German Pronunciation Masterclass | Ingo Depner | Skillshare

German Pronunciation Masterclass

Ingo Depner, Professional German Teacher

German Pronunciation Masterclass

Ingo Depner, Professional German Teacher

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23 Lessons (1h 40m)
    • 1. Welcome!

      1:51
    • 2. Small Change Big Results: Try This!

      6:17
    • 3. Many German Learners Don't Know This

      5:40
    • 4. This Is What Makes German Different

      4:00
    • 5. What You See Is Not Always What You Get

      5:02
    • 6. How Germans Really Speak

      6:41
    • 7. How to Avoid Misunderstandings: Vowels Part 1

      3:45
    • 8. How to Avoid Misunderstandings: Vowels Part 2

      10:58
    • 9. The German CH Demystified

      6:26
    • 10. German's Nasal Sound Explained: NG

      4:24
    • 11. A Special Case: The German QU

      1:50
    • 12. The German R Made Simple

      3:55
    • 13. The German S: One Letter Different Sounds

      3:12
    • 14. Rules for the German Consonants SP and ST

      4:17
    • 15. It's Important to Get These Right: V & W

      4:27
    • 16. Resist the Temptation: The German Z

      3:29
    • 17. The German Umlaut Ä

      2:58
    • 18. The German Umlaut Ö

      4:41
    • 19. The German Umlaut Ü

      5:37
    • 20. Not what You Thought: The German Y

      2:25
    • 21. The German Diphthong EI

      3:37
    • 22. The German Diphthongs AU & EU

      4:02
    • 23. Congratulations!

      0:29
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About This Class

Do you want to sound like a native German speaker?

If you speak German with a strong foreign accent, you're making things difficult for people who listen to you. If understanding your German takes effort or your accent is unpleasant, people will avoid talking to you if they can.

Research shows that people making pronunciation mistakes and having strong accents are often perceived as less intelligent and less credible than they really are. This can significantly harm social interaction and affect their chances of professional success.

Good pronunciation is not just a "nice-to-have" skill

If you want to be able to communicate in German you need to have good German pronunciation. You can live without advanced vocabulary or complex grammar, just use simple words and simple grammar structures to convey your message. But there is no simple pronunciation. If you don't have good pronunciation, you have bad pronunciation. And even if you're on C1 level and make phonetic errors, you will be poorly understood.

"German Pronunciation Masterclass" is perfect if you want to:

  • eliminate your accent and sound just like a native German speaker

  • perfect your German pronunciation and be clearly understood

  • communicate successfully in business and life

  • speak German more confidently and effectively

So do you want Germans to think you're local? Then sign up for this course and take your German pronunciation to the next level!

