Google Analytics for Business Marketing: Demystifying Your Website’s Traffic | Josh George | Skillshare

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Google Analytics for Business Marketing: Demystifying Your Website’s Traffic

teacher avatar Josh George, Digital Marketing Expert

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

13 Lessons (57m)
    • 1. Introduction - Class Overview

      2:41
    • 2. What We're Going To Cover In This Section

      1:18
    • 3. How to Prevent Inflating Your Traffic Data

      3:04
    • 4. How To Find Out How Much Traffic Your Website Gets

      3:23
    • 5. How To Find Out What Country Your Traffic Is Coming From

      3:46
    • 6. How To Find Out What Pages Are The Most Popular On Your Website

      5:52
    • 7. Learn Who Your Visitors Are - Demographic Reports

      5:42
    • 8. How To Find Out What Sources & Channels Send You The Highest Quality Traffic

      5:57
    • 9. Behavior Reports - Learn How To Keep People on Your Site Longer

      6:18
    • 10. Real Time Reports - How To Measure Marketing Performances Live

      3:54
    • 11. How to Segment Your Data To Discover Unique Insights

      5:24
    • 12. 3 Features That Will Take Your Data Analysis To The Next Level

      7:36
    • 13. Conclusion + What next?

      1:42
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About This Class

Learn how to measure and improve your website's performance with Google Analytics! 

Join Josh, an award-winning Digital Marketing agency owner, as he demystifies the most popular Web Analytics tool in the world, installed on at least 10 million websites!

In the class, you’ll learn:

  • How to prevent inflating your traffic data
  • How to find out how much traffic your website gets
  • How to find out what country your traffic is coming from
  • How to find out what pages are the most popular on your website
  • Who your visitors are using demographic reports
  • How to find out what sources & channels send you the highest quality traffic
  • How to keep people on your site longer through behavior reports 
  • How to measure marketing performances live using real time reports 
  • How to segment your data to discover unique insights
  • 3 features that will take your data analysis to the next level

Google Analytics is used by:

  • 64% of the Top 500 US retailers
  • 45% of Fortune 500 companies
  • 55.9% of the top 1 million domains

If you're serious about any form of Digital Marketing then Google Analytics should be your best friend.

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Josh George

Digital Marketing Expert

Teacher

Joshua is the founder of ClickSlice, an extremely successful digital marketing agency based in London.

Joshua originally got involved with SEO as an end result of selling on eBay.  He loved selling on eBay but hated paying the eBay commission fees (also known as final value fees). Instead of paying eBay every time he wanted to list an item he decided to make his own website where he could list as many items as he wanted without paying any insertions fees.

After building the website he noticed his site was nowhere to be found in Google and no one was buying his products.

As you do, he started to Google things like “how to get my website higher in Google” and stumbled across SEO in 2013.

