Getting Started with Todoist | Dan LeFebvre | Skillshare

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Getting Started with Todoist

teacher avatar Dan LeFebvre

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

23 Lessons (2h 23m)
    • 1. Class introduction

      1:09
    • 2. Getting familiar with Todoist's interface

      7:59
    • 3. Adding projects and tasks

      5:35
    • 4. Overview of the task screen

      5:58
    • 5. Working with projects and sub-projects

      6:57
    • 6. Using smart date recognition

      6:54
    • 7. Understanding list and board views

      6:23
    • 8. All about karma in Todoist

      9:19
    • 9. Options for customizing Todoist

      5:57
    • 10. Sharing projects with others

      6:14
    • 11. Adding attachments to tasks

      3:20
    • 12. Organizing tasks with labels

      4:17
    • 13. Working with filters

      9:59
    • 14. Saving time with project templates

      6:06
    • 15. Emailing tasks to Todoist

      6:16
    • 16. Syncing Todoist with Google Calendar

      4:45
    • 17. Stop forgetting things by using reminders

      7:05
    • 18. Overview of the mobile app

      6:02
    • 19. Steal ideas from how I use Todoist

      14:40
    • 20. Filter recipes introduction

      0:59
    • 21. Filter recipes: Everything due at work today

      7:27
    • 22. Filter recipes: Everything due outside of work today

      5:43
    • 23. Filter recipes: Someday/maybe

      3:49
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About This Class

You can be more productive right now. Learn how by taking full advantage of the popular task management tool Todoist. Millions of people around the world use Todoist every day to help them get stuff done. Now you can, too!