Meet Your Teacher

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Ingo Depner

Professional German Teacher

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Transcripts

1. Welcome!: Hello and welcome to the German pronunciation Masterclass. My name is Inga Dibnah, and I'm a professional German teacher with more than 15 years experience. Imagine the following scenario. You're at a social event, talking to Germans in German, telling stories, chanting, enjoying yourself until it's time to go home. On the way back to your place, you feel like something was different this time, and then it hits you the whole time. Nobody asked you where you're from. And why is that? Well, nobody realized that German is not your native language because you sounded just like one of them, and this course will help you get there. First of all, we will learn the secrets of German pronunciation, and what I mean is that spoken language is affected by reductions and simplifications that you need to know if you want to sound riel and not like a textbook. Then we'll take a closer look at the continents and vowels and you learn two things. How to pronounce them correctly and how to get rid of mistakes that many learners make but are not aware off and therefore cause misunderstandings in frustration. And finally, you'll get to know some German tongue twisters that will not only help you strengthen and stretch the muscles involved in speech, but also serve as an additional tool to help you identify sounds that are difficult for you so that you can focus on them and perfect your pronunciation. Off course. You will have plenty of opportunities to apply what you're learning by doing numerous pronunciation exercises. And now I invited to jump right into your first lesson, and in less time than you expect, you will speak German like a native. 2. Small Change Big Results: Try This!: in this lesson. I'd like to talk about the German continent, are which many students say is one of the most difficult sounds to master. But I have a surprise for you. In most cases, the German art does not sound like a continent but like a vowel. More precisely, it sounds like the Schwab sound, and in English, you can find the sound in the words about and freed them or in the filler word. Uh, when you're thinking, Ah, you know the R is only pronounced is a continent when it comes before a vowel, for example, in the words brought. But I see go grune And there is a separate lesson on how to pronounce that are correctly in all other situations. The R is pronounced like a short, uh, and this phenomenon is called the German vocal IQ are, and it's not difficult to pronounce. Let's have a look at an example. Beer. We don't say beer. It's also not a beer. And be your is also wrong. The correct pronunciations. Beer, it sounds like. Be, uh, let's try some other examples and you'll see that all the arson the sentences are pronounced like a feel free to repeat after me. Yeah. Hurt Ghani Music. Yeah. Hurt Gana Musique via Lannan Deutsche via Lan in Dodge Year Von Here. Yeah, Vaunt here, Dear Haunt East. I'm tear. They're haunt east. I'm tear. This also happens in the combination e r, for example in prefixes that are not stressed such as far it's ah or, uh where you don't hear the are at all There's only the sound And by the way, yes, this is a Z The design of the fund is not very clear here. Repeat after me 15 Fash teens in me You don't say fairest Ian, but far for guessing because of him and handy for guessing So black That's glass east LeBron it's in comes to an make a chic that cuts in and the same sound also appears When er is none stressed suffix Repeat after me Soca keeps to me again. Soca Fatah voice stand Fatah Szilveszter minus vester Want in Berlin? Vesa each most there. I'm glass Vasa. Many German names also end in er. Some examples are Mila Steiner, who have no and also my last name Step DNA. Okay. The last thing I'd like to mention is that this sound only exists in the letter combination . E r. If there is only an E and it's not stressed, you pronounce it a like the Ian get. Let's compare some word pairs for making the distinction between a and oh, repeat after me. Vet Veta Mine There my no Fleagle Fleagle bit there bitter. Did you hear the difference? The sounds are similar, but they need to be pronounced differently to avoid misunderstandings. All right, here's a summary of what we've just learned. The German R is pronounced is a continent only when it comes before a vowel applies a broad group. In all other cases, it sounds like a Schwab sound bia mia Worst and unstrung E sounds like a and it's important to pronounce it differently. Toe. Okay, uh, that's it. I'm sure that making this small change and I mean pronouncing the German are as vowel rather than a continent will generate big results and reduce your accent significantly. I'll see you in the next lesson 3. Many German Learners Don't Know This: Hello and welcome back. One of the characteristics off the spoken language is the reduction off the E in UN stressed syllables such as N or L. Usually at the end of words, let's have a look at an example. Guten tack is actually pronounced. Guten talk the disappears. Guten talk. Here are more examples, and please feel free to repeat after me. Zien. It's mustard in FIM Zine. We don't Say it z hen, but Zine It's much did in FIM Zine Hyson v High Cincy Again It's not High Sin, but Hyson v High Cincy Born Vons e Pahlsson, Manda Pheonix 1000 Forego. Therefore, Gle is Troon. We don't say four Gail, but Fogle therefore going is Troon. Schlissel wasn't Manish. Listen, I'm the ample VAR wrote dunker on phone four. Is that dunker? Now? When this reduction off the E happens in the end suffix. There are some continent combination that are difficult to pronounce. For example, in the word HAB. According to what I said, it should sound like Harbin, but that's kind of difficult to pronounce been. So we don't do that when there is Ben at the end of a word, it's pronounced like b m ha Been becomes Harden album via harm height, a kind it sides via harm Height. A kind outside Let's have a look at some additional examples. Repeat After me, Gabe Comes to me the Spool Game Saliva via slime einen believe leading Z leave in Piter. Okay, Another continent combination that is difficult to pronounce is G and N. For example, in Margon, when the E becomes silent, it would be something like Morgan. But yet that's difficult. And therefore I'd like to introduce a new sound that you actually already know. It's the n g sound that we make when we say thing or bring. You cannot hear the G and two nasal sound because the sound is expelled through the nose and not through the mouth. Ah so again becomes Dune and Morgan. Sounds like Martin. Good Mark, Does that make sense? I know it might sound a bit strange, but he'll get used to it. And there will be another lesson about this sound later in the course, let's practice. Zog, Vassal Zargham llegan There are vegan isn us Zeiger. How much did dear at last, tiger. All right, so here is a summary of what we've just learned in the spoken language that happens. Reduction off the E in the UN stressed traffics en And also l gutin becomes Gooden. Hi. Sin becomes high season, etcetera. Now there are a couple of exceptions, Ben sounds like, for example, in Harlem or Gaitan. And again, sounds like boom mugging Zog. All right, that's the silent E. And now you're one step closer to speaking German like a native. 