Josh remembers this day like it was yesterday and says wh... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction - Class Overview: Hello. Welcome to this class on Google Analytics, demystifying your website's traffic. Before we dive into the main class's contents, I want to go through two things very quickly. The first is, who am I? The second is what you're going to learn in this class. Who am I? My name is Joshua George. I've been involved in the digital marketing industry since 2013. In addition to this, I also own the award winning digital marketing agency in the UK called ClickSlice. Here is one of our most recent awards that we've won, where as you can see, it says, ''ClickSlice was named a top B2B firm in the UK,'' which is really nice. In addition to receiving these awards, we also literally use Google Analytics every single day at the agency to measure how well our client websites are performing. Now, I don't show you any of this to brag or anything like that. I show you this to reassure you that what you learn in this class, is actually coming from someone who lives and breathes this day in, day out. What are you going to learn in this class? Well, we're going to be covering tons of things. I'll be showing you how you can prevent inflating your traffic data from with inside your Google Analytics account. I'll also be showing you how you can figure out how much traffic your website gets. I'll then be showing you how you can figure out what country in particular your website traffic is coming from. After that, we'll be diving a little bit deeper, and I'll be showing you which pages in particular are the most popular on your website, which is really good to know as once you figure this out, you can then focus more of your marketing spend or more of your time on optimizing these pages even further to generate more revenue. I'll also be showing you how you can dive into your demographic reports and learn more about who your actual visitors are. I'll then be showing you how you can find out what sources and channels send you the highest quality traffic. As of course, not all traffic is equal. Then once we cover that, we'll be diving into what we call your behavior reports, where here you're going to learn how you can keep people on your website for longer. After that, we'll be taking a look at real-time reports where you learn how to measure marketing performances live. Then once we cover that, I'll be showing you how you can segment your data to discover unique business insights. Lastly, I'll be showing you free features that will take your data analysis to the whole next level. I'm super excited, I can't wait to get into it. Without further ado, let's dive into the class. 2. What We're Going To Cover In This Section: Analyzing the data. In this section, I'll be showing you how you can find the answers to the most commonly asked questions that people have when using Google Analytics, such as how to find out how much traffic your website gets, how to find out what country your traffic is coming from, how to find that what pages are the most popular on your website. I'll also be showing you how you can actually learn more about your actual visitors by looking at what we call demographic reports. I'll be showing you how you can find out what sources and channels send you the highest quality traffic. We're also going to be taking a look at what we call behavior reports. This is really key to understanding exactly how you can keep people on your website for longer. We'll also be taking a look at real-time reports, and I'll be showing you how you can measure your marketing performances live there and then. I'll be showing you how you can segment your data in your Google Analytics account so you can discover and find really unique insights that are going to help you grow your business to the next level. Lastly, I'll be showing you free features within your Google Analytics account that is going to help you take your data analysis to the next level. I'm super excited. I can't wait to get started, so let's get straight into it. 3. How to Prevent Inflating Your Traffic Data: In this video, I'm going to show you how you can prevent inflating your traffic numbers. This is really important to do from the start, as if you don't do this, what you're going to end up with is data which isn't actually that accurate. To comply with Skillshare's policies, I've had to blow out the logo from my website. If you are wondering, why does a website have no logo? Well, it does indeed, I just had to remove it from the video, to ensure is not deemed as self-promotion. Let me give you an example. When you are designing your website, maybe you're updating the copy, some of the images, what you're going to do is actually go onto your website as a visitor. Now, there's no way for Google Analytics to know if you're actually a legitimate user, aka someone who actually hasn't visited the website before, or if you actually own the website. As you can imagine, if you keep going on your website to see how it looks time and time again, especially through if you have a really big team, you can sometimes have about 50 different views a day, just from people inside your business. Then what that's going to do is go into skew all of your data you have seen in your Google Analytics account. You might log in one day and it will say 50 new users, and out of those 50 uses, 40 of them have actually come from employees at your business. What you want to do is what we call blocking out internal IPs. This way we're able to tell Google Analytics that anytime I visit the website on this IP address, then please ignore it as it actually me, I'm not a real visitor, and of course, I don't want my actual views skewing my data in my account. To block out your IP address, what you want to do is go into Admin. Just to confirm I'm actually in the Universal Analytics property. Then you want to go to Filters, on the right-hand side. As you can see, I'm actually in one of our live client accounts. We actually already have an IP address blacklist. However, I will show you exactly how you can create one. Now, what we want to do is click "Add Filter." Put in the name of your filter. I like to make it as descriptive as possible. As this filter is to block out internal IPs, you could literally just put out internal IP block, for example. For a filter type, We want to leave it at predefined. Select filter type. You want to go for exclude. Select source or destination, you want to go for traffic from the IP addresses. Select expression, you want to go to that are equal to. Simply what you want to do here is entering your IP address. Now if you don't know your IP address, then what you want to do is go over to Google, and carry out a search for what is my IP address, and Google will return the IP address just like so. However, obviously, for privacy terms, I've actually blurred out my IP address, as I don't want anyone know where I actually live, especially down to an IP address. But essentially what you want to do is copy the IP address you see here, go back into your Google Analytics account and enter in like so. Then click "Save," and that's going to add a filter to your account, to block out all traffic from your IP address. That's it. Pretty straightforward, very easy to do, and it has a big impact on your data, especially if you work for a large organization. I'll see you in the next one. 4. How To Find Out How Much Traffic Your Website Gets: Welcome back. In this video, I'll be showing you how you can find out how much traffic your website gets. To find out how many people are viewing your website, what you want to do is go to the acquisition report on the left-hand side under reports. Remember, acquisition is all about how we acquire people onto our website, so as a result, if we go into the acquisition reports, we'll be able to find out exactly how many people are landing on our website. Under acquisition, go to overview. Then, once you land on the overview tab, the first thing which you want to do is specify a predetermined date range. To do that, you simply need to click the date range on the right-hand side here. We have a few different options we can select from. We can go to custom, which is literally any custom date range you select. Or you can click the drop down menu and go for it today, yesterday, last week, last month, the last seven days or the last 30 days. For example of this video, I'll go for the last 30 days. As you can see, the date range has now selected and our data has now updated. One thing I'd like to clarify is, as I'm in a demo account for the official Google merchandise store, which is an e-commerce website, I actually have two columns, one for users right here, and I have another column on the right-hand side for conversions. If you do not