I work on the eyebrows. And make sure I get my brush to a nice sharp point. Create the perimeter. And I can take a damp brush and just fill it in. Create my shape. Take a damp brush and fill it in. And there we have our Count Dracula, marshmallow pop. 12. Painting the Marshmallow Candy Corn: So now let's start our candy corn pop. The top layer is white, the center is orange, and the bottom is yellow. So I'm going to start with that white. Again, this is very similar to the ghost. I'm going to come in here and I'm going to wet the top face that's facing us, as well as the top of the side here. Just wet it nicely. Then I'll mix my colors. I'll put a little water on my palette with some cerulean blue. Next to it, I'll make another puddle with civilian blue and Prussian blue. Add a little more pigment here. So now I have two tones of blue. I'll rinse my brush again and pick up that light blue. And I just want to create a nice thick border on the face of this candy corn of this civilian blue that we water down. And the same thing up top here all the way around. I'll rinse my brush and just blend it out, keeping the center a little bit lighter than the edges. I can go over the lines. It doesn't really matter at this point. I'm going to let this layer dry, but keep my colors on the palette. And then we'll start adding a second layer to our white. 13. Enhancing the Shadows: So now we have a nice light base with a surly in blue that's later in the center. And it's very subtle with a sharp brush. I'm going to take that second color. We mix the cerulean blue with a little Prussian blue just to make it a little deeper. And I'm going to pick up it on my brush, make a very sharp point and I'm going to outline with a very light hand. Just going to outline the shape of my candy corn marshmallow. Come right to the edge, go over that pencil mark, and then follow it back. Just like that. I'm going to mix whatever's on my brush with a little of that light blue that remains. And I'm going to come up top here and just gently pull some pigment up top. I'm going to come from the right-hand side here to make it three-dimensional and just pull some pigment in so that it's a little darker at the back. And then I'll rinse my brush. So now it's nice and clean. Remove some of the water so it's damp and just blend that out. Blend out the top as well. I'll come in with that deeper blue, mixing it with the lighter color. And just gently with a very sharp point. Just going to pull pigment in. Every so often on one side. Rinse my brush, remove a good portion of the water, and just blend that out. Again, keeping a little more blue on that one side. I'll pick up a little of that lighter blue, pull it in on this side, rinse my brush and blend it out. Once again. Blend out the top. I want nice soft lines. Come over here, the base and add a little more blue. Blending out the base. Rinsing my brush so it's clean and blending it out. And I'll let this layer dry and then we'll come back and work on our yellow layer. 14. Painting the Yellow Layer: So now for our yellow layer, which is the bottom layer, that a wet my brush and just wet that front face. And the side here. Going to mix the color on my palette. We'll just some water and some of this deep yellow. Whatever's on my brush, I'll rub to the side, rinse it, pick up a little lemon yellow just to mixing with that for a little variation, dip my brush in water and pick up that light color again. And I'm just going to swab across the entire front of this candy corn. Once I have that shape carved in, I'll pick up a little more of that color and go to the side here. I'll rinse my brush and I'm gonna switch to my smaller brush. And now I'm going to pick up that beautiful deep yellow color. Could really play by adding this pigment to the side. Going right up and over that pencil mark. Do the same thing on this side and come down the perimeter. This gives me a nice blend from the deepest yellow on the perimeter, right to the really light center. It's like a nice highlight, a go around the edge of the yellow. The center is still much lighter. And I'll come over here to this piece and the back. Go around the edge. Pick up the remaining paint on my brush. And continue to dab here to really emphasize that brilliant color. Any areas have dried, I can go in with a wet brush and blend them out. But I just want to create that nice variation between that lighter center and that deeper, richer edge. And I'll let this layer completely dry. 15. Painting the Orange Layer: So now to paint the orange part of our candy corn that makes it really look like Candy Corn. Going to come in with a wet brush. Just wet the main part of the face of the candy corn. Little bit on the side here. And I'll mix my color, take this vermilion hue, mix it on my palette with whatever remains of the deep yellow. And then whatever's on the brush, I'll go over that lemon yellow again. I'll come back, rinse my brush pickups more this lemon yellow, and add it in here. And now I'm going to take that color and swab the inside the center of this candy corn. And a little bit over here on the side piece. Pull my color but not right to the edge. Just the majority. 