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Dan LeFebvre

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Transcripts

1. Class introduction: Hello and welcome to this overview of to-do-list. My name is Daniel AFib and I've been using to do is pretty much since they started the company back in 2007. To-do list is one of the most popular task management tools out there. And it's used by millions of people around the world to help them keep track of the tasks and projects they need to get done. We'll start our dive into to-do list today by getting familiar with its interface. And once we know how things are organized within the application itself, we'll learn how we can start working with projects, tasks, sub-projects, subtasks, hierarchies, boards, lists, sections, reoccurring tasks, and so much more. I'm a huge believer that productivity is something you need to be willing to invest a bit of time upfront for it to work. You can't magically be productive. But if you take the time to understand how to do it works, then you'll be one step closer to harnessing its power to help you be productive each and every day. So when you're ready, I'll see you in the next video where we'll get familiar with to-do list interface. 2. Getting familiar with Todoist's interface: In this video, we'll take a few minutes to understand how to do this. Interface is laid out. Now before we dive into the interface itself, it is worth mentioning which version of to-do list will be using and which interface we'll be looking at. So for most of this course today we will be using the free version of to-do list on the web. One of the big benefits to using to-do list as your task management tool is it is available just about anywhere. There are desktop apps. There are plugins for things like Outlook and Gmail. And of course there are mobile apps as well. And while the interface for most of these are going to be slightly different, you think of the interface for something on your phone is going to be different than something in the browser. Of course, what I'm really impressed with the way that the team behind to-do list has done a great job to make them have a very consistent field. So all the features that we're going to be learning about in the web app today are going to be available in those other apps. Now, even though we will be using the free version for most of this course, I will try to point out some of the pro features as we come across them so you can see where some of the limitations of their free account is. The end of this course. I'll happened to my pro account. So we can see some of those pro features in action. So then you can decide if upgrading your subscription will be worth it for you. Okay, So with that said, let's hop into the free version of to-do us interface on the web. So let's start at the left side navigation menu over here, up at the top. And these three items here, the Inbox today and upcoming, our what to do list calls the default views. So the inbox, we can think of this just like our e-mail inbox. So when we create a task and to-do list, we have the ability to tell to-do list what project we want that task to live in. If we do not tell to do a specific task, then the default or I'm sorry, a specific project for that task to live in. The default project is going to be the inbox. So think of it like the email inbox where all of your email comes in to the inbox. And then from there you can organize it into your folders in your email application. Similar concept here, where you can have your tasks come into the inbox and then organize it from there. Okay, and we'll look at that later on in this course. Just know that that's what the purpose of the inbox is. Now we have our Today view or our home view, which what this is is all of the tasks that have a due date of today, whatever today is. Then you will see it in the today view. And then we have our upcoming view. And I really like the upcoming view because what this shows us is not only what is due today, but what's on the horizon, what are the tasks that are upcoming? So if we had a tax that was due tomorrow, we can see that here as well, or the next day or the next day. I could find a very specific date and jump to that in order to see those. Or of course, you know, hop back to its day. Just a nice way of being able to see the tasks that are not only do today, but what are the tasks that are upcoming and on the horizon that are due? And then beneath our default views inside of us, we have our projects so we can open and close our projects to show or hide those. We have our labels here, and then we have our filters. So we'll notice that there are some filters already created here. These are created by default when you create a new to-do list account. So you want to create a count. You should see some filters already in here. And we'll look at how to create our own custom filters later on in this course as well, as well as looking at labels and projects, of course. But just know that this is where they are located inside of to-do list. Now the navigation menu itself, there are a few things we can do with that. If we want to say we have a filter or we have a project or something that is too long and we can't see all of it over here. If we come right here on the edge, you'll notice the cursor changes and we can left-click and drag in order to resize our navigation menu. Or if we're working, say we're working in this view here and we don't want to see the navigation menu at all. We can completely collapsed in menu. Up here at the very top left we have the hamburger button, which is going to close the menu. So if I click on that, you can see it's going to close or open the menu. Now you'll notice the tooltip here tells us that m for menu is the keyboard shortcut. So at anytime as we're working in here, if I just tap M on the keyboard, it's going to open or close the menu. Now, keyboard shortcuts are really, really helpful inside of to-do list. And as we go through, I'm going to try to point out so the keyboard shortcuts, but I'd highly encourage you to start to get used to using some of these shortcuts because it's going to speed up your workflow inside a to-do list itself. Another keyboard shortcut that is super handy is this one right here, which is going to take us to the home view. So you can see the keyboard shortcut is h. If I were to click on this, you can see it's going to take us to the Today View, which is the home view. So kind of the default of the default to use if you were and if we're viewing anything else at anytime we can hit H on the keyboard, and that's going to take us back to our home view here. So same as clicking on the button up here. We have our search. So search is just like you would expect you to come in here and type out whatever you want in order to search for a specific task, search for the name of the task, whatever that might be. You can find it in here. Now if I hover over this, you'll notice the keyboard shortcut for this is F. So think of this as fine, right? So you're looking at, you're going to find something. So even though it is searched, the keyboard shortcut is F for finding. So at anytime for working over here, hit F on the keyboard, and that's going to pop open the search box. Over here at the right-hand side. We have the ability to add a task. So the keyboard shortcut for this is Q for Quick Add. So click on this. It's going to allow us to just add a task to very quickly or Tab key on the keyboard. And that's going to pop open our Quick Add dialog box here. And we have our karma. So karma is something we'll look at the concept of later on. Just know this is where karma is located here and we have help. So the key thing I wanna point out here, of course, there's some great documentation that the team behind to do is just put together if you ever get stuck to go in there. But the key thing I want to point out here are these keyboard shortcuts. So if we open up this little dialogue box, we can see some of the keyboard shortcuts, so we've already looked at in this video. So Q, in order to add a task, right, we have our search, which is F, Or you can see it's slash. Either one of those will open up our search box or we have the ability to show or hide the navigation M for menu or H in order to go to our home view. So some of these keyboard shortcuts we've already looked at what I'd encourage you to go through and just start getting familiar with some of these shortcuts and start using them in your day-to-day. As you're adding and removing are being productive inside of to do is while you're working inside of to do is from day to day. Next to the help we have our notifications. So if somebody were to, as you're in a shared project and somebody were to assign a task to you. We'll look at notifications later on in this course as well, but that will show up here. And then we have, are just kinda the default would, you would expect your ability to change your profile, so change your password, change your account information, things like that over here. Okay, so that is an overview of to-do lists interface. And as I mentioned, we will be looking at these features more in-depth throughout the rest of this course. Speaking of which, let's continue on in our next video where we will look at adding projects and tasks. 3. Adding projects and tasks: In this video, we'll learn how to add projects and tasks into duets. So let's kick this off by creating a new project. To do that, we come over to our navigation menu and with projects, click on the plus here. And that will allow us to create a new project. So let's give this the name of podcasts here we're going to add some tasks based on a project and a little bit more of a real-world example here. Now, the color, this is just for display purposes, what color we're going to see over here. So this is purely my own preference, but I like to have things a little bit color coordinated based on what the project is. So say we want blue for this. So any project, any subproject or anything that we have that's going to be podcasts related will be blue, right? And so I say if we have something that is work-related in another way, that would be yellow or personal ones would be charcoal or however we want to do that. That's just a little visual thing that I like to do here in to-do list. Now, we'll look at favorites. We'll look at these different views later on in this course. But for now, let's go ahead and add our project. We can see that here. We can see it gets cut off. So maybe we want to resize our menu in order to see the entire title of our project here. Alright, so now that we have our project, let's add in some tasks. And I mentioned we'll add in some, some real tasks that actually have to do for my podcast. So we can come in here and add a task. So let's say come up with five episode ideas. Now, the first thing you'll notice here is the project is already chosen. And the reason for that is because we are already inside of this project. So any project that we're inside of to list will automatically attach the task to that project. Really, really handy way of quickly adding tasks. Now another really quick way of adding tasks is if I were to just hit Enter on the keyboard, you'll notice not only is the task created, but to do as already has started the process of adding another task. So I can just come in here and it's really handy. I don't have to take my hand off the keyboard in order to click any buttons or anything. I can just start typing in another task. There we go, Hit Enter and just start typing in another task. And ago. And then at anytime we can hit cancel in order to cancel out of the task creation process. Now, once we have a few tasks at it in, inside of to-do is one thing that's cool about the default view for projects. The list view for projects is we can organize them into a hierarchy. So let's come in here. I'm going to add another couple of tasks you to show this. So let's say we have our podcasts, production and marketing. Okay? Now what we can do is we can say, you know what this task to write email newsletters is, that would be a marketing task. I'm going to take this. You can see the little icon changes with the cursor changes and then drag it down. Notice the gray area. If I were to shift this in, you'll notice it gets indented. So now when I let go of my left mouse button, you'll see now this becomes a sub-task of this one here. So we can start to organize this into hierarchies, make it really, really nicely organized for our productivity. And then these other ones we can put under podcasts, production can see the same process. Drag it in, Same with this one here. Move the task, drag it underneath. And now we have a task with sub-tasks. So you can see this little indicator here showing that we have two sub-tasks, right? So 0 of the two are completed is what this is showing us. And if we were to click on the task itself, we can see those two sub-tasks. And then from here we can just add in our subtasks to directly. So let's say we wanted to say That's part of this process here, right? And then we've wanted to add subtasks underneath that, we can actually organize our tasks using up to four levels of hierarchy for levels of subtasks if we want. So we could click on this. You can see now we have this task is a sub-task of the podcast production, and this subtask can then have a sub-tasks, right? So maybe we have our edits this into Episode 1 for arrows, do a QA process. If I could type properly, go start to add those in so you can see how quickly we can start to add in our tasks are subtasks. And then if we come back close out of this here, we can see the hierarchy and how this works, right? So we have our podcasts production, and then we have a sub-task of the podcast production that is recording the episode. And then we have subtasks of that sub-task. And again, as I mentioned, we can have up to four levels of sub-tasks in side of to-do list. Now I know we looked at this screen here and I didn't really explain too much about this. So before we get too much further, let's actually pause here. Let's take a moment and get familiar with this task dialogue. And we'll do that in our next video. 4. Overview of the task screen: In this video, we'll get familiar with the task screen into doing. So, anytime we click on a task and to-do us will be taken to the task screen. We can see here where we have a lot of different things that we can do with this particular task. As I mentioned earlier in this course, though, it's not quite everything that we can do in here is available on a free account. Now in our last video, we looked at how we can add subtasks, how we can build that hierarchy with sub-task, and how we can even add in a subtask here directly in the task screen. The next tab that we have next two sub-tasks are our comments. So comments are pretty straightforward. Just ability to add a comment to this task, something we want to remember later on, um, for, you know, adding whatever sort of comment that we want, add that comment and then it's going to be added in here. Of course, we can come in, we can edit this if we want to. We can delete it, or we could add a reaction to it. The reactions, of course, are going to be more helpful if we're working with a shared project where there's more than just one person on that project. Next to the comments, we have our activity log. So the activity log is pretty much going to be a history of what's happened on this task. Who made those changes? When we can see a comment has been added to this task and it shows up here in the activity log. Quite honestly, my experience is pretty rare when I'll come into the activity log here for a project or a task that I'm working on on my own. But if I'm working in a shared project where there's tasks being assigned to different people and a lot of people adding different things. It can be helpful to see what changes other people are making. You know, when a task is assigned to somebody else, who assigned it there and so on. So the activity log is, is helpful in those cases. Now, up above we have these few different icons here. So let's go through these real quickly just to get a better idea what they are. This first one here allows us to move this task to a different project. If we click on this and then let's say we wanted to move this to the inbox. You'll notice up here at the top, the project has changed. So now this task is no longer inside of the based on a true story podcast project. Now it's inside of the inbox, right? And at any time, if we wanted to change this and come back, select the project. Now, it is back inside of the base on a true story podcast project. Next to the project we have the ability to add labels. Now we haven't really covered labels very much here, but if we just wanted to add one real quick, create that label, add it to it. Now we can see that this task has a label associated with it. Just to the right of labels, we have our priority level, so priority is pretty much what you would think of it again, it's a visual way or a way of organizing our tasks based on high or low priority. So by default, all of the tasks that are created inside of to-do list are going to be priority level four, which is the lowest level of priority. If we wanted to make this a higher priority task, we could do that. And you'll notice now this a little visual indicator that this is a higher priority task. And there's other ways that we can sort this that we'll look at later on in this course. But just know that the priority is going to be a way of being able to organize our task just a little bit more by tagging them with a priority level. Now this next one here is a reminder and again, we don't have access to reminders as a pro feature. This is why I was saying we're not quite everything in here is something that we can do on a free account. But we will look at reminders later on in this course when we hop into my Pro account. And last but not least, there's a few more things we can do in here. We can rename the task, which of course is going to open this up to same as if we just come in here and click on the title in order to give it a new name. If we wanted to do that. We can add comments to this by email, will look at adding tasks by e-mail and this process later on in this course. We also have the link to this task. So if we wanted to share this task with somebody else, we could copy this link and then e-mail that to them or whatever the key there is that they would have to have access to this, of course they'd have to have it to do is to count. And then it would have to have access to the project that that task lives in. So it has to be a shared project that you have shared with that person. And then we have the ability to hide or show any completed subtasks. Okay, so let's take a look at this. So right here, we have a task here that we've completed. So we click Check to that. It's been completed, but we can still see that it's completed here. And if we look in here, we can see now one of the three has been completed. If we wanted to show this or hide this, pretty much that's what this is doing in here. So when we complete attached subtask, do you will still want to see it in the list just at the bottom, checked off, you know, cross through that has been completed or do you want to hide those, clean it up a little bit. That's just a personal preference, which one you prefer to do. And then of course we have the ability to delete a task. And the only thing that I'll point out here is once you delete a task, there's no way to bring it back. There's, it's been deleted. It's gone, right? So that's something to keep in mind when you delete your tasks. Okay? So we've looked at this task. We, we've gotten a little more familiar with this and some of the things that we can do here. Now, let's move on to our next video where we'll look at working with projects and sub-projects together. 