Getting Started With Photoshop CC | Geoff Blake | Skillshare

Getting Started With Photoshop CC

Geoff Blake, Ten Ton Online

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42 Lessons (4h 20m)
    • 1. Welcome, Here's What We'll Learn

      1:06
    • 2. Understanding Raster Graphics

      4:00
    • 3. A Crash Course In Graphic File Formats

      7:45
    • 4. A Tour Of The Photoshop Interface

      8:41
    • 5. Customizing & Saving Interface Workspaces

      8:33
    • 6. Opening & Creating New Documents

      7:05
    • 7. Zoom & Navigation Techniques

      7:23
    • 8. Multiple Undo With The History Panel

      6:38
    • 9. An Introduction To Resizing Images

      9:51
    • 10. Cropping Your Images

      6:19
    • 11. Using The Canvas Size Command

      4:27
    • 12. Introducing Free Transform

      7:04
    • 13. Getting Started With Selections

      6:51
    • 14. Creating Elliptical Selections

      3:59
    • 15. Adding To & Subtracting From Selections

      5:29
    • 16. Transforming Selections

      4:09
    • 17. Floating Selections And Duplicating

      6:14
    • 18. Creating Selections With The Quick Selection Tool

      5:21
    • 19. Free Transforming Selections

      4:00
    • 20. Introducing Layers

      10:11
    • 21. Pulling An Image Off It's Background

      8:14
    • 22. Combining Images Together

      3:26
    • 23. Rearranging, Resizing & Renaming Layers

      4:41
    • 24. Selections & Multiple Layers

      8:26
    • 25. Blending Modes, Opacity & Fill Layers

      8:34
    • 26. Getting Organized With Layer Groups

      7:32
    • 27. Introducing Text Part 1: Artistic Text

      7:41
    • 28. Introducing Text Part 2: Paragraph Text

      6:11
    • 29. Filtering Layers By Type

      3:38
    • 30. Removing Red Eye From Photos

      3:24
    • 31. Removing Blemishes With The Clone Stamp Tool

      5:47
    • 32. Additional Touchup Tools: Spot Healing, Healing Brush & Patch Tool

      6:30
    • 33. Using Photoshop's Toning & Focus Tools

      5:53
    • 34. Using Photoshop's Auto-Correct Commands

      7:40
    • 35. Using Brightness/Contrast

      3:17
    • 36. Additional Colour Correction Commands

      6:57
    • 37. Non-Destructive Correcting With Adjustment Layers

      6:50
    • 38. Getting Started With Photoshop Filters

      7:47
    • 39. Working With The Filter Gallery

      6:59
    • 40. Using Filters Non-Destructively

      4:39
    • 41. Introducing Layer Styles

      7:36
    • 42. Where To Go From Here

      3:17

About This Class

You’ve seen all the amazing effects and results that are possible in Photoshop, but with such a daunting, in-depth piece of software, where do you even get started? With award-winning trainer Geoff Blake at your side, you’ll master Photoshop’s fundamentals in no time. Geoff’s casual, step-by-step approach makes it easy to understand otherwise complex topics and tough tasks. You’ll learn how to navigate through your images within the Photoshop environment, resize and crop images like a pro, and how to make pixel-perfect selections using a variety of techniques. Geoff will then introduce you to layers, including how to combine images together, apply effects like blending modes and opacity, and show you how to keep your projects organized. Then, it’s on to retouching images and working with Photoshop’s powerful colour correction tools, where you’ll learn methods for making your images look their best. Finally, you’ll be introduced to various special effects and how to work on your images non-destructively. All this and more awaits in Getting Started With Photoshop CC!

Download the project files here.