4. This Is What Makes German Different: one off. The typical features of German pronunciation is the so called little stop. Let's have a look in the dictionary to get a definition of what it is. The interruption off the breath stream by complete closure off the vocal chords. OK, but how does that sound? I'll show you first. I'll read this combination of vowels without a colossal stop, and then I'll read it a second time with a glass. It'll stop. Let's start. Ah, I I ah e uh, a. You can hear that the second time I didn't connect the vowels, but every vowel is pronounced separately. And this is something that happens frequently. When a word starts with a vowel in German, you do not connect the word with the previous one like I, but it's cut off from the preceding one like a, uh a. And this is different from English because in English and many other languages, by the way there is a strong tendency to connect words beginning with a vowel toe, the end off the previous world to form a smooth chain. An apple actually sounds like an apple. Okay, so let's have a look at some German examples. Thus is an artist out. Oh, that's an old car. You can hear that. I did not connect the vowels to the previous words. I didn't say Does this tie night is Otto, But all the vowels and red are pronounced separately. Another example. My auto is device. If you say my now toll, I understand something like this my now toe And that doesn't have a meaning in German. So the lack off the glass it'll stop can definitely make it difficult to be understood correctly. Next, e s a I I'm eating an egg again. I didn't connect the words that would sound very strange for a native German speaker. He s a I not I ni And the fourth example ist amalgam Blick in Istanbul. He's in Istanbul at the moment. Every word is a separate entity and some people say that German sounds a bit harsh because of that, because it doesn't seem to flow smoothly here ist him out in public in Istanbul. All right, so that's when a vowel is at the beginning of the word. But a stressed syllable within a word may also be proceeded by a global stop. For example, ive Azia behind looked. I was very impressed. You can clearly hear the pause between Bay and I end Rocked Bay Kind looked. But of course you don't write it like that. Other examples Forwards that have the glass it'll stop in the middle of the world are be Austin Bitter, bitter Austin See? Does please note that bitter but often see us big ending Z hot A sketch Billy be ended. She finished the conversation z hot, especially he be ended. Be in Hamilton Deep Lies there Be in heart in May have etched oil. The prices include V A T value added tax or in America, the equivalent is the sales tax. Deep lies a bit in Hylton may have etched oil. All right, so that was a lesson about the global stop, which is very characteristic off German pronunciation. 5. What You See Is Not Always What You Get: Hello and welcome back in this lesson, I'd like to talk about the letters P, T, K and B D G. They're cold PLO sieves, and they are similar to their counterparts in English so that most English speakers shouldn't have problems with the pronunciation of thes sounds. So now we will ask, Why did you call the lesson? What you see is not always what you get. Well, the answer is that when the continents B, D and G appear at the end of a word, they harden toe a p t and K B sounds like a p d sense like A T and G. Sounds like a K. Let's start with the letter B gallop yellow. We don't say Gelb, but help the final B Sounds like a P. Get it. Repeat after me, get it, Get help. Other examples are law Law. Do you hear the piece sound at the end? Lope gob, for example. I gave E gob Here is well, the B sounds like a P gob. Help repeat after me help. Okay, let's proceed to the D guilt money. We don't I killed but killed the final de sounds like a T guilt group it after me. Guilt. Guilt. And here are some other examples. Hunt, Do you hear the t at the end? Hunt lead. He was well, the D sounds like a t lead. Repeat after me. Lead divide vied, vile. And to complete the tria we have G sound G that if it appears at the end of a word, it is pronounced as a K car hum book hum book. Fluke. Fluke. Do we hear the case on at the end? Fluke talk, talk. Repeat after me talk. And we used this word a lot, right? For example, ing guten talk or the days of the week Montag, Dean Stock Donna Stock Freitag Some stocks on tak, always with a heart k sound at the end. Only Mitt Law is an exception. Souk Souk, You're as well the G sounds like a K souk. And last but not least, I'd like to mention that there are some initial Pelosis that are pronounced in German, but they're omitted in English. And if you're not aware of that, you could run into problems of communication in English. Initial P is silent before s to your n psychology Initial K is silent before S and n ni and initial G is silent before n nat in German. However, we do pronounce those letters at the beginning off words secure Yogi Seashore, Yogi Kony, Kony gonad gonad All right, so let's recap when the German continents be DMG appear at the end of a word, they harden to the sounds, P, T and K. The sounds are much easier to pronounce at the end of a word, and the reason is that we don't use our vocal cords to make them. And initial PLO sieves are pronounced in some contacts and German in which they are omitted in English. 6. How Germans Really Speak: Sometimes students asked me, You know, when we talk in our lessons I understand nearly everything you say in German. But when two Germans talk to each other, I have a really hard time understanding what they're saying. Why is that? And the answer is that when people speak fast, for example, in a casual conversation with friends, their pronunciation is affected by certain reductions and simplifications that serve to reduce the muscular effort needed to speak. That happens in most languages, and some examples in English are going to becoming Ghana and want to becoming wanna. Now, if you're not aware of this reduction, you will have a hard time understanding what is being said, even if you know the words going to and want to write. So I've created this lesson with two main purposes in mind. First, to show you how we native German speakers really speak so that to become aware off some characteristics and understand spoken German better. The second purpose is to enable you to speak like a native, especially at intermediate and advanced levels and mostly in casual or informal situations . Let's start each Harbour Island haunt. This is careful speech where the words are pronounced very clearly when I speak, I probably say it's happened. Hunt. It happened hunt, and this sounds a bit different. Two things happened. I knocked off the final first person air off Harvey, and there is a vowel reduction in the Unstrung est end