own a e-commerce website, then nine times out of ten, you will not see this conversion box right here, you will only see users. If you'd like to see a more detailed insight into your actual traffic numbers, then what I recommend you do is you go to all traffic and then go to channels. What that will do, will open up a whole another tab where you can see the whole line chart, literally, full screen. As you can see for the traffic chart for the Google official merchandise store, it seems to be pretty much steady at about 2,500 visitors a day. It seems to drop on Saturdays and Sundays and then go back up again on Monday. Pretty much the same story for the rest of that week, drops again on Saturdays and Sundays, increases, drops, increases and drops again. By default, the traffic is going to be sorted out by days, which I do recommend you view your traffic on a day-by-day basis as it makes it very easy to spot any trends you may have. For example, we can see the traffic is consistent from Monday to Friday but it drops on the weekend. If I were to change this from day to week, like I've just done, you can see it's literally almost impossible to see any trends. The traffic looks pretty much steady throughout the whole week. If I go to the whole month on the whole, you can see it's going to be even a little bit worse, no trends whatsoever. The main reason why we're not seeing any trends here is only because I've specified a date range of just 30 days. Of course, if you go for a more custom preset of maybe 12 months, then you'll be able to see trends more easily. However, if you are only viewing data under 30 days, then I highly recommend that you should be analyzing your data on a day-by-day basis. Analyzing your website's traffic is a really good practice so you can get a good idea into exactly how well your website is performing. This is especially true if you're working on maybe SEO in the background. As ideally, the more SEO you do, the more traffic you should be generating. Over time, you should expect to see an increase in your traffic chart and not a decline. If you do spot a decline in your traffic chart, then a sign for you to be aware of and address as a business. That brings us to the end of this video and I'll see you in the next one. 5. How To Find Out What Country Your Traffic Is Coming From: In the last video, I showed you how you can find out how much traffic your website is getting. Typically, the next question people will have, well, what country is my traffic coming from? That's exactly what I'm going to show you how to find out in this video right here. To find out what country our traffic is coming from, what you want to do is go over to audience as remember, audience allows you to learn more about the users on your website. Then under audience, you want to go to Geo and then go to location. If we scroll down on this page, you can see we are getting a breakdown of all of our users by country. In this instance for the official Google merchandise store, we can see that the number 1 countries sending traffic to this website is indeed the United States, followed by India, Canada, Spain, United Kingdom, Taiwan, Japan and so on and so on. We can see how many users are coming from this country. We can also see the bounce rate are these users from this country and for those who don't actually know, the bounce rate is basically an indication of how many people are coming to your website and bouncing straight back to the search results. A high bounce rate is a good indication that people are not happy with what they have seen. A low bounce rate is a good indication that these people are indeed happy with the content they are viewing. There isn't any concrete number which you need to work towards as it is going to change drastically depending on what type of website you operate and dependent on what type of content you have out there. However, do try and keep it as low as possible and you probably could actually carry out some research to find out what the average bounce rate is for your specific industry. In this example, we can see the United States has a bounce rate of 36 percent and we can see that India has a bounce rate of 59 percent. However, we go even higher in South Korea, they have a bounce rate of 66 percent. What this tells us is that the majority of users coming from South Korea are not as impressed with our content in comparison to those coming from the US. We can also view how many pages are users view per session on average, which for the US we can see is 6.65, so essentially what that means is that the average person views 6.65 pages on our website before they exit our site. If we compare that to South Korea ones again, you can see the average pages per session is only 2.70, which would be free pages. Again, this is another clear indication that all website resonates better with people in the US in comparison to South Korea. You can also see the revenue generated per country as well if you have e-commerce and gold tracking sets up but essentially hopefully this gives you a really good idea into exactly how you can use these countries to understand who your most valuable audience is. If you'd like to get more detail on these countries and what you can actually do is click into any of them in the first menu, for example, if I go into the United States, what is going to do is give me a breakdown of all of this data by state or city for that country. Then once again, you can do exactly the same process, review all of the data, and pull out really important insights. For example, I can already see that the bounce rate for Washington, which is number 5, is only 24.77 percent, so roughly 25 percent, but the bounce rate for Florida another state number 4 is almost double that, 44.68 percent. What does this tell me it as a business, or it tells me that people in Washington are liking my content, more than ones in Florida and I can also see from the revenue that Washington is actually generated $2,000 in sales or $2,354 to be specific and Florida has only generated $1,000. This state in particular is worth more to my business and as a result, if I wanted to grow my business and carry out more marketing activities, then Washington is going to be a really good state to target in comparison to Florida. I hope that gives you an idea of exactly how you can use the data in the real world, I hope you find this video useful and I'll see you in the next one. 6. How To Find Out What Pages Are The Most Popular On Your Website: Finding out how much traffic to your website gets is great to know. However, what's even more insightful is finding out what pages on your website are the ones that are generating the bulk of that traffic. To find out what the most popular pages are on your website, what you need to do is go back to report on the left-hand side and we want to go to behavior, which of course is all about how people behave the ones that are on our website and then we want to go to site content and then go to all pages. Then once again, you want to select the specified date range so for me, I would leave it at the last 30 days, just make sure that has reapplied. Then by default, Google Analytics is going to sort all of your pages in order of the ones that have received the most page views. We can see for the Google official merchandise store, the most popular page on the whole website is the homepage, which currently equates to 17.74 percent of the total traffic on the site. The second most popular page is the basket so that would imply that a lot of people, are adding things to the basket and are actually purchasing things off the site, which is great if you are Google. On the site content page, we can also see the bounce rate of our pages as well. For those who don't know, the bounce rate is essentially the percentage of people that land on your website and then bounce back to the search results. A high bounce rate indicates that people are not happy with the content they are viewing. There isn't any concrete rule of thumb number that I like to stay under, however, you want to try and make sure your bounce rate is under 80 percent. If you do see any pages on your website that have a really high bounce rate. For example, such as this one, number 6, this has a bounce rate of 91.55 percent. That is really, really high and it is a strong indication that people aren't really happy in regards to the content they are viewing. Now, this could be for two different reasons. It could be either number 1, the page isn't a good fit for that person, which can have an implication on the SEO. For example, if someone Googles the word apples, then they land on your page and it's all about bananas. Then of course that person is not going to be happy. They're going to hit the Back button and find another website. So things