5. Working with projects and sub-projects: And the last couple of videos we looked at tasks and sub-tasks and how those work together. In this video, we'll learn how to work with projects and sub-projects. Alright, so let's start and let's create a new project. So I'm gonna come in here, create a new project. We looked at this earlier. I'm just going to call this podcast production. Let's give it a color. And then I'm going to create one more. Again, give it another color. And the colors, as I mentioned earlier, just kinda my own visual. I like to have things be color coordinated. So earlier what we did was we created tasks and subtasks for these. Okay, so instead let's actually transition these into projects and sub-projects instead of tasks and subtasks. So what we can do is come over here in the projects. And just like we did with the tasks, you'll notice that the cursor changes and now if we drag it in, you'll notice the indentation, that little gray area there changes and we drop it and now it is a subproject. So we can do this again with marketing. Notice that little gray area there indicates that it's going to be indented. And now it is a sub-projects. Now really the process of taking these tasks that we had created before putting them into that project, we looked at this earlier. We looked at how we could come in here and we can change the project if you want to. Or another probably faster way in this case, would be just to left-click on this and drag it over into the navigation to add that task into that project. So you can see now we have one task in that project. Let's take this one, drag it over, and this one here. And we'll drag it over as well. And now for these, we can either mark these as completes or we can come in here and delete these tasks if we don't need these anymore. Since we've organized things a little bit differently. Now, just like we learned with tasks, with projects, we are not limited to one hierarchy level. We can have up to four levels deep. However, there will be an issue that we come across here and that is the limitation of the free plan. So let me show you what this is. So if I come in here and add a project below, Let's maybe call this our episodes. Hit Add. You can see the free plan has a limit of five projects. So right now we have five projects. We have 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. Okay, so if you wanted to be able to add more projects, what we can do, Let's maybe take these. We could either archive them or we can delete them. Right? So now we only have three active projects. So we can come in here and add our projects. So that's add another one. And let's say this is our episode one. And then we can take this and add it under the hierarchy, right? We could change the color if we wanted to factor blue. So you can see how we can start to have multiple levels of hierarchy to our projects and sub-projects. So as you can see, there's a lot of flexibility to how we organize things. Now, just as a little pro tip, a lot of times I like to use the hierarchy of projects to do essentially what amounts to a bulk move move. So let's say for example, we wanted to move our episodes any tasks under here into marketing. We could take this and if we move the entire project under marketing, if you hover over here, move it under marketing. Now you can see everything is going to be underneath that new project. It's just a really quick way. You can see that the hierarchy of the sub-projects are going to remain, right? So it's not going to shift around it all. Just a nice way of being able to organize things. Now a moment ago we looked at this pop-up and I didn't really explain much about it. So I wanted to go back real quick and just get a better sense for what we can do with the projects here. So we added a project below, which is going to add one just beneath the project that we have selected. In this case, the episodes. I had a project above of course is going to do the opposite, is going to add a project up above that, that particular project course. I can't really do that right now because we have five. So I'm going to run into that limit, but that's what that's going to do. We can edit the project which we saw just a moment ago where we can change the name, you can change the color. We can add it to our favorites if you wanted to. Adding it to the favorites, just going to make it a little bit easier to find. It's going to add to favorites up here. There we go. We can do that or remove that if we wanted to. We can come in, we can duplicate this project. Now as you would expect, this copies the project. But one thing to keep in mind, it does not duplicate any sub-projects. So with this right here, if we had episode one episode to whatever as sub-projects underneath this project, if we were to duplicate this, it would only duplicate this episode project and not anything underneath it. That just something to keep in mind when we're dealing with, when we're duplicating our project. We have the ability to e-mail tasks to this project. This is something that we'll look at later on. We can get a unique email address. Email things to this project really, really quickly. We have our project calendar feed. So this is something that works with Apple Calendar, Outlook, google Calendar. Basically you can add to this project as a calendar and then it uses the due dates of the tasks inside of that project to determine what day and time the task shows up on the calendar. It's another way of being able to visually see all of the tasks that you have in the project. And we have the ability to archive or project. We looked at that Just a moment to go as well as deleting the project. Again, the only thing to keep in mind, the difference here really is archiver projects. You can see it under the archive projects here, the one that we just archived. If you delete a project, of course, you can see the project that we had just at the beginning of this video is not there. It's been deleted. There is no way to bring that project back. Okay, so now that we're more familiar with projects, how can organize into sub-projects. I'd really encourage you to take some time, start to think about the projects that you have going on. How can you organize those in a way that makes sense for you? And when you're ready, I'll see you in the next video where we'll learn about another really cool feature inside of to-do list, smart date recognition. 6. Using smart date recognition: In this video, we'll learn about to-do lists, smart date recognition feature. So by default, when you create a new task inside of to-do list, it will show up in the project that we are currently viewing. We looked at this earlier in this course. Or if we're not viewing a particular projects for example, or if we're in the today or the upcoming view, then our tasks, we'll go into the inbox. But there are some things we can do in order to organize our tasks as we're creating them. For example, let's create a task right now to follow up with our guest in a week. Because sometimes they don't reply right away and we don't want to forget about them. So I'm going to tap Q on the keyboard in order to Quick Add a task. And let's call this follow up with guessed about interview in one week. So you'll notice that to-do list automatically highlights some of these words in one week. That is smart date recognition at work. So you'll also notice right here, there's a date that has already been applied to that. If I were to click on this to remove that, you can see we can schedule this task. Or as soon as I type this out. It recognizes in one week, so one week from today, I happen to be recording this on a Monday. So that means one week from today is when this task, the due date for this task will be assigned. But even though that's sitting the due date, we can actually take this to the next level with this recognition by typing in things like maybe we want to adjust the priority level. So when IT space P1 and that's going to change the priority level. So now if I add this task, we can see this has a priority level of one, like we looked at earlier. And what's cool about the prior level. We'd have a little look at this earlier, but we can come in here with the poverty level and sort this list based on different things. So maybe you sort based on the priority level. So now anything that is prior to level one is going to be at the top and then the lower priority levels will be beneath that. Or if we wanted to, since this, we're actually in a marketing project, this probably isn't really about marketing. This is more podcasts production. So let's come in here and edit this. We can move this to a completely different project using this feature. So come in here, type in the pound or hashtag, and then we can see our project list. So we can either select from our project list using the mouse or we don't even have to take the hands off our keyboard. This is one thing that I love about it as we're typing, I can just come in here and say, you know what, this is going to be part of podcasts production, right? I could spell properly, start to type that in. Hit Enter, and then it's been applied to that project. It save. Now it's been moved to that project so we can see it's no longer in the marketing project, it's now in the podcasts production project, which this particular project are not sorted by priority. So we could do that again in order to sort that we wanted to. And then of course we can remove that sort if we want to as well. Okay, so now that we're familiar with the basic concept of this recognition and smart date recognition how it works, There's a few things that we can do to control how to do is recognize that some of these dates. So I'm going to hit Q. Let's create a new task. And let's call this newsletter. And you know what, this actually should probably be in the marketing projects. So I'm going to change this to marketing. And let's say we wanna do this next week. Okay, so watch what happens as soon as I type in next week and you can see the schedule shifted to be Sunday. So watch this right here is shifted to be Sunday. Well, what if our week doesn't start on Sunday? What if we wanted to start on Monday? Well, we can change that. I'm going to just add this task here. Let's come into our settings. Come into general. And we can see under date and time the next week. So how to do it interprets next week. Let's change this to Monday. Okay, so now if we come back to our task over here, it was in our marketing project. Let's change this and now let's say, you know what we're gonna do this next week. Watch, watch the schedule as soon as I type in K to complete next week, we can see now that it's shifted to Monday. So just a nice way of being able to control some of that smart date recognition. And of course, if you notice when I come back to the settings here, There's a few different things that we can control. So things like next week, the weekend. So if we wanna say, you know, we wanna do something starting on the weekend, you'll what does that mean? Does that mean Saturday or is it a different day? How should a to-do list interpret that? And of course, at anytime, if you don't want to use this smart date recognition, it is on by default. But at anytime we could turn this off if we wanted to, and then any of that smart state recognition is no longer there. Now personally, I like to use this. I'm going to leave this on I, because the last thing I want to point out in this video is how easy it is to create reoccurring tasks using this smart recognition. So let's come in here. Let's maybe come to our root task or root project here, I'm going to create a new task. Comments on YouTube. And this is something that I like to do every single week. So I'm going to set a reminder, say every Friday, watch what happens as soon as I type this in, watch the schedule here. Not only does it change to Friday, but we can see that is going to be a recurring task. So when I add this task, watch what happens as soon as I see that the due date is going to be May 21st, which, you know, as I'm recording, this would be the next Friday. As soon as I complete this, watch what happens to the date? Now it's going to be the next Friday. As soon as I completed again, it's going to be the next Friday after that. So that's how the recurring tasks work inside of to do is it's going to be, in this case, every single Friday 11 is completed. The next one is going to pop up, as you know, that's going to be the next task. Do the following Friday and so on and so on in perpetuity. Okay, great. So in this video, we learned all about smart date recognition. Now for the most part, up until now we've been using what to-do list calls the ListView for projects. Now in our next video we're going to look at another view that we have, the board view. See you there. 7. Understanding list and board views: In this video, we'll learn about list and Board views into doing so, up until this point, we've been using the list view and to do this, because that is the default view from when you create a new project. But we can change any project into a board view. So in this project here, if we want to change this view, all we need to do is to come up to the three little dots and view as a board. Now, when we do this, you can see all our tasks are still there. It's just a different view for those tasks. And what's cool is we can come in here, Let's add a section to organize this a little bit better and maybe add another one. And of course, what you call these sections, how you organize those is completely up to you. But once we have these sections added, now the process, if you're familiar with something like a Kanban board, this is basically the process here where we can come in here and say, you know what, this one here. We haven't started these yet. Okay? So none of those are started. But now, once we say, You know what, we're working on finding a guest to interview, right? So this is in progress. It's just a nice way of being able to visually see, in this case the status of those particular tasks. Now we can organize these, we can add another one, let's say one called QA. If we wanted to move this so we could shift these around and move those wherever we wanted to. Just left-click and drag in order to order the entire section. And of course, if we have a task in that section, when we reorder it, it's going to move that task as well. Now, something that's important to keep in mind here is this is just a view. We can change this view at any time. So if we wanted to shift this back to a ListView, all we need to do is to come back up here and view it as a list. And you'll notice that everything is still organized as we would expect in those sections. It's just with a different view. We still have are not Started section are in progress section in our QA section that we created in this list view. Now we haven't really talked about section do yet, but they're just another way to help us organize the tasks in our projects. So if we wanted to, we could come in, create a brand new section. Let's maybe call this someday. Actually, you know what, let's change this. Let's change this to be someday maybe. So if you're familiar with David Allen's GTD or getting things done someday, maybe as a concept, then you'll be familiar with. And we can start to add our tasks to this new section. Right? So we can start to organize these however we want. Now as a little tip here, what we can do is if once we have these intersection, What's really cool is we can come in here and duplicate this section of watch. What happens when we duplicate this? You can see not only is the section duplicated, but the tasks in that section get duplicated as well. So that can be super helpful if you wanted to very quickly duplicate some tasks here inside of to-do list. Which actually leads me to another little pro tip as another little trick that you can do in order to help organize your tasks inside of to do it. So I want to add a new task, not in any of the sections, but let's add a new task and let's call this feature ideas. Okay, So with this task, you can see we have a checkbox just like we would with any other task. When we check it, it's going to be completed. But what we can do is, instead of calling this just feature ideas, if we add an asterisk in front of it. Now when we save this, that little checkbox disappears. So this can be another helpful way to be able to organize our tasks. Technically, this is still a task, right? So we can still see the task view we can start to add in our subtasks to organize these, to organize this however you want to. And if at anytime we wanted to convert it back to a regular task, all we need to do is to remove that asterisk and then we have that checkbox back. So again, this is just a little tip that you can use to help organize your tasks even more inside up to do it. And That's one thing that I love about this is there's all these little tips and tricks that you can utilize to organize your tasks and projects even more from sections to the board view. If we switch back to that, to the list view to even how to remove the checkbox of