suffix off island. It happened hunt and even more colloquial form is it happened in Haunt. It happened and haunt, and that's my preferred one again. Two things. The air off harbor disappears, and instead of Ironman, I said none. That's very common. You can even read it in dialogues in books. So when you see none now you know that it's an abbreviation off Hainan. It happened and haunt. Repeat after me. It's happening. Haunt All right. Next example, via Harbin in nicked cuisine via Harbin in nicked cuisine. Very clear pronunciation. But usually we say they have diminished cuisine, and I mentioned this in one off the previous lessons. Harbin sounds like harm and the e and the stress. Tough. ICS is not pronounced when we speak fast. It would be something like this via Hominy cuisine. Harbin becomes hum and the tee off next disappears via Khamenei cuisine. Repeat after me via harmony is in some other words, where the T at the end disappears when they're pronounced fast, are yet beast and east. He's been yet to house them. Sounds more like he'd been. It's two houses. No, t s been its to house them. Vobis do requires some effort. Therefore, most people say vobis toe vobis toe Yeah, ist yet neat here and this short sentence you have three words where the final T drops east yet and neat is hits in here. Repeat after me. It is Hittson here. In this context, I'd like to mention that needs becomes knicks in spoken language. We have been needs get coughed actually. Sounds like Kapnick scoffed. I repeat, it happened. XK coughed. All right. Another interesting thing is that in questions, the verb often merges with the second person pronouns do and gets the Suffolk's stay Here is an example Can Stool sounds like can stay Has to Morgan tied Sounds like hasta morgan tight. Repeat after me Hasta Morgan tied Now the words Mitt deem often merged toe meme So let's see. Do you understand the following sentence fest in my motto Festa Mimoto Exactly. It's fierce to omit them out all first to mitt them out. Or but it sounds like first tomato and another example gear yet mit. Dem Hunch Patsy in Comes to mitt Sounds more like it gets me munch Patsy in comes to Mitt Goetzman hunch. Patsy in comes to Mitt, and this Harbin is such an important verb. I'd like to add another ca local form of it. Hobbins e can sound like hum zoo in some die elects hums A. In the streets of Berlin, you'll likely hear hums in an oil all which means happens. The in an oil hums in an oil. All right, so those were some examples of how German native speakers really speak. It's important to be aware of thes little or sometimes big changes that happen in fast, casual conversation, but you don't necessarily have to apply them to your own speaking. If you don't feel comfortable yet, use whatever feels natural to you and leave the rest for later on your language. Learning journey 7. How to Avoid Misunderstandings: Vowels Part 1: very common mistake is to confuse the length of a vowel when speaking German. The length of a vowel is extremely important because it doesn't only influence all the other sounds around it. But it can change the meaning of a word, and that leads to misunderstandings. For example, in many languages, it doesn't make a difference if you say e or e. But in German it does. And by the way, in English as well. I'll show you some examples so that you know what I'm talking about. Do you want to go to the bitch? My biggest dream is to leave in Germany. I have to change the bed sheet. I think you got the idea, right? So now you might ask, OK, but how do I know if I have to make a short or a long vowel sound? And the good news is there are some rules about this. Let's start with the long vowels. A German vowel is usually long if it's followed by a continent, and especially in front off what we call sharp s or est set. Repeat after me. But good fools. Vig, a German vowel, is also long. If it's written as a double letter may, uh so Zal board. What also makes a vow long is if it's followed by an age, and in those cases you do not pronounce the H. It's silent. It's only task is to make the vow along. Bond to Lira, Zune and last but not least, the combination I e usually represents a long e sound lead. I feel spiel. He, uh OK. And now let's have a look at the rules for short vowels. A German vowel is usually short if it's followed by two or more continents and especially double continent such as P p t t an end, etcetera. Bet coffer blunt zahn German vowels are also short if followed by the constant combination . C k Xhaka buck in lecher soca. All right, so those are the rules. There are some exceptions, but if you know the rules, you're on the safe side. In most cases, and when in doubt, I recommend the website four vote dot com, which is a pronunciation dictionary where it confined many words pronounced by native speakers. This was the first part of the lecture. In the second part. I'll show you in detail how to pronounce the German short and long vowels in order to avoid misunderstandings. I'll see you there 8. How to Avoid Misunderstandings: Vowels Part 2: Hello and welcome to the second part of the lecture on how to avoid misunderstandings resulting from the wrong length off. A vowel in this part will have a closer look at the vowels are E or and do. Let's start with the long Ah, you have to open your mouth to pronounce it correctly. And the sound also exists in English, especially in British English, in words such as bar or calm. Repeat after me glass Clara zahk and and in contrast, we have the short. It also exists in English and can be found in the words come or but of repeat after me. Munn Hunt Tasci. Here are some German words that show you how important a correct pronunciation is because if you confuse the length off the vowel, the meaning changes just like in leave and live as always. Feel free to repeat after me. Sean Shun Con Come start stucked. We can take a moment to have a look at the rules that I mentioned before on the left side, the long vowels We have vowels followed by one continent, followed by a silent age and double vowels. And on the right side, the short vowels. We see that double continents which make the vowels short or two continents in a row. Okay, let's continue with the long E. And as you can see, we don't pronounce it I but rather e as the English letter e. This long e sound exists in English and the words B C team or here and here are some German words with the long E. Repeat after me, Lee Bear e and then mean. And then there's the Short E, which is also not difficult to pronounce because it's the same sound as in the English words bit lip hit. Some German words with the sound are fish ist bit, and now we'll show you some words that have a different meaning only because of the different pronunciation off the vowel. As always, feel free to repeat after me B 10 bitten she shift steel still. All right, The next vowel is the long E, which can be a little bit difficult to pronounce because it doesn't have a corresponding sound in English, and I noticed that many learners cannot distinguish between the Long E and the long E that I was just talking about. They simply don't hear