like that can have a really big impact on what your bounce rate is. Another contributing factor of having a high bounce rate can be a poor user experience once the person lands on your website. For example, if your website is not mobile optimized and someone on a mobile lands on your website, then they're not going to have a great experience. Looking at our bounce rate can give you a really good idea of exactly what pages you need to improve. Ideally, your most popular pages listed at the top should have the lowest bounce rates as they are the most popular pages on your website. As you can see, number one, the homepage has a bounce rate of 51 percent, the basket has a bounce rate of 32 percent, and then the Google redesign and apparel page has a bounce rate of 55 percent. We do have some really low bounce rate pages below as well. We have 21 percent right here for the Google sign-in page, and we've got a few more 30s toward the bottom of page one. Another great thing you can do to establish why some of these pages are the most popular on your website is actually look at the source and medium. Now what that allows you to do is to figure out where the traffic is actually coming from. When I say where I'm referring to the source is it from a paid ad campaign? Is it from SEO which would be organic? Is it from another website which would be classified as referral traffic? To see this data, all we need to do is go to secondary dimension here at the top. Then under Acquisition, you want to go ahead and click Source/Medium. Now we'll add another column to the data, and it will let you know exactly where the source of traffic is coming from. In this instance, the source traffic for the Google merchandise store says direct and none, using the word none is a little bit misleading from Google. A better word to use instead would actually be unknown as what it means is Google doesn't actually know where the traffic is coming from. Direct traffic is basically when someone goes over to the browser and directly types in the Google URL, it could also come from someone added a bookmark from their favorites as well and clicking on that bookmark to access your website. To give you a bit of more tangible data and show you exactly how this would typically look on a normal website. I'm going to go into one of my client accounts right here. This is the one of the clients we work with called Humax Direct. I'm exactly on the same screen for the site content for all of the pages. I'm going to go ahead and do exactly the same thing. Go into Acquisition. I'm going to go into Source/Medium. Google Analytics is then going to add a new column like you can see, like so. As you can see, we can see all the Source/Mediums for all of the most popular pages on the website. We can see that they have this page right here, which is selling one of the Android TV recorded products. The Source/Medium for this is cpc, which is basically paid ads, which is coming directly from Google, which indicates the bulk of the traffic coming into this page is all coming from Google ads. We had the second most popular page below, which is a free view page. The majority of the traffic coming into this page is all coming from Google organic. Organic refers to SEO, aka this page ranking highly in the Google organic search listings. The same applies to the next most popular pages followed, below. Then in number 8, you can see right here we have the source medium coming from humaxdigital.com, which is actually one of their sister websites. So long story short, what that means is they have another website that they own, and this website is generating them a lot of traffic to the main website. Hence why under source medium, it says referral, understanding what pages are the most popular on your website and where the traffic is coming from, along with how high or how low the bounce rate is, is going to give you tons and tons of information that you can make smarter business decisions based on. For example, if you find that one of your pages have a high bounce rate, you can then go into that page to address that problem. If you find that one of your pages isn't getting as much traffic as you would like. You can then allocate more marketing budget to increase the traffic of that specific page, understanding how to interpret this data is really going to help you take your business to the next level. I'll see you in the next one. 7. Learn Who Your Visitors Are - Demographic Reports: In this video, I'll show you how you can get insights out of your audience reports in Google Analytics. To access them, you need to go to ''Audience'' on the left-hand side. As a member, the audience reports allows us to learn more about our visitors. Then you want to go to "Demographics" and then go to "Overview". If you don't land on a page which looks like this, then you're most likely going to land on a page like this where you have this option to actually enable your demographics and interests reports, which is pretty straightforward to do, to simply go ahead and click "Enable". However, just be aware that if you do actually go ahead and collect this information from your visitors on your website, you may have to update your privacy policy to let your visitors know about it. However, I highly recommend you go ahead and do this as it is pretty common in today's world. Now, the success of any business really comes down to understanding who your target audience is. For example, if you're a men's grooming company selling men's products, you obviously want to make sure you're targeting men as they are the primary audience of your product. However, the agenda in itself isn't the most useful part of information, as the majority of your visitors and customers may be of a specific age range. Understanding what their age range is will give you the upper hand when it comes to launching future marketing campaigns. For example, let's imagine you want to run some Facebook ads or Twitter ads in the future. A part of the ad creation process is to tell both of those platforms, what gender and age range you would like to target with your ads. This is where demographic reports are literally your best friend. In this instance, for the official Google merchandise store, we can see that the majority of visitors are in the age range of 18-24 and 25-34 as those other biggest bars on the bar chart. We can also see that the majority of users on the site are men, which equates to 56.1 percent. Now, most people will see this data and automatically assume this is correct, which it is to an extent. However, one important thing which you need to do before you set it on any assumptions is to confirm you have a wide enough date range selected at the top. This is where a lot of beginners go wrong and draw business-wide decisions based on data only pulled from the last seven days, which is actually what this data is selected to at the moment. Whenever you're trying to pool big conclusions from your data, please do make sure you have a wide enough date range selected. In this instance, what I'm going to do is I'm going to change it from 2021, and I'll change that to 2017 and then hit "Apply". As you can see, men are still the primary gender on the website. However, the percentage has gone actually a little bit up. It's going up to 65.6 percent in regard to that age range. We can see the most popular age range by far is 25-34 at 41 percent, and we have 18-24 at 24 percent. Literally, this age range at 25-34 is literally double the previous range where if you remember the data we had before on the last seven days, it was a lot more closer than that. Before, we had the 25-34 at 34 percent, and we had 18-24 at 26 percent, which is only a difference of eight percent. However, when we're viewing the data on a wider scope, we can see that this age range is literally the most popular by far. Now in some businesses, when you change the date range, it's going to show you completely different data. It's always good practice to make sure you do double-check just to be on the safe side. We know that the majority of the traffic on our website is coming from men, and we know that the most popular age range is 25-34. However, what we also want to do is look at their age range by gender, just to make sure 100 percent that we are targeting the right people. To do that, all we need to do is go to "Gender" on the left-hand side, and then go to "Males" as we know male, it's the most popular gender for our website. As we can see, the most popular age range is indeed 25-34. Again, this is just based on the last seven days. I'm going to do is just update one more time as I reverted that back, click "Apply". If you scroll down once again, you can still see that 25 to 34 is the most popular age range for men as well on the website. Now, you might be thinking, great, I