an individual task. Now there's a couple little things about sections that I wanted to cover before we wrap this up. And one is when we are in the board view here, you notice when I hover over in-between these two different sections, we can add a section directly in-between those. So that's one way of adding something very quickly between these different sections. Something else I want to point out is when we create a new task, we can now apply that task directly to a section once it's created. So I'm going to hit Q in order to create a new task. And let's say this is research and new episode. Now when I start to add this to a project, I'm going to hit the hashtag. You can see not only do we see the projects itself, but we can see all of the different sections inside of that project. So if I set this to not started, add the task, watch what happens right here. You can see that task gets added not only to the project itself, but to the appropriate section directly. So it's another really fast way of adding our tasks and organizing them in one fell swoop. Okay, So in this video, we learned about list and Board views. We learned how to go back and forth between them. We also learned how sections work. Now in our next video, we'll learn all about karma in to-do-list. 8. All about karma in Todoist: In this video, we'll learn all about the concept of karma in to-do-list. So basically karma is how to do is to gamify as productivity, you are in points as you complete tasks. And just like a game, the more points you earn, you start to level up. So we can find Karma up at the top on the right-hand side, right here. And in here we can see our daily tasks or I'm sorry, our daily goals, rather, our weekly goals, as well as the overall Carmel at that level that we have. So right now in this account, I'm a novice, I've earned 516 points and I need one hundred nine hundred and eighty four points in order to get to the next level. Now one of the ways that we can level up and earn more points is using the goals. So in here we can see our daily goal is to complete five tasks, and today completed three of those five tasks. Now we can control this goal in our karma goals and settings, which takes us to the settings. And in here we can see that we can control our daily goal. And if you have a Pro account, we can actually edit the weekly goal as well. So what this means is we say if we, when we complete a task, we're going to earn some points once we complete fine tasks. Not only do we earn the points for completing each of those tasks, we are in an extra little bonus points for hitting that daily goal. And then of course, the weekly goal on top of that, if we happen to hit the weekly goal there as well. So another concept here is the days off and vacation mode. So by default, the weekend, Saturday and Sunday are going to be days off, which means if we have tasks that are due on those days, we're not going to lose any points if we don't get those done, right. So and then the vacation mode, of course, is going to basically keep everything intact, which is helpful if you go on vacation. And there's task, especially if there's recurring tasks you don't remember are things that pop up that are due while you're on vacation. Of course you are on vacation. You don't want to have to be worrying about all of this. And so you go into vacation mode beforehand. And then when you come back, all of your streaks and your goals and all of that are going to be kept through that process. And of course, anytime if you want to completely turn off Karma, you can't turn it off here and then none of this will be it take effect, but by default, it is going to be turned on. Okay? So there are a few different ways that we can earn points in side of to-do list. So one of those ways is simply by adding a new task. When you add a new task, you're going to earn some points, some karma points inside of to do it. Another way is by using labels. So by using labels, you're organizing your tasks. Just an, another way. And so to do this is going to reward you for organizing things and being a little bit more organized and productive. And that way, by giving you some points for that. Another way is using reminders. Of course, reminders are a pro only feature. We'll look at those later on in this course once we hop into a Pro account more and look at that. But when you add reminders, it's another way of being a little bit more organized. And so to-do list is going to reward you for that with some karma points. Another way, as we just mentioned, is by hitting your goals. So if you, in this case, I have a daily goal of five tasks to be completed per day is what I'm going to try to hit. And if I hit a complete those five, and of course I'm going to get a little bit of an extra boost for hitting those goals. Now, gold streaks are something that are continuous. So if I have a goal of five tasks per day, if I were to get that done, five tasks per day every single day for a week. Starting to build up a streak of being productive, not only here in there, every, every few days or so, but being more consistent for that and so to-do list is going to give you even more points for hitting those streaks. And then of course, another way is going to be kind of the simplest way is going to be completing a task and getting that done. Now, something to keep in mind is that you need to have a due dates on that in order to earn those points on that day or time. All right, so one of the ways that you lose points is if you have a task overdue for four or more days, of course. Like I was just saying, you have to have a due date on that for that to be something that is recognized. So if you just have a task that does not have a due date, of course, then it can't be overdue. And so that's not really going to be factored into karma. And those points in there, of course, you're still going to get points for completing that. But if there's a date to it, then you're going to add a little bit extra there. Or on the flip side of that, potentially lose some points if that starts to be overdamped, are overdue for four days or more. So as you can see, there's a lot of ways that you can earn points. And a lot more than you can lose. And this is really the only way that you can actually lose points is by having tasks that are overdue for at least four or more days. The more days that they're overdue then of course, you know, you're going to start, you continue to lose points here and there. Now, as you start to earn these points, you're going to start to level up and that leads into the karma levels. Okay, so from 0 to 499 points, you are a beginner. That is, your level is called beginner. From 500 to 2499 points. Novice from 2500 to 4,999 is intermediate, from 5000 to 7000. For 99 is professional. From 7500 to just under 10 thousand is expert. From 10 thousand to just under nine, 20000 is master, and then 20 thousand to just under 50 thousand is grandmaster. And then the final level is going to be anything 50 thousand points and above is enlightened. Now if we hop back into to-do list to look at some of these, some of this in here. With this account, There's really not going to be a lot of data. You can see in a lot of this is empty. There's really not a lot here because this is a new content created essentially for this course to go through some of the free features. So let's hop into my Pro account here. We pull this over so we can see a little more data inside of our karma. So this is our daily. So I have in order to complete 32 tasks per day so far today, I've completed 10 of those. And we can see the task that we've completed in the past. Not only can we see this, but you'll notice the color coordination here. Under the Projects. You can see I have these colors and that's going to show up here. So you can see most of the tasks that are completed or tasks, in this case under the Myself project or, you know, a sub of that. And we can start to see the tasks that get completed and also kind of what the projects they live under, right? And we'll look at, we'll look at how I organize my project and all that stuff later on in this course. But I just wanted to point that out that you can start to see not only that the task is completed, but start to get a visual representation of where those tasks actually live. So this is daily, weekly. Again, we have our weekly goal. You can see as a pro account, I can actually edit this goal I have. I want to try and hit a 150 tasks per week. We can adjust that if we wanted to. Let me hop back into our karma here. So we had weekly and then this is the overall. So you can see I've hit I'm over 50 thousand, So I I've, I've hit the highest level there. I currently have 68,662 points that you can see here. But one thing that's cool about this is we can see this trend here. So you can see Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday, right? So this is kind of the trend overall. So on Monday is when I'm the most productive, That's the most productive there and then starting to get a little bit less productive on Tuesday, Wednesday. And then we can start to see that our trends for how our productivity there is there. It's just a nice little way of visualizing this. Starting to throw all of this together into a more gamified aspect that starts to make productivity more fun. Okay, So in this video, we learned all about how we can gamify productivity introduced using Karma. And of course, as I mentioned a moment ago, if you don't want to use comma, you can always come into the settings and turn it off completely. Speaking of the settings. In our next video, we'll look at how we can customize to-do list a little bit more. See you there. 9. Options for customizing Todoist: So far throughout this course, we've looked at some of the settings to customize different features as we've looked at those features like smart date recognition and Karma just in the last video. In this video we'll look at some of the other settings that we haven't looked at yet. So let's hop into our settings up top right, go into our settings. Now, one of the things that I like to do personally is to change pretty much anything into the dark theme whenever it's available. So let's start by switching to do is theme to the dark theme. Just select that there and there we go. Now we have the dark theme. One thing that I do want to point out is the ability to sync the theme. So we haven't really looked at it yet. But if we're working with the mobile app or another app like the desktop application or one of to-do list other applications, we have the ability to sync the theme across all of those. So with this unchecked, if I were to switch this to a lighter theme, then on the mobile app we can have a completely different theme, or on the desktop application we have a completely different theme. If I have this set as dark and then sync the theme, no matter what application we're using to-do list will sync that with that same thing. That's another way that the team behind To Do list has done a great job too, helped things feel very consistent across the different applications no matter where you are using to-do list. So some of these other options that we have in here, of course we have our account options. So in here we can do things like change our profile picture or name, or email address, change your password, things that we might expect we can upgrade right now you can see I'm using the free plan. We can upgrade to the pro plan in here if we wanted to do that. Earlier, we did look at the general settings. But I do want to point out that in here, we can change the home view to be pretty much whatever we want. So earlier, when we were looking at using the keyboard shortcut H, or clicking on the little house or the home up at the top. It's going to take us to the today view. By default, we can change that if we want to. So whatever our home view is, we could change that to any of our projects upcoming or any label filters or anything like that. We can change that. We can change our date and our time depending on where we're located. We looked at changing the start of the week, the next week for our smart date recognition, things like that, as well as controlling things like are how many emails we get from to-do list itself. Once you sign up for an account by default, you might notice that you're going to start to get emails for things that are are tasks that are due that day or things, you know, updates from the team at to-do list themselves. You can turn all of that off in here if you want to. Really kinda up to you and what sort of e-mail notifications you get from to-do list itself. Moving along on our settings here we have our subscription so we can manage our subscription in here we can see all of our billing information, download invoices. Currently I'm on the free plan with this. So of course there's there's been no invoices. I don't really have a lot in here, but this is where we can manage all of that. We looked at the theme. We looked at karma in our last video and how we can edit this. We can have our reminders, so we can have this set to be a default. So we'll look at Reminders more later on because reminders are a pro feature, but we can control by default if we were to set a time, say something was due at one o'clock PM. Well then by default we're going to get a notification at 1230 because it's set to a reminder it at, you know, 30 minutes beforehand. So little things like that we can start to control here in the settings. And again, we'll look at reminders later on in this course. And we have our notification so we can control whether or not we get notifications. So We're working on a collaborative project and is shared project and somebody completes a task, we can get that notification if we want to have a task that's assigned, somebody assigns a task to you in a shared project, were just controlling those notifications, whether we get them through email or if we get them through a push notification. When we have the to-do list app installed, the mobile app installed on our phone or something like that. Last thing we have here, our integrations were integrating with another tool. Say something like if this then that or Zapier, if you're familiar with those, that's going to require hooking in and logging in and tying those two accounts together. And so we can see those integrations up here and then disconnect those just for security purposes. If we wanted to do that, we're not using those anymore right now. We can see currently we have nothing that's actually that we're using because again, this is a newer account. And then we can hook into a Google calendar, will look at that later on in this course as well. As well as being able to access things like our subscription and API token, which you can see is going to be blurred out here just for security purposes and you're gonna be able to see this. But this is where you can come in here, see that, and then issue a new one if you wanted to. Now the last thing I do want to point out is because we are using a free account. If you are using a Pro account, there is another setting that you'll see in here. So let me hop over to my Pro account here real quick and just show that we have backups. So by default to do this is going to backup all of our data. You can see it's backed up once a day and we can download that data as a zip file. Just as a nice little backup of any of the projects and tasks and all of that in here. It's just a nice way of being able to back up all of our information. Alright, so that is a look at the settings here inside of To-do list. Of course, how you customize those are going to be completely up to you. But for now, let's hop into our next video where we're going to look at how we can share projects. 