Transcripts

1. Welcome, Here's What We'll Learn: I hope Europe for some Photoshopped. How are you doing? This is Jeff Blake from 10 ton online dot com, and I'd like to welcome you to getting started with photo shop CC. All right, so the photo shop madness is about to begin before we really get started. I want to remind you to download your courses, project files so that you can follow me along through each of the hands on lessons throughout the entire course. If you're watching this course on 10 ton online dot com, you can download the courses project files right here. To click on this link, they'll download as a compressed ZIP file, so you'll need to double click on them to extract them before we can begin. All right. I hope that sounds good. I hope you're looking forward to some photo shop. Here we go. This is getting started with photo shop CC 2. Understanding Raster Graphics: all right now, before we really dive into photo shop, I think it's important to lay some groundwork here. This is sort of graphics fundamentals. Here. I want to talk about the difference between raster graphics and Vector graphics. So if you didn't know this, graphics come in two flavors. Raster and vector. You might want to jot some notes, by the way, as we go along here. So let's take a quick look at these two. Let's start off with raster graphics there, also known as bit mapped graphics, Depending on who you talk to. Don't confuse that with the bit map, graphic file format, you know dot BMPs. Have you ever seen those before or not? So that's evolved. All right. Now, what is a raster graphic? Well, a raster graphic is made up of tiny blocks or tiny points of color. Cold pixels and raster images are usually continuous tone images. So think of things like photographs and artwork and perhaps things that you scan into your computer. You know things like this. Okay, Raster graphics are also what's referred to as resolution dependent, meaning that when we scale are images larger or possibly smaller, that could result most likely results, I should say in a loss of quality. So be careful with this. So let me repeat this. If you take your image, your photograph and you try and make it larger, oftentimes you're gonna blow it. The quality. I see this a lot. By the way, people will download an image from the web and then try to use it in a commercial print publication. And it comes at all pixelated. It are low quality because you can't take a low quality image and make it a high quality image. That's just how it works. Okay, All right. Now, of course, Photoshopped is primarily a raster graphics editor. So photo shop is gonna help us edit and manage things like photographs and artwork and scans and all that great stuff. Photoshopped does have some vector tools built into it, but it is primarily built to handle raster graphics. Okay, so I hope that makes sense now over on the vector side, on the vector side of events, here's the deal with vector graphics. They're made up of mathematical lines, arcs, shapes, curves, all that great stuff. The good news is that if you and I want to draw a circle. We don't have to break out the scientific calculator. This software is gonna handle it all for us, which is great. Okay, now, oftentimes vector images vector objects are going to be solid colored objects. Think of things like text or logo's or buttons or icons. So maybe look around the room just for a moment and see if you can spot any vector graphics logos on the sides of products or icons or buttons. Things like this. Okay, now vector graphics are the opposite to raster graphics. They are resolution independent because they're all based on math. So this means that we can take a logo or take some text, and we can scale it larger or smaller, and it has no impact on the quality. Okay, I love working with vector objects and vector graphics for this specific reason so I could take a logo If I had a vector version of a logo. I could make it theoretically as large or as small as I wanted to, because it's all based on math. I don't have to worry about ah loss in quality. Now, Adobe Illustrator is primarily a vector graphics editor so think of Photo shop in illustrator as brother and sister. Photo shops really great at handling raster Graphics Illustrator is really great at handling vector graphics, although there is some overlap between the two. OK, so there we go. I hope that gives you a little bit of clarity in terms of raster graphics and vector graphics. Now let's take a look at some of the more common graphic file formats that you may encounter in the world of raster graphics. 3. A Crash Course In Graphic File Formats: Okay. Next, we've got to talk about graphic file formats, so at least you have ah, fundamental understanding of your different file formats in what you might use them for. Of course, there's a lot of graphic file formats. What I want you to know is that we're only gonna be focusing on the more common raster graphic file formats, at least in this exercise. Because we're talking about photo shop here and we're talking about working with documents inside photo shop. Of course. So the file formats that we're gonna be looking at are gonna be PSD J. Peg. I'm gonna talk about Giff and PNG together cause they're kind of related, and then we'll talk about tiff towards the end. Okay, so get, you know, pads ready. Here we go. We're gonna talk about PSD first. PSD stands for photo shop document, and this is the proprietary, the native file format four Adobe photo shop. So when we're working with our files inside, photo shop will want to be saving them as dot psd files. So very simply, we would just choose file save as and we would choose the dot psd file format from the format drop down menu and save up are filing away. We go from there. OK, now this file format is going to save Oliver Photoshopped layers all of our photoshopped layer effects. Any masks that we've created, any Alfa channels, text and pretty much anything else that photo shop is going to allow us to create. We can save into this dot psd file formats. So, in other words, six months down the road or a week down the road or whatever the case, maybe I could go on, open up my PSD and continue editing and working on my images from when I left off. Okay, so that works for you. Now, I want to stress this. This is a native Photoshopped format. So if we want to share our work, we're gonna need to take our Photoshopped document and save it into a non proprietary format, perhaps something like J peg or tiff. So say, for example, you're building a document for a client or your boss or a coworker. They don't have photo shop, but you want to show them what you've gone and created. Save your work into the J peg file format and they'll be able to open it up on their side. Okay, so hope that makes sense. So all you would be doing is taking your photo shop document and converting it to a different graphic file format, a graphic file format that other people can open and view. All right, hope that makes sense. Now. Speaking of JPEG, he's the next file format that we're gonna take a look at. He stands for Joint Photographic Experts Group. You don't really need to know that it's not on a test anywhere or anything like that, just some useless information for you now. The J big file format. It is best suited for continuous tone images like photos and supports millions of colors. Okay, and it's a widely supported graphic file format. It's often times used in Web design. But as I had just finished saying just a moment ago, if you want to be able to share your work with family members or a co worker or your client , it's a great graphic file format for getting your stuff around to other people, perhaps non technical, non graphic people who want to be able to see your work. Okay, now the JPEG file format reduces file size so it uses compression and it reduces the foul size by reducing the image quality. And this is called lossy compression. So in other words, it's going to sacrifice quality for file size. So when you go to save a G peg out of photo shop, you'll have a quality slider. The lower the quality, the lower the foul size, which is great. If you want to be able to email a file or something like this, attach it to a message or something. However, the quality of the image could likely be compromised. So it's a bit of a balancing act, OK, and the file extension for J. Peg I want to mention this as well is either dot jp e g or dot jp G. You've probably seen both of these file extensions in your travels. They're both J pegs. Okay, All right, so there's J. Peg now, the next to graphic file formats that I want to talk about are gonna be gift and PNG. And I'm grouping these guys together because, like J peg, both are gonna be used in Web design. So if you're interested in getting into Web design, your graphic file formats that you would use are gonna be JPEG, GIF and PNG, depending on what it is you're gonna be doing now. This course isn't directly related to Web design. But of course, we can use photos shop in a Web design workflow er, process. Let me give you a little bit of information at least to help you along here with Gift and J . Peg. First of all, gift. What gift does is it reduces the foul size, so there is compression, but it does so by reducing the number of colors in the image. It only supports a maximum of 256 colors, which is a far cry from the millions of colors that J Peg can support. So have you ever seen this? You open up a gift. Maybe you've seen this in your travels and someone is taking a photograph and they saved it as a gift. It looks all kind of distorted and kind of low quality and kind of kind of mashed up. It's because it only supports 256 colors. Can't support more than that. Okay, Now, on the PNG side, P and G is actually slightly more complex graphic file format because it comes in a variety of flavors. There's PNG eight p and G 24 PNG 32. And each of these three flavors can do different things. And I don't want to get into a whole discussion on the difference between all these graphic file formats and and this sort of thing. But the bottom line is that these various flavors are going to support lots and lots of colors and also transparency in your images, which is one of the reasons why it's used in Web design. I should've mentioned earlier. That gift also supports transparency and also animation, but in any regard. There you go. There's Giffen, PNG and a quick look at the two. All right, we've got one more graphic file format to go, that is. Tiff stands for tagged image format, and this is a graphic file format that is widely used and widely supported in the graphics industry. So all of your graphics applications in design and illustrator and photo shop and any others that you can think of Cannell open and work with tiffs. When I'm explaining what the tiff graphic file format is. I used the analogy of a Jeep. It's really good for getting around in. So if you want to be able to send someone your work, but you don't want to send them the fully edit herbal dot psd Photoshopped document, you could send them a tiff instead. And it's gonna maintain all the quality, the nice big file size, the nice resolution and so on. But you could save it in a non creditable version if you wanted to. Okay, however, the tiff file format does support Photoshopped layers if you want. If you're not sure what layers are, by the way, we'll be talking about those in just a little while. Also color profiles inside Photoshopped as well, all right, And once again, the file extension can either be dot t i f f or dot t I f. All right, so once getting possibly you've seen each of these in your travels. But in any regard. Thus concludes the shortened sweet look at graphic file formats again, I have to stress here, this is only a look at a small handful of graphic file formats that we have available to us . And don't forget. Specifically, we were talking about raster graphic file formats 4. A Tour Of The Photoshop Interface: All right, That's enough theory for now. Let's actually get our hands dirty inside. Photoshopped, go ahead and launch Photoshopped. Let's dig into it here. What I want to do in this exercise is I want to give you a quick five cent tour of the photo shop interface. Kind of give you the lay of the land here, okay? And I'm gonna try and keep this short and sweet cause I want to get to the good stuff here . I want to show you how to do things inside photo shop, But to get ourselves started here, I'm gonna start at the very top of the photo shop interface aware. Of course, we have the photo shop menus and, of course, inside the menus there are loads and loads of commands. We could easily spend a few hours discussing each of the photo shop menu commands, but I'm sure you and I have better things to do with our time. You're more than welcome. If you wanna take a quick look through some of the menus and kind of get a sense of some of the different commands and options and where they're located inside the menus, that is perfectly fine, but a lot of the menu commands you're going to see in action. As we work our way through the course together, just beneath the main menu, we have what's referred to as the options bar. This guy here Now your options bar might look a little bit different than mine because the options bar is dynamic. In other words, he'll change. He'll give us different settings, different options, depending on what it is that we're doing inside photo shop. What tool we have activated what task were were currently trying to ah, complete or accomplish inside are Photoshopped documents. You'll see this guy change, so keep your eyeballs peeled for this guy and the different options and commands that he contains. All right now, with that out of the way, let's move over to the left hand side of the screen where we have the photo shopped toolbox . Now the tool box, as the name would imply, is loaded, full of different photo shop tools that we can use to accomplish different tasks. Different different techniques and methods inside of our set of images and our files. Okay, and there's loads of tools here. The first guy here is called the Move Tool. You can hover over top of your tools to get a little tool tip that will tell you the name of the tools of this is the marquee tool, the last so tool and so on and so on, all the way down the toolbox. Okay, so, again, just like the menus, you might want to take a moment and just kind of familiarize yourself with some of the different tools that we have available. Noticed, by the way as well. This is a bit of ah, Photoshopped pro tip noticed. When I hover my most over top of a tool, it tells me the name. But then there's a single character inside brackets on the end of the tool tips. So rectangular marquee tool. And then it said, M, let me get this guy to appear. There he is right there. Or the lasso tool l or the crop tool. See these characters inside brackets? This is a keyboard shortcut to activate the tool inside the toolbox. Check this out. I'm gonna go after the second tool inside the toolbox, the rectangular marquee tool. But clicking on this guy requires a little bit too much effort on my part. So instead, what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna tap the M key on my keyboard. That activates the tool for me. Now I have to stress here, not shift em or control lamb or command M or anything like that, Just em all by itself or the for my move, tool or C for my crop tool l for my last so tool and so on and so on. P for the pen tool down towards the towards the bottom of the toolbox. H for hand Z or zed for the zoom tool and so on. Okay, now I have to stress here. I don't know all of them, but I know the ones that I use all the time. And that's what's most important. Okay, there you go. So there's your photo shop Toolbox. Pro tip. Now, something else that we can do here. Notice that some of the tools have a tiny triangle in the bottom corner. If you had a keen eye, you may have noticed that there what? This is indicating tow us is if we click and hold with our most, we're going to get a tool fly it that exposes additional tools so hidden underneath the lasso tool. We have two other lasso tools. We have the political lasso tool and the magnetic lasso tool as well hidden underneath the rectangular marquee tool. We have the elliptical marquee tool, the single row and single column Marquis tools as well. Okay, and again, you'll find these all the way through the entire toolbox. There are loads of tools inside the photo shopped to a box. Okay, so there you go. There's the toolbox, at least. Oh, there's one other thing I want to mention here. Way down towards the bottom of the toolbox, you'll see a black box and a white box. If you have different colors in there, try tapping the D key on your keyboard. Just D all by itself. The first guy here. This is the foreground color Swatch and the white guy. The second guy. He's the background color swatch. And this, of course, relates to working with color inside photo shop. Okay, so we have a little color area at the bottom of the toolbox. All right, so there's the Photoshopped toolbox now, over on the right hand side of the screen, we have the photo shop pallets or the photo shop panels. These guys give us access to all sorts of different commands and options and special effects. Sort of like the tools the pallets really come into play, depending on what it is that you're trying to accomplish inside photo shop. If you're doing some work on color, of course, the Colors panel or the swatches panel are really going to come into play. If we're working on color adjustments, we go for adjustments. If we're after some special effects, it's all about styles and so on and so on. There are loads and loads of panels. In fact, there's even more panels than what we see here. If I head to the window menu, what we'll get is our full laundry list of Photoshopped pallets or panels. And, of course, as you can see there, tons of them channels Russia's actions info Navigator, tons of them. I really gotta stress here, though, and this applies to the photo shop menu and the Photoshopped Toolbox as well were given loads and loads of options. A lot of these guys you're not going to use you'll use a handful of these panels just like you'll use a handful of the tools and a handful of the menu commands. Okay, depending on what it is you're doing inside photo shop, for instance, I sometimes use channels. I sometimes use brushes. I'm always using layers. I'm sometimes using adjustments I never use three D. I often times use actions. It really depends on what you're doing. So I don't want you to feel overwhelmed here that we have everything in the kitchen sink in here and that you feel you have to master every single one of them. You're gonna get really good at using a few of these and you're gonna get really efficient inside photo shop, Others you're gonna learn about as they as they come up for you. Others you might never use in a 1,000,000 years. OK, but the idea here is I can come to the window menu and I can go. Let's take a look at brushes off pop open brushes and there's my brushes panel now activated inside the photo shop interface. I could head back to the window menu and I could say, All right, let's check out actions. I choose actions and in the actions panel springs to life, and by the way, the panels have a few different modes that you can work on here. Notice I've got this double headed white arrow towards the top here. I can use that to collapse down the panel. The panels are now appearing inside a group of icons. There's my actions panel. There's my brushes panel, for instance. This guy here collapse him back down. Other panels appear docked into the interface, like swatches or color or styles and so on. But what I can do here is I can collapse them down, using again the white double headed arrow. Something like this. Collapse them down so that I see the names and the icons, something like this. Or Aiken grab this divider here and tug him towards the right and collapse everything down toe icons. There's, for instance, my layers. There's my swatches, my color and so on. So it really depends on how you wanna work with your photo shop interface. It's really up to you. Okay, in any regard, there we go. There's the quick five cent tour of the photo shop interface. I hope that was informative and educational. What I want to show you how to do next is how you can make the photo shop interface your own. How you can customize the photo shop interface to your own liking. Let's go and check out how to do that. 5. Customizing & Saving Interface Workspaces: Okay. Now, when I refer to customizing the photo shop interface, what I mean is arranging the panels and some of the other interface elements that we have in a way that works for you. So, in other words, if you run into five different photo shop users, you're going to see five different interfaces for Photoshopped. Everybody always customizes things to their own liking. Think of this as rearranging the furniture and decide photo shop. Okay, Now I'm gonna get you started off with a look at some of the pre existing photo shop work spaces. What a workspaces is a saved photo shop interface. It's pretty simple way up towards the top right corner where it reads essentials. If you drop down that menu, what we're gonna see is a set of existing or pre created Photoshopped workspaces or interfaces. So, for instance, I could go painting. Maybe I'm going to use photo shopped for a lot of digital painting. Well, I'm gonna go painting, and what happens here is some of the panels and other interface elements rearrange themselves. I am now inside the painting workspace. If that makes sense, I could drop this guy down. Maybe I'm going to use photo shopped for a lot of photography. Instead, I'll choose this guy again. We get a different arrangement of the panels inside the interface and so on with typography or with motion, lots of different interfaces, lots of different options that we have here. Okay, Pretty straight forward. I'm gonna go all the way back to essentials, though. And what that does is that takes you and I all the way back to where we started. So what I'm gonna do here for you is I'm going to simultaneously show you how to customize the photo shop interface and also how to save your own custom work space that you can go and retrieve at any point in time. Okay, so you can certainly follow me along here If you want again, though, everybody typically will find their own workspace that works for them. Here's what I'm gonna do. I'm gonna do some some opening and closing of some different Photoshopped panels. I'm gonna keep my layers panel open. I'm gonna start with him, but channels I'm gonna get rid of. How am I going to get rid of him? Well, check this out. I'm gonna take the channels panel tab itself where it reads channels. And I'm gonna click and tear that guy away. Click and drag on that guy and pull them right out into the middle of the screen. And then I'm gonna click on the X in the top corner. Now, this doesn't mean that I've deleted the channels palette or anything like that. He's still available. Don't forget from our laundry list of Photoshopped panels. I can always go in, retrieve them whenever I want. He's simply not available on screen at any given time. I have to go to the window menu to activate him. That's all that means. Okay. All right. So I've got layers. I've got paths. That's fine with me. I use paths quite a bit. I'm gonna help towards this guy, though. My history panel, which I use a lot of now if you don't see this icon on screen, just had your window menu and look for history. What I'm gonna do is I'm gonna tear this guy away, and then what I'll do is I'll drag and drop them into the Paths group. Now, you have to be a little careful here when you're dragging around here. Look for the blue rectangle As you're moving, you're most around. It's that blue rectangle that I'm after When I see the blue rectangle I'm gonna let go with my most. And what that does is that groups the history panel together with paths and layers. Okay, as a matter of fact, what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna take history. I'm gonna drag him towards the left to rearrange the panel groups and Alecos Layers history paths. OK, this is what customizing the interface is all about. Okay, All right. Now, the actions panel, for myself, anyway, is still kind of kicking around here. I don't want this guy on screen all the time. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna tear him away, and then I'll close them out, just like I did with channels. And, you know, as a matter of fact, I'm gonna do that with a few other guys here properties. You know what? As a matter of fact, I'm gonna keep properties kick around because I do use this guy. I'm gonna drag and drop him into the layers. History and paths group something like this, but my brushes and also the brush presets I don't need. So what I'm gonna do here for these guys is I could tear them each of them away and then close them out individually. Or I could go to their panel menu. Now, this is something that didn't show you earlier, which I should have. Every panel has a menu in the top right corner. And when I click on this guy, we're going to get a variety of options. What I'm gonna do, though, is I'm gonna choose clothes Tabb Group, and that'll get rid of those two guys for me. Okay? So just to rewind for a second. Because I did mean to show you this earlier, and it slipped my mind. Every panel has a panel menu. Okay. Or at least most of the panels have a panel menu that give you lots of different options related, of course, to that panel. Okay, So apologies for not showing you that earlier. Okay, So here's my set up. So far, I've got color. I've got swatches, adjustments. I'm gonna keep them kicking around styles. You know, I'm not going to use styles, At least not for now. So close him out. adjustments. I'm gonna drop him into color and swatches something like this. What I try to do myself is I really try to work in kind of Ah, a minimalist, sort of economical approach. That's my approach Anyway, for photo shop and some of my other adobe programs. So I'm gonna reduce down the number of panels that I'm working on. The other thing that I'll do sometimes is all collapse these guys down. Just toe icons, sometimes icons and the names. But I'm gonna go all the way down to just icons. This gives me a huge amount of elbow room here inside the the actual photo shop work area. Okay. All right. Now some other panels that you may wanna have kicking around. I'm gonna head to the window menu one more time and let's see, I'm going to start off with paragraph, gonna grab paragraph that opens up my paragraph panel this guy here and you know, I'm also gonna grab character. He opens up his well, so paragraph in character. If you're doing a lot of text formatting and things like this inside photo shop, you may wanna have these guys kicking around. What? I'm gonna do, though, is I'm gonna group these guys together again. That blue rectangle that we see when we drag a panel into another panel, we'll group them together for us. And then what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna take these guys by dragging on the dark grey bar across the top, and I'm gonna dock thumb to the interface right now. They're just kind of floating around in the interface. I can move them around wherever I want. I'm gonna dock them, though. Way over on the left hand side of my screen. Note the blue vertical line running right up the edge of the tool box, indicating that if I let go with my most, these guys air now docked over onto the left hand side of the interface. You know, if I wanted to, I could go on, open up more panels and doc some of these other panels over onto the left hand side of my interface. That is perfectly fine. Whatever you want to do here and as a matter of fact, for good measure, I'm gonna collapse these guys down to icons as well. Something like this. Okay, so obviously, the more that you work with Photoshopped, the more comfortable you're going to get them. Or you're gonna get an idea of what all these different panels and tools and so on do, and obviously, the better sense you're gonna have of which panels and which tools you're gonna use most often in which one do you want to keep kicking around on screen? Okay, so what I want to do now is I want to save this custom work space that you and I have gone and created. So I'm gonna head back to this workspace drop down menu in the top, right corner, and I'm gonna choose new workspace, just like so. Now, give your new workspace some kind of a name. I'm gonna name this after myself. Jeffs. Snazzy workspace. How's that? Something like that. Something that'll work for you Or, you know, maybe a little bit more realistically, a little bit more. Real world, some workspaces. Maybe I'll want to set up for different purposes. For example, Web design work, space photo, touch up, work space, things like this. Work spaces that will give me access to the tools and panels that I'm gonna use for specific tasks. Okay, so consider that in any regard. I kind of like the name of this workspace, so I'm gonna stick with it, save it up. There it is, Jeffs. Snazzy workspace. So now I can switch it to some of the other workspaces that we were exploring earlier on. And then, of course, at any point in time, I can go back to Jeffs Snazzy workspace. And sure enough, there's my saved customized photo shop interface. 6. Opening & Creating New Documents: okay, Creating new documents, opening documents you might be sitting there going. This is easy stuff, but there's actually some cool things that I want to show you. Here. Do you like your keyboard shortcuts? I love keyboard shortcuts. You could choose file new instead. I'm gonna hit command in here on the Mac or control and over on the windows side. And that'll bring up my new document dialog box for me. This is when I want to go and create a brand new blank document here inside photo shop, Of course. Now, inside the new document dialog box. We have a pile of options here. You could give your new document and name if you want. You could set the dimensions for your document. Now, you're dimensions are gonna be measured in inches, often times by default. But you can go and change that. We have a variety of units of measurement that we can use pixels great for Web design, by the way. Inches, of course, for the world of print design centimeters millimeters and so on. Okay, so good enough there. We also have the resolution of the file. This is something that we're gonna be talking about in just a little while, but just make a mental note here. 72 pixels per inch or pixels per centimetre. That's the default there. We'll come back to this. OK? It's important stuff. The color mode as well. This is something else that will talk about in just a little while. Rgb c m y que. And there's a few others in there as well. Okay, No, if you wanted to. What you could do is you could choose a preset to create a new document off of Sort of like a template. If you want to think of it like that, U s paper, photo, Web film and video and so on. Okay, but oftentimes what I'll do is I'll just come in here and I'll say, All right, I'm creating a new print document, perhaps a brochure or something like this. And photo shop is in the best place to design a brochure. But it's just a quick example, and I know that it's gonna be 12 inches in width by who knows, six inches in height, something like that. Okay, then I would simply click on OK and the new document gets created for me something like this. Okay, now, notice that the new document appears as a new tab up towards the top here. So, in other words, if I open up another file Hill appear as another tab across the top, we can have tons and tons of different images and files opened up inside photo shop at any given time. For example, try hitting command or control O on your keyboard. That's the same is choosing file open. And if you navigate into your Project files folder that I've given you, you'll have a variety of files to choose from. I'm gonna grab this guy here always bright ideas PSD. And as a quick side note dot PSD is the native file format for photo shop. It stands for Photoshopped document. Okay, go ahead and pop this guy open. And as I was mentioning just a moment ago, he piers as a second tab across the top of the photo shop interface. So now I can flip back and forth between my two files that I have opened inside Photoshopped. Perhaps I want to share some resources between the two files and so on. Okay. All right. Now what? I could do if I were so inclined is we saw this earlier with our panels. We saw that we could tear panels away and have them float in the middle of the photo shop, interface or screen. We could do the same thing here with our files. I could grab this always bright ideas. I could tear him away. So now he's floating inside the photo shop interface and I could move him around wherever I want inside the interface. I could do this with my untitled file. I could tear him away as well and have him floating around notice. Bright ideas is gone. What the heck happened to him? Well, if I go to my window menu and scroll all the way down towards the bottom, there he is, right there. Always bright ideas. He's kicking around there somewhere. He just have to go and find him. OK, so in other words, you can work with your your files, your opened images inside Photoshopped as tabs which he saw earlier or as floating windows . It's really entirely up to you. I prefer the floating windows, but that's a personal preference. OK, let me show you something else. Here. I'm gonna close out of these files, you can click on the X in the top corner, or you can hit control or command w on your keyboard as well to close these guys out. I love these keyboard shortcuts. Helped us move a little bit faster inside photo shop. Okay, let me show you this. This is another one of these Photoshopped pro tips that I'm gonna try and jam into the course here for you. So I don't have anything opened inside Photoshopped. I know that if I want to go and open a new file, I can choose file open or I can hit control or command o on my keyboard. Or I can double click on this seemingly useless great background inside voters Job double click on that. And that'll open up the open dialogue box for me where I can go and open up another file if I want to. Okay, so what I'm gonna do in this case is I'm gonna hold down the shift key, and I'm gonna open up three files here, so I'm opening up. Always bright ideas. I'm also opening up fish bull dot PSD and go getter radar PST by the way you can use control or command to select individual files as well or multiple files. Really? I should say over those guys up. And this is what will wind up with. Okay, so now I have three document tabs running across the top of the interface. Always bright ideas fishable. And if you can tell me what movie this is from, then you'll have my undying respect. So there we go. There's opening up multiple files. Hopefully, no big deal. Okay, now, I mentioned this earlier that I don't really like the tabs. And again, it's a personal choice. Let me show you something here. I'm gonna close out of these three fouls again. You can either use the X to close out of these guys or control or command. W on your keyboard is perfectly fine as well. Check this out. I'm gonna head to photo shops preferences. Now, if you're on the windows side, head to your edit menu here on the Mac, I'm gonna go to the photo shop menu and then down to preferences. And then I want you to go down to interface choose interface that'll get us into the interface preferences and What I'm gonna do is I'm gonna uncheck open documents as tabs, okay? And then I'll go ahead and click on. Ok, then what I'll do is I'll double click on the seemingly useless gray background. I'm gonna go and grab these three files one more time, always brought ideas Fish bowl and go get a ray. And I'll pop these guys open and notice that they all open now as floating windows rather than as tabs. Okay, again, it's personal preference. I could hit controller Command and on my keyboard to go and create a brand new document, perhaps a document that's gonna be five inches by five inches within height. There, go ahead and click on OK. And he also opens as a floating window. Like so. So there you go. There's a bunch of different ideas here for you to consider and, of course, a bunch of different shortcuts as well. To finish things off, I'm gonna close out of all the files that I've opened up here again by using control or command w on my keyboard 7. Zoom & Navigation Techniques: this lesson, I think, is gonna be one of the most important in the entire course. Because it's really gonna help you work inside Photoshopped more efficiently getting around inside your images, navigating within your projects. So there's lots that I want to show you here. I'm sure you're gonna want to take lots of notes here. What we need to get ourselves started is an image toe work on. So I'm gonna double click on my grey background and I'm gonna use fish bowl dot psd Go ahead and pop this guy open inside Photoshopped. There we go. Something like this. Okay. All right. We have this guy opened inside Photoshopped. Now what if I want to zoom in and out on this guy? What if I want to navigate around inside this guy? Well, there's a variety of methods a variety of approaches to achieving this. What I'm gonna do is I'm gonna head down towards the bottom of my toolbox and I'm gonna grab this fella here. The zoom tool. You can