know exactly who I should target. I should be targeting men in the age range of 25-34. However, when you actually drill down into these reports, especially if you own an e-commerce website, and you have e-commerce tracking set up, you'll be able to see exactly how much revenue or these age ranges have generated for you. For 25-34, we can see that this age range has generated $1.2 million of revenue for the business. However, if you look down below, we have an age range of 35-44, that's also generated over a million dollars in sales. However, this age range only equates to 20 percent of the users on the website. Let me just clarify exactly what that means. One thousand dollars of revenue has been generated from just 21 percent of the traffic on the website, $1.2 million has been generated from 40 percent of the traffic on the website. Although this is the most popular age range on the website, this age range is actually more profitable for the business to target. You can see how when you start to drill down to the data, you can pull out tons of marketing data that you can use the action upon to really grow your business going forward. One thing I'll just like to clarify before we end the video is that demographic reports aren't just useful for those who are willing to run Google Ads or any type of paid advertisement. They are also useful for those in general, as it would helped me put our better messaging and content on your website that your audience would typically like to see. That brings us to end on this one, and I'll see you in the next video. 8. How To Find Out What Sources & Channels Send You The Highest Quality Traffic: Welcome back. In this one, I'll be showing you how you can figure out what sources send you the highest quality traffic, and I'll also be showing you how you can see what marketing channel is producing you the best results. Both of these are crucial to know as if you are looking to grow your business, once you discover what these sources and channels are, you can then allocate your marketing spend in those specific areas. Knowing that, these sources and channels are going to generate you the best ROI for your money. To find the highest quality source of traffic, what you want to do is go into Acquisition. As remember, acquisition shows us a report of how we actually acquire those visitors. Go into Acquisition, and then go to All Traffic, and then go to Source/Medium. I had the data range selected as the last 30 days, and if we scroll down on this page, you can see we've got tons of different sources and different mediums. To clarify it, the source is a place where users are, before they see your content, and the medium describes how uses arrived at your content. For the first example, we can see that the users were on Google, and they found our content by carrying out an organic search, as organic is the medium. For the second example, we can see that uses were on Google once again. However, they found our website this time through a CPC, which stands for cost-per-click, which relates to a paid ad. The one below that, we can see the user was on humaxdigital.com, and the medium was actually a referral. Users were referred from this website over to our content. That's essentially how you read the source and medium in the first column. As you can see, the biggest source of traffic in the last 30 days for this specific website has all come from Google organic searches. Which is actually really nice to know as this is one of the clients we work with and we do all their SEO for them. So knowing that the majority of the traffic is coming from organic searches, which, of course, relates to SEO, is really reassuring to know. We can see that from Google organic searches, this actually resulted in 39 percent of all the traffic to the website in the last 30 days. The second most popular channel is actually the paid advertisements they are run in, followed by this other website below humaxdigital in position 3. Now this is primarily based on amount of users that these sources are sending to the site every single month. However, as we want to find out the highest quality of traffic and not just what produces the most traffic, it's more useful to look at the columns on the behavior here in the middle of the screen. Under behavior, we can see the bounce rate, the pages per session, and the average session duration. We can see that for Google organic, the bounce rate is 53 percent, the pages per session is 2.62, and the average person spends roughly two minutes and 38 seconds on the website. If we compare that to people coming on the website through paid advertisement, which is Google CPC, we can see the bounce rate is a little bit higher, at 66 percent. The pages per session is just 2.06. On average, people view more pages when they come through organic searches, in comparison to paid advertisements. We can also see that the average session duration is only one minute and 44 seconds, which is almost one whole minute shorter than those who are coming in to our website through organic searches, as organic searches is two minutes and 38 seconds. We can also see how many of those users actually converted and actually bought one of our products, which should be listed as a transaction if you own an e-commerce website. We can also see how much revenue has been generated by that specific source and medium. Essentially, what this data is telling us is that the majority of people coming to our website, are coming through Google organic searches, the people that come through Google organic searches, they bounce a lot less on our website, the user typically visit more pages per sessions, they spend longer on our websites, and they actually spend more money on our websites as well, all in comparison to paid advertisements. Hopefully you can see just how powerful this data actually is, as once you actually go into your acquisition reports, you can really understand exactly what sources are driving the most revenue for your specific business. If you'd like to see a more wider view of exactly all of these sources and mediums, as you can see it, number 1 is Google organic. We also have number 5 which is Bing organic. So these are both organic users. One type has just come from Google and other type has come from Bing. If you'd like to categorize organic all into one channel, so you can really see what type of channel is driving all the results, then what you need to do is go to Channels and the traffic at the top, and then Google Analytics will categorize all of this traffic, based on what channel it came from. As we can see, that once again, the number 1 driver of traffic to this website, is coming from organic searches. Followed by number 2, which is paid searches. We can also see all of the details as well, such as the bounce rate, pages per session, the average session duration, and the revenue for these channels on the whole as well. Once again, it's the same story, organic search is number 1. Organic search is typically going to be king when you are running any marketing campaign, as people who land on your website organically, haven't really been forced to do so, where if you're showing an ad in front of that user, then essentially you're paying to be in front of that user. A lot of people are aware of this, which is why they won't actually click ads in the first place. But nevertheless, it's always good to come into your analytics, and see exactly what the data shows, as I have seen, loads and loads of Google Analytics accounts that have actually better numbers for the paid advertisements than organic searches. Which just goes to show if you do set up a Google ad campaign really well, then it's not going to have that much of an impact in regard to how much people convert and buy your products. Now you know how to pull insights out of your acquisition reports. It's over to you to go into your acquisition reports, so you can start to pull out some actionable data that you can use to grow your business further. I'll see you in the next one. 9. Behavior Reports - Learn How To Keep People on Your Site Longer: In this video, you are going to learn how you can use behavior reports to keep people on your website longer. You can also use these reports to figure out what some of the best and worst performing pages on your website are. You can learn from these pages to further optimize your website for the ultimate user experience. To access these reports, you need to go to Behavior on the left-hand side, then under Site Content, you want to go to Landing Pages. Now, a landing page is the pages which the users enter your website. We really want to make sure that our top landing pages are optimized so that the user is pushed further through our website and ideally on a journey to take some form of action which