10. Sharing projects with others: In this video, we'll learn how we can share projects with other people. Well, except for this example, I'll be sharing a project for my free accounts that we've been using to my pro account. So we can see how this process works, but we'll also see how it looks from both sides. So let's pick a project I'm going to work with this podcast production project that we had created. So let's come in here. And we can either come in here and share the project this way. Or over here on the top right-hand side, you probably notice that we have the ability to share the project here. So I'm going to share this with my Gmail account. Invite. And we can see that is pending. Now if we hop over it, let me pull over my pro account here. We can see we're going to get a notification up here. We've been invited to join this project in our email. We can see we also got an email saying, Hey, you've been invited to join this project as well. All we need to do is we could come in here, view this into do this, or we can come in here and accept this. And now over here in our projects will see we have this project at it. The first thing I want to point out here is you'll notice the indicator, the icon for this project is different. So you'll notice all of these other projects. The icon is a circle. That means it is not shared with anybody. It's only in our account. This icon is a little user, which means it's shared, it just shared a project with somebody else. And in here, we can see all of the tasks that we've created in our other account. And then up here at the top right-hand side, we can see there are two people currently in this project. And at anytime we could come in and we can leave this project if we wanted to not be a part of this project anymore. But now that we've shared this project, working with tasks is going to be, It's actually pretty straightforward. The team behind to do it did a great job of working with this. So in a task, now that this is a shared project, we can assign this to different people. So we could come in here and say, you know what, let's assign this to. I realize it's both MY same name, but with this account that's in my pro account, we can assign it to the other one. And now, if we hop back over here, we can see the notification. We've been assigned a task in this project. And over here we can see this task is assigned to me to this account. And so it's a pretty straightforward process and this works. The notifications work with things like comments as well. So if we were to come in here, add a comment, something along these lines. You'll notice by default, everybody in this project, so everybody who is in this shared project is going to get a notification about this comet. We can control this if we want only certain people. Now in this case, there's only two people in this project. So everyone is still, it's pretty much everyone else, right? Because I'm adding this project under this free account. So everyone else outside of this is going to get a notification. We could choose specific people if we wanted to, if we had multiple people in here, once we add this comment, and then if we hop back into our pro accounts, we'll see we get this notification, the comments been added. We can pop this up, see this notification, see this comment, and start to have some of this communication back and forth. Now, one thing that I had pointed out mentioned earlier is when you're working with shared projects, the activity log can be helpful. So with the activity log, we can see who has assigned this task. So this task has been assigned to a different person. We can see the comments who, who started to add comments? You can start to see how this activity log can be beneficial. As these tasks are being updated with different people, we can start to keep track of Who's assigned this to somebody else, you know, maybe sometimes something get assigned to somebody by accident. No, that's that's happened a few times to me in the past. And so it's helpful to see who has done that and being able to rectify that and resolve that fairly easily using the Activity Log. Great, and that's pretty much all there is to sharing a project from here on out. It's things like with our subtask when we start to add those, of course, we can start to assign those to certain people, just like we did with regular tasks. Starting to add comments to those sub-tasks are doing that however we want to. The only other thing that I want to point out when it comes to shared projects is you will notice the project that got shared was podcast production, which means we do not see any of those sub-projects. So if we hop back over here, if we were to take another project here, and let's drag this in as a subproject. These that doesn't automatically share these projects even though there's sub-projects of a shared project. This is the only project that has been shared. So over here, we don't automatically get those project, even if they were already a hierarchy of sub-projects. When we share a project, only sharing that one project, not all of the sub-projects. So that's something to keep in mind. If you wanted to share the sub-projects in a hierarchy, you'd have to share each of those with certain people as well. All right, so in this video we learned how we can share project with someone else. We learned how we can assign tasks to them in the project. And we also looked at what sharing looks like from both sides, from sharing the project as well as receiving a share of a project on the other side as well. In our next video, we'll look at how we can add attachments to tasks. 11. Adding attachments to tasks: In this video, we'll learn how to add attachments to tasks. So attachments are added it through comments. And we've looked at comments so far in this course, but let's hop into a task and focus on the attachments part. So once we're in the task view, if we come over to our comments, down here, underneath the comment, we have the ability to add attachment, to actually record a little voice attachment, or to add in a little emoji or something like that. Now, we could click on this in order to pop open a browser window, or we can actually drag and drop a file directly over. Now, there's something to keep in mind here because I'm using a free account. And a free account has a limitation on the file size. But all we have to do is just drag and drop. You can see the attachment gets added, add the comments, and there we go. Our attachment has been added, of course, because this particular one is an audio file, an mp3 file to do this recognizes that and then we can play that directly inside. I'm not I'm not gonna do that. It's going to get confusing if I'm talking over playing that back. But you can see that there. And if we're attaching, you know, something like a Word document, of course it's not going to have this little player, but I like to do is automatically recognizes some file types in order to make it easier to play that back. We also, speaking of audio, we do have the ability to record a voice attachment. So this is really, really helpful as we're directly inside of the browser here. If I just hit record and we give it permissions, you can see that to-do list is going to start recording this. You can see there's a max of four minutes and it's recording. We can stop this at any time. Retake playback or attached. Let's attach this. It gets attached. And just like the previous one there, this is a voice memo that we've recorded. So if I play this back, you can see that to do this is going to start. We can start to see what that sounds like. It pretty, pretty simple and straightforward, but it makes commenting and talking back and forth. Sometimes it's easier to just talk about it, talk about something than it is to type everything out. So I loved that to-do list gives the option to do that. Now, I did mention that there is a file size limitation and that is something to keep in mind. So using a free account, there is a limitation of five megabytes per upload. Five megabytes each for an attachment. If you're using a Pro plan, that limitation changes to a 100 megabytes per file. And it's actually the same for a business plan. It's a 100 megabytes per file for attachments on your comments. Okay, so in this video, we learned how we can add attachments to tasks. We even learn how to record a voice attachment directly into dualist. And if we wanted to remove those at anytime, all we need to do is to come in and basically just delete that attachment and it is gone. Now in our next video, we'll learn about labels. 12. Organizing tasks with labels: In this video, we'll learn about another way that we can organize our tasks using labels. Not to do It's calls them labels. Other apps might call them tags. It's the same concept and just another way of organizing our tasks to help us be more productive. So let's start by creating a new label. To do that, we just come over to the labels in our navigation. Click on the plus and we can create our label. So let's say, let's call this our recording computer. And we can give it a color, just like we did with the projects. How you colorize these is really up to you and kind of how you want to organize things. I'm going to stick maybe let's give this. Let's give this maybe a light blue. And you can see that the label has been applied. And now, once we have the label created, we can come into a task and apply the label to that task. So we can choose from the labels that we have. If we have a lot of them, then it's easier to start, start typing. We can apply that. Watch what happens as soon as I click here you can see this label has been applied. Not only has it been applied, but it actually applies that color to that as well. So if I were to change this to something maybe a little bit more different than maybe change it to a yellow. You can see that the color changes as well. So again, it's just a nice little visual way of being able to organize things better. And now once we have this label applied, if we click on it, we can see all of the tasks that have that label applied. So essentially what we're doing is we're filtering out everything so we don't want to see everything in this project. We only want to see things that have this one particular label applied. And just like our projects that we looked at earlier, we can come in here, we can add this to our Favorites if we wanted to. The favorites are just another way of being able to access things easier, but it doesn't have to be just a project. We can also apply a label or as we'll look at filters later on, we can actually apply those to our favorites as well. Now what's cool about labels is unlike a project. So with a task, a task has to live inside of a project. It can only live inside of one project at a time. As we learned earlier, we can move that task between different projects. But a task can have as many different labels as you want applied to it. So if we were to come into this task, let's come in and apply another label. Now has multiple labels applied to it. So regardless of which one we go to, it's going to show that of course, in this particular case, you know, there's maybe not much of a difference there. But if we wanted to say on this one, Let's only apply this label. I'm just going to add a couple of different labels to these. There's another way that we can apply labels if you wanted to. So let's say, you know what, for this one here? Instead of coming in here and clicking, Let's edit this. And let's just come in and say for this I'm going to hit the add sign, that's going to pop up our labels. We can say this one is going to be at the computer. Save. And you can see how we start to apply these labels to our tasks. And now we can start to filter these out and really start to organize all of our tasks in another way. And that's just helps us be a little bit more organized, which of course, the end of the day, it's going to help us be more efficient and be more productive. Alright, so what I would encourage you to do right now is take some time between videos. We've looked at projects, we've looked at how we can organize things and how we can start to organize and projects and sub-projects and tasks and sub-tasks. And now with labels, we're adding in a whole new layer of organization. I would encourage you to take some time between videos, start to think through how you can take advantage of labels to help organize your tasks better. And when you're ready, I will see you in our next video where we'll learn about filters. 13. Working with filters: So far, we've looked at a lot of ways to do it, lets you organize your tasks. In this video, we'll see how we can take that one step further using filters. So basically a filter lets us see a collection of tasks together in one place. Let's make a simple one really fast so we can see how they work. And then I'll share one of my favorite filters that I use all the time. So let's get started. I'm going to create a new filter here. We can just click on plus next to the filter. And let's give this a name. I'm going to call this everything boats are based on a true story. Now we need to do the filter query. And then query is basically going to be the search that to-do list is going to do for this filter. So in this case, because we have this hierarchy of our project based on a true story Project podcast as a project, and then we have sub-projects here. What we can do is Find all of the tasks, not only in this one project, but all of them underneath as well, by using two hashtags. So if we did one, that would be just this one project. If we do two, That's going to be this project and all of the projects underneath it, all of these sub-projects. So let's call it that. Again, we can color coordinate these, however we want to add it to the favorites to just throw it up there. Let's add this. And we can see we're hitting a limitation of our free account. So no problem. Let's cancel this. Come into our filters. Some of these have automatically been created. So I'm going to delete some of these. One thing to keep in mind when you delete your filters. There is no way to get that back. So if you ever wanted to save any of these, I'd recommend coming in saving these, saved the filter query. Maybe it's a text file or something like that. And then that way you can always bring that back if you need to. Go. All right, we'll leave those. We can have up to three. So let's come in and create this again. There we go. Add this in. And now we can see all of these tasks. This is everything not only in this one project, but everything in this project. Everything in this project, which is nothing. Everything in this project again, nothing. And then everything in here. Because we're looking at the, everything under the hierarchy using this filter query. So that in a nutshell is how filters work. It's a way of being able to see things in a different way. So rather than just seeing the different things in a particular project, and we can see everything using our hierarchy or we could start to throw in labels and start to customize our views of the tasks that were being able to see. So now that we have an idea of how filters themselves work, It's really up to you how you want to build these out. Now, to do this, I would recommend looking at some of the great documentation that to-do list has. So if we hop into our filter here, this little question mark right here is going to be helpful. It's going to pop open a bunch of different ways that we can use the syntax. So things like, if you're not sure the little using two hashtags, right? Filter by tasks. So we can see this right here is going to tell us not only does it show us all the tasks in this project, but all of the sub-projects as well. So there's other little tips that we can do here too as well. So like, you know, things that end with a certain word or things that are showing all the different sections are starting to throw in things in there. There's really a ton of different things that we can do with these different queries to get the tasks that we want to be able to see the tasks that we want. Now, I mentioned earlier that I would share one of my favorite filters. So let's do that. I'm going to go ahead and let's just save this. That's fine. And I'm going to hop into my count here and show one of my favorite filters so today for work. All right, so in here we have this filter query and I know it can look pretty complex actually. You know, it's kinda hard to see in here. So let me hop over. I actually have this built out into slides to see this a little bit easier. So this is my filter query. Now, let's break this down a little bit further. So to start with, we have overdo or today, the little bar in between. That means or which means basically anything that is either. A due date on it that is overdue or something that is due today. So used to be due today and if I didn't get it done, that means it's tomorrow, it will be due yesterday. So I'll still show up in this filter as something that I need to get done. It's not just showing things that are due today. Now. That is in parentheses, which means that is, think of this kinda like with math, right? Where you're doing that first, right? So we're doing that. And I want to make sure that I'm only seeing the things that are overdue or today inside of the work project, right? So all of this is one expression and, and meaning. And literally and what we just saw a little moment to go where we have another expression. Instead of being debate, seeing everything in the hierarchy of base on a true story podcasts. In my pro account, I have another hierarchy project called work. So I'm seeing everything under there. So altogether basically what this is doing is it's showing everything that is overdue or do today. And in the project named work. But not only inside of that project as we learned just a moment ago, the project hierarchy matters. So here's an example, my hierarchy and i'll, I'll explain this a little bit further. But just for later on in this course, but just for this purpose as far as the filter is concerned, you can see I have a project called work. But because I have two hashtags in the filter, it's also going to show me everything in the hierarchy underneath that project. Right? Now that entire expression is going to be wrapped in parentheses, right? So just like with just the overdue or today, this entire first expression is going to be wrapped in parentheses, which separates it from the other expression that's tied on there. All right, So this other expression that I have tied towards the end, so basically what I'm saying there, you'll notice in-between I have that bar, which means as we learned earlier, means or so basically I'm saying, okay, anything There's overdue or today and in that work hierarchy or anything that's overdue or today, and in this sequence of the labels, right? So again, breaking down the, this particular expression here, we have overdo or do today and using any of these labels. So it has a label named work, or has a label named Internet, or has a label named phone, or has a label named e-mail, or has a label named JIRA. And those are all labels that in particular I use typically are going to be used at work, which is why they're in this filter. So all of those labels we can add to them if you want to remove to them. Again, it's going to do. A big part of this is going to play into how you organize things with your labels in your projects. And I'll explain how I organize them and how I came up with these in a future video. But if we put all of this together, basically, my filter here says, Okay, Everything that is overdue or do today. And inside the work project or inside any of the sub-projects in the hierarchy, underneath the work project or anything that is overdue or do today. And inside of or tagged with any of these labels right here, work, internet, phone, e-mail, and JIRA. And that in a nutshell is what this query is going to do. And then for convenience purposes, basically what I can do is I can click on this and I can see all of the tasks that I need to do that are tied to work regardless of the project that they're in, regardless of what the labels are that are applied to it. I know that all of those labels and that those projects have to do with work. And so the things that I need to do for work are going to show up with this filter. And of course, for security purposes, you can notice some of these are going to be blurred out. But to recap in this video, we learned how to create a filter. We learned where to go to find the help on the syntax that to-do list needs to build out your filters. And I even shared one of the filters that I use every day to find the task that I need to do that day for work. In our next video, we'll learn how we can save time by using project templates. 