95 percent of this candy corn. I'm going to switch to my smaller brush, pick up a little more vermilion hue and mix that in with the color that's on our palate. And now starting at this side, I'm going to go just around the edge, the perimeter here, connecting that front top white part of the candy corn to this yellow on the bottom. It will blend beautifully, the lighter orange we've already put down. And I want to come all the way around the perimeter right up to that pencil mark on the other side. I'll do the same thing. And this bottom layer here with the yellow creating my line. And then making it nice and thick. And I want to create, write down that line. The front face of this candy corn. Pick up more pigment and deposit it, getting it a little thicker as I go each time. Create a nice boundary. And then I'll do the same thing on the side here. Come down for the boundary, connecting the top of a candy corn to the yellow layer. I'll leave a little distance between the front face and the side face. And they'll pick up that lighter color and just blend it out. I'll take that lighter color. Go over the center yet again. Just to create a nice blend, dabbing it on. I'll go over some of that orange color, that deeper color we made. And I'll let this layer completely dry. We'll come back and work on the stem in the face. 16. Painting the Face: So now that our candy corn is dry, I'm going to work on the stem. My small brush just going to wet the areas in between those pencil marks. They'll take a little Payne's gray, mix it with my blue. Whatever's left on my palette. Still get a nice gray with just a hint of that blue. And then I'm going to trace right over those pencil marks to create those lines. Rub off a little on my brush and go down one side of the stem here. Rinse my brush and blend that out. Removing a little bit of the pigment as I go with a fresh clean water. They'll take a little of that color and just create a little shadow. Underneath the stick here, the stem of the marshmallow pop, just like we did with the others. So now I'm going to take some more of this. Payne's gray can mix it right in with that blue. Now what to work on my face? Turn my piece to the side, make a very sharp point. P the mouth and the eyes. And leave a teeny little highlight on the eyes. Now I made my eyes very teeny. You can make them larger if you'd like. But it's a cute little look. And there's our candy corn marshmallow pop. The next chapter we'll work on our final pop, the pumpkin pop. 17. Painting the Marshmallow Jack O'Lantern: Scenario painter pumpkin pop, and to treat each section here as its own piece using the same pigment. I'll start, we'll start with the center section. Just going to brush water right down the main part of the center, leaving the top dry just because there's not a lot of Material space to work with. Put some water on my palette. And I'm going to take some of this deep yellow. I'll make a second puddle of the deep yellow. And then I want to make some perylene red with that to make an orange. Now play around with the proportions until I get that right orangey color that I'm looking for. Starting to come along. You can use a vermilion hue and just prefer this color. It with my large brush and the sharp point, I'm just going to go to the base of this pencil mark here. Create that shape. Turn this over and do the same thing over here. Bring my pigment rate to the top and the bottom. Just like that. I'll rinse my brush. My brush is relatively clean. Now I'm going to blend that area together. Creating that boundary up top. I'll pick up some of that deep yellow, deposit it in the center. Switch my brush and pick up some of that beautiful orange color we made and deposit even more of it on the same places we deposited it to begin with. I want those colors to blend. So I have to have enough pigment on my pumpkin to blend naturally. And all I have to do is make sure I have enough pigment to let it happen. Coming over here, round this edge a little more. And I'll rinse my brush and pick up this deep yellow and blend it in. Get a wet my brush and I'll start on one side and wanted to use the same technique where I wet that section. I go over it with my deep color right to the pencil marks all the way around the perimeter. Then I'll come in there and pick up that deep yellow right for the edge. And I get a nice blend. Mix, some more color deposited in, and I can switch to my smaller brush if that's easier. But I really want this variation in that orange and yellow can pick up more color deposited over here as well. And I'll work on this last section. I wet it a pickup the deep color. Take it to the pencil line. Rinse my brush, pick up that deep yellow. And then with a smaller brush, I'll pick up that beautiful orange color. Really emphasize that perimeter. Go over the shape a little further. When I'm happy with how that looks, I'll let that dry, believe the color of my palette. But I think a bit I have to mix them more to finish the top, and we'll do that in the next chapter. 