could be buying one of your products or submitting a form of submission to inquire about one of your services. One of the best metrics you can use to assess the performance of your landing pages is going to be the bounce rate under the behavior section on the grid. The reason why we want to use bounce rate is because the bounce rate is a really good indication if people are liking the content they are seeing. If the bounce rate is high, then it's a very clear indication that people aren't impressed with what they're viewing. If the bounce rate is low, then it's a very strong indication that people do indeed like what they are seeing. However, instead of just reviewing the bounce rate on the whole, what's actually really useful to do is to compare the bounce rate of the specific landing page in comparison to the average bounce rate of the whole entire website. To do that, what you need to do is click this Comparison icon right here on the right-hand side. Then what you want to do is change it from sessions to bounce rate like so. As we can see, the average bounce rate for the entire site is 47.48 percent. We can now see all the bounce rates of all our individual landing pages and any pages in particular that have a higher bounce rate, such as this one 56 percent. This is a very clear indication that this page needs to be analyzed by us to see exactly why this bounce rate is higher than the average. This is a really good way to quickly pinpoint exactly what pages could be causing issues. For example, this page right here is the Google redesign apparel Google Dino Game Tee. If you actually click this icon right here, it would actually open up in a new tab. We can actually see this page is currently unavailable, which could be the reason why this page has a higher bounce rate than other pages on our website. You can see it can be very useful to also find additional issues on your website too. Of course, you will need to carry out a little bit more further investigation just to figure out exactly why some pages have higher bounce rates. For example, it's very likely that your order confirmation page will have a very high bounce rate. As of course, once someone has completed a order, they're going to bounce off your website as they've completed the goal. If you would like to see how your website is doing on the whole and not just your landing pages, then what you need to do is go to all pages on the site content on the left-hand side and what Google Analytics will do, it will show you the same report, but literally for every single page on your website. Once again, a great way to assess the performance of all of these pages is to look at the comparison tool. But this time, what we want to look at is the average time on the page. Let's go to the comparison tool once again and we'll change it from page views to average time on page. The reason why we want to look at average time on page here, it is we can see exactly where our users are spending the bulk of their time. For example, if we look at number 1, which is the homepage for the Google merchandise store, we can see that people are spending 74 percent longer on this specific page. Now we know this, we can then be prompted to check our homepage and understand exactly why people are taking longer on this page than other pages on our website. Now this could be a good or a bad thing. It could be a case that our homepage is got really well and people are taking their time browsing all the content on the homepage. However, if this was maybe our checkout basket and it was 74 percent higher, then that could be a really good indication that our checkout process is a little bit too clunky and people are taking too long to go for the checkout process. Which of course, if it was, you'd want to go ahead and resolve that issue. However, we can actually see the basket URL for the Google merchandise store is doing really well in regards to average time on page. So nothing for Google to worry about their whatsoever. On the flip side, let's imagine you didn't own an e-commerce website. Maybe you own a service-based business website or a blog. You can then come into the Site Content under All Pages, have a look at all the blog posts on your site, see which blog posts are performing the best, and then use that as a guide to further optimize the blog posts which aren't performing as well. Of course, all based on the average time users spend on the page. Another great behavior report to check out is the exit page reports, which you can find right here at the bottom under site content. The exit page report will show you why users are leaving your website. Which of course we want the opposite. We don't want our users to leave our website. We want them to stay on our side as long as possible until they complete some form of action, which could be buy one of our products or submitting a form submission. When we come across pages, we have a high percentage exit rate. What we want to do is further optimize those pages to result in a better user experience. We can use the same site comparison tool up here on the right. But this time instead of exits, what we want to do is go for percentage of exits. This will show us the exit percentage rate in comparison to the site average, which is 20.59 percent. We can see the homepage has an exit percentage rate or 108 percent, which is a lot higher than the site average. This could once again be another clear indication that our homepage is probably a little bit too confusing. It may have too many products on which as a result, people are just getting confused and they're hitting the ''Back'' button and leaving our website. You can use the same strategy and methodology once again here on your exit pages to figure out exactly what you should change on these pages to keep people on your website longer. Which of course, you want to review the pages which had the lowest exit percentages as those that are ones where people are not leaving your website. As you can see, the behavior reports in Google Analytics, they literally give you tons of information and tons of insights as to how users are interacting with your website, which you can then use to further improve that user experience. 10. Real Time Reports - How To Measure Marketing Performances Live : In this video, you are going to learn how you can use real-time reports to monitor and review activity on your website as it happens in real-time. To access your real-time reports, you need to go to your real-time on the left-hand side, then we have a few different options, we have overview locations, traffic sources, content, and events. I typically find overview to be more than enough information as it literally gives you an overview of all of the real-time information. The first thing we can see is amount of users who are on our website right now. We can also see what devices those people are using to access our website. If they're on a mobile device or if they're on a desktop device. We can see how they are coming to our website if they come in from a referral, so that could be a number website linking into our website which is how they are accessing our content. We can also see what social platforms they are coming from. If they are coming from maybe Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram for example. We can also see what keywords people have typed into Google to access our website if that data is available, now it's not always going to be available. Sometimes you might see some keywords listed here, and sometimes you may not. On the right-hand side, we can see a breakdown of the page views per minute. Now this will give you an overview of your website for the last 30 minutes. We can see that 17 minutes ago or let's say 60 minutes ago on the website, this website had 62 pay views. Fifteen minutes ago, it had 11 page views. You can really start to see how things fluctuate over time. You can get even more precise breakdown by the second. However, I find that to be a little bit overwhelming as you don't really need to know how many people are in your website literally every second unless you're operating let's say a massive website and you really want to drill down into the data. We can also see the top current active pages on your website. It will also give you a breakdown of how many users are on each of these pages as well and actually really interesting to see that you can also see the location of the people who are using our website. This can be really useful to know as well. You may be wondering, okay, when would I actually use this information? You could use your real-time reports for two main scenarios. The first scenario could be when you want to monitor new or change content on your website. Maybe just sent out an email to all of the people on your email list, and in that email, you