14. Saving time with project templates: In this video, we'll learn about project templates into DOAS. Now project template can be a great way to very quickly create the same tasks over and over again. If we have an entire project that is reoccurring, we don't want to have to recreate the same tasks every time. That's where the templates can come in. So to showcase this, Let's actually hop into, say, this episode. I'm going to rearrange some of the projects here because we are working with their free account. So we have a limitation of five projects. I'm going to come in, That's archive marketing. And let's say, you know what? We have, say maybe this is episode one and this will be Episode 2. So we're going to say this, this process here is going to be in episode 1. These are the tasks for episode number one, and I want the same tasks inside of episode number two, but I don't want to type them all out. And every time I have a new episode, I want to be able to create a new project and just import all of the tasks that I need to do for that particular project. So the first step of this is to export the tax that we have. So we wanna make sure that we have all the tasks ready to go. We can add labels, we could add due dates, whatever we want to do for this task. In fact, let me actually do this. I want to add a due date to this of today just so we can see this because when we come in to the project and export this as a template, one of the key things to keep in mind is the use of relative dates. So relative dates is Colic what I just did saying today. So if today is the tenth, then that task will be due today. If we uncheck this and we do not do relative dates, then it will say, okay, when we, when this is created, basically okay, today is the tenth. That means that task will be due on the 10th. Not necessarily today, but it will be due on the 10th, right? So relative dates is something that you want to keep in mind. And by all means, if you're exporting this and you find that it's not really writes, then you may want to go in there and make some changes to how you created the tasks and then export those against. Sometimes it takes a little bit of playing around to get the actual results that you want based on your, your tasks that you have in there. Now there's two ways that we can export this template, either as a shareable URL. And realistically this is the fastest way that's just going to give us a URL. And then we can just come in here and then import. It's just a URL that we will be able to use. This is probably the fastest way if you're doing this for yourself to just import this very, very quickly to save those URLs. Now if you're trying to share this with somebody else, of course you're going to have to have it to do is to count and you're going to want to make sure that they've already got that sort of stuff setup. So in that case, or another way that we can export this is as a file. Now when we do this, it's going to be a CSV file and there is a benefit to this as well. So let me hop in here to a text editor just so we can see this CSV file is just a comma separated value. And the cool thing about this is we can actually change this and then of course that's going to change the template. So even though we've exported this, as, you can see, the priority level here, prior level on all of these are for, right? We can see the due date is today because we have those relative dates set in when we did the check there. We can say, you know what? The listen for errors. Let's set that to a priority level of one. So we're going to change that here in the CSV. Now when we save this off, Let's move this over to a different monitor so I can come in episode number to import from templates. We can select the file on a computer. And then once this is imported, you can see the tasks being created there in the background, it's imported and we have those tasks that have been added. The relative date of today has been added. The priority level update change that we made on the CSV has been added as well. And you'll notice all those tasks come in. But what if we wanted to not just import the tasks? What if we wanted to import the entire project? Well, to do that, what we would want to do is to use that shareable URL. So let's say we were to export this as a shareable URL. And then let's import it. Use this template. Now, back into our to-do list, you can see an entire project has been created, right? Of course, in this case it says Episode 2 because that's the, that's the name of the project that we export it as a template because we're using the URL. It's not a CSV file that we can edit, but now it's just a project. We can come in here say, okay, this is Episode Number 3. Or we could just call that episode or however we want to name that, change our hierarchy. There we go. And we have all of those tasks in that project that we've created. We export it as a template and then re-import it. Okay, so in this video, we learned how to create projects, templates. We learned how to export them, both as a shareable URL that will allow us to import the project and the tasks inside. We also learned how to export it as a CSV. How we can make an edit to that CSV file and then import those tasks into an existing project. In our next video, we'll learn how we can e-mail tasks to our projects. 15. Emailing tasks to Todoist: In this video, we'll learn how to email tasks to projects inside of to-do list. So the first step we need to do for this is to find the project that we want to email tasks into. So let's say we want to email them into this based on a true story, a podcast project. Go to the three little dots, email tasks to this project. And then we'll get an e-mail address. This is a unique email address just for this project. Okay, So, uh, copy this to the clipboard. Now we can hop over to our email and send an e-mail to that project. I just hit Control C to copy that in. Now when this, when we e-mail this, the subject is going to be the title of the task. Okay? And then the, the body of the email is going to be the comment. So now we send this and it'll send that. Let's hop back over to our project here. And depending on how long you internet connection and servers and all that kinda stuff, it might take a few seconds in order to populate here. We will see that task show up here inside of to-do list. And there it is. So we can see the comments that we added in there. Those are the body of the e-mail. And then the subject is the title of the task there. Now we can take this to a new level by starting to add some variables to this. So let's come in and let's say they maybe want to email to the inbox instead. So I'm going to copy this to the clipboard. Let's head back to our e-mail. Compose Control C in order to paste. And let's say, okay, this this email is due tomorrow. Now inside of to-do list, you remember when we're typing, it's going to recognize that date automatically with our smart date recognition, it's not necessarily the case with tasks coming in through email. To do that, we need to do something a little bit special. We need to do open this due dates is tomorrow and let's say you know what? We're going to have it be at 06:00 PM. There we go. So something like that. We could even come in and start to add in labels if we wanted to. So adding a label, we can even add priority if we wanted to do. So. Do a priority level of one, it's due tomorrow with a label of computer. Once we send this. Now, if we head back to to-do list, give it a moment and we will see this task pop up inside of our inbox. And there we go. So this e-mails do tomorrow, you'll notice the text is still there. It didn't actually get highlighted. But because we added that little variable, they're saying we want it to be due tomorrow at 06:00 PM. That is when that date that day and time has been sets. We have the label that's been applied to it. And it even has the body because we had our signature in the email that just has my name on it. There has been added to the comet. Now, you may be wondering what sorts of other things and what sort of other variables are there. There's a lot of different variables that you can do it to find. Those were just come into the help and just do forwarding e-mails to do is they have this great little article that shows you things like what's the date? How can you tag these different things? Are the label, things like that that we looked at. Seeing how we can forward our e-mails into to-do list. Now what's really cool about this is you can start to get, they get as complex as you want, because you can start to combine this feature with email filters. For example, four years, I've used JIRA as a project management tool with my colleagues. But I used to do is for my own task management. So when I get email notification from somebody assigning me something in JIRA, what I would do is inside of Gmail outward set an automatic forward for those notifications to go to to-do list. So I have one place to look for my tasks. So essentially it's Jira notifying to-do list of something that I need to do. Or there's another time where maybe I'm working with an a big project with some colleagues. And I wanted to make sure that I reply to any emails before I left the office for the day. Of course, with filters in Gmail, you can't add text to the subject line, but you can't do that with tools like if this then that or Zapier. So what I would do is I would set up in Zapier. So anytime I got an email in Gmail from my colleague from a certain address, it would get forwarded to the address inside of to-do list here. And then add that little variable to it that has a due date of today and the time at the end of the day at 5 PM or whatever time I'm getting off of work. And then that's coupled with reminders that we saw earlier. You can set the reminder default to be like, you know, 30 minutes ahead of time. That's basically going to mean I'm automatically going to get a reminder to reply to the email if I hadn't done so already. So there's so many cool things you can start to piece together with these different features of not only inside of to-do us, but other tools as well that are kind of outside the scope of this particular course. But using them, you can start to piece all of these things together. You can start to see how powerful this can be and how powerful you can make your productivity be using to-do list. Now in our next video, we're going to look at another tool it because we're going to look at sinking to-do list with Google Calendar. 16. Syncing Todoist with Google Calendar: Sometimes it's great to see things in a calendar view. And instead of building one into to-do list interface, the team behind to-do list decided to integrate with the calendar you already have. So let's start with one of the world's most popular online calendars. Google Calendar. So here's how we can do this. Let's hop into our settings. Under integrations, we can connect our Google Calendar. So I need to do is to connect to the calendar, sign into our Google account. So let me sign in here. And I'm going to pause the video just for a moment to type in my password. Okay, once we're signed in and we wanna make sure to allow to do us the ability to access the calendar. Agree to those. And we can give our calendar name. We can see all all of the options here. Go ahead and connect that we're going to leave everything at the default. Okay, So now that we have this hooked in, let's hop over to our calendar. And in our calendar you'll notice we now have a to-do list calendar that's been Add. I'm going to hide the holidays here just so we can see. So what this is showing us, this is showing us the tasks based on their due date. Okay. So we have, let's say this is the one that we just emailed in our last video, making it due tomorrow, which is going to be the day after day after day. I'm recording this on the 17th. 18th. If I wanted to say take this and move it to the next day, watch what happens inside of to-do list by hop back over here and hop back to that task. We can see now that task is due on Wednesday. We can move it there. We can see shifted to Thursday. We can see it's automatically updated inside of to-do list. So what's cool about this is because it's a two-way sink. That means not only do we see the tasks inside of from to-do list inside of Google Calendar, but we can make edits to it in Google Calendar and that will update in to-do list. And then actually works the other way around too. So if I were to take remember, this is on Thursday, the 20th. If we were to take this and say, you know, maybe the 21st, let's go ahead and save that. Over here in Google Calendar, it'll take a second for it to update, but it'll automatically jump over to the 21st reflecting that change. Some super, super cool stuff that we can do using the two-way sync between to-do list and Google Calendar. But what if you're not using Google Calendar? There's a few other ways that we can integrate to do just with a different calendar system. If we hop back into our settings, come back into our integrations, and we can integrate with either Apple Calendar or Outlook. Now the key thing to keep in mind here is this is a one-way sync. And the same would be true if you were to subscribe using the app I cow link in something, something else, you know, if it wasn't Apple Calendar or Outlook in particular, most calendar applications are going to support an account link. It's a pretty standard and you could use that to import it. Now the key there is, as I mentioned, it is a one-way sync, which means you would be able to see it in a calendar, but you can't make changes to it. It's basically read only as far as the calendar is concerned. So if you wanted to make a change to the date, you'd have to make that change inside of to-do list for it to then reflect on the calendar. We can't do things like we did in Google Calendar. Making the change in the date inside of Google Calendar and watch that reflect. See this is a two-way sync, which means I can actually edit it. And then it will update inside of to-do list. But that's not the way the one-way sync works. It's only obviously going to be one way, right? It's only going to update once we updated inside of to-do list. And then that sinks One way to the calendar to be a visual view essentially. Okay, So in this video, we learned how to set up the two-way sync with Google Calendar. We also learned where we can go to get the ical link in order to sink another calendar system, whether it be Apple Calendar, Outlook or something else. Now in our next video, we're going to learn about one of my favorite pro features, reminders. 17. Stop forgetting things by using reminders: Up until this point, for the most part, throughout this course, we've been using a completely afraid to do is to count. In this video, we're going to be using my pro accounts and talking about the feature that realistically to me as worth the cost of a Pro account in and of itself. That is reminders. So let's start by creating a task. I'm going to hit Q on the keyboard to Quick Add a task. Let's say this task is going to be 2. We're still talking about podcasts or let's say, listen to our second episode. Okay, so I'm gonna give a priority level of 1, P1, right? Level of one. And I'm going to come in and I want to say I want this to be due, let's say in 45 minutes. Okay? So 45 minutes from now is when this is going to be due. Now, if you're like me and you're on the go a lot with your phone. A lot of times. I'll just forget. And that's why reminders are so great because I'm going to forget things, but I always have my phone with me. And so the notifications on my phone are going to remind me of the things that I need to do through to-do list. So when I add this task, the task is due at 319. But you can see when I hover over this, There's a reminder 30 minutes beforehand. You can see this little indicator here means that there's a reminder. So this is set by default in the settings here. Under reminders, the default timing is 30 minutes beforehand. We can change that to be whatever we want. We can turn off the automatic reminder if you want. I prefer to keep them there. But not only do we have the ability to choose the default here, we can come in and let's say, you know what, I want to actually add another one. Let's say I already had a 30-minute. Let's say you want ten minutes beforehand. Let's add that reminder 10 minutes beforehand, right? So we can add however many different reminders that we want for this. So now with this task we're going to get to or minders, not just one. We'll get one at it 30 minutes before 319 when this ones do. And then we'll get 110 minutes beforehand. So 309 will get a reminder for this task. So we're gonna get multiple reminders for this one task. Of course, if we were to complete it beforehand, those reminders won't pop up. You know, it's only going to show up those reminders or show those reminders if the task is not complete. So now all we have to do is to wait to get that reminder because I'm going to get that reminder on my phone and I'll show you what that looks like in a second. Actually, while we do that, let's hop back into our settings because I want to point out with the reminders here, we can add a well-to-do us where we want to get that notification, where we want to get that reminder, do we want to get it on the desktop if you're on a desktop computer, in which case, you know, I use Windows, so it'll come through Windows notification system. We can choose if we want to get the mobile push notification, if we're signed into our to-do list account there, which is my preferred method. You can see that's what I have checked. Or I can get an email reminder if we prefer that it will send us an email to the count associated with our to-do list account to get a reminder that way. And it anytime. If you're not sure if you have hooked up right, you can always send a test push notification through the app to make sure that that works. But now we need to hop over to the phone to see that reminder in action. Okay, So this is what the reminder looks like on the phone. We can see it pop up. And since it went to my phone, no matter where I'm at, I will get reminder to get that task done. I'll make sure to get that task done. Or we can come in here and we can actually snooze this. And when we snooze this, and that will snooze it for 30 minutes. So there'll be times where, you know, I know I need to get something done, but I'm in the middle of something else and so I just I don't want to forget it. So I'll snooze it, pop it back, and it'll come back up 30 minutes later. Or we can reschedule it if we want to for a different day, different time. I however we want to do that or we can just complete it right here from the notification on the phone. Now if we hop back onto the desktop computer, I want to point out another way that we can use reminders because it doesn't always have to be a specific day and time. We can also create a reminder based on location. So if we hop into our reminder here, let's say, okay, this is day and time. We can set a specific day and time if we wanted to, instead of before the task. If there's not a particular due date on a task, we set a specific day and time, say, you know, Friday at 03:00 PM or something like that if we wanted to or we can set a location. Now, location based reminders are a great feature and I like to use them for places like maybe the local grocery store. When I get there, I have to do is to pop up my shopping list task. And so that way I remember to get things on my shopping list. So if we were to say something, maybe let's say when we get to the local targets. Once we get there, we can see the location when I arrive or when I leave depending on what, you know, what sort of reminder we want. In my case, in this example where I'm using it for grocery store or something like that. I want to use if I want to get the reminder when I arrive at that location, not necessarily when I leave, but I will sometimes use the location reminder for when I leave, say if I leave the house, maybe I want to have a reminder for when I leave the house for something I want to remember to do the next time I leave the house, something like that. So not only do we have reminders for before the due date on a task, we also have a reminder for specific day and time that's not associated with any sort of a due date on the task. But we also have location based reminders. And of course those are going to be super, super helpful on the mobile app on your phone. So as you can see, there's a ton of power in reminders. And that's one of the reasons why in and of themselves, they are enough reason for me personally to purchase a protocol. That's why I love reminders were to do it so I don't forget anything. So in this video, we did actually hop onto our phone and look at the reminders pop up on our phone there. But we haven't really looked at the to-do list mobile app. So let's hop into our next video where we'll take a look at that. See you there. 