tap your Z key on your keyboard if you want. Notice my cursor changes to a magnifying glass tool with a plus inside of him the plus, indicating that if I single click with my most, I can start to zoom in on my image. And as a matter of fact, I can zoom way in on my image. Something like this. Notice how we get this mosaic pattern, These air, the pixels inside of our image. Okay, Now I can continue zooming in on my image. Eventually, I'm gonna hit the maximum zoom here, which is 3200%. Now, how the heck do I get back out? Well, try this. Try holding down option on your keyboard or bolt on your keyboard. If you're on the Mac side, hold down. Option. If you're on the windows side, hold down bolts. Notice the plus inside my cursor now changes toe a minus. And I can now zoom out on my image. Like so. Okay. In fact, I can zoom quite a ways on my image. That is something like this. Okay, As soon as I let go of cult or option on my keyboard, my cursor changes back to zoom in tool. Okay, so it's sort of like having two tools built into one just by throwing an adult or option. Okay. Now, The other thing that you can do is you can click and drag with this tool something like this. So you can either single click with the tool like this, or you can click and drag with the tool when you're clicking and dragging, for instance, down and towards the right, I'm zooming in. If I click and drag, let's see here, upwards and to the left or right there we go. I can start to zoom out on this guy takes a little bit of getting used to Okay, something like that. But you know what? This is all fine and well, but I actually have another method for zooming that I prefer. Give this a try. I'm gonna tapped the V key on my keyboard. That takes me back to the move to a way up towards the top of my toolbox. And give this a try. Try holding down either control space bar on the windows side or command space bar on the Mac. And in this particular file, I get some margins appearing here. But I'm really not interested in those. What I am interested in is what happens to my cursor notice my cursor changes to the magnifying glass tool, meaning that if I single click with my most or click and drag with my most, I can zoom in and out on my on my image. Okay, in this case, a cartoon octopus monster. I'm really not sure what that that is something that I drew for us to use. Now, what I can also do with control, space, bar or command space are being held down is I can throw in ault on the windows side or option on the Mac side toe. Also, zoom out if I want to zoom out by single clicking. Okay, this is what's referred to, by the way, as a toggle. What I mean by that is I'm temporarily accessing the zoom tool while I have another tool activated inside the toolbox. Is is a really nice, fast way for getting around inside your images. Okay, so there you go. Pretty cool stuff. Now give this a try. Try zooming in on your image. To some degree, something like this would be perfectly find something like that. What I'm gonna do now is I'm going to switch over to the hand tool at the bottom of the tool box just above the zoom tool. What the hand tool will allow me to do is move around inside the image upwards downwards to the right, to the left. Something like this, this would be the same. Is using my scroll bars inside the actual window interface. Something like this. So I can pan around inside my image. Look at what I have here. Maybe this is a photograph that I'm doing some touch upon. Or perhaps I'm coloring in this cartoon. Something like this. Okay, now give this a try. Tap your wiki on your keyboard one more time. Back to the move, tool. Right. What I'm gonna do is I'm going to temporarily access by hand tool by holding down just the space bar on my keyboard. This will allow me to pan around inside my image. Something like this. As soon as I let go of the space bar, I'm back in this case onto my move tool or whatever other tool I had previously activated inside the toolbox. So there you go. Another toggle for you. Okay, so there you go. I mean, we could leave it at this. There's more than enough for you. to get around inside your images. But of course, I gotta throw a few other things at you here. You like your keyboard shortcuts? I think I've asked you this already, once or twice. Try this. Try using control or command minus on your keyboard or plus on your keyboard to zoom out and zoom in, respectively. Like so. Okay. Or you could try this. Try hitting controller. Command zero on your keyboard to fit the image into your window. Or try this controller Commander one on your keyboard. And what that will do is that will zoom your image to 100%. How do I know I'm at 100% bottom left corner right down here, 100% Right there. As a matter of fact, what I could do, I suppose I could say, Hey, let's zoom into 215% or whatever type in a value their hit. Enter on my keyboard and zoom into that percentage. Hold down the space bar pan around to the location that I want to arrive at, and then away I go. Okay, so a lot of times you'll see these these different photo shop uses ripping through their work, just zipping along. You know, something like this moving along, working on whatever it is they're attempting to accomplish in your corn pan with that. Is that guy doing it? Looks like he's playing piano. It's all these keyboard shortcuts. This is exactly what they're doing. Okay? And you'll find me as we start working our way through the course, I'll be zipping along and I'll go. Okay, I'm holding down my space bar and I'm moving around that I'm zooming out that I'm zooming to 100% or fitting the image into the window. Something like this. Okay, so if you're a brand new photo shop user, grab a sticky note right down these shortcuts on the sticky note and hang it off the bottom edge of your monitor until they become second nature and they'll become second nature within a week or two of working inside photo shop. Okay, so there you go. I want to mention one other quick thing I mentioned zooming to 100% control or command one . Why would I want a zoom 200%? Well, I do a lot of web design work, and I do a lot of Web design work inside photo shop. So if I want to see how this image is gonna look inside of, ah, Web layout or inside of, ah, Web browser, zooming to 100% gives me an idea of what my work is gonna look like when it's being viewed inside of, ah, Web browser. So there you go. That's why I mentioned that one. All right, so there you go. There's a whole pile of different methods for you for getting around inside your Photoshopped projects. 8. Multiple Undo With The History Panel: all right now, before we move on, there's one more thing that I wanna squeeze in here. This is a photo shops history. Now this relates to undoing steps inside photo shop. A lot of applications have multiple undoes, believe it or not, but photo Shop only has one official undue level, if you can believe it. But many, many versions back. Photoshopped came up with something called History, which, for all intents and purposes is indeed multiple undoes. But for the record, there is only one official undo inside Photoshopped. So let's say, for instance, were working on our image and we apply a special effect or something like this. We could Onley head to the edit menu and choose undo. Once that's it. That's all we got, then what we'd have to do is we'd have to head to history. So let me introduce you to history. Usually I'm using my history rather than undoing, because there's many undoes in history, but only one official undo, as I'm saying here. So head over to your right hand side and look for your history panel. You may have to head your window menu and look for history by the way. What I'm gonna do with this guy just to help us along here is I'm gonna tear him away for the time being. And what I'm gonna do is just kind of position him on screen so we can zero in and focus on this guy. What's cool about the history panel is imagine like he's spying on you. Imagine he's keeping his eye on everything that you do inside photo shop, and he tracks everything that we do inside photo shop. So what's a good example to demonstrate history for you? Well, I'm gonna completely jump ahead and foreshadow on something that we're gonna take a closer look at in just a little while. Photoshopped filters these air, our special effects what I'm gonna do here, and you're more than welcome to follow along or you can just kick back and watch the show is I'm gonna go and throw on a couple of quick filters here. So I'm gonna go filter and then down to style eyes. And quite honestly, I'm just gonna throw on a couple of quick filters just taking the defaults, Something like this. Okay, So, as you can see, I now have this this special effect or this style now applied to my image. Notice what happens inside the history panel. So inside the history panel, it says fish bowl dot psd, and then it has open and then it has tiles. Let's go and throw on a few more quick filters here. I'm gonna go filter and then down to blur and then down to Gazi and Blur. That's a pretty popular filter here. And maybe crank up my radius or my blur amount on. Click on OK, and now my image looks a little bit fuzzy. Once again notice what's happening inside the history panel. We now have Ghazi and Blur. Let's go for one more here for good measure. I'm gonna head down to pick so late, and then let's go down to Meso Tint and I'll take the defaults on this guy as well. So we wind up with something like this. Very grainy, very blurry. Obviously, I've completely kind of destroyed my image. What happens a lot of times inside photo shop you'll find is you'll have this amazing bright idea for some crazy idea. Let's head down this path and see the results, and you wind up with something like this and you go cheese The heck was I thinking this was ah much better idea when I when I initially had the thought We can head to the history panel now and we can literally rewind time, weaken back up in time. So right now, meso tint the bottom most item inside the history panel is selected here. The most recent items, or the most recent steps that we've taken inside photo shop, appear at the bottom of the history panel. The earlier steps appear towards the top of the history panel. So what I could literally do is I could take myself back in time just by clicking on these different history steps. There's the Gazi and Blair. There's the tiles. Let's rewind all the way back to when we had initially opened the file. Okay, now I really want to make sure that you understand this, that I'm simply using filters as an example, the history panel will work for all of your Photoshopped commands and techniques and tasks . I'm just using the filters. Here is a quick example, so I can step forward, step backwards in time, something like this all the way back to the beginning if I want or all the way forwards in time. If I grab ah history step That's halfway through my full list of history steps and I go and perform some new command These steps here, Ghazi and Blur and Meso tint will be deleted and they'll be replaced with the new steps that I partake in. Okay, milk, that makes sense. Now, Last but not least, I want to show you this The top most item here, fish bold dot psd If I click on this guy that takes us all the way back to where you and I had started very similar to clicking on Open. So it basically takes us back to the starting point. Okay, So kind of like closing the file, that saving the changes and then reopening the file if you want to think of it that way. Okay, so there's the history. What you could do, if you wanted to, is you could use some keyboard shortcuts to step forward and step backward in time. Let me grab a history. Step halfway through my list of history steps. There we go. Now. My commands aren't great. It's so I can step forward by hitting shift command Z on the Mac, you're or shift control Z on the windows side or to step backwards in time I was holding on old or option and in control or command and then z on my keyboard, if you want. Okay, so there's your to history commands. One last thing that I'm gonna show you with your history, and then we'll move on. If I head to the history panel menu, I could head down to history options, and we have a variety of history options that we can choose from here. Specifically, I wanted to show you this guy here automatically create the first snapshot. So what this means is, as soon as we open up the image, we're going to get a snapshot. That's what these guys air called at the very top of the history panel created for us. Okay, so I would highly suggest that you have this option turned on. There are some other options in here automatically create new snapshot when saving. You could certainly do that. So whenever I save my file, I'm gonna get a new snapshot appearing at the top of the history panel allow nonlinear history. That's a pretty cool options, as well as a few other options that we have there as well in any regard. There we go. There's our history panel. I wanted to introduce him to you. I'm gonna take my history panel now and drag and drop him back over onto the right hand side to tuck him back in to the photo shop interface. So there we go. There's a look at photo shops, multiple undo using the history panel. 9. An Introduction To Resizing Images: all right, we have the fundamentals under control. Hopefully. Now what I want to do is I want to talk about re sizing your images. I want to talk about cropping your images, photo shops, canvas a few other things in here as well. Let's get started here in this exercise with re sizing your images, making them bigger and making them smaller. Now, before we really jump into this topic, what I really want to stress here is that you don't resize your original images. Hang on to your originals, back them up. We want to resize copies of your images because you know, this has happened to me in the past. I'm guilty of this where I take the original and I shrink it way, way down, and then I save it. And then I close it so I can't undo. And then maybe the next day or a week later on I go. Aggies, Where's the original? I can't find Oh, wait. I resized the original. I can't go back to the original dimensions because I overrode the original file. So lesson learned, right? So let's get started with an image here. I'm gonna go on double click on my seemingly useless gray background here inside Photoshopped and go ahead and grab a file. Here. You can even use one of your Rome. That is perfectly fine. I think maybe what I'll do is I'll grab go getter radar PSD. You know, pop this guy open. There we go Now Photoshopped has a dialog box dedicated to sizing and scaling your images. Let's go and take a look at him. He's found underneath the image menu as a matter of fact image and then down to image size . There's your keyboard shortcut. If you're interested. Command option I on the Mac side control Ulta I on the windows side, and this is the image size dialog box revamped in this latest version of photo shop. So here's the grand tour of the Image size dialog box on the left hand side. Here we have this little kind of this little preview window here, which I don't even really bother using. You can zu mode and zoom in on your image if you want. I don't really know why, because I have my original image sitting there in the background so I don't even really pay attention to this guy. More importantly, all the action is happening over on the right hand side of the dialogue box right over here . So there's the file size for my image, my current image that I'm working on 7.5 megs. And then the next item that I have down is the dimensions. Okay. And what I'm seeing here are the dimensions of the file or the image in pixels. You can see P exercise 2000 pixels by 13 19 pixels. What I can do, though, is I can drop down this dimensions menu, and I can change the unit of measurements, I could say. All right, tell me what the what? The image is in the images. Dimensions, I should say in inches. So six in, let's say, 6.5 by about 4.34 point four. Something like that. Okay. Or of course, if I go percent, then we're gonna get 100%. The image hasn't been criticized yet, so it's at 100% with 100% height and so on and so on. You could go centimeters. You go millimeters. Whatever works for you. Okay, So the idea here being that if you're working in the world of print design, you will typically use inches. If you're working in the world of Web design, you will often times use pixels. Okay, myself. Personally, I flip flop back and forth between those two worlds print design and Web design. So all depending on the project that determines the unit of measurement that I'm gonna use . Okay, now, this fit to drop down menu I never use in a 1,000,000 years. But I'm obligated to show it to you here so you can choose different, different dimensions here. Presets, if you will, you can create your own. If you want, you can load them in. You can save them out, all that kind of stuff. But I typically don't bother with this stuff. Okay, more typically, what I'll do is I'll come down to width and height. Now, notice that the width and height are linked together. This means if I change one, the other is gonna change automatically. So, for instance, if I take my width, I go all right. It's about 6.5 inches. Let's say, for instance, I want to size this image down to just five inches. I'm gonna type in five here, and the height automatically adjusts for me. Okay? That's because this icon here is activated. So we're constraining was referred to as the aspect ratio, the width and the height, right? If we announce unlinked these guys, unlike the width and height, Now I can change the width and the height independently of one another, and you wind up getting what I refer to as the carnival funhouse mirrors. You get the distortion happening here. You know, those carnival funhouse mirrors that that make you appear tall and skinny or short and wide . You know something like this, right? So you start distorting your image, which I don't like personally, I really want to make sure that I constrain my proportions. So again, if one of the values changes, the other value is gonna change is well, okay. And of course, once again, I can go and change my unit of measurement inches centimeters millimeters pixels. Okay, so here's perhaps a more really world example for you. I come in here, I'm switching my unit of measurement two pixels because I'm working in a Web project and building a Webley. Let's say for instance, and in my Web layout, in my code, maybe in Dreamweaver or maybe in some other application. Maybe I'm using WordPress. Who knows? I know that the area that I've left for my image is exactly 500 pixels in width, so I would type in 500. Like so, the unit of measurement, of course, has already set aspect. Ratio is locked, so the height automatically changes and that's it. I can go ahead and click on OK, and then save this guy out in a Web friendly file format. That's kind of the long and short of it. Okay. However, there are some additional options that we have inside this dialog box which start to get a little bit technical a little bit on the complicated side. We have the resolution. Okay. Now, ah, lot of people, even professionals, would come into this dialog box. Ingo Oh, you've got a 300 dp I image. Have you ever heard of that before? D p I So you've got a 300 BP I image or a 200 GP I image. As a matter of fact, that's not correct, because we're not working in DP. I D P. I, by the way, stands for dots per inch. We're actually working in something called pixels per inch. Okay, And this is where it gets a little bit confusing and, truth be told, a little bit above and beyond the scope of this course. The shortened sweet is that pixels per inch is used on screen by software. Dots per inch is used in the world of print, typically in offset printing. Okay, so all this number means at this point is, if I were to print this file on my desktop printer or, you know, on a commercial printer than 300 pixels would be printed for every inch of paper. That's all that means. OK, so I could come in here and I could change this value if I wanted to. I could knock it down to 100 or I could crank it up to maybe 600 something like this. Okay, but here's the interesting thing is in the world of print resolution matters. But in the world of Web design, resolution does not matter. Okay, so a 600 pixels per inch image is just fine in the world of Web design, just as if you've ever done any Web design, you might be familiar with 72 pixels per inch. Okay, what really matters in terms of the world of Web design is the pixel, width and height. That's what really matters here. So again, back to 500 something like this, I could knock it down to 72. That would be fine. I could leave it at 300. It doesn't really matter. So long as the width and height are set correctly, that's really what matters. And as a matter of fact, this is such an intricate, kind of complicated subject that I think I'm gonna have to make a dedicated course. Just just a talk about resolution and re sampling, which I'm gonna talk about in just a second and understanding D p I p p. I pixels per inch. And there's 1/3 1 LP I, which is lines per inch understanding all this stuff in understanding how it all works. But again, it's all sort of beyond the scope of this course. I mentioned re sampling. That's this guy here. Essentially the shortened sweet. Here is what re sampling is is how we want Photoshopped to handle the pick souls inside the image when we go to resize. So try to use the suggestions here in the brackets Enlargement If I'm making an image larger or if I'm reducing the size of an image or if I want to try and maintain my hard edges and so on. Okay, so that's kind of the long and short of the image size dialog box. I come in here, I set the unit of measurement that I'm gonna be working in again. Either inches or pixels. Typically. Then I'd hammer in my width and height. The other thing that I want to mention is often times you can size an image smaller. You can scale its smaller without having any impact on the quality. But cranking at higher, cranky at larger in terms of size will result in a reduction of qualities we usually want to scale down rather than scaling up. Okay, come in here. I set up my dimensions. I would recommend if you're brand new to photo shop, leaving re samples had to automatic. Go ahead and click on. Ok, that's all there is to it. Okay, so that's kind of a run through of your image size dialog box. I hope all of that makes sense for you. Let me zoom in on this guy. There's 100% for this guy. And again, don't forget command Option I or Control Holt I on your keyboard to get into the image size dialog box, all right, with sizing and scaling images. Now out of the way, let's go and take a look at cropping your images. 10. Cropping Your Images: the previous exercise discussed re sizing images. I hope I didn't overwhelm you there. There's there's sort of this technical side to sizing and scaling your images. I would strongly suggest you just stick with the basic principles that I gave you there in the previous exercise for sizing your images until you get more comfortable with it. And then you can get a little bit more complicated, more involved with it, if you like. I want to address cropping now in this exercise. So I'm gonna take this file that you and I went and resized in the previous exercise and I'm gonna close a moat. And when Photoshopped promised me here, I'm not gonna bother saving this guy. Okay. Instead, I'm gonna go after a new file, an image called cropping dot JP. Go ahead and pop this guy open or, once again, you can go and use something that you have yourself kicking around. One of your own images would be perfectly fine. Okay, so in my example, at least we have a lopsided barn. As a matter of fact, it isn't the barn that's a lopsided. It's the person holding the camera. That would be me that click the photograph on an angle. I did that on purpose to show you how to straighten out a photograph. Okay. Using the cropping methods that were about to get into What I'd like you to do is tap your c key on your keyboard. Just see all by itself. And what that does is that activates the crop toe afore you over inside the toolbox. Okay. Now, interestingly, as soon as we activate the crop tool notice we get this this frame appearing all the way around our image. Okay, this is the cropping frame. And notice that the crop frame has these sizing handles or scaling handles on the top and the bottom on the right hand side, the left hand side, and also in all four corners as well. So what I can do is I can sort of decide what parts of my image I want to keep. And what part of parts of the image. Sorry. I want to get rid of okay or or delete crop away. Anything that falls outside of the crop frame notice. It appears almost kind of grade eight. That means that this stuff on the outside edges of the crop frame is gonna get deleted. If I go ahead and proceed with the crop, anything that appears inside the crop frame is gonna be kept. All right, now, notice, too, that I get this sort of this grid pattern appearing inside the crop frame. This is called the Rule of Thirds Grid. If I move my eyeballs up to the options bar across the top and the options were has been changing a few times for us already. Hopefully you've been keeping your eyeballs on this guy. This drop down menu right here, we can go and choose the type of grid that we wanna have appear inside the crop frame. Something like this. OK, so it's entirely up to you. You can certainly explore these guys if you want. Usually, I just leave the default, which is the rule of thirds. Okay, now, how did I actually apply the crop? How do I go ahead and cut away all of the excess on this image? We've got two options. You can either hammer your enter key on your keyboard or you can double click anywhere inside your crop frame. I prefer the good hammer on the keyboard. just to kind of, you know, it's sort of an emotional thing for me. So there you go. So there's cropping your image, okay? Cutting away some content from your images. Okay, Now give me a second here. What I'm gonna do is I'm gonna undo that because there's more that I want to show you here . I'm gonna head to the edit menu and choose Undo crop. Okay? And of course, that takes me back one step notice. I'm still on the crop tool, but I don't have the crop frame anymore. What you could do is you could switch back to your move tool, for example, and then go back to your crop toe. Or what you can do is just click and drag out a frame. That would be perfectly fine as well. And now we're back in action. We're back in business here. Okay, So what I'd like to do here is I'd like to try and straighten this image, as a matter of fact. And here's my technique for pulling this off. There's a bunch of different ways to do this. But while I have the crop frame activated, I'm going to zoom in on my image, and all I'm doing is I'm hitting command plus or control plus on your keyboard there. And I showed you how to do this earlier. And what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna find an edge or a line inside this photograph that's supposed to be straight. I'm using the left hand side of the barn here, sort of its outside wall. That whoa, I'm assuming is supposed to be straight. Sometimes in different images, it could be a lamp post or the edge of a building or who the heck knows, Right? And what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna bring the edge of my crop frame. Kind of kind of beside or adjacent to the line. That's supposed to be straight anyway. Okay, inside the photo. And then what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna bring my cursor eight side of the crop frame notice . When I bring my cursor outside of the frame, my cursor changes to ah curved, double headed arrow, suggesting that if I click and drag, I can actually rotate the image. Something like this. Okay, So what I want to try and do, and I'm totally eyeballing this, by the way, is. I just want to try and line up the line in the photo. That soup post to be straight with the edge of the crop frame. Okay, so something like that, maybe a little bit more somewhere in there, something like that. Okay, so that's my trick is I just find a line inside the photo that's supposed to be straight, and then I just sort of eyeball it right. And then all I'm gonna do is I'm just gonna pull out my crop frames. I'm not cutting any parts of the of the barn off or anything like this. Maybe I want to keep that little. I think that's Ah, lightning rod or a weathervane way up on top there, something like this, right There we are. And then the satisfying keyboard pound there, enter or double click inside the frame. There would be perfectly fun. And there we go. We now have a cropped, somewhat straitened image inside Photoshopped. Sometimes I'll take another run at it to get it completely rotated around. But in any regard, There you go. There's had a crop and straighten your images 11. Using The Canvas Size Command: There's another command that comes to mind here that I've got a show you. He's called the canvas size command. We've already talked about sizing the image, right, re sizing and scaling your image. What we can also do is we can change the documents size if this makes any sense at all. In other words, I'm gonna play off of my crop barn here. I don't want to resize the photo. I just wanna have more space inside the document. Think of Ah, painter's canvas or think of paper size. I want to increase the paper size without changing the size of the photos. I don't want to scale the photo. I want more workable space inside. The document of that makes sense. It's all about the canvas size. Okay, so check this out. I'm gonna head to the image menu. And just beneath image size, we have canvas size. There's your keyboard shortcut. If Europe for Command Option C or control Ault C on the windows side, let's pop this guy open. Kinda looks like the image size dialog box. Here's how this guy works. There's the current size, the width and the height, so almost seven inches by almost six inches down beneath we have the new size area, width and height. So what I could do is I could come in here and decide on a new document size or canvas size for my image. Let's say, for example, I want to make this guy 10 inches square. Okay? Just for a simple, easy example. So I'm gonna go 10 inches for the width and 10 inches for the height. Okay. Now, notice a couple of things. First of all, my units of measurement inches or pixels or centimeters, or anything else here again, I'm gonna stick with pixels for Web design inches for print design. Okay, I don't think I've ever used in all my photo shop years any of the other units of measurement. Okay, now, beneath that, we have the anchor position. Now, this is really interesting. This little dot here represents your image. Inside photo shops of this little dot for myself, anyway, is representing my barn. So where do I want my barn? In relation to the increased document size, if you will, that I'm adding in here. So do I want my burn to appear in the top left or the top right? Or the dead center or the bottom center, or who the heck knows? Okay, so I'm gonna stick with the default there, the dead center. So in other words, I'm gonna be adding extra space or extra paper size, if you will, to all four sides of my barn photograph in this example. And then last but not least, the canvas extension color, the color that's going to be used to fill in this extra space that I'm adding in noticed. The default is background and you might be scratching your head background background for what? This ties back to the background color swatch that you and I had talked about earlier. So the default background color is white, but we could go and change that. We could say Use the foreground color swatch, or use gray or use black or use something else. Okay. And I invite you to explore some of those other options. I'm simply gonna go ahead and click on, OK, And now what happens is I have all this extra space now added to my Photoshopped document to my photograph via the canvas size command. Okay, That's really all there is to it. So if I wanted to, I could come back into the canvas size dialogue, walks, command option C controlled. See? And I could go and change my my documents size again. As a matter of fact, you know, what I could do is I could reduce the document size. Check this out. I'm gonna go five inches by five inches and I'll leave my burn in the dead center. I'll go ahead and click on OK, And Photoshopped goes Well, hold on a second. You're actually reducing down the size of your image, your cropping your image. Are you sure you want to do this? I'm gonna say, Oh, yeah, I'm sure. Go ahead and proceed. And this is the result that I wind up getting. So now my canvas size has been chopped down to five inches by five inches. How do I know for sure? That's five inches by five inches, while the image size dialog box is gonna tell me image sized dialogue box and give me a second here. I'm gonna switch back to inches for my unit of measurement. There it is right there, five by five. Okay, So there is your canvas size command. Definitely cool stuff 12. Introducing Free Transform: all right. I've got a bunch of other cool things that I wanna try and pack into this exercise for you . I'm not really keeping count, but it's at least two or three very cool options and features for you. And I love packing all this stuff into these exercises. I hope you're enjoying all this and taking lots of notes. All right, so the first thing that I want to do is I want to take this, this image, this photograph that I've gone and cropped and rotated and kind of messed up. I want to come back to the last saved version, which for myself, was the version that we saw when I first opened him up. I haven't saved him yet. OK, Photoshopped has this really handy revert command, which is found underneath the file menu F 12 is your keyboard shortcuts. So when I choose File Revert, what that does is it takes my file back to the last time that I saved him. Okay, Sometimes I'll get some kind of crazy idea like, Oh, what if we throw a drop shadow onto it and a bevel in Boston? I'll throw this other filter, and I got all these crazy ideas for a special effect. What I'll do is I'll save my file, go forward five or six steps in my lunatic idea and decide that the idea is stupid. And then just choose Fall River and it takes me all the way back. So there's sort of a safety net there for me, which is great. Okay, so that was the first thing that I wanted to show you. I had to work in the Revert Command somewhere. That's where I worked it in. It's a great command agree feature to keep in mind as you working along in your projects inside Photoshopped. Here's the next thing that I want to show you. This is an alternative method for sizing and cropping and positioning your images. I'm going to use the example of working on a Web related projects, so I know I'm gonna be working in pixels. What I'm gonna do is I've got, of course, the photo open that I want to incorporate into my Web project. What I'm gonna do, though, is I gonna go and create a brand new blank document inside photo shop. OK, follow me on the magical mystery tour here. I'm in Web design mode, So I'm gonna make sure my unit of measurement is set to pixels there. Okay. And the width that I'm gonna use for this guy, I would look to my code or my layout, maybe inside Dreamweaver or WordPress to figure out the dimensions of the image. Okay, so let's say, for instance, and this is just the example that I'm gonna use here, let's say, for instance, the space that I have inside my layout reserved for this photo is gonna be 400 pixels by 400 pixels. Okay, Just like that. All right. And if you'll recall from our earlier conversation on re sizing your images in the world of web design, the resolution doesn't matter. Okay, I'll go ahead and click on, OK. And of course, I get a brand new document sitting there ready to go. OK, so what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna use this file, this brand new blank file that I've gone and created as the actual document that I'm gonna use inside my web lay out. What I'm gonna do is I'm gonna take the barn that we have here, and I'm gonna move them over into this new file that you and I have created. Now, there's a couple of different ways to do this. What we could do is we could use our move tools to make sure that your move tool is activated inside the toolbox. And then all I would do is simply drag the image drag from one image I should say into another image like so that's really all there is to it. Something like that. Okay, that's one option. Another option is I could copy from one file and then paste into another file. That would be perfectly fine as well. Okay, so I moved my image over. That's the important thing. OK, I'm gonna go back to the original, and I'm gonna close them out. I'm done with him for now. Now what I want to do is I want to take this guy and I want to size and position him inside the new document that you and I have created. And to do so, we're going to use a command called free transform inside Photo shop. And this is a command that you're going to use a lot inside photo shop. Okay, He's found underneath the edit menu. Let's go edit and then down to free transform. You'll want to memorize this keyboard shortcut or add it to your sticky note that's hanging off the bottom of your monitor control T or command T on your keyboard. Okay, now, when I choose free transform, notice that I get some lines appearing inside my image. But they're kind of running off the edges and so on. What happens here? Let me just scale that the size of my document window. What happens is the original photo. The barn is falling off the edges of the new document. He's still there, by the way. He's not lost. There's still image in there. It's just not appearing inside the document window at this time. Okay, So as you can see with the free transform Aiken drag my image around inside this new document window or what I can do very much like the crop tool, which we saw earlier is I can use the resize handles that appear at the top, the bottom, the right, the left and in all four corners as well. But I want to make sure that I constrained my proportions. I don't want the carnival funhouse mirror effect. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna hold down my shift key and simultaneously, while shift is being held down, I'm gonna drag on my corners something like this to size and position Might image like so Okay, so I'm gonna try and sort of Centrum inside the document window. Maybe holding down shift will scale them up just a little bit, something like that. And then again, very much like the crop tool. I'm gonna bring my cursor outside of the free transform frame. I get the curved, double headed arrow and now I can click and drag to rotate my image. As a matter of fact, you can go kind of wild here. So all I'm doing is I just want to try and straighten this guy out as best I can. Maybe a out there. I know it's not perfect, but somewhere in there, okay. And I might spend a moment here kind of positioning and scaling this guy. You can use your arrow keys on your keyboard, by the way as well. To position this guy that's called micro positioning. And then to lock in this change either hit your enter key on your keyboard or double click inside the free transform frame. That's all there is to it. Okay, from here, I would save the file out into a Web friendly file format and load him into my code, in my example, my example of setting this guy up for a Web project. So there you go. There's a bunch of extra things for you. The Revert Command. An alternative method for sizing and scaling your documents. I showed you how to take an image and move it from one document into another document. And you also got introduced to the free transform command inside Photoshopped. Remember the keyboard shortcut control or command T on your keyboard? And by the way, if you're inside the free transform frame as I am here and you want to get out of it, you don't want to use it anymore. Just tap your escape key on your keyboard. 13. Getting Started With Selections: okay, we're ready to move on to another section of the course that's going to relate to working with selections inside Photoshopped now, getting good at making decent selections inside your photographs inside your project and someone is really important selections are gonna be used whenever you want to apply a special effect to a specific area of your image or perhaps some color effects or color adjustments and so on. Really? I think a huge part of photo shop is all about selections. So let's get started here. What I'm gonna do is I'm gonna go on, open up one of our project files. I'm gonna open up windows dot j peg and this file is going to get us started working with some of the more fundamental aspects of creating selection. So here's our photo, okay? And what I want to do is I want to get ourselves started with this first selection tool, the rectangular marquee tool. It's a bit of a mouthful. Most people just call it the rectangular selection tool or the, you know, the square selection tool or this thingamajig e over on the left anyway, So go ahead and grab that guy. You can tap your m key on your keyboard if you want. Now this guy's going to allow us to create, as its name would imply. Rectangular selections. Okay, so all I want you to do at this stage of the game, maybe between the two windows here is just click and drag it with your most just something like this. Okay? And while I'm holding down my most notice, I get some marching ants. I call them the Merchants. And then I also get this sort of this kind of this tool tip appearing, giving me the width and the height of my current selection. That's handy. Sometimes when I want to make a very precise selection inside Photoshopped. As soon as I let go of my mix, there's my marching ants sitting there on screen. Okay, so then now what I could do is I could maybe apply a special effect of this area of the image or again, a color effect or some kind of a filter or something like that. Okay, Now, how do I get rid of this selection? I've created this selection and I want to get rid of it. Well, what I could do is, I could head up to the select menu up at the top and then down to de select the second choice. There. There we go. Ok, now, let's get a little bit more practical, a little bit more real world. What I want to try and do is I want to select some of the rectangular shapes that we have inside these barn windows. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna hold down control or command and space bar, and I'm gonna zoom in on these windows, something like this and all this kind of pan over here holding down my space bar. And what I want to do is I want to try and select this first windowpane here. So what I would do is I would bring my cursor up towards, for example, the top left corner and then click and drag down to the bottom. Right corner. Something like that. Okay, maybe I want to knock this area out. Maybe I want to knock them all out, and I'm gonna put a photograph into the window frame itself. Something like that. Okay. Now, as far is actually working with your selections. I've got a bunch of different things to show you here. We already know how to get rid of the marching ants. If I make a selection and then I want to get rid of the selection, I can go to the select menu and I can choose de Select. You could also hit Controller Command D on your keyboard to get rid of your merchants. Or here's my favorite. You have a selection here on your photograph or inside your image. Something like this. You want to get rid of marching ants. Just bring your cursor outside of the selection outside of the marching ants and just single click. That's all there is. Do it. Okay, all right. Now there's a bunch of other things that I want to show you in terms of the fundamentals of working with selections. Check this out. If I start clicking and dragging with my mix, sometimes you don't get it right on the first try. By the way, sometimes you'll try and select this window frame, for example. But notice that I'm off on the top corner. They're no good, right? So as you're clicking and dragging, in other words, while I still have my most button held down or press down. I could hold down the space bar simultaneously. And now I can move my selection around inside my photos. So maybe I want to tuck it right up into the top left corner of this windowpane. Let go of my space bar. I haven't let go of my most just yet and that I can continue dragging this selection something like that. So that's a really good trick for you as you're working with your selections, Okay? So again, just holding down the space bar, repositioning the selection wherever you want it inside your image, let go of the space bar and then continue dragging with your most until you get things happening for yourself inside your image. Okay. All right. So this is all fine and well, this is creating rectangular selections. Of course. What about creating squares? Well, give this a try while I'm clicking and dragging it with my mess. I'm gonna throw down the shift key. I felt like I was That was a little big gangster. Wasn't throw down. I'm gonna hold the on my shift key. That's really what I meant something like this. So now I'm getting a a perfect square in whatever size, whatever dimensions I want. Okay, so we're throwing down this elections here. And by the way, as I'm throwing down my my sick wear here, I can throw down my space bar as well. Move this guy around. Get in position where I want let go of the space bar. I'm still holding down shift, and then I can continue dragging. So there you go. Pretty cool stuff. How about this one? Try holding down either Ulta fear on the windows side or option here on the Mac. And we can create a selection from the center rather than from a corner. Something like this. And wouldn't you know it? I can hold down old or option and shift and create a square from the center. Something like that. Okay, so I'm gonna admit something to you. Working with your selections. Does take a little bit of practice. Does take a little bit of getting used to. This is why we're going to spend a little bit of time working on these guys because I want to make sure you get good at creating your selections. Here's one final take away before we move on to the next selection tool as I'm creating my selection or I should say, really, after I create my selection, let's just say something like this, right? I'm just gonna throw in this in really quickly here. What I can do is I can bring my cursor inside the marching ants, notice what happens to my cursor. By the way, when I do that, I get this kind of this white arrow, and now I can actually move this selection around inside my document. I can't change the size of this selection. Not yet, anyway. I'm gonna show you how to do that in just a little while. But for the time being, any way I can move this selection around inside my photo like so Okay, so very ago, There's a whole bunch of different techniques for you to get used to get comfortable with those. Practice them for a minute, maybe. And then I'll catch up with you in the next exercise where we'll take a look at the elliptical selection tool 14. Creating Elliptical Selections: All right. So we've been having some fun with the rectangular selection tool. Hopefully, you're getting comfortable with it. What about the elliptical selection tool? In other words, selecting ovals and circles. Usually I just call it the circular selection tool or something like that. So give me a second here. I'm actually gonna go and open up a different project file. Give me a second. Gonna close this guy out, and I won't bother saving them. Inside your project Files folder, you'll have a foul called selections dot PST. I got to tell you about this file. So I was digging around in my garage, actually going through some old junk, and I found this bucket full of all these old rusty bolts and washers and all the junk that you see here. And I thought, Well, this is some cool stuff. I think I had collected it, you know, years and years back. I just thought it looked cool. I didn't want to throw it all anyway, so I thought they would make a really good exercise for us in terms of dissing our selections, working with different shapes and different objects. So, for instance, as you can see, there's a variety of circular shaped objects inside this this image that we have here, this digital photo that I took of of all this junk I found in my garage for you and I to practice on. So let's go and check this out. So I'm gonna go and grab my elliptical selection to or my elliptical marquee tool, as it's officially called over inside the toolbox. There again, just clicking and holding down on the rectangular selection tool provides that pop up for us, and I'm gonna go after one of these two washers here. So give me a second here. It's going to zoom in on these guys something like this. Well, maybe that's a little bit too close. Something like that. Now, everything that we talked about in the previous exercise in terms of working with your rectangular selections, you know, clicking and dragging, clicking away to de select or controller Command D. Let's see what else holding down the space bar as you're creating your selection holding down shift while you're creating your selection. All this stuff applies to both the rectangular selection tools and the circular selection tool as well. Okay, so creating circular selections or oval selections is a little more tricky, though, because, let's say, for example, I want to select this washer here. Maybe I want to use him in some kind of a project. Where am I going to start my selection? I'm guessing somewhere up here, because when I click and drag down noticed that the marching ants, the marching ants event that comprised my my my circular selection they're kind of move around or adjust on screen. So I find actually creating circular selections or Huvelle selections a little tougher than creating rectangles and squares. Okay, so sometimes I'll have to take a couple of runs at it until I get it, you know, nailed down until I get it absolutely precise sometimes what I'll do, you can see here that I'm missing sort of the top left area of this of this washer here sometimes all overshoot on the other side. If this makes sense in the bottom left and then I'll hold down my space bar, pull it back. Something like that until I get it locked in. Okay, there we go. And then what I could do from this stage is I could copy this guy and paste him into another document. Or again, I could apply a filter or color effect or who the heck knows. OK, so you may want to spend a moment or two getting comfortable with this guy if I wanted to create a selection from the center. Remember how to do this from the previous exercise. If you're on the windows side, hold down bolts. Mac users hold down, option and click and drag, and you can create a circular selection from the center. Perhaps something like that. Okay, so get comfortable with this guy. Once again, spend a few moments getting comfortable getting used to how this guy works, because I've got, ah, lot more that I want to show you in terms of working with our selections and handling selections inside of our documents. 15. Adding To & Subtracting From Selections: Once you have the basics of working with selections down, you can start to do some pretty cool things. And we've already covered the basics creating rectangles, crating squares, ovals and circles A variety of methods for working with those selections. Let's now get into working with subtracting from a selection and adding to a selection. So these washers that we have are a really great example of where we might want to use this . I'm gonna use the second washer as an example here. So let's say, for example, I want to select the washer itself. But I don't want to select the space inside the washer. The hole in the doughnut, if you will. I just want the washer or the doughnut. In my case. Sorry, I'm thinking about food. So what I'm gonna do here, I'm still on my elliptical marquee tool, by the way. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna click and drag out some kind of a selection here. I want to try and select this guy as best I can, cheating a little bit by using my space bar just to help me out. And I wind up getting something like that Okay, now it isn't perfect, but it's pretty darn close. And I think that's gonna work for me now. What I want to do is I wanna subtract it the center area of the washer. Check this out. This is a lot of fun here. What I can do is I can hold down either option here on the Mac or the bulky on the windows side and notice when my cursor is on the inside of the marching ants. Inside the selection, I get across here with a tiny little minus sign indicating that I can subtract from my selection. Now, subtracting can be a little bit tricky. I'm gonna start from the kind of the top left. For whatever reason, I usually start from the top left. You don't have to go. And what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna click and drag out another circle cheating again by using my space bar to kind of help me out. And it's not gonna be perfect, but I'm gonna wind up with something like that. And then when I let go of my most and my keyboard now what happens is it looks like I have two selections, right? As a matter of fact, what I have is just the washer itself selected. What is currently not selected is the content that appears outside of the marching ants here and the content that appears on the inside of the marching ants. How do you like that? You want to see that one more time. So subtracting from a selection, you can do this with the elliptical marquee tool. You can also do it with the rectangular marquee tool, which we were introduced to earlier on. You can do it with all of the other selection tools that we have available inside Photoshopped. Okay, so let me give you another example of this. I'm just gonna single click away just to get rid of my marching ants. And I think what I'll do is I'll use this white space over here. What I'm gonna do is I'm gonna flip back to my rectangular marquee tool and holding down shift. I'm just gonna throw down a quick square, something like that. Okay, then what I'll do is I'll switch out to the circular selection tool. The trick here is you have to bring your cursor inside the selection and then hold down either option or Ault, depending on your operating system. And then when we're inside the selection, I can click and drag to create. Think of it as creating a hole inside your selection. Now, I've punched a hole in the middle of my selection. So this content here, which is empty dead white space, is the content that's selected. Okay, so holding down ultra option to subtract from a selection, What about adding to a selection? We can always add onto a selection. Sometimes you'll have to do this. I don't know if I have an example of this in this file or not. But sometimes when you have kind of an oddball shape, maybe something like like this this bolt here with the with the nut kind of screwed on there. So let's say, for instance, I'm just gonna zoom in on this guy a little bit. Let's say, for instance, I want to grab and this is just kind of a quick example off the top of my head here. Let's say I wanted to grab this portion here, and I also want to grab the washer so I'm not gonna bother grabbing the head of the of the bolt, if that makes sense. OK, so this is going to require two selections. I'm on my rectangular selection tool. I'm gonna click and drag down. Now, I know that this isn't perfect, but this is just kind of a quick example. Something like this. OK? And now I want I want to create a second selection running right across here. Okay, so what I'm gonna do now is this is sort of the opposite of subtracting from a selection. I'm gonna move my cursor outside of the marching ants, and I'm gonna hold down shift this time and notice when I hold down shift. Now, get the crosshairs with a plus, suggesting that if I click and drag with my most, I'm going to be adding to my selection. Something like this. Okay, let me show you a quick example of this out inside some white space. So there's a rectangle there, marching ants, no big deal. I'm gonna hold down shift while bringing my cursor outside of the marching ants, and I'm gonna click and drag into my selection. Okay, Toe, add to that selection. Something like this. So now this area here is selected. It's the active content, if you will. Okay, so adding to your selections and also subtracting from your selections another great set of skills toe have inside photo shop for selecting things like doughnuts and rusty metal washers. 16. Transforming Selections: I've got to show you how to transform your selections. I think you're really gonna like this, because, no doubt already you're getting used to the selection tools, but no doubt it's a little tricky. You're finding it a little bit tricky to get the perfect selection on a particular object. You know, something like this. Or maybe it's gonna be, Ah, I don't know, a car tire or, you know who the heck knows? It's tough to get the perfect selection. Right. Well, check this out. I'm gonna select this washer here. He just happens to be kicking around here. He's handy. So I'm gonna I'm gonna grab him here. What I want you to do is I want you to make a bad selection. I want you to purposefully sort of throw down just a junkie selection. Something like that. Just kind of lay it in there. Who cares, Right. Check this out. I'm gonna head to the select menu and then down to transform selection. Now, I've already introduced you to the free Transform Command here inside photo shop. And no doubt you're enjoying using that command. Very awesome command that I use all the time. Well, the Transform Selection Command is very, very similar to the free transform notice. We get this free transform frame now appearing around our marching ants. Wouldn't you know it with the resize handles in the corners and on the sides and all the rest of it? So now what I can do is I can take my time and I can just go and yeah, but there something like that, and we'll bring the selection up towards the top and drag it down towards the bottom somewhere in their notice. I have a little bit of white space in there, so I'll just kind of sit here and sip on my coffee and get the perfect selection. Just take my time until I really have it nailed down. Okay, Now, again, you won't always get absolutely the perfect selection, but this definitely goes a long, long way. When Photoshopped added this command years and years back, man, I was over the moon because I was constantly creating terrible selections, and he would take me forever to really get my object selected properly. So I've scaled my selection here around this rusty washer double click inside the frame or hit the enter key on your keyboard toe. Lock it in and there we go. There's our selection. Okay, So your transformed selection tool is again one of these really great tools that you have access to inside Photoshopped. He's gonna work for ovals or or circles that we create. Also, he'll work for rectangles as well. Check. I'm gonna try and select this guy. He's kind of an oddball shape that he's not quite a perfect rectangular square. So let's see what we can do here. I'm gonna click and drag out just kind of a rough square or rough rectangle. Something like that. You know what? I'm creating my selections now. I'm not even careful. I just throw it in, give myself some kind of a starting point. And then I use the Transform Selection Command to help me perfect or refine the selection. So maybe something like this and again, it's an oddball shape, so it might not be the best example, but of course, he's on an angle is, well, this kind of a square washer or square nut that we have in the background. So, just like the free transform, just like the crop tool which we've also seen. I'm gonna bring my cursor outside of the frame. Curved, double headed arrow tells me that I can rotate the selection just like so again, whether it's an oval or a rectangle or whatever it is that I may have write something like that. Now again, I'm gonna start Teoh, lose my selection a little bit. I'm getting a little bit of background in the top corner there, top left corner. I'm missing a little bit of my washer down in the bottom corner. There I could fiddle with this a little bit, but again, because it's an oddball, three dimensional shape, it's not gonna be perfect, but double click inside the frame. There we go. There's my selection. Awesome stuff. So the transforms selection command really awesome stuff. Have fun with it again. Take a moment to get comfortable with it, and when you're ready, will move on to the next topic, which is gonna be very cool. Topic related to floating selections 17. Floating Selections And Duplicating: I've got to introduce you to the concept of floating selections and moving your selected content and also duplicating your selected objects as well. So here's what I'm gonna do. I'm gonna use this second rusty washer as my example. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna flip back to the circular selection tool. The elliptical marquee tool and you don't gonna do is I'm gonna make use of the good old transformed Selection Command, which we know all about now just to help me along with this selection and really just a kind of speed things up for ourselves here a little bit. Okay? Something like that, I think, should be good enough. It doesn't have to be perfect. And, of course, I'm kind of rushing things here just for the sake of time. So maybe something like that will be just fine for us. Okay, so we have this object selected. Maybe what I could even do is I could subtract out the center. I'll leave that up to you if you want to do that, what I'm now gonna do and this is gonna introduce us to the idea of floating selections and moving our selections is I'm gonna head back to the first tool inside the toolbox of the move tool. And what happens when I bring my cursor over top of a selection when the move tool is activated? Noticed that beside the black arrow, I get a pair of scissors, right? Meaning that if I click and drag, what I can actually do is tear the object away from the image. So think of this metal washer as now floating on top of your photograph. Okay. As a matter of fact, I can move it over top of other objects inside the image as well. The key to understand here, though, is that as soon as I d select, this guy is now locked down on top of the image. Okay, let me show you some things. Here, let me show you some examples of this. Give me a second term is gonna pan over towards the left. I still have my marching ants. And there's this. Actually, this was a really cool object. It was like a rusty cylinder of some sort of was maybe 1/2 inch to 3/4 of an inch deep. It was kind of this cool object Wow. Where the heck that I find all this stuff anyway? Garage junk. I'm gonna drag this rusty washer over top of the rusty cylinder. Something like this. Okay, just for a quick example. So now I have one object stacked on top of a second object, if that makes sense. And while I still have marching ants, I can sit here and fiddle around with the positioning of this selected object, because again, don't forget he's floating on top of the image. As a matter of fact, rather than using the move tool, I can use the arrow keys on my keyboard to micro position this guy. Either just tapping up, down left and right or holding down shift and using my arrow keys to move in larger increments. Something like that. Okay, so I get this guy positioned up, Okay? Once I have him positioned, what I can then do is de select. Now, remember your keyboard shortcut for de selecting control or command D on your keyboard as soon as I d select. That's it. What happens is this previously selected rusty washer now gets flattened down on top of the image. Okay, So in other words, he's now deleted the pixels that appeared underneath. Um, okay, so then if I try to re select this guy, let me show you this. And sometimes, you know, I've tried to explain this to people, and they have a hard time really kind of understanding this concept. If I go and re select the same metal washer, give me just a quick second to do this. A lot of times, people think that the object underneath is still there, right? In other words, my my half inch rusty cylinder that I dragged this this washer over top of he's still underneath him. In other words, the overlapped areas are still there. Well, I've tapped my wiki on my keyboard. I'm back to my move tool. I pull this guy away. And as a matter of fact, what happens is I don't if you can see it in there or not, but it actually deleted any of the pixels that were overlapping. As soon as I d select, anything underneath gets deleted. Okay, let me show you may be a better example of this. I'm gonna move my washer over top of this kind of odd bowl rusty bracket. That I have here something like this De select controller Command D And then I'll tap my M key on my keyboard to go back to my marquee tool, my elliptical marquee tool. And I'm gonna re select this rusty washer here something like this. And then when I tear the washer away from the image once again, something like this, what happens is those pixels beneath get deleted, they get toasted. Okay, this is the concept behind floating selections. Okay, So what happens in actuality is the area that the that the previously selected object occupies gets filled in with whatever background color we have selected at the bottom of the tool box. That's how that works. Okay, so just be careful with this stuff, okay? Now, I also want to show you how to duplicate selections. So here's my selection. He's a floating selection so I can move him around in position wherever I want on screen. Check this out, though. What I'm gonna do is with my move tool still activated. I'm gonna hold down either option here on the Mac or bolt on the windows side and click and drag out. And what that does? Is it duplicates the object and simultaneously selects the new object. Noticed the marching ants and d selects the previous object, locking him down to the image. Okay, so I can create as many duplicates as I want. Just bear in mind that if I have one of my objects overlapping or one of my selections overlapping an object, and I go in, duplicate that selection. This guy's now locked down. I can't pull them back and move them around anymore. I've just deleted all the pixels underneath. Um, OK, so keep that in mind. So as I've been saying all the way along here, I encourage you to experiment with this. Get comfortable with this. You're floating selections and, of course, duplicating your selections as well. 18. Creating Selections With The Quick Selection Tool: okay. There's a few more things that I wanna show you here. I want to show you now how to create selections based on color rather than based on shape. So far, we've been working with ovals and circles and squares and rectangles. What about making selections based on color? Well, we're gonna get into this, but the first thing that I need to do is Well, my file is is getting a little messy here? Is there a way for me to take what I have here inside photo shop and take it back to the last time that I saved it? The last saved version of the file to recall anything like that? Remember, we have the handy revert the safety net underneath the file menu, so I'm gonna choose File Revert. And as you can see, that takes me all the way back to the original document. Okay, So, like I say all the way along, we've been working with ovals and rectangles and so on. What I now want to do is I want to create a selection based on color. Now, this is really handy for oddball shapes. Something like this this curved. I don't know what that is? A bracket or or a brace of some sort That guy or or maybe this guy or this nut and bolt that I had pointed out earlier on. I'm gonna use this. Nothing bold. As an example, I'm going to see if I can select this guy properly when I try to make a selection inside Photoshopped. Whatever it is that I'm trying to tackle again, maybe it's a special effect or or some kind of a color adjustment. I kind of run through a process of elimination in my own head. And I start from from simplest to most difficult. I go. All right. Could I use the rectangular marquee tool on this guy? Wow. Maybe. Could I use the Oval or the elliptical marquee tool? Definitely not. Not on something like this. Well, what else could I use? Well, I could try and select this guy based on color, because this guy is generally the same color, and he's kind of a wacky shape too. Well, it's all about this tool here, the quick selection tool. And I think you're really gonna like this guy. Go and select this guy. This guy allows us to actually paint a selection, believe it or not. So I have this this sort of this oval or circular cursor now appearing on screen, all I'm gonna do with this guy is just single click anywhere inside the bolt there and I now get some marching ants just like that. It's kind of like poof! Marching. Hence, we now have a selection to work with. Here's the cool part is I can continue clicking and dragging, painting my selection until the entire object gets selected. Something like this. OK, and boom! There's my entire object. Awesome stuff. Now let me try the sky out on a few other objects. I'm gonna de select controller command D on my keyboard and maybe I'll go after something like this, this sort of thin washer or bracket or brace or whatever the heck it is going to start clicking and dragging, and pretty quickly you'll have a selection there. I also got the drop shadow in there. The flash on my camera created a bit of a drop shadow on this guy, but in any regard, there you go. It's all just a matter of clicking and dragging with this guy now this. This piece of metal here is gonna be interesting because he's got some rust on them. But there's also some chrome on him as well. So let's see what we get here. If I start clicking and dragging, there we go. I'm literally painting in this selection, something like that. So, for yourself, for your own projects, give this guy a try. Maybe you'll find that this guy's gonna give you much better results, depending on the task or really the object that it is that you're trying to select. Okay, now, a few options here for you. If I move my eyeballs up to the options bar, There we go. The options Where has changed once again for us. I wanted to show you this drop down here, the brush drop down when we're working with photo shop painting tools, we can do things like adjust the brush, size, the brush, spacing the hardness and so on. And it's all about this drop down here so I can reduce the size of my brush either by using the size slider or by typing in a pixel value to adjust the size of my brush. So I'm gonna scale down the size of my brush, maybe to about 15 picks of something like that, and then notice that my my circle on my cursor is smaller. So the cursor is actually an indication of the size of the brush. OK, so I'm gonna de select here one more time Controller command D on my keyboard. And then maybe what I'll do is I'll go and find another object and I'll start painting in yet another selection. Something like that, and boom pretty quickly there's my entire object selected. The other cool thing about this, uh, selection tool or this selection method is he's gonna call him Additive. So in other words, if I make a selection here, this this bolt with the with the washer rusted right onto it, I've got that object selected. I can now move my cursor towards another object notice my cursor has the cross here That's actually a plus, indicating that if I go and select another object, I now have two objects selected. So I'm continually adding to my selection. Something like this may be what it is that I'm after is I want to select all of these rusty objects or perhaps some of these rusty objects. And then I want to pull them off of the background inside this image. And I want to go and copy and paste them or move them into another document. Something like this. Okay, so in any regard, there you go. There's your quick selection tool making quick work of your selections. 