are linking them to your latest new blog posts. If you'd like to see how that email is performing in real-time, then real-time report is going to be a great solution. The second reason when you'd want to use real-time reports is going to be on big so days such as Black Friday, if you want to monitor in real-time exactly how your website is performing, how many visitors are coming in, what are your top active pages on such a big day as Black Friday, then once again, real-time reports can be really, really useful. Now one thing which I just wanted to clarify is that the majority of the time, or 99.9 percent of the time when you're using Google Analytics, you're going to be reviewing and analyzing data from the past, aka historical data. As historical data is going to be the best guide you can use to make long-term decisions for your business. However, real-time reports can be a little bit useful as I just said, in the two case scenarios. However, me personally, I don't tend to use real-time reports primarily because I don't own an e-commerce website and as a result, I don't really have any big so days which I want to monitor my website for. However, if that is you, then I highly recommend you log into your Google Analytics account and check out your real-time reports to see exactly how it's performing. For example, you may have sent out an email marketing list to only a group of subscribers who are based in a specific country, if you wanted to monitor how many of those people in those countries will access your email, straight away and went on to your website, then you can simply go into locations and what that will do, it will give you a breakdown of the visitors by location, which of course, the location you offer the email discount too should be the highest amount of users. But that is it for this one. I hope you found it useful and I'll see you in the next video. 11. How to Segment Your Data To Discover Unique Insights: In this video, I'm going to show you how you can segment your data to discover unique insights. Segmenting your data will allow you to take your analysis to a whole new level as it allows you to take a subset of data and compare it to the total data set. Now, you might be wondering, okay, that sounds great, but when would I actually use this in the real world? Let's imagine you own an international business and you sell products in multiple countries. If you wanted to figure out what value a specific audience in a specific country is bringing to your business, then segmenting your data will allow you to figure this out. For example, let's imagine you want to figure out the age and the gender of people in a specific country. If you go to the Audience and then go to Demographics and Overview, the data you're seeing here is based on all of your users and not users in a specific region. Let's imagine, I want to figure out the age and the gender of all my users who are coming from Spain. I will simply go to Add Segment right here, click the button, I'll then go to New Segment here on the left-hand side. As you can see from the summary report, currently it is including 100 percent of the users on this website, primarily because I haven't specified who I would like to target. You can see I can break it down by range, I can go for gender. However, in an example of this video, as I want to find people who are based in Spain what I'm going to do is I'm going to go to Location here at the bottom. I'm going to change that from Continent and I'll go to Country and what I'll do is I'll type in the word Spain, which is the country I would like to figure out. Notice how the chart on the right-hand side is going to update as soon as I select Spain. Now you can see it's gone from about 100 percent to 3.75 percent, which basically tells me Spanish people equates to 3.75 percent of all of the traffic on my website. You can add other variables as well if you'd like, such as language in market segments but for the purpose of this video, this is more than sufficient as I just want to show you exactly how you can segment your data. Once you're happy with all of your selections, simply go ahead and name your segment. I'll simply go ahead and call this Spanish Users and then click "Save." As you can see, Google Analytics has now added a whole another column on the right-hand side, which is going to include my new segment which I just created. Now if you scroll down, we can start to see some differences between the data. Let's imagine you wanted to set up a marketing campaign for the people in Spain and you wanted to target the two most common age groups. If you just look at the data from all of your users, you would assume the two most common age groups for your visitors are 25-34, followed by 18-24. However, if we look at the data subset for Spain, you can see that the two most popular age groups is indeed number 1, 25-34. However, number 2 is in 18-24 as it is for all the users. Number 2 for our Spanish users is actually 45-54, which equates to 23.29 percent of visitors, which as you can tell, is quite a big difference as the same age range for all of our users only equates to 12.45 percent of users. This is why segmenting your data can be really useful, especially if you're running international campaigns. We can also scroll down and get insight into the gender as well. The gender split for all of our users, male currently comes out at 55.7 percent. However, if we compare that to our Spanish users, you can see that male users only equate to 38.5 percent. In this instance, the majority of users on our website from Spain are actually females, which once again, is completely different to what all of our user data shows. Now the great thing about these segments is that once you set them up, you can actually follow through the other reports in your Google Analytics account such as acquisition, maybe your overview report there and all the data will actually follow through into that report too, so you can once again analyze your data sets and spot any differences. For example, we can see that our bounce rate for Spanish users for direct searches is a little bit higher than it is for all users on the whole which is quite interesting to see. We can also see that there hasn't been any conversions coming from any type of traffic whether it's direct pay display or affiliates for any of our Spanish search, which is another really good insight to learn about your business. What's really cool about segmenting your data you can actually go ahead and add more segments. You could compare all your users to your Spanish users, to maybe your British users to your French, German, and so on and so on, to really figure out what markets in particular are the ones who are generating you the revenue. You can very easily edit your segment as well just by clicking up here and then go in into Edit. Then if you wish, you can add any data ranges, specify it by gender, whatever suits your business requirements. When you're finished analyzing all the data and you like to simply delete the segment you created it's exactly the same process go up to the segment, Click the arrow, and then click "Remove." What I will do is remove that segment from your data. It's really that straightforward. Segmenting your data is a skill that so many people overlook. You'll actually be surprised at how many people out there call himself Google Analytics experts, but they don't even know how to segment their data. Now you know how to do it. It's over to you. Go into your Google Analytics account, or the Google demo account start to play around with segments and really start to learn more about your audience. That's it for this one and I'll see you in the next one. 12. 