the difference because e doesn't exist in their native languages. So here are some words to show you that there actually is a difference. E day. The German word for idea e d first a long e then along e Did you hear the difference E day ? Now, if I don't pronounce the D in e. D, it sounds like e a e A. And by the way, it's easier to pronounce the long e when you smile. Ah, the next example is Mia and Mia. Mia Mia Mia has a long E and Mayor has a long E a mere Mayor Mia May. Ah, If you don't hear the difference, don't worry. It takes some practice, but eventually you'll be able to distinguish between e and E. Your brain simply has to get used to the different sounds. Let's practice and repeat after me beat ze Uh, me ah, me. Uh, all right that waas, the Long E and it's short equivalent is a okay. This one is easy because it does exist in many other languages and in English. In the words get or set, here are some German words with the short a get then bet And as we did before, let's have a look at some words that change their meaning depending on the length off the vowel. B 10 Betton Dean, then stealin Stellan. All right, now we move on to the long mm, he it's very similar to the hole in the English words Mawr or door. The trick to make the sound is toe whistle, a very low tone, and that's exactly the shape of the mouth we have when we say hello. Or and we use the sound in words such as orphan board, born on. In contrast, there is a short oh, which is easier to pronounce because it's similar to the English not or a lot. Oh oh, some German words with the short all are toe conto zahn. And now I'll show you some words that have a different meaning only because of the different pronunciation. Off the O sound. Zola Zala, a wolf in Often Shore's Show us and the last vowel I'd like to talk about in this lecture is the German vowel. Ooh, let's start with the long version who, ah, it's like the sound in the English words Boot moon or shoot and be careful not to pronounce it you as in English, for example, the German word for music is more, Zeke, but I hear a lot of learners who say Musique, and that's wrong, right? It's moo Zeke like a cow. Moo moo, Zeke. Other German words with a long who are stool do share and boom. Now let's have a look at the short version of the vowel. Oh, as in push or book or foot in German. You confined this sound in the following words Hunt Botha loft And here are some word pairs to practice distinguishing between the long and the short German vowels, Moose most boo say bush room. Um, all right, so now you know how to pronounce the German vowels are e or and all you know, the rules went to make a long or a short sound. So you're all set and able to avoid misunderstandings resulting from the wrong length of a vowel. 9. The German CH Demystified: the German C H is one off the main pronunciation problems for German learners, mostly because there are two different sounds that are represented by this letter combination. And usually these sounds, or at least one off them, don't exist in the learner's native language. In this lesson, I will explain how to pronounce the's sounds, and I'll give you tips on how you can pronounce them as well. Let's start first. There is the so called back see age, which is pronounced in the back off the throat. And then there is the Francie Age, which is produced in the front of the mouth. Now you will ask okay, but when do I make which sound? And the answer is it depends on the letter that comes before the sea age. If it's an R or who, then you pronounce it in the back. If the CH is preceded by any other vowel home, loud or continent, you pronounce it in the front. Now let's have a closer look at the back see age. The sound that is produced corresponds to the Sea age and Scottish English, for example, law in Loch Ness. The CH can also be compared to the rough sound of an angry cat. Listen to the following words and feel free to repeat after me. Doh doh boom boo! No, not ball ball. Cohon Cohen All right, let's move onto the front. See age. It's very similar to the sound made at the start of the English words huge human or the name Hugh. Another way of making the sound is saying the initial Why sound as in, Yes, But say it very Long E. And then you try to say it without voice or in other words, you keep the same mouth position. But you whisper your vocal cords are not vibrating anymore. Mm. And this is actually exactly what happens when we say the German word. E. Here are more examples with the front CH Repeat after me. Becca. Becca, Least lead Kia here. Kia here Life light. Okay, Why don't we practice a little bit more this time? You will hear word pairs. The first word with a sound and the second word with a sound sh lest schlock toys. Oh, cool. Here, cool friend to start talkto by 10 of All right now, I'd like to mention to special scenarios the 1st 1 is when see ages followed by M s C. H s. Then it's pronounced like an X Ducks folks ZX vixen. And the second scenario is when there is an s in front off the sea age and this combination belongs to the same salable. It's pronounced like a for example, in surely men's flashy. Soon let's summarize if the CH is preceded by are or who it sounds like like an angry cat. If the CH is preceded by any other vowel on loud or continent, it sounds like like the initial sound and huge or Hugh or the voice less sound off the E. And yes, C H s sounds like an X, for example, in folks and S C age sounds like, for example, in surely and finally, don't worry if you're or doesn't sound perfect. Yet this is a process, and I like to compare pronunciation to training a muscle. Little by little, it will get better. You know, if you've never pronounced thes sounds in your native language or other languages, you speak your mouth needs to get used to it, and it will 10. German's Nasal Sound Explained: NG: German has a very few nasal sounds compared to French or Hindi, and in my opinion, and G is the most important one. I mentioned this sound in one off the previous lessons, and now I'd like to dedicate more time to practice it thoroughly. Let's start the constant combination. N G is pronounced like the final sound in Bring or thing You don't Hear the G, but you press the back off the tongue to the roof off the mouth, and the sound leaves through the nose, not through the mouth. That's why it's called nasal. Ah ah, If you're not used to natural sounds, you might run into two issues. The 1st 1 is to pronounce this sound as a simple en. Let's take the German word building and as an example, it would sound like bring then. But that's wrong toe. Correct this. Pay attention to the position of the tongue when you say n the tip of the tongue is behind the top teeth. Mm. But in order to make the sound it needs to be behind the bottom teeth and the back off the tongue touches the top off the mouth, not the front of the tone. Here we concede again. Ah ah, The second issue is making a sound, but it's important to avoid that. It's not bringing again bringing in but bring and in orderto practice, this make a long sound and then pronounce the suffix, oppressing the urge to say bling bling in Bring In in German, the injury is nearly always pronounced without a exceptions are only some words of foreign origin in English. It's not so consistent. And that might be a reason why English speakers have some difficulties with this sound. You know, on the one hand, you say bringing and singing without, But on the other hand, you say finger and hunger with good. So, as I said in German, it's important to avoid the gig. Sound all right, Let's practice some German words, and we'll start with that at the end of the word. Repeat after me. Young young lung, lung Helene Helene, born on born, um Taitung Thai Tom. And here are some German words with the sound in the middle of the word. And as I said, it's important to avoid pronouncing the G or zing and zing and who, nah, whom Ne finger finger song, song, Lungs, lungs. All right. That's how you pronounce the German nasal sound. Um, I'll see in the next lesson. 