18. Adding a Glaze: So now our pumpkin is dry. I went to rinse my brush, get it nice and wet, and whatever orange remains on my palette that we mixed maybe two brush moles of water. I want to turn that into a glaze and go over the pumpkin sections one more time. This will unify them and brighten that color up a little. So making sure I have a very wet brush and I'm covering every area and not really working the dried layer but just covering it. Go over all that area once on all the sections. And then I'll mix a little more color. If I missed any area, cover that. So I'll take my deep yellow little perylene read. Then I'll switch to my small brush. And I'm going to treat all of these areas as one that is still leave that white area of the stripe. But I'm going to with a wet brush, wet all the areas from the back to the front with a good sides gap, leaving the paper dry in the front. Pick up my pigment, and start in the back. Letting it just blend, seeing what it does it first. I'll dip my brush in water and just pull that color up a little bit. They'll take us a little perylene red on my brush and mix it with what remains and just dab it at the base, right at the back. Then I'll rinse my brush, pick up a little of that deep yellow and just dab that in the front. While waiting for that to dry and want to work on my stem. That a wet my little brush with my stem. Take a little of this Payne's gray, mix it with some water in a very sharp point on the brush. Just trace over my pencil marks. Once I have that, I'll take a little more of my brush. Creating a shadow underneath my pumpkin. Rinse my brush so it's damp and just go the length of that stem. I'll let this layer dry. And then we'll come back and work on the actual green pumpkin stem and the face. 19. Painting the Face: So now to work on this pumpkin stem up top, I want it to be green. Tick my large brush, I'm just going to wet the stem, staying away from the pencil marks. And I'll mix my color. Take some lemon yellow in a puddle. And second puddle with a little lemon yellow and just a little deep green. So now I have two colors to work with. I'm going to take my lemon yellow on my brush. And I'm going to paint that stem, starting the left-hand side. Going all the way to the right-hand side, just filling that in and up top. I'm only going to pay the top of it. I'm not going to paint that pencil mark. I'll pick up that green color and add it on that side, right over those pencil marks. And on the other side as well, gently start working it to the center with short little strokes. Same thing on the other side. And then I'll pick up a little more deep green, mix it in and just dab the deep green on the side. That gives three layers of color. And I can just make little dabs again to help that blend. I'll put my piece to the side and just barely touched that green, the base of that stem. And at the top, outline it. I have my stem. To do the face. I'm just going to take this Payne's gray right on my palette. And just like we did with the other Pops, create that face. This face is jacket, lantern face. So instead of being round, the eyes are triangular. But I'm still going to leave a little highlight. Paint the nose and the mouth. Just like that. I'm going to let this layer dry and erase the pencil marks, and then we'll come back and do a little more detail work on this stripe. 20. Painting the Stripes: So now our layer has dried and I erase the pencil marks. Could go in there with my small brush. I'm going to re-wet this orange that we have here. And I'm going to work on this outline, starting at the top, closest to the screen pumpkin stem. Going to go around and create the outline to our jacket lantern and pop here. And I'm going to outline the entire piece, going very lightly. And when I get to the bottom, I want these lines to look like they're kind of melted chocolate. So I'm just going to create little rounded edges to those lines. Up top here. I'm going to do the same thing. I'm just going to create little rounded sections. Just like that. I'm going to take my larger brush. I'm gonna pick up this deep yellow, mix it with a little bit of the orange just so it's a very faint orange and very barely. And this gonna debit up top here closest to the stem. And just pull it down. I'll rinse my brush, dry it so it's damp and just pull that color down. Just want it to be phage so it's not white like the paper. And then with whatever's on the brush, I'll go over this little white area, the little highlight to the top of that marshmallow. And there we have our deco enter marshmallow pop. In the next chapter, we will review all the work we did in class, and I'll show you some variations. 