18. Overview of the mobile app: Up until this point, we've really focused mostly on using to-do list on a computer. But of course, one of the real powerful aspects of to-do list is we can use it anywhere. And now that we're familiar with the key features that to-do list has with projects and tasks and labels and things like that, the mobile app should feel very familiar, but let's take a moment to walk through it. And oh, and has a heads up as you can see here. I just want to point out that I am using the Android version of this app. Okay, So with the app open, we can see the menu over here on the left-hand side. So we can see all the things that we saw on the left side navigation menu on the desktop as well. We have our favorites, we have our projects, including the shared project that we added earlier in this course. We have our labels and of course we have our filters. So we have all of that up at the top. You can see we have our default views, the Inbox Today, Upcoming. We also have, we can see the karma there that we could click on in order to see our karma just like we can on the desktop as well. And then we have the, the, this is kinda like the main view, right? So of course adding a task is going to be super simple. We just click on the plus at the bottom rights. My task added from the mobile app can add that in. We can set our dates if we wanted to, just like we saw, you know, any sort of date that we want. Another thing I do want to point out is not only can we do that, we could also use our smart date recognition. So say this is going to be due tomorrow. Tomorrow, There we go. So it's going to use the smart date recognition just like we saw on the on the desktop and on the web version of to-do list. We could add in our project if we wanted to write. So we can add in the project, we can start to do that. We can add in our priority levels. We can add in any sort of labels that we want. Just like we saw on the desktop app that we've looked at throughout this, throughout this course, right? So all these different things we can add in our reminders if we wanted to, we just looked at that, you know, adding in a reminder based on a date and time or location-based reminder, things that we saw. You'll notice that there's no reminder. Do before because this task does not have a specific time associated with it, only a day. How has to do it's good to know. Give me a reminder 30 minutes beforehand when there's no time associated with it. So if we want that, we'd have to come down and add in a time. And let's say, okay, we're going to have this at 5PM reschedule. And now if we come in, we can add a reminder before the task. So now we can say, okay, I want a reminder three hours beforehand or whatever for this particular task, right? Once we're happy with it, we can actually, you know what, I'm going to take this, let's set this back to inbox so we can see it right here as soon as we create it. And as soon as I do that, you can see the app has been added to the inbox. Now, there is one thing I want to point out here in the mobile app, and this is just something as of recording this. And that is, if we come in here, you'll notice not only do we have our comments, so things that we looked at, our attachments, all this sort of stuff that we had we looked at earlier in this course. We also have something else you'll notice right beneath the title of the task, we have our description. So the description, as I'm recording, this is currently a feature that is in beta. And I've noticed that only available on the mobile app is not available on the desktop yet, at least as of recording this, by the time you watch this, I may be available on the desktop app. That's perfectly possible. But that's just points out that there are going to be times if you are in the to-do list beta that you might see some features pop up that are new and may not quite be everywhere, right? So if we were to hop back into our onto the desktop, I'll show you where we can change this if we come into our settings and then come to General down towards the bottom, we can enable or disable our beta access, right? So that's going to enable or disable the ability to see some of these new features that the team behind to-do list is putting out and maybe you don't want those. There is some, you know, of course, with anything, it's going to be a little bit less stable. Um, I mean, quite honestly in my personal experience, I've never really come across anything that has caused me to lose any sort of data or anything like that. But it is something that, you know, it is still going to be Beta and I always have to be a little cautious when you're using beta software, but that is something to keep in mind. Okay, Great. And that just about wraps up learning about the different features into dualists. We looked at the mobile app, we've looked at throughout this course. We've looked at projects and tasks and labels and filters and reminders and sinking to do list with Google Calendar and Email tab and you know, and tasks or projects and project templates and so many different things. We've looked at all of the different key features inside of to do it. But before I let you go, I know sometimes it can be tough to figure out a way to organize all of your tasks and projects and how to get that started. So in our next video, I'm going to walk through and explain how I organize things in my to-do list. So maybe it can give you a few ideas for how you can start to organize yours. See you there. 19. Steal ideas from how I use Todoist: Throughout this course, we focused on key features you can take advantage of inside of to-do list. Now from here on out, a lot of this is just going to have to do with how you want to use to do it. How can you use these features that we've looked at throughout this course to help you be more productive. Well, if you're like me, then a lot of times the best way to answer that question is to see how others are using it to steal ideas from how other people are using something to figure out how you can use it in your own routines. With that said, I wanted to take a step back from the features of to-do list and just chat with you about the features that we've learned about and how I use them. Although to be honest, not all of these are my ideas. Right? Over the years, I've spent a lot of time trying to figure out a way to be more productive. And over the years I've picked up things from family, friends, colleagues, how they do things that like I know that that's really good idea, I should try that or something like that. So many years ago I started using David Allen's Getting Things Done methodology. And that was kind of the backbone for a lot of how I organize things. And over the years I've customized how I organize things. So I'm not really adhering to GTD is strictly as I used to. So this is not strictly GTD stuff, but some of the core concepts are still there. And let's start with projects because that's something that's, there's a core concept there that comes from GTD. And that concept is a OR, or the area of responsibility. So an area of responsibility is basically what's an area in life that you're responsible for? Not necessarily individual projects, right? I know they're called projects inside a to-do list. But what's an overall area that you're responsible for? So let me hop into to-do list to show you how I organize things. So this is my project list, and of course, this one here at the bottom is the one that we were just working with in this course. I could actually come in here. Let's leave this project just so it's not. So we can see day-to-day. These are the projects that I'm working with. This is the hierarchy of my projects. So these are the root level areas of responsibility that I have. There's others, basically anybody but myself. There is myself. So tasks that have to do with me. And then there's work. And then there's someday maybe and we'll come back to this here in a minute. But if I break down this hierarchy here, we can see under others There's extended family. So you can see this is a shared project, right? So this is shared with other people in the family. They can add task, I can, I can add task. We can go back and forth and just kinda set there. There's family-based tasks that aren't necessarily shared with other people, but just test that I know I need to get done for somebody in the family. Task for friends. Similar concept, but tasks that I need to do for friends and of course get ideas throughout the year. As I think of something like a that would make a good gift for so and so I'll throw that into that project. So when a birthday rolls around or holiday rolls around, I've got some ideas for gifts already kinda lined up. So that's my others area of responsibility and how I organize that under myself. I have this broken down into bills. So straight up as, you know, bills, it was on their chores. Chores that need to get done around the house. Finances. So I separates the bills from finances. So financers would be more like a recurring task to remember to balance my budget every week, right? As opposed to bills that's 0. This bill is due on such and such a day. So that's how I kinda separate that in my mind. And then I have a shopping list. So when I'm at the grocery store, when I'm at the store, I can pop open the shopping list. A lot of those tasks, like I mentioned, with reminders, I will set up a location-based reminder on the task itself. You cannot set a reminder on an entire project, but I'll set it up on a task and then have a subtask. B, this is shopping list at the grocery store. This is shopping list at the hardware store, things like that. And then that task has a location-based reminder for whatever the story is I need to go to. And then there's social, so my own social media, things like that, things that I need to get done for that as well. And then I have work tasks. So under my work tasks, now we have all of our works are working with a friend of mine that I'm helping out on a lot of things for her. So tasks that are associated with that, my administrative tasks. So things that are work-related, but more administrative office paperwork, accompany paperwork, things like that, tutorial. So anything related to this particular course, and I'm creating this one here. Those tasks couldn't go inside of that project. They're based on a true story. We looked at the base on a true story podcast project that we created throughout this course. This is actually the project that I use for managing all of those tasks for the podcast itself. And then I do a lot of photography in sections so that anything that's related to my photography is going to be inside of that project. Now, I did mention someday, and this is a concept that has to do with someday. Maybe is what it's called Inside of GTD. So the concept of someday maybe it's essentially a place to throw all of the tasks or projects that you would like to do someday, Right? So there's not necessarily something that we're going to take action now right now, it's just an idea in the future. At some point, I would like to do X. Maybe it'll turn into an entire project for now instead of to do is I'm just going to create a task. I'm going to throw it inside of that someday project. And then I know that I am not forgetting that and it will be something that I come back to later on. Now when I come back to that, that's going to be something in a moment here I'll talk about my process and my productivity process, and that's going to come into play there. But for now, let's hop back into to-do list. So we've looked at projects, Let's look at labels. So the way I use labels are It's another term inside of GTD. It is context. So the context, basically the way I use labels, is the pre-work requisite for getting that task done, right? So if we were actually looking at these, we can see some of the labels that I have. So anything that has the label of home, that means in order to get this task done, I have to be at home. If I'm in the car, if I'm driving somewhere, if I'm at the office, if I'm out somewhere else, I cannot get that done. Right. I have to physically be at home in order to get that done. Maybe it's something like taking out the trash would be a simple one, right? I can't do that while I'm at the office because the trash is at home and so I can't actually get that done. And so there's no point for me to actually look at that task when there's no way that I can get that done. So that's how I use labels, seeing what desktop. So even though desktop is my desktop computer, there's apps, there's things that I have installed on my desktop computer that I can only access from the desktop computer. So if I'm not going to be on my desktop computer, then there's no point in looking at that, right? Something like the Internet is a little bit more vague. So I can access the internet from my desktop computer, but I can also access it from my phone, from my laptop. Me, I'm at the library wherever I may be. I can access the internet. And so it doesn't require me to be on the desktop, but it does require me to have Internet access. So hopefully it can start to make sense how I'm organizing the labels and the context and the prerequisite for being able to get that particular task completed. And you'll notice, even though earlier in this course I did create a label called computer. You'll notice day-to-day. I don't actually have a computer label. That's because I have multiple computers and so I broke it down. So I have a tablet and a desktop computer. And so there's certain things I can do on the desktop that I can't do on the tablet. And so I actually separate that out a little bit more in order to make sure that I have the context correct for any given task. Okay, so to recap, I use projects as an area of responsibility. So what are the things that I'm responsible for and then break it down that way, I use labels as context. What's the prerequisite before I can actually get this task done? So let's dive into my overall process before we wrap up this video. Just kinda the process for how I used to do is because it's more than just the features themselves and how I use the features, but, you know, the kind of workflow around that. So my process is broken up into three key timeframes. Every day, every other week, and every month. So every single day, what I'll do is I'll go through and I will pick the tasks that I'm going to get done that day. So we looked at goals, karma, I'll pick those key tasks that I want to get done that day. So it's something I do every morning of figure out what the tasks are that I'm going to get done that day. As a little pro tip, I would not recommend adding tasks mid day. Once you've decided this is what I'm going to get done today. Just stick with that, make sure you get that done. If there's other things that get added, then you can look at that tomorrow and get that done tomorrow. Now, there are some things to keep in mind here, of course, and that is that there might be some tasks that you have to get done, right then. Well, if that's the case, I would recommend removing another task. So to reiterate that, try not to add any tasks mid day. If you do have to add a task, add it to your inbox, and then you can organize that later on. And if you really have to add a task that cannot wait, it has to get done today, remove another task. So you're not you're not at, at the end of the day, you only have so many hours and you're not adding so much work that you can't get everything done. So that's how I work every single day, figure out the task, then we're going to get done that day and then start working on those tasks, pushing off anything else, anything else? It gets added throughout the day that I'll figure out that tomorrow and maybe added to the list of tasks n and you get done tomorrow. If I really need to, then I'll remove another task. Now, every other week, my process, what I will do is I will clear out the inbox, okay? So if there are tasks that I get added throughout the day and I haven't had a chance to actually organize those. I make sure to go through my inbox and to-do list and make sure it is completely cleared out. Those are organized. They have due dates on them if they're if they need to be there in the appropriate projects or create projects if needed, organize all of that every other week. That really helps the daily process. Even because if I know every single day if there's a task that gets added, but I can't do it