11. A Special Case: The German QU: in this lesson. I'd like to talk about the letter combination. Qu It also exists in English, but in German, the pronunciation is very different. So when you see this combination in German, you do not pronounce it like cool but cool. Could you? Let's have a look at some words first with Qu at the beginning. Repeat after me. Covelli Really about a lot. Covered a lot. College Tate Volley Tate. Have it on Quit home, Watch much and here are some words with Qu in the middle as always, feel free to repeat after me. Big cream, Big theme flick events flick Venz. A volume, a volume a lot or a lot or sack affection, sir Collection. All right, now you know how to pronounce the combination. Qu in German words. 12. The German R Made Simple: the are is one of the most varied German continents, not only because of the regional differences but also because of the different ways of pronouncing it. I mentioned in one off the previous lessons that more often than not, the German are sounds like a short, namely when it's preceded by a vowel. In this lesson, I'll focus on the are as a constant. Broadly speaking, you can divide Germany into two parts regarding the pronunciation off the are in the north . It's pronounced like a French Ah, sound that you make in the back off the mouth, and in the South you pronounce it like a Spanish, a sound that you make with the tip of your tongue. I am from the south of Germany, so that's how I pronounce the R. I roll it, but let's start with the Are that you make in the back off the mouth, the one that sounds French. In order to practice, you could take a glass of water and gargle. That's basically how the sound is produced. Then you continue without the water, and it sounds like this Uh, okay, so that's the first way of pronouncing the R in German. The second way is rolling it. Use your tongue now and feel behind your top teeth where they meet your gums to make the second her sound in German, we hit this spot with our tongues quickly. Let's try something. Make the sound D in English. Do you feel when the tongue starts right behind the top teeth? The So what we're doing in German to make the Rolling R is just hitting that spot very quickly. And the best way to learn how to make the sound is to say the English word body progressively faster when we say buddy over and over again, faster and faster and faster. Eventually, the D won't sound like a deep, but like a rolling are body, body, body, body, body, bury, bury, bury, bury, bury, bury Tried now, all right. And now let's have a look at some German words that include the German are as a continent listen and repeat. And by the way, as I said, I roll my R's, but please feel free to pronounce them in the French way in the back off the mouth. If that's easier for you, brought brought Grune balloon, the Lies, allies Strozzi, Strozzi survive alive. Okay, let's summarize. There are two main ways of making the German are sound, either in the back of your mouth and that sounds like gargling water or rolling it with the tip of your tongue. If you're not used to these sounds, used the tips in this lesson to drill them many times over and over, and eventually they will come out naturally. But don't worry. As I said, there is a huge variety of dialect and different pronunciations all over the German speaking countries, so we will understand you, no matter which pronunciation you choose. 13. The German S: One Letter Different Sounds: the German s can be pronounced in two different ways and it's pronunciation Depends on the position in the world. The rules are pretty simple, but important. Let's have a look When the s comes before a vowel it's pronounced is like the Z and zoo In any other position. The SS, pronounced like the s in son Double s and the so called sharp s or s set are also pronounced like s in Son. Here are some words with s in the initial position. Repeat after me Zanni, This is on me Xai Xai, Zubair Zouk Pay Zai it, Zai it zing in zinging. You can see that all these words are pronounced with this as the SS, followed by a vowel. Now let's have a look at some words with the voiceless s sound arise Arise laws Los Hess Ley Hess ley fu si Food, sir Ist east. All right. Next, I'd like to show you word pairs with the two different ways of pronouncing the German s. The words are very similar, but this is helpful to understand when which sound is made and why Let's go on is always please feel free to repeat after me. Let's say Reza Vision Visa, Alyce And that Isand Vasa vas e vice and advise. And as you can see in the words in the left side, there is either a double s or a sharp s. That's why these words are pronounced with us. And on the right side there is always a vowel after the s. So it's pronounced like All right. Now you know how to pronounce the different s sounds in German. I'll see you in the next lesson. 14. Rules for the German Consonants SP and ST: Hello and welcome to this lesson about the continent combinations SP and S t In standard German at the beginning of a word, S p is pronounced like Imagine ship without the I and s t is pronounced like shot without the old Let's have a look at some examples. Repeat after me. Spiel spiel. Classy Strozzi Spot spot Storm Storm spot us boss. All right, that was at the beginning, off a word. The same happens in the middle of a word when the s p or S t start a syllable. Repeat after me up stunned up. Stunned Bihsh feel by steel First blessing First impression helped start. Helped that bubbles feel Bihsh feel just to make it a bit clearer. What I mean by saying at the start of a syllable, I'll show you the syllables off the words we just saw up stunned by spiel for blanking helped start by the spill. Okay, now, when the s p and S t r at the end of a word or when they don't start a syllable But I mean is when the S and P or T belong to two different syllables there, pronounced as they would be in English. Let's check out some examples. Vespa, Vespa Lister Lister Gust, Gust Lost a los de house here. House tear again. I'm gonna split these words into syllables so you can see that the s and P or T do not belong to the same syllable and therefore need to be pronounced without the sound Vess pay Lis. Hey, gust at the end. It's