3 Features That Will Take Your Data Analysis To The Next Level : Welcome back. In this last training video, we are going to be taking a look at free features inside Google Analytics, which is going to help you take your data analysis to the next level. I'll also be giving you some real-world case scenarios of where you could actually use these features so you know exactly how you can apply them to your specific business. Let's get started. The first feature which I would like to show you is a comparison tool. To access the comparison tool, you can let you go into any reports on the left-hand side. I'll go to Audience and Overview just for the purpose of this training video. Now, let's imagine you are reviewing your data and you want to figure out how well your website is performing this year in comparison to last year for the same date. Maybe you've hired an SEO company and you'd like to see exactly how your website is performing now, in comparison to how it was before you hired that SEO company. Most people would go over to the Date Range and select the date range I would like to review, so maybe it's the last 30 days. They then look at all the data and try and remember exactly how the website is performing and then they simply go ahead and change the date to the previous year. Let's go for 2020 like so, then hit "Apply" again, and then look at the new data like so and try and spot any differences to figure out exactly how the website is performing now in comparison to a historical date range. Now, whilst that does actually work and you can do it this way, it isn't the most efficient way to do it. Let me show you why. Because you can actually compare a date range to another date range all within one report. If I go back to my previous example of looking at the last 30 days and then hit an "Apply", now if I want to compare this to last year for the same date range, all I need to do is go to Compare To, this little box right here that so many people seem to miss, and all I want to do is proceed at the same month, which is going to be April 14th and I'll go for 2020, and I'll go for the same that we have selected May 13th, but I'll change it from 2021 and I'll change to 2020 as well. If I go ahead and hit "Apply", and you can see that Google Analytics has overlaid all the data for the previous reporting period. We can get an overview of exactly how things are going by looking at these boxes right here. We can see that our users this year are up 25.48 percent. We can also see how many users we got this year in comparison to the previous year, so 60,000 in this year and 48,000 last year, so 25.48 percent increase. You can see how many new users will get in, so number 22.19 percent. We've got another 20.5 percent sessions this year, which is great. The number of sessions per user has gone down almost four percent. Our pageviews have gone up 30 percent. Our pages per session have gone up eight percent, so essentially what that means is more people this year are viewing more pages than they were last year. We can see the average session duration as well has gone up four percent, so this year the average person is spending two minutes and 56 seconds on our website, where last year they were only spending two minutes and 49 seconds, which is a seven second increase in how long the average person is spending on our website. Our bounce rate has gone up almost nine percent, this is actually a negative impact on our website. We don't want our bounce rate to be increasing, we want it to be decreasing. There's no reason why you'd want more people bouncing off your website this year than they did last year. When you see increases in your bounce rate, is definitely time for you to review and figure out exactly why more people are bouncing off your website this year in comparison to the previous reports in period. Now the great thing about this compared to which I've just showed you is that this follow through to all the other reports as well. For example, if I go into Acquisition and then go to Overview Report for Acquisition, Google Analytics will also give you a comparison of your users for this year in comparison to last year and it'll break it down by your Acquisition source as well. For example, we can see that our direct searches are a lot higher this year than they were at the previous year, we're actually up 44.9 percent, so almost 45 percent, which is good to see. We can see that organic traffic has actually gone down 100 percent. This is a very good indication that maybe the Google Official Merchandise Store had some SEO done on it last year, but nothing's been done this year, so as a result, they've lost all that organic traffic. It's really good to actually come into the data and see exactly how things are going over time. Do not underestimate how powerful this comparison tool is, it allows you to see tonnes of actionable insights as I've just showed you in this video. The second feature which I want to show you refers to the filtering on your actual reports. If I go back to our Audience Overview Report, I'm simply going to tick this box again like so, and then click "Apply", and as you can see by default, Google Analytics shows you your users at the top. However, what if you want to see the bounce rate of your website in the same format of this line chart. Well, a lot of people don't actually know, but you can actually change what you see above the fold right here by simply going into this drop down menu right here and change it from users to whatever date you'd like to review. You can check bounce rate, new users, pages per session, pageviews and so on, which will give you a really good insight to you once again how your website is performing in all different aspects. For example, if I go to the Bounce Rate, you can see the bounce rate is pretty much stable, it doesn't seem to be dropping that much whatsoever. However, let's imagine that this date right here was a really big dip and it was somewhere down here. This report would allow you to see that so you can see exactly how your bounce rate is performing over time too. Sometimes it can be a little bit misleading just to review the number at the bottom, bounce rate 53 percent and of course you do have a little line graph right here, but it's not as detailed as you can see above the fold. The third and final feature, which I would like to show you is going to be how you can add annotations onto these reports. Annotations can be very useful so you can figure out exactly what is the core reason behind any increase or massive decrease in your data. If I go back to Users and put this back to defaults, like so. Now if I see any massive increase or decrease in the amount of users on my website, what I can actually do is put a note on that specific date so I know when I go back in the part and view my data exactly what is the reason why the traffic was so large, also low on this day. Let's imagine this figure right here on Saturday May 1st, 2021 was at really low and we had about 10 users. What actually I should do is select this day so it highlights like so, and then click this drop-down menu below, and then click Create New Annotation on the right-hand side. For some reason it's changed the May 13th, so make sure you do double-check that. I'll go back to May 1st, which is the date I'm going to use it for this video. Then what you can do is simply enter in a note. You can say something such as maybe your site got hacked and it was down for 18 hours. If you do end up reviewing this data maybe five years from now, you know exactly why that date was so low for your traffic and of course, if you are working at a company and you move onto a new role at another company, the person who is filling your position will be up to scratch and know exactly what happened on that specific date. Once you're happy with all the notes you've added, simply go ahead and click Save, and on that note is added to that specific day. You can see we've got a little no signal right here so they are very easy to see indeed. I hope you found that video useful. Those are my free Google Analytics features which are going to help you take your data analysis to the next level. Thanks for watching, and I'll see you in the next one. 13. Conclusion + What next?: Hello. Now Google Analytics Experts, well, I certainly hope this isn't a goodbye forever, and it's just a goodbye for now. I thank you so much for making it to the end of the course with me, and really taking your time to understand how to pull valuable key insights out of that Analytics account and use them to better improve your website's performance. The majority of businesses that are successful in this digital age, are all using Google Analytics so they can better understand the audiences and thus create better marketing campaigns going forward. The more you know about your audience and how they interact with your website, the better is for your business. The power is truly in the data. If you'd like to learn more about Google Analytics and take a knowledge up to the next level, then I highly recommend you check out my other class on advanced Google Analytics, which is essentially the next step up from this one, and we'll cover more advanced strategies such as how to set up custom dashboards. I'll go over Google's new machine learning feature, good analytics intelligence. I'll cover everything you need to know about goals and how to set them up. We'll also be taking a look at e-commerce tracking, event tracking, campaign tagging, you name it, it's all covered in the next clause. However, I really hope you found that this class valuable. Please be sure to leave me a review and share your feedback. It would mean the world to me if you could leave me a review. Once again. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. I hope you loved it. I had a great time making this class, and hopefully I'll be seeing you in another one. Goodbye for now.