19. Free Transforming Selections: Okay. I hope you've been having some fun here with me learning about photo shop selection tools. You know, I got to say, though the rial horsepower in photo shop is when we start combining multiple commands multiple tools together. So when you're learning photo shop, you have to learn about, um, kind of individually. But it's when you start working with them together. That's where things really start happening for you inside Photoshopped. I'm gonna give you a quick example of this. What I'm gonna do is I'm gonna combine together one of my selection tools and also photo shops handy free transform. And let's see, I also want to move the object in, duplicate him as well. So a bunch of things here that I want to do So let's say, for example, I want to use this object here to my right this again. Ah, bolt with a with a not rusted onto the end of it, I asked myself, All right, how am I gonna select this object? I could go rectangular. I could go elliptical. We just learned about quick selection. So let's just make short work of this and move on to other things. boom. There's my selection. Right? Okay. Good stuff. Now, what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna tapped the V key on my keyboard to, of course, activate the move tool inside my toolbox. I'm just gonna zoom out a little bit. Here is, well, control or command minus on my keyboard. And even though the selection is kind of running off the edge of my screen there, he's still selected. No, no problems there, so long as I can see a little bit of him. What I can now do, as we know already, is tear this guy away. So we now have this floating selection inside photo shop. Something like this can zoom in a little bit. Autumns weaken, seem a little bit more closely. So he's floating so I can move him around. I can stack him or layer him on top of other objects. And by the way, something that I neglected to mention during that exercise on the floating selections is in the next chapter. We're gonna get into working with Photoshopped layers where you'll see how to stack objects and organize your images in a much more friendly, much more useful organized way in any regard. Just wanted to mention that. So I have this floor instruction. Now, what can I do with, um Well, what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna head to photo shops. Free transform, Command. We have seen this guy in action already. Do you remember the keyboard shortcut for the free transform? If you are thinking control or command t on your keyboard, you are absolutely correct. So go and hit control Command T, or you can head to the edit menu and choose free transform. I now have the free transform frame surrounding my marching ants, which, of course, in close my selected object. So now what I can do is I can rotate this object around. I can, of course, continue to move him around inside my image. I can scale him or distort him. I don't want to disorder most. So I'm gonna hold down my shift key and drag from one of the corners to scale them larger or smaller. Something like this. And I know that this is just kind of a quick down and dirty example, But I'm sure you get the idea here. Maybe in the real world, this could be maybe an automobile that I selected off of a background or maybe a person or sign or a piece of text, or who the heck knows? Whatever you might have inside your images, right? As soon as I hit enter on my keyboard that locks in the free transform. Okay. However, don't forget, we still have marching ants, which means we still have a floating selection, which means we can still move this guy around on screen. And if we wanted to, we could still jump back to the Free Transform Control Committee on York keyboard and continue to scale imposition and adjust to this guy. Okay, as soon as I d select, the story is over. Okay, So as soon as we choose controller command D on our keyboard or select and then de select the show's over. Okay, Unless we decide to get into layers and as promised, that's coming up next 20. Introducing Layers: all right now onto one of the most important aspects of photo shop layers. Of course. I think I said that at the beginning of the previous chapter on selections I said onto selections. One of those important aspects is Photoshopped. Really? Photo shop is all about creating really great selections and really getting comfortable with the layers. I would say these two subjects are really they really sort of make up the fundamentals of photo shop. So we're gonna spend a little bit of time here talking about layers, working with layers. If you're brand new to all this, if you've never done this sort of thing before, I think it might take a little bit of time until your brain clicks. I'm gonna say a few things talk about some fundamentals. I might repeat some stuff. Somewhere along the line, your brain is gonna flip a switch and go. I get it. I understand. I understand exactly how it works. So I'm gonna take my time. I'm gonna work through this with you. And by the end of this, we're gonna be layer experts. So here we go. First of all, we need an image. I went and closed out of my previous image. So let's go and open up an image. I've gone and thrown in a few extra files into our project files folder for you and I to work with. As a matter of fact, I'm gonna grab this guy right here, which I happen to be hovering over top of statue dot jp, go ahead and pop this guy open inside photo shop. And we were out for a drive, I think one Saturday or Sunday afternoon and happened across this really cool statue, So I took a quick photograph of this. Matter of fact, this is going back a few years, but in any regard, here we go. Here's our photo. Now I'm gonna go ahead for my layers panel over on the right hand side. Go ahead and grab this guy. By the way, if you want, give me a second here. I'm just going to collapse this guy down. If you like your keyboard shortcuts, try hitting F seven on your keyboard is not cool. So f seven on your keyboard to activate your layers panel. Just kind of a neat trick. Now, as a matter of fact, what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna tear away my layers panel just so we can sort of zero in on him and kind of focus our attention on him. So here he is. Now what we see right away inside the layers panel, I would say most prominently inside the layers panel is this guy here. It's his background, and he's highlighted. This is what's referred to as the back groomed layer, and we're gonna be talking in some great detail about background layers in just a few minutes. However, keep this in the back your mind. Notice the padlock icon, suggesting that the layer here the background layer is locked or unedited ble. So keep that in the back of your mind. As far as the rest of the layers panel is concerned, it looks like there's a lot of cool stuff here, but it's all great out. We can't use any of it, but I'll at least give you the five cent tour here. This first bar running across the top of the Layers panel allows us to filter our layers. There's actually ah, huge array of different layer types, text layers and masks and path layers and all kinds of great stuff, so that's one option we can use. I have to be honest. I very rarely filter my layers, but it is there for you. If you want to make use of it, the next guy down, we have this drop down menu. He's great. Out for the time being will take a look at this guy in just a little while. The tool tip is telling me that I can use this drop down menu to set what's referred to as the layers blending mode for the time being. Think of this as the color effect or the special effect for the layer. Okay, then just adjacent to that, we have the opacity. We can change the opacity or the transparency of the layer will talk about that in just a little bit. And then beneath that, we have some lock options for the layer as well, which kind of relates to the luck icon that we have there and then beyond that, we have some icons running across the bottom. If you want, you can hover over top of these guys. That tool tips will hopefully help you. Along here, we can create new layers. We can create what's referred to as a layer groups. We can delete layers using the trash can there and so on. Lots of other great stuff in there. And don't forget. Of course, we also have the Layers panel menu, which is loaded full of tons of options again, many of them great out for the time being. Okay, All right, so that's the five cent tour. Let's move on. Now I want to talk about the background layer, and this is really sort of layer fundamentals. Layers 101 here. So the background layer, he's unedited ble right now, my photograph that you and I have in front of us is flat, so we can't really edit. Um, there's not a whole lot really that weaken due to this guy in his present state. If you take a photograph with your digital camera or, you know even your mobile device something like that opening up inside Photoshopped that that image, I should say, is going to be flat, you're going to see a background layer. Or if you download an image from the Web and open up inside Photoshopped, he's gonna be flattened. He's gonna have a background layer. Okay, let me show you this. Inside the panel menu, the panel menu has an option here called flatten Image and flattened images. Great out because the images already flat. Okay, So in other words, inside this image, there are no objects that air hovering over top of other objects. Everything's kind of compressed down and flattened. However, let me show you this. I'm gonna shove this guy out of the way. Just kind of talked him out of the way. For the time being, I'm gonna go and open up another file from our Project files folder. I'm gonna go on grab. Remember this one? Go getter ray dot psd. Go ahead and pop this guy open. So this is go getter, Ray. Pull this out a little bit. Notice that go getter. Ray also has a background layer which is also locked, but it also has a go getter ray layer as well. So we have two layers inside this image. When I select the background layer, everything's kind of great out towards the top. If I so like to go get a ray, suddenly the layer options towards the top spring toe life interesting. Keep that in mind now. The other thing that I want to mention here is if I were to head to the panel menu, there's my flatten image command now available, suggesting that this image is not flattened. He's fully edit herbal so again, reinforcing this idea that images with Onley background layers like our statue are flat images. This image that we have here has multiple layers, so he's not flattened. Now. What is this concept of layers? Well, I want you to think of your background layer as a white piece of paper. What we can do with this column over on the left hand side is we can turn on or turn off the layer visibility. So I'm gonna disable the visibility of my background layer just by clicking inside that column, I noticed all the white inside the background disappears and is replaced with a checkerboard pattern. This is important, by the way. The checkerboard pattern inside Photoshopped indicates transparency. So in other words, wherever I see the checkerboard pattern, we have nothing. We don't have any pixels. It's not like we have gray and white pixels. We have no pixels at all. It's clear it's see through imagine it's on a piece of glass or on a clear piece of acid. Eight. Something like that. Have you ever been in a classroom? And the teacher sets up the overhead projector. He kind of grown to yourself. Imagine it's the same concept. So here we have. Ah, piece of acid Tate with an image on it. Okay. Sitting on an overhead projector, what happens if the teacher comes along and puts down a white piece of paper underneath that acetate will all the clear area now fills in with white? That's the exact same idea that we have going on here. And by the way, your images can have a huge number of layers as well. Okay, Now, let me show you this. I hope you're getting all this. I hope this is making sense here. I'm on my move tool inside the toolbox. And I also have a go getter race selected inside the layers panel. So what I can do is I can actually drag around inside the image to move the object that resides on the go getter Ray layer. I can move him around inside the image. Okay. This is really what layers are all about being able to edit and work with our files. If I go on, grab my statue, which was kicking around their down towards the bottom. I'm still on the move tool. I have the background layers selected. If I try and move the statue around inside the image, he's not gonna move. And as a matter of fact, photo shop is going to give me a warning. He's going to say I couldn't use the move to Well, because the layer is locked or unedited. Herbal. Okay, I hope that makes sense. In just a little while, I'll show you how to convert a background layer to a regular old photo shop layer. Okay, so I hope this is making sense here. I'm gonna show you one more quick example. Give me a second airing in a double, clicking a little sliver of background here, and I'm gonna go on, grab this guy. He remember this guy? Always bright ideas. I'm gonna go on, open him up inside photo shop. I want to show you this guy because this is a file that we've already seen once or twice. And he has that checkerboard pattern. Check out his layers panel just as a layer one. There's no background layer, meaning there's nothing underneath this guy. There's no sheet of white paper in my overhead projector example. So all I have is just this cartoon robot head, and I can move him around inside the image like so Okay, so sometimes your images will. I only have a background layer. I don't minimize that guy in any regard. Sometimes on Lee a background layer, sometimes they'll only have regular layers. Sometimes they'll have both. Okay, it really depends on the image that you have. What I do want to say, though, is that it really depends on the file format as well. Noticed that go getter, Ray is a Photoshopped document, a native Photoshopped document, as is always bright ideas. And if I go on, grab my clouds again or sorry, my statue statue dot jp various. He's a JPEG, as I just mentioned Jay Peak, so J. Peg does not support layers Interesting, but native Photoshopped documents do support layers. Keep that in mind as well, so there's so much more that I want to show you here. I hope this serves as a decent introduction for your related to layers. Let's now go on, get her hands even dirtier. Inside that layers panel, I want to show you how to work with multiple layers, how to create new layers, how to convert your background layers to regular layers, all kinds of great stuff. So let's dig into it all. 21. Pulling An Image Off It's Background: I've got to show you now how Weaken taken image and pull it off of its background. Maybe we want to use it in some kind of a composition or some kind of a layout that we're gonna build inside photo shop. So, in other words, I want to take our statue. If I flip back to our statue for a second. Of course, he's on a background layer. What if I wanted to take this image which, as you can see, was photographed on Ah, very drab, be kind of dreary day. What if I wanted to pull the statue off of this background and perhaps replace the background with a bright blue sky? Something like that? Well, as a matter of fact, that's exactly what I want to do. So I've got to figure out a way to pull the statue off of the background so that I can manipulate it just like we can manipulate our other two images. Okay, so let's check this out. First of all, I'm gonna close out of always bright ideas. I won't bother saving and same with go getter, Ray will close out of that as well. Going all the way back down to our J peg statue dot jpeg. So, as with everything inside photos up, there's a variety of ways to achieve this. I think what I would like to do for you, though, is tie in some of the stuff that we learned in the previous exercises on working with selections. So what I want to try and do is I want to try and select this drab, be dreary background. And then maybe once we have it selected, we could try deleting it or getting rid of it or something like this. Okay, so once again, and I mentioned this in our earlier exercises for me, it's a process of elimination. Could I use my rectangular selection tool to grab the background? Now, that's that's not gonna work. The oval selection tool. No, that's not gonna work either. How about creating a selection based on color? Yes, that would work. So that's gonna be our quick selection tool, which we were, of course, introduced to earlier on. What I'm gonna do with my quick selection tool, by the way, is I'm gonna crank up his brush size from the options bar. How big? I don't know. Maybe around 80 or 90 pixels or, you know, somewhere in that neighborhood, I don't really know something like that. And I'm gonna zoom in on this guy. And what I want to try and do is make some selections based on color, the color that we see inside the background of the statute. So I'm not grabbing the statue even though it's a statue that I want. I'm not grabbing statue. There's too many colors in here, right? I'm grabbing the opposite of the statue. I'm gonna create a negative selection. If that makes sense, we're gonna start clicking and dragging down the left hand side of the image and boom. We have marching ants. Awesome. I'm gonna continue clicking and dragging inside some of the background areas that we have inside the photo until I have a decent selection, something like this. Now, as a matter of fact, there's still three tiny slivers of background that we have inside this photo between the statues, staff and forearm. There's a tiny sliver there beneath the statues hand and between the staff and sort of the body there. And then way down in the bottom right hand corner. There's a tiny sliver there as well. When you're doing this kind of stuff, you really have to keep an open eye and make sure you grab all the little bits and pieces. Okay, so give me a second. I'm going to zoom in on my photograph. I'm just using controller command plus on my keyboard to zoom in. I've got to show you a really cool trick. I need to reduce down the size of my of my brush here. I could, you know, do something like this. Slide down and hopefully try and guess at the right brush size. Try instead. Just using your your square bracket keys on your keyboard. Notice they increase in decrease your quick selection tools, brush size and the supplies for the other painting based tools inside photo shop where we can increase and decrease the burst size. Very cool. So go ahead and adjust your brush size and then make your selection. It might not be perfect. There's still a tiny little piece of background in there. If this were the real world that really get in there. But, you know, time is of the essence here, so let's keep moving. It's not gonna be an absolutely perfect selection. But I'll do my best to to get at least a sort of 1/2 decent selection going. Maybe something like that. There I caught part of the edge of the statue there. I'm not gonna bother fixing that. That will just keep on moving here and then way down in the bottom, right hand corner. As I had pointed out, there's another little sliver of background. There we go. Something like that Again. I could fiddle with this for a few minutes to get it. Absolutely perfect. But I think I'm gonna leave well enough alone. Okay, so I have the background selected. That's really great. I'm gonna tapped the V key on my keyboard. That takes me back to the move tool. The other thing that I'm gonna do is I'm gonna tap the D key on my keyboard. Remember what that does That reverts us back to the default foreground and background colors at the bottom of the toolbox. Here's what I want you to do next. Try tapping the delete key on your keyboard, and when you do so, you'll be presented with photo shops, Phil Dialog box and where we have contents and then use. Just make sure that you're set to background color for now. So it's gonna fill this selection with White in this first example when I click on OK, this is what we wind up getting. So any area that was enclosed by marching ants is now filled in with white, which, as a matter of fact, I mean, that's all fine and well. But that's not exactly what I wanted. What I really wanted is I wanted to pull the statue off the background. Don't forget. So rather than being filled with white, really, if we stop and think about this, what we want is we want the selection to be filled with the the transparency, that checkerboard pattern, which we saw in the previous exercise. And then what we'll do is we'll throw another image that I have into the background filling the checkerboard pattern. I hope that makes sense. So here's what I'm gonna do instead, what I'm gonna do with the selection still activated inside, my image is I'm gonna head over to the Layers panel. We were talking about the background layer and how the image was flat and we couldn't really edit it or do anything kind of fun or exciting? Do it. What I'm gonna do is I'm gonna convert the background layer toe a regular photo shop, layer a fully edible photo shop layer. Here's how to do it. It's very intensive. Get your note pads ready. Double click on the background layer. I'm only kidding. It's really It's really, really easy. Just double click on the background layer. We get the new layer dialog box coming up. You can throw a name into this guy if you want. How about statute? If I can type correctly, there we go something like that and then go ahead and click on OK, and now we no longer have a background layer. I can tell that it isn't a background layer because it doesn't say background, and there's no lock icon that we see there, either. Okay, now try pressing the delete key on your keyboard with your marching ants still active. Wouldn't you know it? We have now a checkerboard pattern inside of our marching ants. Isn't that awesome? Go ahead and de select. Remember the keyboard shortcut to get rid of your marching ants controller commanded D on your keyboard and because I'm still on my move tool. Now, Aiken, try things out. I can actually move my statue, in my case, around inside my image. Like So, how do you like that? Pretty awesome stuff. So that's how we can pull an object off of its background and also how we can convert a regular layer or sorry, a background layer. Really? I should say, into a regular photo shop player fully edible. We can completely adjust this guy, notice all the options towards the top now spring to life so we can go to town on this guy Now. What about a situation where you have a more complex image? Maybe you have Ah ah, street scene photograph or something like this. And there's a car on the street that you want to pull off the background. That is a real challenge. A lot of times people think it should be easy. Aguas grabbed the car and away you go. Well, you got a select the car first. How do you select the car? Well, use your selection tools inside Photoshopped, the ones that we've seen already, or perhaps even more precise selection tools that we have available inside photo shop, which we haven't taken a look at yet. It's not easy work. It's actually pretty tricky stuff. Once you isolate the object, though, as we have done here, then we can actually start working on the image and creating our composition inside Photoshopped. 22. Combining Images Together: once you really get a handle on how layers work inside photo shop, how to pull an object off of its background, which you saw earlier how to convert a regular background layer into a photo shop layer things like this basically all of the information that we covered in the previous two exercises. Once you get really comfortable with it, then combining your images together, creating compositions and lay its inside photo shop becomes really, really easy. And that's exactly what we're gonna do in this exercise. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna go grab another image, another file that I've added to our Project Files folder. This guy's called clouds dot j peg. And wouldn't you know it? I was on a boat on a much nicer day, saw these clouds that I thought looked kind of cool, took a quick picture with my digital camera and thought, Let's throw that into the background of our statute image, and that's exactly what I want to do here. Now there's a bunch different ways to do this. By the way, check it the layers panel for clouds dot jpeg. We're back to a background layer, which is locked. Why? Because it's a JPEG JPEG doesn't support multiple layers. Right, So here's how I'm gonna pull the clouds over into the statue layout of the statute composition. I'm still on the move tool inside the toolbox. I'm gonna grab the background, layer itself from the layers panel, and I'm gonna drag and drop that guy right into the statue image just like that. Now, let's take a look at the layers panel. Let's see what's going on here. By the way, whenever I open up a image inside Photoshopped maybe an image that someone has emailed to me or I've sourced it from somewhere else. My eyeballs go right to the layers panel. I want to see what I'm working with. Right there is the original statue layer. Of course, there's the new layer that you and I just moved over no longer called background, now called Layer one. Interesting. Now there's a bunch of different ways. As I was mentioning to move content from one file one image to another, let me show you a couple of alternatives here. I'm just gonna undo Controller Command Z on my keyboard that gets rid of that new layer one and I'm gonna head back to my my clouds image. What I could do is I could try dragging and dropping Mrs with the move tool from the image itself over into another image. Something like that. That's another way to do it. That's certainly possible. I'm just undoing here, either from the image itself or from the Images Layers panel. It's perfectly fine. Try this, though, either from the image or from the layers panel dragging over. But before you let go of your mouth, hold down shift. And what that will do is that will drop the image that you're moving into the dead center of the image that you're moving to. Does that make sense? I hope so. So there's the clouds now sitting in the dead center of my statute image. Of course, the clouds aren't as large as a statue image. I still have some empty space above and below. The clouds will fix that in just a moment. Of course. The other issue that we have is the clouds air on top of the statue, not behind this statue. We've got to fix that as well. This is all stuff that I'm gonna show you in the upcoming exercises, but for the time being, you may want to take a moment and try moving some of your files into other files and, of course, keep your eyeballs on your layers panel. 23. Rearranging, Resizing & Renaming Layers: Well, I've left us in a bit of a mess here, so let's try and clean ourselves up here. First of all, let's get rid of clouds dot jpeg. If we really wanted to, we could go on move Mawr objects into this composition. And perhaps, you know, we would. In the in the real world, you know, some additional objects, maybe some text things like that. Okay, but in any regard, you can certainly start to stack up your layers. Now, as you can see inside the layers, panel layers that appear towards the top of the layers panel appear on the top of the image . If that makes sense, think of a stack of papers or stack of objects. Layers that appear towards the bottom of the layers panel appear towards the bottom of the composition or the layout inside of our image. That's just how it works. OK, however, what if I want to change the order? What if I want to take the clouds and move them behind the statue or beneath the statue? It's actually very simple and straightforward. I'm gonna grab the layer itself and click and drag and drop it beneath the statue that said , It's really, really easy stuff. So that's really all there is to it. I'm just gonna zoom in a little bit here. So we have a closer look at this composition here. That's it. Just dragging your layers above and below one another. That's it. Up, down. That's it. That's all there is to it. Okay, something like that. Okay, so that's under the way. Let's call it a day. Well, wait a minute. What about re sizing our layer content? For example, I mentioned this towards the end of the previous exercise. The clouds layer is smaller than the statue image itself. If I zoom out here a little bit, of course you can see that there's empty space above and below the the cloud. So what can I do here? I think I've mentioned this once or twice already, but really, the horse power the rial real power behind photo shop, is when we start combining multiple tools together, For instance, the quick selection tool and layers. Or how about our layers with free transform, which we've seen already? So make sure your layer one or your clouds layer is selected inside the layers panel and then hit a pure free transform from your keyboard. Don't tell me you forgot the keyboard shortcut Its control to come, Aunty, on your keyboard. Go ahead. It control command T on your keyboard. Your clouds will now be enclosed within the free transform frame and everything is as it was before. You can rotate your layer contents. You can size and scale your layer contents. I'm holding down shift here while I'm dragging on the corners. Something like that. Okay, I can move this. This guy around this is all on the on the layer, one layer inside the layers panel and what's really cool here is once I hit enter on my keyboard toe lock In my changes at any point in time As I'm working on my image, I can come back Toe layer. Wanna go? You know does not feel in that background controller Command tea on my keyboard. Continue manipulating the background of the sky or whatever it is that happens to be inside there. I could rotate him around if I wanted to. Maybe something like this and kind of position I'm up. Whatever it is that I like. This is the really great thing about layers is we can constantly edit our images. Now, I have to stress here that if we want to save our work at this point, we have to save our work into a layer friendly file format. Most likely the native photoshopped format dot psd. Okay, if I save this guy out as a J peg, what's gonna happen? Everything is gonna wind up getting flattened for me inside the layers panel. Okay, so bear that in mind. All right. Before we move on this one more thing that I want to show you How do we rename our layers? And I would really like to stress that you name your layers appropriately. I used to never name my layers and I'd have layer one layer to layer three layer 18 layer 19 alert layer 32 layer 33 I'd say Where the heck are the clouds? Where the clouds, They're in here somewhere. Oh, and eventually I'd find them. Oh, there on layer 27. I should probably rename that clouds to make it easier to find. So name your layers appropriately. It'll save you loads of time. How do you rename your layers? Double click rate on top of the text there, where it reads the layer one. Just double click in there, that's it. And then give it some kind of a name. Whatever you want, doesn't really matter. Okay, Something like that, that's all there is to it. Rearranging your layers, re sizing your layer contents and, of course, renaming your layers. 24. Selections & Multiple Layers: lots of goodies to show you in this exercise creating new layers, working with selections and selecting layers, deleting layers, lots of good stuff. So let's jump into it. So what I want to do right off the bat is I wanna go and create a new layer. Now, note that I have the the bottom most let's say layers selected inside the layers panel for myself. Clouds. Okay, What I'm gonna do is I'm gonna bring my cursor down to this icon here at the bottom of the layers panel, create a new layer. Looks like a little PGE icon, Gwen, and click on that guy that creates a brand new blank layer for us. Think of ah, clear sheet of acetate in our overhead projector. Example. So there is now a clear piece of plastic between clouds and statue, if you will. Okay. But of course, what I want to do is I want to take this a layer, and I want to move him above the statue layer. We already know how to do that. I'm just gonna click and drag layer one above the statue layer. Okay? So point being when we go and create a new layer. It's created above the previously selected layer. Okay, I'm gonna go on rename this layer rather than layer one. I want to give it a much more meaningful names. While remember, Six months from now, with that, this layer is for I'm gonna call this stripe. Okay? And as the name would imply, what I want to do is I want to create a stripe inside my composition here. So to do this. And this is where we start getting into some more of the tricks where we start to combine multiple tools and commands together. What I'm gonna do is I'm gonna head back to my rectangular selection tool and with the stripe layer selected inside the layers panel. And this is noteworthy here. Whenever we're working inside our composition, double check your layers panel. I can't tell you how many times I've gone to do something and realize that I've had the wrong layer selected inside the layers panel. So make sure you have the correct layer selected inside the layers panel. What I'm gonna do with my rectangular selection tool is I'm just gonna drag out a selection inside my image. Something like that. Okay, it doesn't have to be very precise. Now, what I want to do with this guy is I wanna fill him with a solid color. I want to fill him with solid white double. Check that white is still set as your background color at the bottom of your toolbox. Tap your D key if it's a different color and then check this out. This is another really great keyboard shortcut for us. Try holding down command if you're on the Mac or control on the windows side and press your delete key. And what that will do is that will fill your selection with the current background color. How do you like that awesome stuff? Okay, we can go and de select our our selection here that we have here control or command D on your keyboard. I'm also gonna tap my wiki on my keyboard to switch me back to the move tool a couple of things that I want to mention here just while I think of it, when we want to go and select the pixels inside of layer. So of course I'm still on my stripe layer inside the layers panel What I could do is I could use Controller Command A on my keyboard. What that does is that makes a selection that encloses, not the entire image. This is an important distinction to make here, but all of the pixels, all of the available space on the current layer. Okay, on the currently selected layer. So I have everything selected here using controller command day. If I press my delete key on my keyboard Onley the pixels on the selected layer get deleted . OK? Important distinction to make. As I say, I'm just gonna undo that Controller command dizzy on my keyboard. Now what if I wanted to select on Lee the pixels on this layer? Not the rest of the layer? While check this out, I'm gonna de select controller commanded d on my keyboard. Then what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna bring my cursor over top of the layer Thumbnail. I'm gonna hold down either control on the windows side or command here on the Mac, notice my cursor changes. Here I get a little box with some marching ants there beside my cursor, I'm gonna click on the layer thumbnail. And that loads the content of the layer into my image as a selection. Pretty cool stuff. Here's a better example. How about the statue itself? Maybe for whatever reason, I want to go and select this guy. I'm gonna hold down control or command. And what I'll do is all single click on this statue layer thumbnail that loads in that layer as a selection superfast week to create selections here. What if here's something else that just came to mind? What if I wanted to simultaneously select the statue and the pixels on another layer? This stripe player? What I'm gonna do is I'm still holding down Controller Command, bringing my cursor over top of the stripe layer Thumbnail, I'm gonna throw in shift as well and notice beside my cursor I get a tiny little plus sign now single click, and that loads in another layer as a selection as well. And I have to layer selections happening here Pretty cool stuff in any regard. There you go. Just some neat things that we can do here. Okay, go ahead and de select Controller Command D. I wanted to mention that again. If you're ever in a situation where you need to make some quick selections here now, as far as actually selecting your layers, I wanna bounce this off of you as well. Sometimes will be in a situation where we want to select more than one layer at a time. Maybe you have ah, group of layers that you want to delete or a group of layers that you want to organized into ah layer group, something that will talk about in just a little while. Well, I can hold down control or command and click on multiple layers to select more than one layer out of time, perhaps something like this. Okay, you can certainly do that. Or you could also use shift if you have a continuous group of layers that you want to select. This is really great when you have a huge number of layers inside your images, so you can certainly do that as well. Here's something else. What if I wanted to take two layers? I'm going to use statue and stripe. What if I wanted to connect them together? Well, what I could do is I've got them both selected here, right? So I used controller command and I grabbed both layers. I could head to the layers panel menu and what I could do is I could choose merge layers now. What that means is it's gonna take the pixels on both layers and compress them down into one single layer. Okay, Kind of like flattening the two layers together. Okay, once they're merged together, by the way, there's really no easy way to separate them apart again. So there's an edit ability issue here, and I know that I could have tons and tons of layers inside my Photoshopped images, so I don't usually merge my layers. But I wanted to mention this to you, but sometimes I may link my layers. Check this out. I'm gonna go link layers. So in other words, I had multiple layers selected that I went to the layers panel menu, and I chose length layers. Now I have link icons appearing on each of these layers, meaning that whatever happens toe, one of the layers will simultaneously happen to the other layer as well. So this could definitely be useful for you moving them around, even things like using your free transform. If I transform one of the layers, both of the layers are going to get transformed Okay, so there you go. Some neat stuff there. So what I'm gonna do here is I'm gonna go and re select my two layers there, back to the layers panel menu, and I'm gonna say unlinked layers, and that takes me back to where you and I started. Okay, so there we go. Oh, last but not least, one more thing that I want to show you. If you ever want to delete a layer I mentioned this earlier on. You would select the layer and then just use the trash can icon down at the bottom of the layers panel. Something like this. You can go and delete your layers if you want. Now, often times you'll see this when you're working along inside Photoshopped photo shop. So Hey, hold on. Are you really sure you want to do this? And I say yes. And then the next time I go to do it, I say yes again. And then the third time, Yes, again. Often times I'll just say, Look, stop bugging me and just go and delete the layer in this case, All right? Anyway, I'm gonna cancel this eight. I'm just gonna say no, but in any regard. There you go. There's a smattering of various techniques for working with multiple layers creating your layers, the leading your layers, selections related to your layers and so on. 25. Blending Modes, Opacity & Fill Layers: okay, I want to introduce you to something inside the layers panel called Blending Modes. Admittedly, it's a pretty deep subject, Really. What I'm aiming for in this exercise