always without Los t House. Tia. All right, so let's summarize at the beginning off words s p and S t always sound like torched. The same happens when they start a syllable inside a work when they belong to separate syllables there pronounced without this sound. I know these rules might sound a bit confusing at first, but don't worry. The more words you learn, the more natural it's going to be. And you'll get a feeling for the right pronunciation. So for now, I'd like you to remember at least one thing. And that's number one here on the list. At the beginning, off words s p and S t always sound like torched 15. It's Important to Get These Right: V & W: When I see the title off this lesson, I immediately think of folks wag the German car because the abbreviation is VW or, as we say in German foul V. So the topic of this lesson is how to pronounce the German V and W. The interesting thing is that there shouldn't be any problem for English speakers to make thes sounds. They exist in both languages, and they're exactly the same. What creates a lot of confusion is the German spelling. Lets see why, in most cases, the German letter V is pronounced in the same way as the English letter F in fish or find, so the difficulty doesn't come from the sound itself. But from seeing a letter that you're used to pronouncing vu and remembering that in German , you need to pronounce it as here are some words to practice. Repeat after me for good, for good, Fatah Fatah feel ized, feel ized, fear, fear, fun, fun. It requires a little practice to overcome the interesting to pronounce the V as. But once you get used to it, it's pretty straightforward, all right, I said that in most cases the German V is pronounced like an English F. This rule is only valid for words of Germanic origin. In loan words Off Latin origin, the V is pronounced like in English. Here are some examples. Varzi. Varzi. Now verse now juice. November November. Weise Um Weise. Um you never hesitate. You never hesitate. Okay, so that's the German letter V or foul as we call it. Now let's have a look at the letter. W and its name in German already shows us how we pronounce it v v All right. The German letter v is pronounced like an English V in very or video. Let's practice vassal vessel wien Wien provide vie it Be vegan, be vegan Give season give season. Now we'll move up a gear and use some examples that contain both the German V and w Repeat after me for via tongue for viol tongue v feel v feel folks bargain folks of argon Fogle via dei Fogle via dei four vets for vets. All right, let's summarize. The German V is pronounced like the English F in fish inwards off Latin origin. The V is pronounced the same as in English, and the German W is pronounced like the English V in very 16. Resist the Temptation: The German Z: Hello and welcome back in this lesson, I'd like to talk about the Germans. E English speakers shouldn't have a problem pronouncing it. It sounds like the combination off the letters T and s. This sound is very common in English, especially at the end of words, for example, in let's streets or gets So that should be okay. But I've noticed that a surprising number of people find it difficult to pronounce the Germans e at the beginning off words. Now I think this is rather a psychological barrier because the sound exists. But the position is unfamiliar, so it can be overcome pretty easily. My tip is to practice that sound in familiar positions at the end of the word, concentrating on feeling how it's formed and then carry the very same sound to the beginning off a German word. Let's practice. And by the way, what looks like a two at the end of the word is actually a Z. It's just the fund nets nets. Hence hence Zai. It's Zai. It's all right. And now we carry this sound from the end to the beginning of a word Soul soul took, took Say it, Say it side site. Sima Sima. Very good. So we've seen the Germans e at the end of words at the start, and it also exists in the middle of words. Let's have a look at some examples, and by the way, when you have the combination T and Z, the pronunciation is exactly the same as a standalone Z. Repeat after me, Zet Sin Zits in Cut See Cut Sir Invites and Invites and Vizio Vizio. All right, so that's the Germans e. To summarize its pronounced in the same manner as the English ts. It's at the end of words such as gets or let's. I called this lesson. Resist the temptation because many English speakers tend to pronounce the Germans e like the English see especially at the beginning, off words for example, Zo instead of soul or zouk instead of took. But that's not correct. The Germans e is always pronounced so resisted temptation, and you're all set 17. The German Umlaut Ä: in this lesson, we're going to practice the long and the short A one off the three home allowed letters in German. Let's start with the long air. Usually when it's long, it's pronounced exactly the same as the long E that we've seen in previous lessons. For example, in Z and Me, here are the rules went to make the sound long. First, when there is one continent after the air isn't Keesey when there's an age after the air, as in Een Lee and when there's a sharp s after the as in disease, let's practice Repeat after me be, uh, be a hkifa Kiefer Me? Yeah Ni yeah, may see may see V in V in. And now let's have a look at the short A which is very similar to the short. A sound that we already know the one that sounds like the and get okay, we pronounce it in this short way when it's followed by two continents and especially double constants as in head. Here are more examples. Repeat after me ec for MENA, mena Henderson Hend Chemin chemin Elga egg Uh, all right now you know how to pronounce the long and short a. And as you could see, it doesn't really have a sound off its own. But it sounds either like the short or the long A that we already know the other arm loud sounds and you are, of course, different, and in the next lessons will have a closer look at those. 18. The German Umlaut Ö: Hi and welcome back in this lesson. We're going to practice the long and the short German who are second on loud. Let's start with the long do and I'll show you a trick. How to get it right. You make the long E as in Z or me. The tip of your tongue touches the lower front teeth and then you keep your tongue in that position and round your lips this movement of the lips will create the er sound e er, uh I repeat, I start with E and then around the lips like a kiss e ah ah! Feel free to look in the mirror to make sure that your lips are really rounded and in case position All right. And here are the rules when to make the sound long First, when there is one continent after the earth as in cool when there is an H after the earth as in Houla and when there is a sharp s after the as inclusive Let's practice repeat after me Shuhn soon grew say guru say Zune, Zune, Merck and Merck and Booth and Earth and and now let's have a look at the short which is not simply a shorter version off the new sound, but the mouth is more relaxed and the lips are not so round. It's actually quite similar to the sound in the English words hurt or bird