21. Class Wrap Up: So here we have the paintings that we did in class today. We have our ghost, Count Dracula, the modified candy corn from the original template, as well as the jacket lantern. Now I wanted to show you some variations that you could do by modifying your template using the same characters that we have on our template. All of these illustrations in one painting. Now for the ghost, the only difference is the shape of the eyes are a lot larger, and so that creates a different personality. Count. Dracula remain the same to slight modifications. I colored his hair and a lot darker, and I personally prefer the lighter version for the candy corn. I maintain the shape from the template. So you have that just marshmallow shape with the three colors. And again, it's a different effect. Lastly, for the jacket lantern, I maintain the marshmallow shape rather than making it a rounded. Once again, the personality really comes through. You could always create just a simple marshmallow on a stick. And perhaps if you're doing this in a journal or a sketchbook, you'll want a starting point and that marshmallow on a stick and a great starting point. I hope you try your hand at one of these creatures. Use illustrations from class. Post your work on Instagram, be sure to tag me. I'll take a look at your work or snap a photo of your work and post it in the project section. Be sure to follow me here on Skillshare to get notified of future classes. And please consider leaving a review. Thanks for joining me today. 22. Bonus Class: As a bonus class, I wanted to show you the painting of the acute marshmallow on a stick. This might be a starting point for a journal for you. So it's just a quick little painting. There's no template for it. You just make a rounded rectangle and that's the basic shape of your marshmallow. And then you just add in the elements. So I like to add just a little rim up here, just indicative of the top of the marshmallow. And there it starts to appear. I take a ruler to make my stick here. You can make it any width you'd like. And then lastly the face. And I just do a light sketch of the face with pencil. And depending on where I put it in the size of my eyes, I get a different personality. Same thing with the depth of the mouth as well. From doing my journal work or starting my class illustrations, I take a waterproof marker and I'll go over the shape. And if it's important to get the shape straight, I'll use my ruler just to make those guides. But I'll just carefully create that shape. Carefully connecting it to the straight edges. I'll make my top of the marshmallow. And then I like to use that straight edge to get that stick nice and straight. Lastly, I'll work on the eyes and the mouth. Create those shapes. And then fill them in with a little bit of a highlight remaining. Middle finish my painting. Take my water and I'll mix my color first. I just want a little shadow of that marshmallow. So I'll take some civilian blue, can use any shade of blue that you like. Take a little Prussian blue and mix it in with that. Whatever remains on the brush, I'll mix next to that. And I like to add a lot of water. I want my colors very light. I'll rinse my brush so it's clean water, basin wet. Just go around here and make an L. Really saturating that paper. And it'll pick up my color and just deposit it in. I go parallel to the edge over here on the left. Then I just pull my color up, down there following the curve. And then I just pull my color across. I want this to be very faint and very gradual. I can always go back in and add more pigment. I'll do the same thing up top, rinse my brush. And I like to go parallel to that arc. And just drop in my pigment. I'll rinse my brush, remove some of the water, and just pick up a little of it. Just so more pigment stays on the perimeter. I can go back in and deposit it, seeing what it does. As long as my background remains wet, I can go back in, make sure those parallel that line is parallel to that border. I'll go up top as well. Then I'll rinse my brush, remove some of the water, soften that edge. I'll take some of that other color and just dab it in a few spots. And then I like to come in with a clean wet brush and just make a very faint line on this side. I'll take that lighter color and just barely added in. There's any areas here that are not the shape I want. I'll sharpen my brush, go in there and just extend them, adding a little more pigment as I go. And once again, I take a look at my piece. I like that soft blend. I have my little shadow on the side of my Marshmallow can add a little bit over here. If I add too much, I can either absorb it with my paper towel, will just come in there with my brush. And then just to make some cheeks make to round circles with clear water. And then I'll go in there with a little brilliant pink and just dab it in. I'll take a little Payne's gray here, sitting with a little of that blue. Just go down the side of my stem and underneath my marshmallow, rinse my brush and just pull some of that color off and blend that edge. And there I have my cute little very plain marshmallow.