is to at least get you warmed up to the idea introduced to the idea of blending modes. And then perhaps a little bit later on, when we talk about some special effects will take an even closer look at how these guys work. If he asked me to define what the heck of blending mode is, I'd say it's a special effect applied to a layer. If you want the actual technical definition of what a blending mode is, here it is. It's a mathematical algorithm to calculate color effects between two different layers. How do you like that? Two or more layers? Really, I should say so. Essentially, what we're gonna do is we're gonna take one of our layers inside the layers panel and apply a blending mode to it. What that's gonna do is it's gonna playa color effect to the pixels that reside on the layer and control or apply this algorithm, as I say. Chew those pixels and it determines how they interact with the pixels inside the rest of the image. It's kind of complicated. I think I should just show you. So here we go years our introduction to blending modes. Go and grab your statue layer for woman. If you would up towards the top of the Layers panel where it reads normal dropped this guy down. And here's our huge list of blending modes special effects, if you will, that we can apply to the pixels on the selected layer. There's tons of them, and there are a lot of fun to mess around with. For instance, what does multiply do? We'll go ahead and choose, multiply and we see a color effect now applied to the statue layer. Okay, so mine started, darkened a little bit. How about lighten? What is that to Oh, there we go. We have something like that. So just sort of a faint outline we could get into, for example, and overly something like that or one of my favorites is difference. Which gives us something like this almost kind of like a photo negative effect. So that's why I say there special effects when when people ask me exactly what a blending mood is, a special effect, and a lot of times you just have to try them out and see what you're going to get. There are actual definitions for every single one of these guys, but I've long since for gotten, and I think I started to get into some of them. And then I quickly just decided, You know what? It's easier just to experiment visually rather than trying to remember exactly which ones do what. OK, but what you'll find in your work is you'll find your start to favor a handful of them. Okay, for example, I like my vivid light. I'm a big fan of overlay. I use overly every once in a while difference, as I mentioned and so on. Okay, now where things get interesting is when we start to apply opacity to our blending modes as well. So here's a quick down and dirty example of what I'm talking about. I'm gonna go back to normal, and by the way, I should mention this as well as a quick aside that the blending modes are what's referred to here inside Photoshopped as non destructive. So as you can see him all the way back to where you and I had started simply by taking the statue layers blending mode back to normal. Okay, so you can really start to monkey around with these guys. But they're have you can always go back to normal. Which takes you back to the beginning. Ok, All right. Now, how does opacity play into this? Well, what I can do is I can start to fade back my image. I'm gonna move over to the opacity field here. You can either use the drop down slider, or you can drop your cursor into this field, or you can actually click and drag on the word opacity. There. Opacity is a scale from 0 to 100%. And what we're doing is we're fading back the opacity of the pixels that reside on the selected layer. So we're messing around with the transparency, Really? Okay, Now, where it gets interesting and this is what I was leading to just a few minutes ago is we can monkey with the opacity and the blending modes simultaneously. So this is what normal And 73% looks like it looks something like that. But what I could do is I could say, Ari, let's try another blending mode. Perhaps vivid light, something like this. And let's see what vivid light looks like. Maybe down around 40% or maybe up to 50%. Something like this. Okay, again, You can use the drop down slider if you want. If that works a little bit better for you, I usually just click and drag on the on the actual label name. They rapacity moves a little faster, so obviously you're gonna want to spend a little bit of time experimenting. This is our first sort of foray into working with special effects inside photo shop. And of course, there's lots more than I want to show you. But you can have a lot of fun with these guys now. What's interesting, too? I should mention this as well is we can start to monkey with multiple blending modes. Multiple a, pass it ease on multiple layers. So, for instance, here is 91% difference on the statue layer. Then I could go after my stripe layer today. All right, let's take this straight player and just fade it back a little bit. So I'm gonna do is I'm simply gonna just his opacity may be down to above 75% or so something like that. So now I can see part of the layers beneath the stripe layer through the content of that layer, If that makes sense, okay. Should have a lot of fun with this stuff. All right, So I feel like I should almost sort of turn you loose and let you have some fun here with your blending modes and your opacity here inside Photoshopped. However, before I do so and now I'm starting to have fun here, monkeying around with some of these guys before I turn you loose. There's one more thing that I want to show you. Give me a second here. I'm gonna crank my straight player all the way back to normal and 100% taking me all the way back to where I started. Of course, one more thing that I want to show you, and that is how to create something called a fill layer inside photo shop. Now you'll recall this from earlier Ron, we were talking about background layers, and I said that it that image that had only a background layer was flattened image that sort of thing. Well, if I come along and I grabbed my bottom most layer in my case clouds. And let's say, for instance, I start to fade this guy back, maybe even down to about 40% or so. I'm seeing that checkerboard pattern appearing inside the background. And of course, we know that the checkerboard pattern is Photoshopped way of telling us that this is a transparent area or a semi transparent area, as we're having here, or as we're seeing here. So what we can do is we can create a solid Phil Layer because I want to see what this would actually look like on a solid white background. I don't want to see the checkerboard pattern, but I do want to see the clouds faded back just a little bit. Okay, so what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna create this thing called a fill layer. Here's how to do it. I'm gonna bring my cursor over to this icon here at the bottom of the layers panel, create new Phil or adjustment layer. There's lots of great commands inside this drop down menu, but we are after solid color, so we're gonna create a solid colored Phil layer. Good. And choose that guy. This is what we wind up getting. We actually wind up getting photo shops, color picker window. And I could probably spend about 20 minutes talking about this window alone. But here we go. For the sake of time, what I'm gonna do is gonna bring my cursor into this area here on the left hand side of the dialogue box. And it's white that I'm after strong in a drag and kind of click way up into that top left corner somewhere in there. Okay, of course I could go and choose another color if I wanted to. You can see what's happening there in the background of my photo. You have a lot of fun with this. As you might guess, I can use this center color ramp to go and change the colors that I'm working in. Perhaps I want to go up to blues or purples or something like this. And then the specific color that I'm choosing. I'm just clicking out of this left hand box here. Okay? But as I say, it's white that I'm after, so I'm gonna go way up to the top left corner sampling white in my background like so And then I'll go ahead and click on. OK, now, as you can see, the fill color layer is on top of the clouds layer. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna drag the fill color layer beneath clouds, something like that. So now I can see the clouds. I can see them faded back to about 40% or somewhere in there. But now I'm not getting that checkerboard pattern, which is great. So sometimes I will use a white Phil layer. If I'm messing around with a passages and blending modes on my bottom. Most layer, just a little trick there for you in any regard. Go ahead and monkey around to your heart's content for as long as you want, with your opacity and your blending modes. When you're ready to come back, I'll be waiting for you and we're gonna check out something called layer groups 26. Getting Organized With Layer Groups: all right. I hope you had fun with your blending modes. You know, I was saying about this too. If you're sitting there going, Yeah, I'm messing around with the blending modes. I'm monkeyed around with these guys. I'm choosing different capacities, but I don't really know what I'm doing. I don't know if I'm really getting this. You are getting it. That's really all there is to it. This is where we get into sort of the creative side of photo shop. And as I was alluding to in the previous exercise the special effects aspect of Photoshopped, there's no right and wrong here. There's just fun, right? You're just sort of exploring and experimenting and messing around until you get something that you think looks kind of cool or, you know, half decent. So just so you know, here's where I wound up. Here's my stripe player. I pulled him back to normal, and about 70% or so they're statue. I pulled him all the way back to where we had started, and I think I brought the clouds up just a little bit. I was messing around with some of the blending modes, but I decided to leave well enough alone. So that's where I wound up. But of course, you're certainly more than welcome to experiment and play and have fun. This is sort of the the playground aspect of Photoshopped. There's no right and wrong here. Okay? All right. Now, I promise you that I would show you something called layer Groups inside your layers panel . Now, as I've been mentioning, kind of all the way along. Normally, what winds up happening is you wind up with a ton of layers inside your Photoshopped documents, whether you're using Photoshopped to build Web layouts or compositions or who the heck knows. So we're gonna wind up with a lot of layers. What we can do is we can start to group. Are layers organized are layers into layer folders or layer groups. Okay, so we only have a handful a small handful of layers inside our layers panel for the time being. But let me at least get you started with your layer groups. You can see how this works. Notice down at the bottom of the layers panel. We have a file folder icon which will allow us to go and create a new layer group. So I'm gonna go ahead and click on this guy and we wind up getting a folder inside the layers panel called Group One. Okay. And what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna double click on this guy because I want to rename him. I don't wanna leave him named as his group one. Once again, we're gonna wind up with Group one, Group two, Group 3 27 Group 28 we won't remember what's what. So I'm gonna call this Group one, and I'm gonna call this. Condemn it. Whatever the hanky one. I'm gonna call this background stuff. How is that? Okay. So anything related to my background, I want to sort into this layer group. Okay, so check this out. What I'm now gonna do is I'm gonna take my clouds layer, and I'm gonna drag and drop him directly into the background stuff Layer group, just like so. Okay. And I'm also gonna grab my color fill one might color field layer, and I'm gonna drag and drop him also into background stuff. Okay, Now, here's where layer groups get very interesting. So I've got my background stuff layer group within the layer group. I have clouds and color. Fill the colorful layer and I have a stacking order within the layer group. Okay, So in other words, I can rearrange the stacking order of the layers inside the layer group like so. And then there's an overall stacking order for the entire composition. For instance, notice my statue has disappeared. He is now behind color fill one. Okay, so what I could do now is I could take background stuff, collapse that layer group by clicking on the little twisty arrow there to the left of the folder, and then drag and drop all of the contents of the background stuff layer group behind the statue layer. I hope that makes sense. Okay, So all I'm doing here is I'm just organizing my content. That's really old layer groups are about. Okay. Okay, cool. So I hope that makes sense for you. Now we can go and create mawr layer groups. If we wanted Teoh, I'll go and create another layer group and maybe all name this guy text. Because maybe what will wind up doing is creating a series of text layers or text related layers. And I could go on drag that towards the top of my my stack of layers, if you will, inside the layers panel, you know you could even do is you could get into creating sub layer groups if you wanted to . I'm gonna grab color, fill one, and I'll go and create another layer group. This is now a group inside of a group, if that makes sense, okay. And what I could do is drag any of my perhaps my color effects into this sort of sub layer group. And I'll call this, as I say, color effects, like so. Ok, so you could certainly get into that. I have found in my experience in my travels that having any more than two levels worth of layer groups and it starts to get complex. Okay, so I try to keep it to two levels at a at a maximum for myself anyway. Okay. All right. So now what if I want to get rid of ah Layer Group? Well, what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna take my color film later. I'm gonna pull him out of the layer group. Just kind of drag him up there to tuck him under the layer group I want to toast to this color affects a layer group that I've gone and created. So all I'm gonna do is I'm gonna make sure that he's selected and I'm gonna click on the trash can icon at the bottom of the toolbox and that toasts the layer group and any layers that it happens to contain. So be careful eso. In other words, if I grab background stuff and I tap the trash can icon at the bottom of the layers panel, all of the layers that appear inside that layer group are also gonna be toasted. Okay, so watch out for that. Okay, So I hope this is working for you. What I am now going to do is show you a quick tip here. Ah, faster method for working with your layer groups. And just like your layers, you can have as many layer groups as you want when I'm using Photoshopped to build Web layouts and Web related compositions. I'm really keeping myself organized. All the header area, all the the main navigation area, the body of the lay of the footer all the way down. Right. You can really keep yourself organized which is great, but there's a faster way to work here. Give me just a second to set myself up here. I'm gonna grab my two layers that appear inside the background stuff layer group. And I'm gonna pull them out of the layer group just by tugging them up above the layer group like so. And I'm gonna grab backer and stuff. And I'm also gonna grab text holding down Controller Command to select those guys simultaneously. And I will toast them simultaneously by using the trashcan icon at the bottom of the layers panel. Now, let's say, for instance, I have a variety of layers that I want to go and group together. Well, here's what I'm gonna do. I'm gonna select multiple layers here. Okay, More than one layer. Okay, so in my example, I'm just gonna use clouds and my fil layer. You could grab additional layers if you wanted to. Okay, Gonna grab those guys and from my keyboard. I'm simply gonna press control or command g. And that groups all of my layers into a layer group for me. Just like so. And then of course, I could go on double click to rename this guy, so I'll go back to named Scott Background stuff. Okay, so that's a much faster way for you to work with your layer groups in at least setting them up initially. Really, I should say so often times what I'll do is I'll go and grab all the layers that I want to be grouped together. Controller Command G. Go on, grab the next group of layers that I want a group together Controller Command G and I just ripped all the way through my layers, getting them all organized into my layer groups. So there you go. There's your layer groups. 27. Introducing Text Part 1: Artistic Text: I would be remiss if I did not show you how to work with text inside Photoshopped. So that's what we're going to do in this exercise. I've always found text to be a little clunky inside Photoshopped. They've made some some pretty huge strides over the last few years, making it easier and easier to work with text inside Photo shop. But I still find it a little bit clunky. I find text inside a program like Adobe Illustrator to be way easier, and I can't even really pinpoint why. But anyway, let's get into this. There's a bunch of things that I want to show you here. We're going to start off with what I refer to as artistic text inside of our, instead of our little composition that we're kind of working on here. So inside the toolbox and go and find your text tool or your type tool, go ahead and grab this guy when you select the type tool, by the way, move your eyeballs on up to the options bar across the top, and this may take a moment for Photoshopped toe Lodin for you, by the way. But we get a font drop down menu, a style drop down menu size and so on. So lots of options across the top. Here, what I'm gonna do with my type tool is I'm gonna bring it over towards sort of towards the left edge of my composition within this white stripe that you and I have gone and created. And I'm just gonna single click. OK, now, if you're taking notes here, what you might want to jot down is when you single click with the type tool. This is what I'm referring to his artistic text. Sometimes it's called point text. In other words, what I could do is I could start typing and the text would actually run right off the right edge of the document. Okay, so it's just a single line of text. The text is going to appear on a single line of text, if you will, until I hit, enter or return on my keyboard to create a line break. Okay, notice also, and we haven't even really typed anything yet. Notice also the layers panel. What's going on inside there? So the previous layer that I had selected was stripe, so a new text layer gets created above your previously selected layer. Okay, so I'm gonna type the words come join us something like that. So maybe this is gonna wind up being a flyer or a banner for some kind of an event or something like this. Okay, All right. Now I've gone and typed in my text. It's tiny, though. It's super small there. So there's a bunch of different ways that we can start to work with this text. Here's what I normally do. I'm gonna hit controller, command a on my keyboard. And what that does is it selects all of the text because we're still on the type ritual, right? And we're still kind of clicked inside there. And then what you can do is you can crank up your font size to something that's maybe a little bit more suitable for us here so we can actually see what's going on and very similar to our blending modes. There's no right or wrong here. You can crank this up as large as you want. Of course, this is more of the design aspect of Photoshopped, the creative side of photo shop. It's still pretty small, though, so I'm gonna show you a trick that I use all the time. I really don't care what sighs my text is. I just wanted to be nice and large inside my layout. I don't care for 72 or 82 or 97 or whatever. I don't care. So I'm gonna head back to my move, Tool. My type player is still selected inside the layers panel. And by the way, as a side note, whatever you had typed into the text inside the document now becomes the layer name, which is very helpful. But what I'm gonna do to size and position my tax is I'm gonna use my free transform controller command tea on my keyboard. I'm gonna hold down shift and just start cranking on one of the corners. Just something like this. There we go. Something like that looks a lot better. Okay, so now we can actually read this text. Go ahead and hit. Enter on your keyboard to lock that in. So ah, lot of times I am using my free transformed Help me size my text position it Maybe I want rotated this sort of thing. If I want to go and change the font or some of the other formatting aspects of the text that I've typed in here. I'm gonna tap the T key on my keyboard, which reactivates the type tool for me inside the toolbox. And I'm gonna bring my cursor over top of the text there. I don't want to go and create a new type player. I want to work with an existing type player. I'm gonna go and select that content and then go to town with the different formatting options that we have. So, for instance, maybe I want to go and change the font here. Now, I've got tons and tons of fonts installed on my computer. I have no idea what you have on your end, but maybe we want to go and find something that's gonna be a little bit more suitable now, I don't know if you can see this sort of happening inside the background, but as I was hovering over top of different fonts inside this this front drop down menu I'm getting a live preview inside my document of the font being used inside my inside my composition Pretty cool stuff. So there you go. Hopefully that will kind of help you along a little bit. Okay? So obviously, ah, competition like this would want to find sort of a suitable font that might work for us. I do have a font in mind, but I can't remember if I still have it installed or not. Let me see if I can go and find it here. I went accidentally clicked away from my font. Drop down this. There it is. Right there. Blackmore was the one that I had in mind. Kind of a sort of a gothic You looking fun to go along with our Gothic e looking statue? Is that a word? Gothic E. I have no idea. Anyway, so I might wind up with something like this. Now, what if I want to change the color of the text? Well, the blacks not really working for me. I want to use something else. Notice We have a color swatch option way upon the options, borrowing in a single click on that guy that brings us into this window here, the color picker window which we've already been introduced to. And this guy's going to allow us to go and change the color of our text. So of course, you can go and choose from whatever color you want that you think would work well with your composition. Okay, here's a cool trick. By the way, when you're working with this sort of, you know, color picker window, and we're trying to find a color that would work here. If you bring your cursor over top of your image, your cursor changes to an eyedropper tool allowing us to sample a color from our from our photograph from our composition. Okay, so maybe I'll wind up going with some of the blue out of the sky here. Or there's that that color sample there. Maybe I'll make it just a slightly darker version of that sampled color. Kind of moving down this sort of this color picker window. So kind of a cool trick there for you anyway. Okay. All right. So there we go. I wind up with something like this, I'm gonna go back to the move tool, and I'll use my free transform to once again kind of crank this guy up kind of position, um, a little bit and sort of size him and get him set up exactly where I want inside my composition. So there we go. Something like that, I think looks OK. Now. This has been a look at working with what I've been referring to. His artistic text or point text again with the type tool selected out of the tool box were just single clicking and then typing at our text. What I'll do is I'll put the brakes on here and I'll let you monkey around and experiment a little bit on your own if you want. And then in the next exercise, I will show you how to work with what's referred to as paragraph text, which works a little bit differently than artistic text. But before I leave you to it, I do want to mention one other thing. With our type player selected, we can throw in blending modes onto our text, something like that, and also opacity once again as well. So once again, further experimentation on your part with your text layers related to opacity and, of course, the blending modes that we have available as well. All right, so have some fun with your artistic text, and then I will show you how to work with paragraph text next 28. Introducing Text Part 2: Paragraph Text: hopefully no problems with the artistic text. Now, how about the paragraph text while paragraph text would be used? Maurin a situation where you have lines of text or paragraphs of text where you want to create a text bounding box, if you will, that you want all the text to fit inside of Okay, So artistic text, which we've already been introduced to, is really more suitable for things like headlines or just a small short piece of text, maybe a button label or something like that. Okay, so give me a moment here. What I'm gonna do is I'm gonna toast my text layer by using the good old trash can icon there. I'm gonna head back to the type tool inside the toolbox just by tapping the T key on my keyboard this time, rather than single clicking with the type two will check this out. I'm gonna click and drag out Ah, box with my with my type tools, something like this. And we wind up creating what's referred to as a text frame or a text box. Okay. And then what I can do is I can start typing in my text, or I could even paste in some text from somewhere else. And the text is gonna be contained within this text frame. Okay, So, in other words, if I start typing eventually when I get over to the right hand side of the text box, the Texas gonna wrap on to the next line and continue moving over around and is going to continue inside the text frame in that fashion. Okay, so let me give you some examples of how you might want to use this. I'm gonna type in once again, the text come join us. Something like this. Very nice of Photoshopped to remember the color and the font that I had selected earlier. Not size, though. But that's OK. And I'm gonna hit enter on my keyboard, and then maybe I'll type in. Ah, date Monday, September 1st, 2014. You know, something like that. And then maybe a telephone number, maybe something like for 16 550001 You know, something like that. Okay, we have some text in here. It's all being contained. Are bound within this text frame that we've created. I can now go and select this text when I'm working with paragraph text. It's very similar to working with text inside of a traditional word processing application like open office writer or Microsoft Word. Something like this. If I want to crank up the size of this text once again, a trip to the top of the interface to the options bar and I could go and throw in some kind of value here. Oh, I don't know, 130 or something like that. Okay. I can't use my free transform in this case now. I'm kind of guessing, But what I could do is I could do something like this. I could grab the headline here, come join us. And I could make that a different size from the rest of the text inside the text frame, perhaps something like this. Okay, now, what I could do as well is I could start working with both the paragraph panel and also the character panel, which I'm sure you remember from earlier on. I'll give you a quick five cent tour here, starting with the character panel. The character panel contains options related to formatting and working with individual characters and words. For example, the font, the style. We could get into what's referred to as the leading and the tracking and so on scaling and there's air color there as well. And there's also some additional options down towards the bottom here, upper case and capitalizing and superscript and subscript and so on. Okay, so I think a lot of the options that you see here are gonna be familiar to you again if you've worked with traditional word processing applications. So I don't want to bore you to death here. But if there's anything in here that you want to see, feel Frieda to monkey around with it there. All right. Now, if we flip over to the paragraph panel here, we get options and commands related to working with an entire body of text or block of text . So, for instance, controlling the alignment of that text, centering the text inside our text frame or right aligning the text or getting into justifying our text. Things like this. Okay, you could get into setting up your in dense a left in dent, a write in dent, a first line in dent, space above and space below. Okay. And you can also choose, of course, to hyphen e as well, so you can use the options that we see inside the options bar. That's certainly fine. Or you can use your character and paragraph panel, which contains a lot of the same options that the options bar does. But it also includes some additional commands and features, of course as well. So I prefer working with the panels myself. Hits entirely up to you. Okay. More importantly, though, I hope the concept of working with a text frame is working for you. If you want, you can start to size and scale your text frame by using that handles that we see inside the corners and on the edges there. Maybe I want to size it down something like this, because I told my text to center align. It's always gonna be center aligned inside the text frame, regardless as to the size of the text frame. So bear that in mind. Okay, so maybe I wind up with something like this, okay. And then I could grab my move tool and then kind of micro position. This guy's something like this. Get him set up inside the white stripe that I've gone and created kind of off topic, but I'm gonna go and grab my white stripe and use my free transform controller command tea . And I'll just kind of reduced the height on that guy. Something like that. So it looks a little bit nicer. And for good measure, maybe what I'll do is I'll take the stripe and the text layer and all group thumb into a layer group controller command G on my keyboard, and I'll call this text or text label or something like this and then using my move tool all move them down towards the bottom of my composition. Something like that. Okay, Anyway, lots of fun here. I started to aggress when I start getting different ideas, but there you go. There's your paragraph text. I hope it's working for you again. Just play around, get comfortable with the different options that we have available inside photo shop for helping you build your compositions 29. Filtering Layers By Type: I hope you've been enjoying this. Look at working with layers inside Photoshopped before we wrap up the subject. There's one more thing that I want to show you here. This is actually something that I had mentioned at the beginning of our layers chapter, and that is filtering or sorting your layers based on the kind of layer that we have. And I said earlier on that there's lots and lots of different types of layers, and we're already starting to see that inside of our very simple, admittedly composition that we have here inside the composition that I have here, at least we have a fill layer. We've got some pixel layers, we've got a type player and so on. Okay, so what I can do is I can use the filter that runs right across the top of the layers panel to help me sort and find the layers that I'm after. And as I had mentioned earlier on, I don't really use this very often. Maybe I I should. But I don't really make a use of this in a large scale in any kind of large capacity. But essentially what we can do is we can use these options here to quite literally turn on and shut off layers based on their type. So, for instance, is very first option here. My drop down menu, By the way, it's set to kind the very first option here. Filter for pixel layers. If I turn that guy on, nothing happens inside the composition. That's important to know. But what has happened inside the layers panel is any layer other than what photo shop is referring to as a pixel layer gets disabled, he's no longer visible inside the layers panel. And a quick glance over to the right hand side tells me that we do indeed have a filter activated here. Okay, so I can click on that guy to deactivate the filtering and the layers panel returns to normal. Okay. All right. Now, let's kind of continue here filtering through our different types. So that was the first guy that we have here. I'm gonna turn filtering back on over on the right hand side, but I'm gonna disable my my filter by pixel layers, if you will. Let's go on filter by adjustment layers. Have we talked about adjustment layers yet? No, we haven't But if I go and turn that guy on its considering the fill layer to be an adjustment layer, Okay, how about filtering by text layers or type players? There we go. There's my type player in there, OK? And as a matter of fact, you can have more than one of these toggles activated at any given time. Show me adjustment layers and type players as well simultaneously or show me pics. So layers and type players or pixel layers and the adjustment layers. Okay, so lots of fun there. We haven't gotten, by the way to the other two layer types that we have here shape, layers and the last guy here smart objects a little bit more advanced, but they are available there as well, if you want. If you don't want to sort by the kind of layer, what you could do is you could sort by the name of the layer. You going type in the name of the layer there if you wanted to, or the effect that is applied to the layer. Or how about this, the blending mood that's applied to the air show me all layers that have a blending mode set to normal. Or show me all layers that haven't overlay blending modes. Something like that. Okay, you could certainly get into that if you wanted to. Okay. Pretty cool stuff. There's some other options in here as well. You're welcome to explore them. I won't go through every single one of them. But the attribute, the color, the smart object or selected there. Okay. But normally this is set back to kind. So there you go. There's how you can go and filter and sort your layers. You may want to make use of this in your own work. And I thought I would take a moment to show you exactly how it works. 