right now. I can put in the inbox. My mind can rest at ease knowing that even though it's in the inbox, it will get taken care of. I'm going to organize that later on. Now. Every other I'm sorry, every month. What I'll do is I'll go through and I'll clear out all my inboxes, not just the to-do list in box. I'll clear out all my inboxes. That includes email inboxes and multiple email accounts. Anything that may have come in physical mail, anything like that, make sure to clear all of that out. Because in e-mail or physical mail, the bills that come in wherever that may be, there may be tasks is sodium associated with that. So at least once a month, what I'll do is go through, make sure that everything has tasks. Assume that the appropriate task associated, then the right project there had the right labels, everything is organized and ready to go. That way I make sure nothing slips through the cracks. One other thing that I will do every single month is to check that someday project, that someday maybe project. So anything that's got thrown in there that I created it and there's like, you know, someday I'd like to do that. I'm going to check that at least once a month and say Is this the month that I'm going to get that done? If so, maybe I need to create a project out of it starts to break that down into actionable steps and start to figure out what that looks like to actually get that done. If not, it'll stay in the Someday project until the next month. The last thing that I do at least once a month, is to give myself at least 30 minutes to do a brain dump. After going through clearing out of the inbox is going through the someday maybe project, anything like that. I'll give myself another 30 minutes and sometimes it doesn't take quite that long. Sometimes it takes a little bit longer, but at least 30 minutes to sit down and just think about things that might need to get done. Is there anything that I can think of inside of my head that may not have come through email, may not have been physical mail, may not have come through any other way. So maybe somebody just told me something that I'm, you know, sit down and think about that in order to try to dump any of that out of my brain. So take a step back and say, you know, what happened in this last month and what's going to be happening in the next month. I was there anything that I need to take action on maybe looking at the calendar, see if there's anything in there. Is there anything that I'm missing? You'd be surprised how helpful that can be. Even if there's nothing, even if you don't end up adding anything to your project list or your task list. Just the process of going through that brain dump helps your mind know that, you know what? I've checked that out. I know that there's nothing missing. There's nothing slipping through the cracks. Okay. So I know we've covered a lot in this video, but now that you know, how I used to do is hopefully you've gotten a spark or an idea somewhere in there for how you can start to use to do is to boost your own productivity. And that's bringing us to an end of this course. Now, you'll probably notice there are a few extra videos. Those are stand-alone videos where I walk through some filters that I use. Now if you want to check those out, I'll see you over there. But if not a kitchen next time. Thanks for watching. 20. Filter recipes introduction: By now, you're ready to start using to-do list on your own. Now I wanted to wrap up this course with some filter recipes. Each of the recipe videos is designed to be stand alone so you don't really need to watch all of them if you don't want to, but they do require the knowledge of how filters work inside of to do it. So if you haven't already, I would recommend watching the video in this course where we cover filters before watching these filter recipes. Now these recipes are a mixture of things that I've used over the years and some new ones that I'll continue to add to the course. After all, if there's one thing that's universal about being productive, it's that there's always new things to learn. There are always new ways to tackle the challenges that arise each day. And if you have any challenges for filters introduce, you'd like to see covered. Feel free to let me know. In the meantime, I hope you find these recipes helpful as you continue on your journey of being more productive. 21. Filter recipes: Everything due at work today: In this video, we'll learn how to set up a filter and to-do list that will let us see all the tasks we need to do at work. Now before we begin, every filter and to-do list will have some sort of a requirement for it to work. For example, if you call a project something different than I do, then of course, me using that project name and the filter isn't going to work for you because that project is called something different on urine. So requirement number 1 for this filter is to identify the project you use at work. After you've done that. Requirement number 2 is to identify the labels that you use at work. As I explained in a different video, I use labels as contexts. In other words, I'm using labels into DOAS to let me know where I need to be or what context I need to be in to get a task done. With that said, here is my filter. And I know it can look scary. But let's break this down. Okay, So let's start with the first part here. So this first part here over it says overdue. And then that line there means or. So. Basically what I'm saying is overdue or today. In other words, we're telling to do is to show us anything that is either overdue or do today. That's not so bad. So if we hop back to our filter now, the next step here are the parentheses. Now the parentheses separate expressions. So with that in mind, this whole expression here, overdue or today is one expression. Okay, So it started to make a little bit more sense how these are broken down. The next step here is, and so basically that means and right. So what we're saying here is we're going back to that overdue or today. And, and then another expression in this case, that expression is the name of a project. If you remember in a earlier videos explaining my projects. I have a project called nifty and that is my work area of responsibility. So what do we bundle all of this together? We are saying, fine tasks that are overdue or do today. And in a project named nifty. Now when it comes to filters, something very important to keep in mind. Project hierarchy matters. So in my case, I'll show you a screenshot of my project. Again, you can see nifty is the very root area of responsibility that matters because telling to do is to find anything in the project. Nifty also tells it to find anything in those sub-projects as well. So I can have sub-projects under there and it's all in the same area of responsibility. Hey, so that entire first expression is wrapped in parentheses, as you can see right there, it's wrapped in those parentheses. So we can start to get an idea of the next set there. So we can see this next one here is also wrapped in parentheses. And what that one means basically is if you go back here, you can see these two separated out here. But you'll notice there's a line, a bar, a horizontal bar, I'm sorry, vertical bar between those two expressions. So again, that means or, which means we're saying, okay, find anything that is overdue or do today, do that. And it has to be in the project nifty or find anything that is overdue and do today. And any of those labels, and that's where it's, it's helpful to find those labels. So again, let's break this one down just a little bit more. So we're saying okay, overdue or do today. We looked at that before. And then the labels here we're saying, and not only is it overdue gnarly, or not only going to overdo or do today, but it also has to have a label named work. Has, or it has to have a label named Internet, or it has to have a label named phone and email, JIRA, and so on. So that's why you need to know what the labels are that you're using at work in order to add those into that expression. So that final part, there is really just a list of labels that saying, okay, find me anything that's either overdue or it's due today and it has to have one of the labels that I use at work that are contexts that I use at work. So putting all of this together, it starts with any tasks that are overdue and do today. I'm sorry, overdue or do today. And in the project nifty. So overdue. And in the project nifty today and in the project nifty, right. Any of those or show me anything that is overdue or do today and has any of these labels. Right? So that's basically all that that filter does. And now that you understand, now that we walked through that, hopefully it's not nearly as scary looking at that filter overall, we're just really just saying find something that is either overdue. I don't want it to slip through the cracks, something that's due today. And either in the area of responsibility project that I've created or any of those contexts. So it might be actually in a different area of responsibility, like it might be in my family area of responsibility. But you know what, I do have access to the phone. So maybe over lunch break at work, I can make a phone call and get something knocked out, something like that. So that's why those are in there as well. And don't forget, if you love that filter, you can add it to your favorites. Now in my case, I use this filter all the time. So when I get to work, I can separate out everything that I need to get done today with only the things that I need to get done at work. I don't need to look at things that I can't do anything about at home when I'm at work and vice versa. Now, is there something that you're trying to get done as a filter introduced, let me know and just become another filter recipe for this course. Until then, feel free to check out some of the other filter recipes in this course and find. Now is there something you're trying to get done as a filter introduced? Let me know and it just might become another filter recipe for the course. Until then, feel free to check out some of the other filter recipes in this course to find inspiration for how you can get stuff done introduced. Thanks for watching. 22. Filter recipes: Everything due outside of work today: In this video, we'll learn how to set up a filter in to-do list that will let us see only the tasks that are not at work. So this is a filter that I've used a lot so I can focus on work tasks at work. And then when I'm at home, I have a different filter to focus on the rest of my tasks and leave work stuff and the office. So there are some filter requirements. Every filter and to-do list will have some sort of a requirement for it to work. After all, you call a project something different than I do. Then if you're trying to type in the exact same filter them using, of course that's not going to work because your projects are called something different in to-do-list than minor. So the first thing you need to do really is to identify the projects that you use outside of work. And when I'm using project names in the filter, you just swap out your project names for the ones that I'm using. So here is my filter, and this is the filter here. And let's break this down a little bit more. Okay? So starting with this part at the beginning, we are saying overdue. And then the bar, that bar in the middle, that vertical bar, that means or. So basically what we're saying is show me a task that is either overdue or do today. Okay. So that part here, really all that that's all that's saying. And then we have around that we have parentheses. So the parentheses separate expressions, okay? So that part right there is one expression. We are saying, show me task that are overdue. So search for that. Think of it kinda like math. We add parenthesis. It's saying, okay, first, look for tasks that are overdue or tasks that are due today. Then we're going to add to that and we're going to say on top of that. And that's what that means. The ampersand there means and, and show me a task that is inside of this project and that project is called others, that's the name of the project. So that isn't another expression. So we're putting those two expressions together into our filter. So basically, in a nutshell, that first part there is saying, find tasks that are overdue or do today. And in a project that is named others. Now, one key thing to keep in mind with filters here is that project hierarchy matters. So here's a screenshot of my projects here. And you can see the project, it's literally called others is that stands for other people, right? So it's others that is at the root. Which really means when I'm searching for tasks using a filter, when I'm searching for tasks in that project, It's really searching across everything. It's searching not only that, but everything that is indented in a different level, right? So the hierarchy matters there. Now, that first expression that we looked at that is wrapped in parentheses. So you can see that very first one there. You can see the parentheses wrapping around that. Now beneath that we have another set of parentheses and that is wrapped around Another, another expression there. So really what we're saying there, if you see the vertical bar, that also again means or. So really what we're saying is we have this expression here or this expression at the bottom. And then expression at the bottom is pretty much the exact same as the one that's above it. The only difference is the project name. So in that one, again, we're saying find tasks that are overdue or do today. And in a project named myself. And you can see I said others there. It actually is myself. I just forgot to swap that out, but you get the idea. You can see the project name myself in the actual filter up above. So putting all of this together, this is the overall filter and this is the breakdown. We're looking for tasks that are either overdue or do today. And in the others project or because of the hierarchy, any of these sub-projects underneath the others project in the hierarchy. Or That's one expression or task that are overdue or tasks that are due today and in the project called myself. Now, don't forget, you can add filters to your favorites as we learned earlier in this video. And that's one that I use a lot. So if I'm not at work, then I can see anything that is in those areas of responsibility outside of work and see the things that I need to get done or either done today or they are overdue. Okay, So in this video, we learned how to build a filter that will help you see only your tasks outside the office. Is there something you're trying to get done as a filter introduced, let me know and it just might become another filter recipe for this course. Until then, feel free to check out some of the other filter recipes in this course to find inspiration for how you can get stuff done, introduced. Thanks for watching. 23. Filter recipes: Someday/maybe: In this video, we'll learn how to set up a filter into dualist that I use for someday, maybe. So that might beg the question, what is someday maybe. Now I mentioned this briefly in a different video, but the concept of someday maybe comes from David Allen's Getting Things Done. Methodology. The basic idea is to throw all your future tasks or projects in there and then include them in your regular review. Now, I review someday, maybe once a month. And basically what happens is if there's something in there that I want to work on in the next month. Now, pull it out of someday maybe and put it in a project that it needs to be put in depending on the area of responsibility that it goes to. Now, if not, it will stay in there for another month until the next review and so on. So this is the filter that I use that I will actually look through as someday, maybe. Now, there are a number of ways that we can tackle this. But the way that I do it is to have a project for all those future tasks and potential projects. So that really means that the only key requirements for this filter is to have a project for someday maybe tasks to live in. Now that's because in to-do list, tasks need to live in a project and in the future, one of those tasks might actually turn into an entire project by itself. But until that time it's just a task and just kind of a reminder for something to think about in the future someday. Maybe it'll happen, maybe it won't, but that's the whole point of someday maybe. And that is pretty much the only prerequisite for this filter. So you can see I have a project called someday that those tasks living, and here is my filter. So rather than just looking at the project which I could do, I actually have a filter that looks like this and that is my someday maybe. Let's break this down. What this is and how this is different than just looking at the tasks in the Someday project. So what that bar means, that bar there means or that vertical bar. So basically what I'm saying is, fine tasks that are in a project named someday. That's what that first part means. Or any task that does not have a due date assign. So basically, what this means is it's going to look through all of our tasks and if there's not a due date assigned to it, that's going to show up in someday maybe because there are times where I forget to throw something into the Someday project. And since I'm reviewing it once a month, it really doesn't take that long to go through and make sure that things actually either have due dates if they need them or things that don't. I can look through them real quickly and see if they should be included in someday maybe. So it's a nice way of double-checking, making sure that nothing slips through the cracks. And again, don't forget to customize the filter with your own projects. If you have, someday, maybe project that's called something different. Of course you're going to have to change that name. And don't forget, you can also add the filter to your favorites. So I do use this once a month and sometimes I'll throw it in my favorites. Sometimes I don't want some month usually isn't enough to warrant putting in favorites. But if you do use this more often, of course, you can add that to your favorites as well. Now Is there something you're trying to get done as a filter introduced? Let me know and it just might become another filter recipe for this course. Until then, feel free to check out some of the other filter recipes in the course to find inspiration for how you can get stuff done, introduced. Thanks for watching.