30. Removing Red Eye From Photos: Okay, I now want to take a look at some of photo shops, retouching tools as well as some color correction commands to help make your photographs look their best. And I'm going to start off with a look at Photoshopped, a red eye to it. This is a pretty common issue that comes up for a lot of people when they're taking photographs of family members or a different events. Of course, we've all seen red I We've all been victims of red I do. You know what causes red? I, by the way it's caused when the camera flash bounces off the back of a person's retina and back into the camera lens. It happens a lot in low light conditions when the eye's pupil is fully dilated. There you go. That's the scientific reason. Anyway. How do we go about fixing it? That's the real issue. Well, go ahead and head into your open dialog box into your Project Files folder. I've gone and dropped a new file in here for us. Called red eye dot jp. Go ahead and pop this open, and eventually, when this file opens up will wind up seeing their rare photograph of a young man here suffering from the red eye syndrome. So what can we do about this? Well, you know, there's actually a variety of things that we could do to try and clean this up. I usually like to zoom in nice and close, of course, to kind of position this up here. Photoshopped has the red eye tool, of course. And I'm gonna go and show you this guy he's found inside your toolbox here, hidden underneath this guy here the spot healing brush tool, which is a tool that I'm gonna show you in the upcoming exercises. Here he is right here. The red eye tool and this red eye tool that we have inside Photo shop is so simple toe work with. All we do is we bring the tools crosshairs over top of the offending red eye and just single click. That's all there is to it. And Photoshopped does the rest just like that. How easy was that? So just a single click on the pupils, of course, of the eye to remove the red eye. And then, of course, when I zoom out, everything looks hunky Dorey. That's it. End of lesson that's all there is to it. It's really, really simple now. Usually if you get lucky and well, I'm talking here, I'm just gonna revert my file back so we can go back to where we started. Usually, it really is this simple. Sometimes you have a really nasty case of red eye where you're gonna have to spend a little bit more time working on on your file. You do have some options across the options bar across the top, the people size and the darkened amount. You may want to experiment with these options if you're really not getting the result that you want. Okay? The other thing that you can do with the tool is rather than single clicking, you can also click and drag, perhaps in the case where we have ah, a pet, maybe, or an animal with a slightly larger I. So here I'm not really getting a decent result. At least on this young fellow's right, I I'm gonna move over to his his left, our right hand side, they're gonna have It's not too bad, but anyway, you can't really beat a single click with this guy. So there you go. That's pretty much all there is to working with the red eye tool inside Adobe Photo Shop. So I'm gonna leave it at that experiment for yourself. If you have some family photos that you want to try and clean up just a little bit, just a single click using the red eye tool. 31. Removing Blemishes With The Clone Stamp Tool: So as you saw from the previous exercise, removing red eye from your photographs is super easy stuff. There really isn't a whole lot to it. Unless, of course, you want your friends and family members and pets toe look like demon health bonds or something. But in any regard, I'm gonna close out of the red eye image. What I want to do now is I want to introduce you to a new tool inside photo shop called the Clone Stamp Tool. It's actually not new to photo shop. It's gonna be new to us. But this guy has been around for a long, long time, and I think a lot of people think of this tool when they think of photo shop. What we can do with this tool essentially is touch up. Our image is, as the name implies, we can clone part of our image and copy it over to another location inside the same image or even into a different image. Okay, so here's what I'm gonna do. I'm gonna head back into my Project files folder. I've gone and given us another new foul called screw dot jp. Go ahead and pop this guy open inside photo shop. And this photo, by the way, has been graciously given to us or provided to us by photo spin, photo spin dot com Which is a really great resource if you're looking for stock imagery, stock photography and so on. Four year, you're different design projects. All right, so the clone stamp tool. Here we go. He's this guy way down inside the toolbox. Oftentimes, I lovingly referred to him as the rubber stamp tool. Go ahead and grab this guy. Now, This tool, like some of the tools we have already been introduced to, is brush based notice. My cursor is now a tiny circle on screen. So the first thing that I'm gonna do is I'm gonna head up to the options bar right to the top left here, and I'm gonna crank up the size of my brush. As always, I really have no idea how large I want my brush, but maybe something like that Or don't forget you can also use your square bracket keys on your keyboard to increase in. Decrease the size of your brush. OK, All right, Now, this guy's really easy to work with. What? I'm gonna do is I'm gonna bring my cursor over top of the screw head, okay? And I'm gonna hold down cult or option and single click with my tool, and then I'll let go of cult or option. Now, what that does is that sets the sample point or the point inside the image that we're working on that's gonna get copied, okay? Or the starting point. At least when I move my cursor away, notice that copied area wants to follow me around, right? And if I start clicking and dragging inside another area of the image, I can quite literally start painting in using the copied source. If you look back on the original object, the original screw head there as I'm clicking and dragging with my most. If you look back on the original screw head now, you'll notice across hair. It's telling me that this is where the sample sources coming from. Now I can sample from just below the screw. You know, something like this, and quite literally, start cloning in the image into another location inside the same image. Pretty cool stuff. If I want to start again, head back to the screw head old or options Single click and then away I go again. Okay. There are so many different applications for this tool. The one that I saw recently actually just came to mind was spray paint on on the side of a tree to mark a path. So we took a photograph of this really nice nature path. What? You want to get rid of a spray paint on the side of the tree? So it was a simple job for the clone stamp tool Or maybe graffiti on the side of a building or oil stains on a driveway or on road. Something like that. Okay, as a matter of fact, give me a second here. I'm gonna head back to my Project files folder because I have another image that we can work on here called tarmac dot jp. Go ahead and opened this guy up. And as you might guess, this is a photograph of a tarmac at an airport again provided to us by photo spin. Now, this guy, I'm going to zoom in quite a bit on this guy, and if you look down towards kind of the bottom left area of the screen, there's all sorts of oil stains and marks all over the tarmac here. We could clean this up using our clone stamp tool. Now, notice that I'm still getting the screw head inside my cursor. I could paint inside this new image with the source that you and I had sampled from the previous image, which, for me at least, is still kicking around inside the background. Okay, so here's what I'm gonna do, though. I'm gonna use my left square bracket key just to shrink down the size of my brush. Something like this. Okay, I'm not really sure how small I want to go here. Maybe something like this. I'm gonna hold down bolts or option to sample once again. I'm gonna go after some of the blemishes and marks that we see here holding down alter option. And I'm just gonna single click and again, Don't forget that sets the clones source. Now, I could just start clicking and dragging inside my image to remove thes blemishes. Something like that. Okay, there we go. And then I might work my way around the image something like this, and maybe up into these areas into the shadows. And I could spend you know, probably a good at least an hour on this image, cleaning it all up. This sort of stuff does take time. Of course, in any regard. There's your clone stamp tool. I really want you to get comfortable with this tool because he's so applicable in so many different situations. When you're comfortable working with this tool, I want to show you this tool siblings, namely the spot healing brush tool, the healing brush and also the patch tool as well. I'll show you those guys next. 32. Additional Touchup Tools: Spot Healing, Healing Brush & Patch Tool: Well, I hope you've been having some fun with your clone stamp tool. If this is your first time seeing the tool don't feel bad. If you've you know, you've gone for half an hour or 45 minutes messing around with this tool. Everybody loves the tool. Everybody loves playing around with the tool and getting comfortable with it. And so on. Now, like I say, I want to show you this guy siblings, the spot healing brush tool, the healing brush and the patch tool as well. So give me a second here. What I'm gonna do with my tarmac file is I'm gonna go on, revert him back to the original. So there's the original blotches and blemishes and so on, on the charm AC. Once again, I'm gonna start off with the spot healing brush tool. It's a bit of a mouthful here. He's found in the same group of tools where we went and grabbed the red eye tool from. And as a matter of fact, he's the very first guy there. There he is. Spot healing brush to avoid and grand this guy once again. By the way, this guy is brush based. So you may want increase or decrease the size of your brush using your keyboard, your your square bracket keys or the drop down from the options bar is perfectly fine as well. Now, in the previous exercise with the Clone Stamp Tool, we had to tell photo shop where we wanted to sample from and where we wanted to copy, too. So we held down alter option to tell Photoshopped whereto sample from or where to clone from. And then we started clicking and dragging to copy that area over to the new area. Right, what with the about healing brush tool. The tool determines where the clones source should come from, where the copied content should come from. So, as a matter of fact, he's even simpler to work with than the rubber stamp tool or the clone stamp tool. With this guy, all I have to do is just single click over top of my blemishes. Boof blemishes gone, click and drag gone, click and drag gone something like that, right? So very ago. That's really all there is to. It's super easy, I would suggest so that your image doesn't look too manipulated to touched up that you use appropriate brush sizes for the blemishes that you want to remove. Okay, whether it be these small blemishes that I'm removing here, or perhaps a large blemish like this guy here, maybe crank up may burst size just a little bit. And just click and drag rate across this guy. Something like that. Okay, Now notice the crack in the in the tarmac. You're gonna switch back to my move, tool. So I have a pointer here. There's a line here which sort of got blurred out on that last maneuver. What I could do if I were really dedicated. And, you know, I would do this if this were a a real world project is I go back to my clone stamp tool, my rubber stamp tool, and I try and clone some of this some of this stuff back in, maybe grabbing or sourcing from down here and cloning it back up towards the top. Something like that. Okay, in any regard, that is the clone or I'm sorry. The spot healing brush tool, Duminy Tools here. Okay. How about the healing brush tool? Lets check this guy. I'm gonna grab this guy and what I'm gonna do just for good measure here, so I have a decent image to work on it. I'm gonna revert one more time. I could've tapped F 12 on my keyboard, of course, to Revert, that's our keyboard shortcut. Now, with the healing brush tool, we're gonna bolt or option click to sample. And so this is gonna work in a very similar way to the rubber stamp tool or the clone stamp tool. But when we release our most button photo shop is gonna adjust the loo minutes. So the sort of the brightness or the color values. So unlike the clone stamp tool, which directly copies photo shops, gonna kind of jump in here and help us out a little bit. Okay, So I'm gonna go after some of these blotches and blemishes one more time here, maybe towards the left of this blemish here. And I'll just reduce down the size of my brush a little bit, holding down ultra option and sampling and then bringing my cursor over top of the blemish and just clicking and dragging something like that. So think of this as your rubber stamp tool, but a little bit more subtle. Okay, So it's taking into account some some of the colors and some of the other pixel values that we have around the blemish rather than just doing sort of Ah, raw copy and paste, as the clone stamp tool was doing. Okay, so a little bit more more subtlety Here, I guess, is what I'm trying to say. All right? You can certainly monkey with this guy. And by the way, all these different tools that I'm showing you you might like one or two of them, and you might leave the rest. That's perfectly fine. I'm just giving you options here. Okay, so there's the healing brush tool. Now for one of my favorite tools here in in terms of the touch up or the cleanup tools, the patch tool. And I'm gonna use this this large mark here on the tarmac to demonstrate the next you will hear the patch tool with this guy. What we can do is we can quite literally cut a window into our image and then move the image around inside the window. Let me show you this interest. Instead of trying to explain it, I'm gonna bring my cursor up towards the top of this blemish, and I'm gonna click and drag out. And what we are doing here together is we are free handing out a selection. In other words, marching ants just like that. So this is gonna be our window. Okay? And then if I bring my cursor inside the window, I can click and drag around and decide what area of the image I want to drop into that window. Maybe it's some other area inside my image. Hopefully one that doesn't contain a blemish. Those two, maybe down towards the center here, something like that. Let go with my most photo shop, matches it up. And then Aiken de select Controller command D on my keyboard. How do you like? That s so there's the patch tool. Very, very cool tool here inside Photoshopped. Let me give you another quick example here with the patch tool. So maybe this looks almost like a skid mark or something like that. So this kind of freehand A selection around this guy, maybe something like that that might not be the best selection, but in any regard. And then I just start clicking and dragging inside my image to decide what content I want to put into that tiny selection that you and I just made something like that. Notice when I let go of my most the brightness and the color value shift just a little bit inside my window inside my selection. So again, photo shops jumping in to help us sort of match up the colors and the luminess ity that we have here in any regard. There we go. That's looking a little bit better anyway, but has always I could spend a lot of time working on this guy, But there you go. There's your spot healing brush tool, the healing brush tool and also the patch tool as well. 33. Using Photoshop's Toning & Focus Tools: we've been talking about touching up our photographs and trying to make them look their best. I now want to take a look at photo shops, toning tools. There's three of these guys Dodge, burn and sponge. You may wish to make use of these guys. You may wish to forget the next five minutes of your life. I have no idea. But I'm at least gonna make you aware of these guys. I'm gonna head into my Project files folder. I've gone and thrown in even more photos into this Project files folder for us to work on. I'm gonna go on, grab this guy here, horizon dot j. Peg, go ahead and pop this guy open. And no doubt you've seen images like this before. Perhaps even photographs that you've taken before that are kind of kind of dark or kind of drab, and you want to do something to them. Well, here's the toning tools found about half way down inside the toolbox. Here they are. Dodge, burn and sponge. Let's start off with the Dodge Tool. Go ahead and grab this guy. Now. These three tools, by the way, they're all brush based. Okay, so you can once again use your square bracket keys on your keyboard. To adjust the brush size, you can head to the options bar to adjust the brush sizes while it's really up to you. Now, what does the Dodge Tool do? Well, this guy mimics a traditional dark room true of the method of dodging light during a photographs exposure in a traditional dark room. So these three tools actually really mimic traditional darkroom techniques. So specifically, the Dodge tool is gonna lighten areas. Okay, So say areas of my image that are coming out a little bit too dark, for instance, the foreground specifically for myself. Give me a second round in a crank of the size of my brush, something like this. And just with some short kind of quick, most clicks, I'm just gonna try and lighten these areas, you know, something like this. Okay, now, be careful, because it's really easy to go way too far. You know, something like this, right? And I wind up with a with an area of my image that I've completely blown out something like that. Okay, so you just want to try and make nice, short most clicks. Nice wispy lines in here. Maybe something like this. Okay, there were. And again, as I say, when I'm while I'm showing you this, you can take this or leave this. I think I've got a little bit too far, you know, in some of these areas, but in any regard. There you go. This is our dodging tool. Okay, Now, what about burn? What is burned do? Well, the burn tool does the opposite to the Dodge Tool, so he's gonna darken. Okay, So I'm gonna grab this guy, and what I would now do is I would look for dark areas that I want to lighten, so I would look for light areas that I want to darken. So, for instance, maybe some areas inside the sky, the clouds that I have here maybe again, just some light, gentle keystrokes or or story most drags. I should say something like this. OK? And again pretty quickly, you can maybe go a little bit too far and dark in the area too much. But maybe you want to create some kind of a dramatic effect. Who the heck knows? Some dramatic lighting here? The storm on the horizon, something like this. OK, so lots of fun with this guy. Okay, so they go, There's Dodge. There's burn. Okay, be careful again. You can go too far with these guys. The third guy that you may want to make use of is the sponge tool. And what this guy is going to do is he's going to increase or decrease the saturation. What that means is the intensity or the amount of color inside an area. So give me a second hearing in a crank up my brush size here and maybe I'll try and de saturate or remove some of the color from some of the areas that maybe I had applied a little bit too much dodge to earlier on. You know, something like this. OK, so we're literally pulling color out at this point, something like that. Okay, so, Dodge, burn and sponge, you're more than welcome to make use of these guys. If you so choose now, I do want to squeeze in something else into this exercise, and that is the three toning tools their siblings. Just above we have the blur two of the sharpened tool and the smudge tool, which, quite honestly, these three tools I find to be completely useless. And the last time I used them was the last time I showed somebody Ah, little bit of a photo shop and they were asking about these tools. I never actually used these three tools in production. I'm gonna show you the smudge tool to get you started. What this much too will do literally is allow us to finger paint on top of our photo. And I'll bet you just went, Oh, cool, right. That's about the last time you'll say, Oh, cool. Because when you're using this tool because you're never gonna actually use this in the real world, you might play around with and go a. That's pretty neat. That's pretty cool. And that's gonna be the end of it. You're never actually gonna have a need for this sort of thing. Now you may have a case for taking an area of your image and blurring it. So maybe kind of d focusing an area, maybe to create some interest, or or some some kind of a focal area inside your image. And this probably isn't the best example, because kind of hurt to see on screen here, but you can see these pixels in here are starting to get more and more blurry. The more I kind of click and drag my minutes over top of them. Okay, but again may be kind of hard to see in the in the recording here, but in any regard, that's the Blur. And in the sharpen, he does the opposite of the Blur. So he'll take blurry pixels and make them even sharper. Okay? And it's quite easy. Toe over. Sharpen. Okay. And again, it's kind of hard to to see this in a recording, but maybe a little bit easier for you to see your cell phone on your side. Okay, so there we go. There is this much tool, the sharp into on the blur tool. Now, those guys were the bonus tools for this exercise. Really? It was all about the Dodge, the burn and the sponge tool inside photo shop 34. Using Photoshop's Auto-Correct Commands: I don't know if you're aware of this or not, but I am slowly leading us down the path to the issue of color correction inside photo shop , which, of course, is a huge subject. We just saw the toning tools inside photo shop, which is ah, form. I guess you could say of color correcting your images using tools. What I now want to do is I want to introduce you to photo shops, three auto commands and this for me anyway. And for a lot of people is sort of the first stop in the color correction adventures. So you open up in image inside Photoshopped and you want a color Correct that. You know that it doesn't look right. Maybe you can't quite put your finger on why it doesn't look right. Head to your auto tools. And, as I say, there's three of them. There's auto tone, auto contrast and auto color. Let's go and take a look at them. So I'm gonna head into my Project files folder once again. Of course, I've closed out of the horizon dot jpeg image, which we were taking a look at in the previous exercise, and I'm gonna go and find a file. Very is right there called nice view dot jp. Go ahead and pop this guy open. Okay, so here's a nice view. Now, what I want to do is I actually want to take this image, and I want to duplicate him three times. How can we do that? Well, from the image menu, we have a duplicate command. So we're gonna use this guy to duplicate our image. You could go and rename them if you want. Actually, as a matter of fact, I think I will. This is gonna be auto tone. How's that? And I'll hit Enter on my keyboard. So there is a duplicate now called Auto Tone, and I'm gonna go and duplicate this guy a second time. And instead of auto tone, I'm gonna call this auto contrast. There we go. Something like that. And then the third and final time image duplicate. By the way, duplicating your images is very handy when you want to try different things at different tests, different examples, things like this. This is gonna be auto color. Okay. All right. There we go. So now we have a whole pile of images here inside photo shop all, Of course, the same and nice view is the original. Of course, What I'm gonna do now is I'm gonna arrange everything on my screen here so we can sort of follow along here window and then down to arrange, and I'm gonna say four up. And this will give us four tiled windows that we can work with here inside photo shop. And of course, they're all the same at this point. OK, so maybe what I'll do here is this kind of position. These guys, you might wanna zoom out a little bit on each of these guys and kind of position them on screen something like this just so we can see as much of each of the images as possible. And we're gonna run our auto commands on each of these guys, of course, leaving the original intact. So we have a reference that we can look back to OK, so the first auto command that I want to show you is auto tone and auto tone. What he's gonna do is he's gonna automatically set the brightness and the contrast for your image, and he's also going to remove any kind of a color caste. Okay, so go and look for your auto tone image. He may be in a different location than mine is, but go ahead and look for him there. This command also works on a channel by channel basis. Now, what I mean by that is he breaks it down and goes one color at a time. Now I happen to be in a three channel image. RGB. This is a little bit above and beyond our course here, but I did want to at least mention that this command works on a channel by channel basis. Okay. You're not sure exactly what that means. Just sit tight. Make sure this is the active window. Okay. Make sure your auto tone image is indeed the active window had backed your image menu. And sure enough, auto tone. Go ahead and choose that guy. And the command gets applied to the entire image. Unlike our previous exercise with her toning tools where we could control exactly where the pixels, we're gonna change inside our image. With these three auto commands, all of the pixels should adjust inside our image. Okay, so there's auto tone. This is what auto tune looks like. Okay. And once again, you can compare the auto tone back to the original something like this. And obviously we can see a difference between these two images. I think the auto tone looks much better than the original. Okay, all right, So there's auto tone. The next guy that I want to show you is auto contrast. Go ahead and find your auto contrast photo. Mine happens to be down in the bottom, left corner again. Yours maybe in a slightly different location inside your version of photo shop. Now, what's with auto contrast? What's he gonna do for us? Well, he's the same as auto tone, but he's not gonna go channel by channel. Instead, he's going to use all the pixels inside the entire image. And if you're taking notes, you might want to drop this down as well. This command will not remove any kind of a color cast if ah, color caste happens to be present. Okay, so make sure that this image window is indeed selected back to the image menu and then down to auto contrast. Okay, And there's auto contrast. I saw just a very slight shift in the color inside my auto contrast image again. Comparing him back to the original looks pretty darn close. There's just a little bit of a transition or change that's happened here. Okay, All right. So there's auto contrast again. The entire image has been adjusted. Not a specific area of the image we've got. One more to go, that is auto color. So go ahead and grab your auto color image for myself. Top left corner. This guy right here, what this guy's gonna do This is pretty cool, actually is. He'll find the darkest pick. So inside your photograph and it'll make it solid black. And then it will also find the lightest pixel inside your image. So for myself, probably up inside the sky somewhere and it'll make it pure white. And then third, what it will do is it will find the midpoint, the mid grey point, and it will make it 50% black or 50% gray, If that makes sense, OK, so it's gonna balance out the color inside the entire image. Here's what he looks like. Make sure your auto color image is selected back to the image menu. Back down toe, auto color and we wind up with something like this. Quite a big shift inside the image here again when you compare it back to the original There. Now you may like this image. It might work for you. It might not work for you. Who the heck knows? It's all in the eye of the beholder, right? For myself, it's a bit much. I think I like the auto tune version myself. That's just a personal choice, though. But, you know, I don't mind the change here. It just looks a little washed out a little too drab, e. In my opinion. But, hey, what do I know anyway? Now, auto color is a really great place to start with your auto commands. It tends to produce the best results, but again, it all depends on the image that you're starting with, of course, and this is something that's really important to understand. With photo shop is a lot of times people say, Just tell me what to do. Tell me which command I should use to make this image look amazing. While every images different, there's no silver bullet. That's why there's so many different commands inside photo shop. So many different ways to do things inside. Photo shop. Okay, in any regard, There you go. There's the three auto commands. When you open up an image inside photo shop and you want a color, correct it. Start with auto color underneath the image command. If that doesn't work for you, use your file menu and then down to revert and then try one of your other two auto commands . And if these auto commands aren't working for you, then we have to bring it up to the next level, which is gonna be the brightness and contrast command which are gonna show you in the next exercise. 35. Using Brightness/Contrast: as I alluded to in the previous exercise. Photo shop is loaded with all kinds of different color correction commands, some of them very simple and straightforward, like the auto commands, the auto correct commands, which we were introduced to in the previous exercise, some of them very, very complex and very much on a high end professional level, if you will. But I want at least kind of get you going here. I want to show you the next color correction command. He's still in the I would say in the fundamental or the simple side of things, he's called brightness Contrast. What I'm gonna do here is I'm gonna close out of the duplicates that you and I had gone and created in the previous exercise. Give me a second here is gonna close these guys out. I'm gonna go all the way back to just the nice view dot jpeg. Okay, so of course that is this fella here consume in on him a little bit if you want. Now from the image menu down to adjustments, here's the huge array of color correction commands we have available to us inside Photoshopped. There's tons of them. Okay, But what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna get you started here. As I say, as I promised with brightness contrast, Here he is. Remember your old school television? Maybe your grandparents still have one, and it has a brightness knob on it and a contrast knob on it. And you can kind of make wheel of fortune look crazy and goofy looking. That's what the brightness contrast command does for us. Okay, so we have a ah brightness slider and a contrast slider, and that's about it. Okay, so make sure that you have preview turned on because that's going to give us an idea of what our image is gonna look like here. And with this command, quite literally, we just start monkeying around with the brightness and the contrast sliders that we have available to us. That's it. This is why this guy kind of falls into the category of the more simple color correction commands, if that makes sense, okay. Again, make sure that preview is turned on so we can see the result that we would actually get if we did indeed click on. Ok, All right. Now, a lot of these commands that you and I are gonna be monkeying around with having auto option. You can give that guy a try. Essentially, what that will do is it will give you photo shops. Best guess. Okay. And sometimes it does take a moment or two to render for us. There we go. So this is Photoshopped. Best guess at the brightness contrast. And actually, as a matter of fact, that doesn't look too bad. Here's a neat trick for you too, By the way, oftentimes all use this preview check box to give me a before and an after. Do I like that? So I wanna boost up the contrast just a little bit. Mawr Do I wanna drop down the brightness Just a little bit more. You know, this sort of thing. Once you're happy, go ahead and click on. OK, mats it. All right. Now, bear in mind that if I were to save the image right now on close out of it, that's it. This is what I would refer to as destructive color correction inside Photoshopped Libit. Later on, I'm gonna show you some non destructive methods for color correcting your images which are not permanent changes. We can always go back, right? But as I say here, if I save in closest guy Oh, that's a permanent change. I can't go back All right. With brightness contrast out of the way, there's a few other color correction tools that I want to introduce you to hear inside Photoshopped. It's going take a look them. 36. Additional Colour Correction Commands: what are some of the other color correction tools that we can make use of here inside photo shop? Well, as I say, there's a lot of them. Let me get you started with one called Vibrance. They're all of course, found underneath the adjustments sub menu. Go ahead and look for vibrance. Very much like brightness. Contrast. We have just two sliders inside this vibrance dialog box. Once again, just make sure that your preview is turned on so we can get an idea of what's gonna happen here. So the vibrant slider, What that's gonna do is that's gonna crank up the richness of the colors inside the image, something like I'm getting here. You can see the greens are really starting to come out inside this image again. If you want that before and after view or idea here, just check and uncheck your your preview check box there. Okay, so there's the vibrant slider there. I could reduce the amount of vibrance until I wind up with something like this, a very dreary kind of drab image which who the heck knows? Maybe that's what you're after. Maybe there's some kind of ah special effect that you're looking for. Okay, so maybe I'll kind of pump up my vibrant a little bit and then saturation, the amount of color that I want inside my image, I could certainly over saturate an image. Or I could set my image to be under saturated If I crank this guy all the way to the left. Wouldn't you know it? We're now into the world of black and white photography. So if you're wondering how you can take an image and convert into a black and white photo, there are many, many different ways to do that inside photo shop. Here's one very simple method. Okay, Just dragging down the saturation slider. OK, so you could have a lot of fun with this guy. Go ahead, knock yourself out. What I'm gonna do here is gonna cancel this guy out, though, because I'm gonna show you another command that you may want to make use of. Now, this starts to get a little bit more heavy duty in terms of the color correction tools that we have inside photo shop. But I'm gonna show him tree Anyway, this guy is called levels. Okay? So image adjustment and then down to levels. All right, this is what we get here. A much more complex dialog box, as you can see here. What's the deal with this guy? Well, in the center of the Levels Dialog box, we have a graph. This graph for grid is actually what's referred to as a hist a gram. And here's how a history am works. It measures the lightest and the darkest pixels inside your image. So way over on the left hand side, we have solid black way over on the right hand side, the opposite side, we have solid white. And in the middle, of course, we have grey and the height of these fellas here. Tell us the number of pixels at each of those sort of points on the history and you can see here way over on white. There's a bar that goes almost up to the very top of the grid. That's all the white areas that I have inside the image. Okay, so what I can do with this guy is I can start to monkey with these sliders here. I could take all of the pixels that are sitting towards sort of the left side of the history and I could drag them towards the right. See the result that we're getting there? What I'm doing is I'm shifting Mawr colors into solid black. And I told you this was a little bit more complex. So basically, what I'm saying is any pixels from this point over to the left should be solid black. So as I'm dragging towards the right, more and more colors air being thrown into shadow. If that makes sense, more and more pixels are being reassigned to be solid black. If that makes sense, okay? Or darker colored pixels. Now, I could do the opposite as well. I could say. All right, let's take some of the lighter pixels and shove them towards the darker side. Okay, so now what I'm doing is I'm pushing mawr the colors away from the white point and into the dark areas. OK, so usually with something like this, I might come in here and just make a few minor adjustments. Kind of tug things. Either way, something like this until it starts to look a little bit reasonable. Maybe all move this center slider just a little bit back and forth until you know looks half decent. Something like this. Another trick with ease. Dialogue boxes as well as I could Hold the old or option and notice what happens to my cancel button. He changes to a reset button so I can reset the dialogue box. And I can always go back to where you and I started. Okay, Another option that I could do is I could make use of the auto button, which we saw earlier so I could press auto there and photo shops going to give me. It's best to guess in terms of the settings that I should use inside the levels dialogue box for this particular image. Okay, All right. Now, the levels command is, as I say, very complex. There's a lot more to it than than what I'm talking about here, but I think I'm gonna leave well enough alone cause I don't wanna blow your brains out too badly here. You could certainly make use of this guy. I think he's a great command to use to at least get started in a more advanced direction for your color correction. But what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna cancel this guy. It because there's one more command that I want to show you. This command, I think, may fall into the special effects category. But what the heck, Let's get into it. I'm gonna go image and then down toe adjustments. There's a command in here called photo Filter. Go ahead and grab this guy. And as his name would imply, we can apply a filter, a color filter on top of our photograph. So the default here is a warming filter. So now the images kind of warmed up, and it has almost sort of this orange overlay applied to it. I can adjust the density of the overlay. I could crank that up something like this. Or I could reduce the effect, reduce the photo filter. Something like that. Okay, now there's tons of filters that you and I can go on. Apply lots of warming filters that we could make use of some cooling filters as well. To try and cool image off a little bit, we could get into specific colors violets, magenta, jys, blues, greens, all the rest of it. You can really have some fun here, down into some emeralds and so on. Okay. Or what we could do is we could go color and I could click on this little color block. And that brings us into Wouldn't you know it? Photo shops, color picker, where we can go and choose a specific color ourselves. Maybe something like that is what I'm after. Okay? And then I could crank up the density on that guy. Okay, again, it kind of falls into the realm of special effects, but I thought I'd throw him in here because he's a pretty cool command in any regard. If I'm happy with this, I would go ahead and click on. OK, Now I have to remind you that all the commands that we've seen in this exercise levels the photo filter, the vibrance and in the previous exercise, the brightness contrast. These are all permanent. Don't forget their old destructive. I've got to show you how you can color correct your images in a nondestructive way. And that's coming up in the next exercise 37. Non-Destructive Correcting With Adjustment Layers: as we know everything up until this point has been destructive. Meaning that if I see even close out of my image after applying perhaps a photo filter of some sort to it that I can no longer go back to the original. So I've got to show you how to non destructively color, correct your images. You want to change up our image. Let's go and grab a different file. I'm gonna close it to this guy, and I won't bother saving from the Project files folder. I'm gonna go in grab windows dot jpeg. Okay, give this guy a second to load up here. Now, we're actually gonna wind up making use of a variety of panels. So what I'm gonna do on the right hand side is I'm gonna go and expand it all of my panels . And as a matter of fact, it's the adjustments panel that I want. Okay. So make sure you have your adjustments panel handy. If you don't see him on the right hand side, you know it ahead to the window menu, right window and then down to adjustments. And you should be ready to roll. Now, inside the adjustments panel we just see a whole series of icons or buttons doesn't really make a whole lot of sense, but if you hover over top of them, you'll start getting their names up in the top left corner of the adjustments panel. So there's brightness contrast levels. Hey, wait a minute. Where have we seen this before? Curves, exposure, vibrance. The heck they're all in here. So many of the commands. I shouldn't say all but many of the commands that we have underneath the adjustments menu are also available from the adjustments panel. Why would I use the panel instead of the menu? Because the menu versions of these commands are permanent changes. The panelled versions of these commands brightness, contrast levels, curves and so on are non destructive. They're going to create what's referred to as an adjustment layer, and this is exactly what we're gonna talk about in this exercise. Okay, so I think to get our started here, let's use something very simple. Let's use our brightness contrast. We've already been introduced to the traditional brightness contrast. So from adjustments, I'm gonna click on the brightness contrast icon. Go ahead and choose that guy and all of a sudden the properties panel springs to life. And wouldn't you know it brightness and contrast sliders, right? Exactly like you and I saw in the previous exercises. But now we're getting the panelled version of that command, if that makes sense, OK, Now, I'm not really trended. Achieve anything specific inside this image here. I'm just gonna monkeying around here a little bit with the sliders. Maybe I'll use the auto command to let Photoshopped take a crack at adjusting this image. There we go. Something like this. Okay, now here is the what do they call it? The P Austin Resistance. Here it is. I'm gonna head back to my layers panel. There's my background layer, which of course, is locked. And there's brightness Contrast specifically, brightness, Contrast one. This guy here is what's referred to as an adjustment layer. Okay, Now, what this means is that the brightness contrast color correction command that you and I just applied is actually applied to the layer knocked to the the actual image itself. Where is the original image? He's hidden underneath the brightness contrast adjustment layer. And at any point in time, I can go in, disable my color correction again in this case, brightness, contrast. And I can see the original down beneath. Um Okay, So, quite honestly, in the real world, I am not using photo shops, traditional color correction commands at all. I'm doing everything with adjustment layers. Okay? And I would highly encourage you to as well. So what's cool about an adjustment layer is at any point in time, I can go back to that adjustment layer. Then I can go back to properties, and I can continue monkeying around with sliders, trying to get in effect or trying to get a correction that's gonna work for me, right? I save the file into the native Photoshopped file format dot PST and then at any point in time, I can come back into this image, grab the adjustment layer, go back to properties, and continue monkeying around until I get things looking decent. Okay, so this is nondestructive color correction at its finest here inside photo shop. Okay, now check this out. Let's say I've got this brightness contrast adjustment layer, and I'm kind of going at I'm not really feeling it. I wonder if levels would be a better choice. I'm gonna deactivate my brightness, contrast adjustment layer. I'm gonna make sure my background layer is selected. I'm gonna go back up to the adjustments panel. I'm gonna look for my levels command now, and I'm gonna give him a tap with my most. The properties panel springs to life again now, giving me the panelled version of the Levels command with the hissed a gram and the sliders and all the rest of it. Okay, so once again, I can get in here and I can start reassigning Cem pixel color, values or lightness values, if you will. Perhaps something like this, perhaps adjusting that midpoint one way or another way. Maybe it's some kind of a special effect that I'm after something like this. Back to layers. And now I have to adjustment layers. Let's compare levels back to the original brightness. Contrast something like this or I go cheese. That brightness contrast really isn't doing a whole lot. I'm gonna grab him, go back to properties and maybe make some further adjustments. Maybe something like this, and you know, something like that. Who the heck knows? Right back to the layers panel. So we can quite literally edit and tweak and adjust our image for as long as we won't until we get it. Absolutely perfect. Okay, so there you go. Your adjustment layers. Very cool stuff. Now check this out. What I'm gonna do there's more to show you. I'm gonna grab both of my adjustment layers just by holding down controller command, and I'm gonna drag and drop thumb down onto my trash can icon at the bottom of the layers panel taking me all the way back to my original. Okay, there's another way to create adjustment layers inside photo shop. Rather than going from the adjustments panel. More often than not, I'm going from this guy here. This drop down menu here at the bottom of the layers panel Create a new Phil layer, which you and I saw earlier that solid color fill layer. Or we can go and create an adjustment layer. There they all are. Brightness, contrast levels, curves, exposure, vibrance and so on. And so on. Let's try a photo filter. Maybe a photo filter adjustment layer. As soon as I choose the command, I'm booted over into the properties panel and I go Hold on. Wait a minute. What happened? Back inside the layers panel. There's the photo filter adjustment layer created for me inside properties. We can go nuts. Of course, as we saw inside the command there. So whatever. Kind of an overlay, whatever kind of a filter I want to apply to this guy. Maybe something like this. Okay. And again, it's all using adjustment layers, all non destructive. 38. Getting Started With Photoshop Filters: Okay. Now, on to the world of filters and special effects here inside Photoshopped. As you can see, I've closed out of my open images. I collapsed down the panels on the right hand side. What I want you to do is I want you to go and get your hands on an image, some kind of an image. It doesn't even really matter exactly which image you use. I think I'm gonna go back to windows dot J pig myself. You congrats. That guy you can grab something that you may have of your own kicking around. That would be perfectly fine. Of course, this exercise is all about getting started with filters inside photo shop. And I would say that filters is really one of those things that photo shop is known for. So let's get started with a quick look at filters here. And then, of course, in the upcoming exercises will go further with our filters. So here's the deal. We have our image opened up. We can head to the filter menu and all of the options that we see here three D Blur, Blur gallery all the way down, toe other, these air, all of our Photoshopped filters. Okay, Now, I'm gonna introduce you to a handful of these guys to help you get started. I think really, the best way for you to get comfortable with filters is to explore them on your own. But I'll help you get started here. And most of the filters, by the way, work in a very similar fashion. They're all gonna have a very similar dialogue box in a similar interface. So let's get started here. Maybe with a blur. So I'm gonna go blur, and then I'm gonna go over to Radio Bolivar, okay? So go ahead and choose that guy. If you're following me along here, There we go. So here's the radio blur interface. Lots of options here. Usually you get some kind of a preview inside these these filter dialogue boxes and usually a series of sliders and options related to working with the special effect of the filter itself. Okay, so we're adding in here a zoom blur, or we could go spin something like this. We have some quality options as well. And again, as I say, rather than me going through every single filter with a fine tooth. Come here with you. I think it's best for you to experiment and kind of discover a lot of these on your own. Okay, so there we go. I'm just kind of throwing in some settings here with a spin. As far as my blur method is concerned, I'll go ahead and click on, OK, And then what's gonna wind up happening is the filter or the special effect is gonna be applied to my image, just like so. Okay, so there you go. Pretty cool stuff. Now, I'm gonna go ahead and undo this controller Command Z on my keyboard. That's the first filter that we've seen. Let's go on. Check out another one here. This is kind of a cool one. I'm gonna go back to Filter, and then I'm gonna go down to stylized all the way down to style lives. Here's another fun one that we could use em, boss Or actually, any one of these really is pretty cool stuff, But I'm gonna show um, boss here. And what we can do is we can make our photograph appear as if it's m bost on paper. OK, now, this filter is a little bit different because it's giving us a live preview inside of our image. The actual filter interface has a preview window, but honest to goodness, a lot of these preview windows. I think I alluded to this in a an earlier exercise much earlier on these preview windows are kind of useless. I usually go within the actual document window if that makes sense, and usually you'll have some kind of a preview check box in some of these filters. Not always, though we didn't have one with the radio blur, for instance. All right now, as far as I am boss is concerned, I can set the angle. So, in other words, the lighting angle for the M boss effect the height of the M boss effect, or imagine this is almost the depth of the embossing. And then, of course, the amount as well. So there's really no right or wrong here. We're just having some fun throwing some special effects onto our images. When we're happy with them, we can go ahead and click on OK to apply them to the image. Now I do want to say here as I hit my undo one more time Controller Command Z on my keyboard. I want to say here that these filters at this point are destructive once again, just like the color correction commands that we saw earlier. I apply a blur or stylized filter to my image. For example, this time I'll go back down to stylized. But this time I'll go extrude something like this, and then maybe I'll wind up taking the defaults. Or maybe I'll throw in some different settings here and click on. OK, this is a permanent change on my image. If I save the image and close him out and opening up tomorrow, this is what he's gonna open up as I've destroyed the image. Okay, So be very careful with this stuff. There's no going back. Okay, now Ah, lot of these filters to I have to say, and I don't mean to take the window to your sales. There are a lot of fun, but that's kind of where it ends. Where the heck am I gonna use these in an actual real world project? Maybe once in a while, but by themselves, usually you're not gonna use them all too often. There are a lot of fun to explore and go through and try them out and so on. But that's about kind of where they end unless you start mixing a few of them together, or unless there's a specific affect your after. So what if we wanted to create sort of a film green effect? What if I wanted to make this photograph look as if it were photographed on some grainy film stock? Something like that? Well, you could go to your filter menu and then down to noise. This is one of my favorites, and then over toe add noise. You could do this. And here's our noise, by the way, and we should be getting a preview in there because my preview option there is marked off. But I'm not getting a whole lot of in effect here inside my image window until I start cranking up the amount. There we go, something like this. So there's kind of this grainy film effect here. I usually wind up going Gagosian for the distribution and monochromatic, something like this. Now that's a lot of grain there, so maybe I'll try and tone it down a little bit. Maybe something like that. Very subtle effect. There something like this and then I'll go ahead and click on. OK, All right. So there you go. So I guess the point that I'm trying to make here is some of these filters have more wow than actual practical purpose. Other filters might actually have a purpose. There's a set of filters, by the way, just while I think of it here called the Sharpen Filters and unsure Mask this guy down here often times would be used for an image that's a little bit blurry. It's more of a corrective filter rather than a special effect. OK, now check this out before we move on. I want to throw a couple of interesting keyboard options at you here. I'm gonna undo this is the film grain that I'm back on here, right? I'm gonna undo the film Green effect. What I could do is I could hit control or command f on my keyboard to replay. The last filter that I used noticed the film Grain effect is now back onto my image. Okay. Or what I could do is I could hold down command and option here on the Mac or Control and Olt on the windows side and hit F on my keyboard and that will open up the dialogue box for the last filter that I had used. Okay, now, interestingly note that what I've done here is I'm actually gonna be applying noise onto an image that already has noise applied to it so I can actually layer my filters on top of one another if I wanted to. But I'm gonna go and cancel this last but not least from the filter drop down menu. The last filter that you've used is available from the filter drop down menu. Very first option there. There's a bunch of other filter commands that we have in here, which we're gonna be exploring in the upcoming exercises, namely Smart Filters and also the Filter gallery. Before we get to these two guys, though, make sure you're comfortable with some of the other filters that we have available to us inside the filter menu. 39. Working With The Filter Gallery: Well, I hope you've been having some fun with your photo shop filters. You may have been gone for a little while. I have no idea. There are lots and lots of fun, though, of course. But what I wanna do now is I want to show you the filter gallery. I think you're really, really gonna like this. I've got enclosed out of the photograph of the burn windows. By the way, of course, because I'm gonna go and grab a different image. I'm gonna go on grab. Always bright ideas dot psd This guy here and what I want to do is I want to use my filter gallery on this guy to create some kind of an artistic effect. Maybe I want to make it look like this guy was painted on canvas or painted using watercolors or something like that. Now, give me just a moment here. This guy doesn't have a background. Right. So inside the layers panel, what I'm gonna do super quick here is I'm gonna go and create a fill color layer the solid color fill their solid white here. Something like this. Just so he has a background as a matter of fact, this is completely off topic. But what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna grab both layers and hit Controller Command E and that will merge the two selected layers together. Okay, which has nothing to do with the filter gallery. Let's head back to the filter menu and then down to filter gallery. So you've been messing around and having some fun with filters so far inside photo shop, I hope there's even Mawr inside the Filter gallery. Mawr Filters Mawr special effects that we have available to us. This dialog box is probably the largest dialog box I've ever encountered. It's huge, of course, over on the left hand side, we have this huge preview window, and what you may want to do is zoom out on that preview so you can get a better idea of what your image actually looks like in the center column. We have all of our effects, which I'll be getting to in just a second and then over on the right hand side, we have the controls for the effect and the number of effects that we can add to our image . So with the filter gallery, we can actually stack multiple filters onto an image. It's pretty cool stuff. So, for instance, maybe I want to twist open the artistic category here, which has already opened up for me. And you can see there's a variety of effects or filters ready to go. For instance, paint Dobbs something like this or cut it. Maybe something like this, right? And as I'm choosing these different options, we're gonna wind up getting a different set of controls over on the right hand side. So maybe I wind up on something like rough pastels, Right? Maybe that's the one that I'll stick with here. And then I can start monkeying around with the different options that different controls that we have. For instance, things like the stroke length this stroke detail the texture canvas. So I have sort of this canvas effect happening here. Maybe I want to go with burlap, something like this, right? And really, as always, there's really no writer wrong here. It's really more a matter of monkeying around with the options until you really get something that you like. Okay, maybe something like this I don't really like a whole lot. I could switch over toe water color and then go on monkey around with the watercolor effects. Maybe something like this. Okay, so again, it's just a matter of kind of monkeying around and playing around until you get the results that you want. OK, so maybe I'll go back to cut it something like this. And let's see what I can do with this guy here. Number of levels, actually. Maybe I'll drop that down a number of levels there, something like that. Who knows? Whatever it could be that we're after here edge, simplicity, edge fidelity, whatever it is that you want. Okay. And by the way, I'm not really pleased with what I'm getting over on the left hand side. But that's beside the point, because I really want to focus on the filter gallery here. So I'm monkeying around here now. What's cool about the filter gallery and I alluded to this just a moment ago is we can actually stack multiple filters on top of one another, so check this out. What I'm gonna do is down towards the bottom, right corner. I'm gonna click on this guy here. New, effective layer. And wouldn't you know we get a new effect down in this sort of this bottom right quadrant. Think of these guys as your layers. Okay, so now I have to cut it effects. I'm gonna grab one of the cut. It's the top most cut it. And what I'm gonna do instead is I'm gonna twist open sketch, And what I'll do is I'll go and throw on a different effect. May be graphic pen. Something like this. Or notepaper or half tone pattern or whatever it is that I want. Okay, maybe. Watercolor paper. I think you get the idea here. Okay. We'll go with watercolor paper. Once again, I get a different set of controls up towards the top, right that I can use to go on a just the effect that I'm gonna be applying to my image. Okay. Now, let me go back to something a little more decent looking here. Maybe graphic pen. Something like that. What's really cool here is these effects, as I say, are very similar to layers so I can disable the view of one of the effects to go back to just the cut out. Or I could go graphic pennant and disable cutting. Let me see what it looks like with just the graphic pen so we can actually start stacking. 345 different effects all on top of one another. It's pretty cool. Maybe something crazy like this. Who the heck knows what it could be that you're after? Okay, so all I do is I just make sure that I grabbed the correct effect layer before I start monkeying around with some of the different options that I have inside the center column. Okay. And usually what I try to do is keep these guys all collapsed and then go after individual options here, maybe patchwork or whatever it might be OK, so of course you could have tons and tons of fun with the filter gallery. If there's an effect that I have inside the bottom area of my filter gallery that I'm not happy with, maybe cut out, I can re select that guy at any point in time and going monkey around with his his controls . Or I could go and change him to some other effect that I may have available in the center column. Okay. So I can always go back. I can always make changes, change the filter that's being applied. Or I could take this guy. He's now diffused glow and I could get rid of him. I could trash him just like that. Okay, So very flexible. You can spend as much time inside the filter gallery as you want, creating the effect that you want for your image. Once you're happy, go ahead and click on OK. And the set of filters that you had set up inside the filter gallery are now applied to your image, as we can see here. So very cool stuff. I have to reinforce this, though, with you the filters that we saw in the previous exercise. Let's call them the standard filters Inside Photo shop and also the filters that we have inside the filter gallery are permanent changes to our image. There's no way to go back now and continue making our changes once I click on OK inside the filter gallery. That's it. So I've got to show you how to work with your filters in a nondestructive way. Let's see how to do that in the next exercise 40. Using Filters Non-Destructively: I've got to show you how to work with your filters in a non destructive manner and non permanent way. And I've been alluding to this all the way along throughout the entire course that when I'm working inside photo shop, I try toe work in as non destructive away as possible. I always want to be able to go back. You know, I'm always changing my mind or I wanna change the effect or change the color correction that I've been working on. So let me show you how this is gonna work here. What I'm gonna do, first of all, is I'm gonna head to the good old history panel. And what I'm gonna do is I'm just gonna step back to the merge layers there. That's where we're back to just the layer one you'll recall. In the previous exercise, I had selected both layers and hit controller command E on my keyboard to merge them together. What I'm not gonna do is I'm gonna set this guy up for a non destructive filter approach, if that makes sense, what we're gonna do is we're actually gonna convert this layer here, layer one to what's referred to as a smart object. So from the filter drop down menu, what I'm gonna do is choose the second option here, convert for smart filters. Go ahead and choose that guy and you'll get a message here inside Photoshopped. No one ever reads these, so call ahead and click on. OK, This guy is now a smart object layer. How do we know? We know because of the icon that we see inside the layer thumb. Now, this guy right here. Okay. So what, we can now do what this guy is. We can now go on, apply filters to him in a non destructive manner. Let's go and take a look at what we can do here. I'm gonna go to the filter menu and maybe just for simplicity. Maybe I'll head to one of the more simpler filters or effects that we have here. I'll go down to distort, and let's go and check in Zig zag tragos zigzag. Here there is the zigzag filter. No preview. So I'm really not sure exactly what I'm gonna wind up with here, so I'll throw on some kind of an effect like this and I'll simply click on OK and photo shop applies the effects. Now it's kind of subtle in there. Looks like my looks like my robot head here took a fist right between the eyes. But in any regard, Mawr importantly, then my beat up robot is what's happening inside the layers panel. So there's a layer. One note the icon over on the right hand side, we now have a smart filter layer with zigzag applied to him. And because we have little eyeball icons, this means we can turn on and shut off the filter that's being applied to this guy. Okay, very cool stuff. What if I decide that I want to make a change to the actual zigzag filter that I've applied ? Well, all I need to do is simply double click on Zigzag gets me back into the zigzag filter where I can go and make some adjustments. Maybe something like this or whatever the case may be OK, and I'll go ahead and click on OK, and there's the filter now applied to my image in a non destructive manner. Very cool stuff, so I can always go back and adjust the filter if I want to, simply by double clicking on him or I can disable the visibility of the filter if I want to . What I could also do is I could remove the filter from my image just by taking the smart filter itself and dragging him down to the trashcan icon at the bottom of the layers panel . And we're all the way back to where you and I started. How do you like that very, very cool stuff? So you're your nondestructive filters are gonna work with the traditional filters that we have here inside Photoshopped, which we started off by taking a look at. They also work with the filter gallery as well. And by the way, as far as the filter galleries concerned, notice that I come back into the filter gallery. And it remembers the last filters that I had used just kind of a handy aspect of the filter gallery, which perhaps you already figured it on your own. Who knows? But let's say, for instance, I decide that I want to go and throw on some different effects. I'm just gonna throw on a couple of quick effects here for us to see what we wind up getting. Let's say something like that and I go ahead and click on OK, inside my image photo shop applies the gnarly effect to my cartoon head. And, of course, because he's a smart object, we're now getting smart filters. I can double click on the filter gallery, get back in here and go on, make some changes to this guy. Okay, so I know that the filters that I'm using here really aren't very, very educational very useful here for you. But it's really more about taking this object this layer and converting him to a smart filter. And then, of course, working with your filters inside photo shop in a non destructive manner. 41. Introducing Layer Styles: all right. I hope you're enjoying this. Look at special effects inside photo shop. We've been spending our time working with filters and the filter gallery. I now want to introduce you to something inside Photoshopped called layer styles. Or sometimes they're called layer effects. Give me a second here. I'm gonna go after another image here. I'm not gonna bother saving this guy here inside the project Files folder. I'm gonna go after fish. Bulldog PST. Now, as the name would imply, layer effects or layer styles are going to be applied to individual layers rather than the entire image itself. Okay, so check this out. It's all gonna happen inside the layers panel. There's my artwork, a layer selected. That is, of course, my underwater monster. My underwater sea creature. Here. What I'm gonna do is I'm gonna bring my cursor over towards the right hand side of that layer and double click, and that's gonna bring us into the layer style dialog box. Okay, Now, let me give you a quick five cent tour of this dialog box before we start really going hog wild here. First of all, running down the left hand side. We have all of the layer styles or layer effects that you and I can make use of things like drop shadows and color overlays and strokes and all the rest of it. Okay. And then once we select these guys, this center area of the dialogue box is gonna change to give us the controls for actually adjusting and manipulating the special effect that we're applying. And then, of course, way over on the right hand side, we have the okay in the cancel. Okay, so let's zero in on sort of the center area and the left hand column. Let's get started with something fairly straightforward. How about a drop shadow? So I'm gonna go down to drop Shadow Hero, select this guy notice Right away we get a drop shadow, and the drop shadow is only gonna be applied to the pixels on Give me a second here. The layer that we have selected inside the layers panel. Okay, that's how layer styles work. Layer styles are awesome for things like text effects or creating web buttons or web interfaces. Things like this okay. Or throwing a drop shadow onto a cartoon underwater sea creature. Okay, so I've gone in selected drop shadow there. The center area here of the Layer style dialog box has now changed. There's tons of options in here. Let me give you a quick run through. First of all, we have the blending mode we know about blending modes from our layers panel. This is now the blending mode for the drop shadow itself. Okay, Now, usually I'll leave the default. Or maybe I'll start monkeying around a little bit the opacity or the transparency of the drop shadow so I could fade back or drop back the drop shadow make it look a little bit more subtle. Or I could bring up the intensity, Something like this. Okay, the lighting angle for the for the drop shadow. OK, the distance of the drops. I don't know this that these Airil live effects, by the way as well the spread and also this size, something like this. You could really have a lot of fun with these guys. What's great about your layer styles and I'll get to this in just a little bit is they are non destructive, which is really wonderful, so we can always come back and make some changes. So you're not really sort of locked into any of the changes that we're making here. Okay, so let's say I'm pretty pleased with something like this. What I could now do is I could go on, throw on a second or even 1/3 or fourth layer style onto my underwater sea creature, for instance. Maybe I decide that I want to throw a stroke onto this guy. Do you want a stroke? Is that would be an outline, So I select stroke there. Now, with these layer styles, you have to be careful to check the effect and also select the effect for the center area to change. Let's say for whatever reason, I want to go on throw some kind of, ah colored at line onto this guy. Maybe a green or maybe a blue, or maybe a yellow or orange. Who the heck knows? Okay, maybe something like this, or maybe ah, white, a white would certainly work as well. Toe. Pull it off of that drop shadow a little bit, so you'll notice my white line there, which actually encompasses the entire object. But you'll notice him there specifically inside the shadow areas. I could increase the thickness of that wine just by cranking up the size slider. There's tons of other options in here positions. So outside the object inside the object, something like that or the center of the objects. What's riding the edge there and again? A blending mode just like your filters. I don't want to bore you to death with Holy is different settings that we have here. Really? I think the best thing for you to do is just experiment and play around and see what you come up with on your own. Okay, But let's see, I wind up with something like this. And then from here I could I could keep the party going. I could go with a color overlay, maybe something like this. Color overlays are cool because they're applied to the entire layer itself. All the pixels on the layer, but maybe, ah, red color overlay isn't really working for me. So maybe I decide Teoh go into my blues, maybe something like this, but I want to fade it back a little bit, so I still see my artwork underneath. So this is great for creating, like a color caste or ah, color overlay. as the name would imply. And, you know, we could keep going here. I mean, you could get into Grady and overlays, pattern overlays, inner glows and an outer glows and devil in him, boss and all the rest of it. I'm gonna leave those guys up to you to experiment with. But more importantly, what happens your once I click on OK is the layers panel loads in all of the layer effects air layer styles that you and I have gone and applied. And I alluded to this earlier there. Nondestructive. So let's say I saved my file in a layer friendly file format like the native Photoshopped file format, dot PST. And the next week I opened this guy up and I go, you know, that color overlay? I'm not really feeling it. What would this image look like without the color over late? Well, I can simply toggle off the individual layer effects or layer styles at will. Something like this. Okay, war. Let's say, for example, I want to go and change one of them. Maybe I don't want a blue color overlay. Well, I'm gonna double click on the color overlay brings me back into the layer style dialog box onto color overlay over on the left hand side. And then I can go to town and make some adjustments. Maybe, Like I say, I want to change the color instead of blues. Maybe I wanted orange something like this, or maybe into my reds. Who knows whatever change it is that you want to make, Maybe I want to crank up the intensity of the color overlay. Or maybe I want to fade it back. Okay, Maybe I want to head to my drop shadow and make some changes here. Maybe I wanna increase the distance of the drop shadow or the size or the spread or the color of the drop shadow. Who the heck knows they're nondestructive? That's sort of the point here. Let's say, for instance, I just thought of this. I'm making some changes here inside my layer style dialog box. And I go, You know that color overly. I'm just not feeling it. Turn it off, Disable it. You don't have to use ah layer effect er a layer style that you've gone applied to your artwork. All right, There you go. There's your layer styles. Very cool stuff here inside photo shop, Try working with your layer styles on some of your layers, including your text layers. That's where things really come to life inside photo shop. 42. Where To Go From Here: Well, there it is, my friends. There's our look at getting started with photo shop CC. I hope you took tons and notes. I hope you had lots of fun here with me. I tried to jam in as much as I could into this course here for you. Here's kind of ah, run Through a review of what we looked at, we got comfortable inside the photo shop interface of photo shop environment. We took some time learning about customizing the interface and learning about zooming and navigating and so on. And of course, we had a look at the history panel there as well. I hope you enjoyed that. And then it was all about re sizing and cropping your images. I'm sure you'll make good use of everything that we saw inside that chapter. And then it was onto working with selections, which really is again, sort of. I almost want to see the backbone of photo shop being able to work efficiently and effectively inside Photo shop is all about creating selections and, of course, working with your layers as well as we spend quite a bit of time on selections and layers. Lots of great stuff in there for you. And then after that, we got into retouching and cleaning up in color, correct eating York images and then also, of course, working with special effects and filters towards the end. So I hope you enjoyed there. And as I say, I hope you had lots of fun along the way. Now, of course, the big question. Where do you go from here? What's next? Well, I've got a couple of suggestions here for you. First of all, if you're interested in learning how to use photo shopped for the Web, I've got a course here for you called Photoshopped CC for the Web, where we take a look at using photo shopped to optimize our graphics four use on the Web. We talk about different graphic file formats, different techniques that you can make use of in order to get the most out of photo shop in a Web design capacity. And then the Web design with Photoshopped continues in another course that I have here for you. This one's an in depth look at learning how to build complete web interfaces with photo shops who inside this course here, building websites with photo Shop CC. I show you how to build a complete layout from scratch from nothing, and then how to take that layout and convert it into a fully functional website. All right, so hopefully these two courses sound good to you if you want. There's even Mawr on our blood. If you go to 10 ton online dot com, forward slash blood. This is sort of a resource page that we're putting together. We're constantly adding new content to this area here. If you have a 10 ton online dot com, you can click on tools and resources, and it'll bring you directly to this page here. So there you go. There's lots of great extras for you. You know, I'll let you in on something, too. If you're interested in any of the other courses that we have here on 10 ton online dot com , I can save you 10% on your enrollment by using the following coupon code during your check out. Learn 10. That's capital L E A R N. And in the number 10. That's your coupon code. That'll save you 10% off your next enrollment. So make use of it. Save yourself a little bit of money, if you can. All right. For 10 ton online dot com, this is Jeff Blake signing off. I hope he enjoyed. I hope you had lots of fun with me, and I look forward to seeing you soon.