with a British pronunciation and a silent are hurt bird. Uh uh. We pronounce the in this short way when it's followed by two continents and especially double continents. As in F. Nen, here are more examples. Repeat after me much Master Kernan Kernan Cup Fay Cup for lustful, lesser firstly, cursed Lee. All right, let's keep practicing with word pairs to see the difference between the long boom and the short losing lesson. Who let? Hello, Tourist arrest Stern Oesterle ish Good Goethe. All right, Now you know how to pronounce the long and short who? Don't worry. If you still find it difficult to make this sound, the correct pronunciation will come with repeated practice 19. The German Umlaut Ü: in this lesson. We're going to practice the long and the short German, our third and last one loud. Let's start with the long do and here again, I'll show you a trick. How to get it right. You make the long E as in here. Or be, uh, the tip of your tongue touches the lower front teeth, and then you keep your tongue in that position and round your lips, this movement of the lips will create the you sound. I'll show you a year. You Ah, and as we did for the Earth, feel free to look in the mirror to make sure that your lips are really rounded and in kiss position. All right, and here are the rules went to make this sound long. First, always when it's dressed in a word when there is one continent after the, as in Cuba, when there is an age after the as in Gifu and when there is a sharp s after the new as in gruesome Let's practice repeat after me. Boucha Boucha Mood mood, Zeus Zoo's verse day, various day fool and fool And and now let's have a look at this short the mouth shape and tongue position are the same as for the long do. But this time the sound To make it shorter, we pronounce the in this short way when it's followed by two continents and especially double continents as in good. Here are more examples. Repeat after me Look Ok, Look OK. Necessary. Necessary foot done fit on Muslim Merson! Fern Fern! All right, let's keep practicing with similar word pairs to see the difference between the long you and the short vamoose. There first a do now, Don't know Muehler murder Grune Grender Who'd Good day? Okay, now I'd like to add another exercise because you and who can sound very similar, Especially when you're not used to the different sounds. So here are some word pairs to show you the difference. Let's start with the short and new sounds. Hurler Hurley Connecting. Can Upson stuck, Okay, Stuck. Okay. Could hear cook here. Okay, okay. And here is a comparison off the long earth and you sounds to 10 to Cheverly shrewdly to again to, uh Zuna Zuna flu again. Flu. All right now you know how to pronounce the long and short who as well as the long and short you. As I said before, don't worry. If you find it difficult to make these sounds, the correct pronunciation will come with repeated practice. 20. Not what You Thought: The German Y: in this lesson, I'm going to talk about the German letter. Why this letter is interesting because first of all, it's called Epsilon. We took that name from Greek. The second reason is that as the name indicates, it's pronunciation is identical to the long do when it's in the middle off words only when it stands at the beginning or the end of a word, it's pronounced in the same way as in English. A short E. Let's have a look at some examples and please feel free to repeat after me to fish to fish pool. Our media people are media as you a zoo, Zune or newme zoona newme do not meet. Do not meet and here are some words that start or end with Y, and therefore the letter is pronounced as a short eat. These are not words of German origin, but mostly loan words from English but pronounced with a German accent. Listen and repeat, baby baby Hendi Hendi Party, party. You'll got your God Yeah, yeah, all right, So let's summarize in the middle of a word. Why is pronounced like a long you? And if a word starts or ends with a Y, it's pronounced E as in English 21. The German Diphthong EI: Hello and welcome back. In addition to the normal vowels, German also has three def thongs. Now a diff tongue is a combination off to vowel sounds within the same syllable. And in this lesson, I'm going to talk about the I. D phone. There was an equivalent in English, and you can find it in words such as light. It starts with an ah sound, as in father, and then glides into an e sound as in bit but very fast. I I the idea thong in German can be written with these vowel combinations. All off them are pronounced. I It's never a another characteristic off the diff thanks and Germany's that the stress is on the first vowel, for example, fly is never pronounced fry e Let's have a look at some words with this Def phone. Listen and repeat design design. I am Ah, I am. Ah, by on by on Hi. Hi. My, uh my, uh I can tell you that the vast majority off words that include this I defunct are spelled with e i. The other combinations are pretty rare. Here are some more words with this different Clyde client. Applies applies Eisen Eisen, Becca, Becca, I. It's vie. It's vie. There is another vowel combination that I mentioned earlier in the course, and I'm talking about the I E, which is pronounced like a long E. It's not a dip thong because you make only one sound e but is the spelling is very similar . Many students get a bit confused. I'll show you some word pairs where one includes the different I and the other the long e Feel free to repeat after me Vine Wien style steel. I lied lead. All right Now you know how to spell and pronounce the German def thong I in the next lesson , we're going to learn about the other two def thongs. I'll see you there. 22. The German Diphthongs AU & EU: in the last video, we learned about the German def Thong. I and his promised we're going to have a look at the other two German def. Thanks. In this video, let's start with the owl def phone. There is an equivalent in English, and you can find it in words such as brown. It starts with an ah sound as in father, and then glides into an who sound as in look. But the transition is very fast. Oh oh, the out if thong and German is always spelled a you owl. And as with the idea thong, the stress is always on the first vowel. For example. Flower is never pronounced Frau. Okay, let's have a look at some words with this sound. Listen and repeat Okay, All gay house house coffin Kalfin getting owl can now Blau Blau All right, let's move on to the third and lasted. Thong Oy. The corresponding English sound can be found in the word boy. It starts with an all sound as in not and then glides into an e sound as in lip and again the transition is very fast. Oy, oy! The oil dip thong can be spelled. You or a ew. Both combinations are pronounced in the same way. Boy, here are some words that contained this different. Please feel free to repeat after me. Deutsche Deutsche, Loiter, Lloyd. Life, too Life, too Hi fi, higher fee oil. It'll oil It'll many learners pronounced this last word as a little, but that's wrong in Germany. Re pronounced the European currency as oil, so it starts with the same sound. Is the English word oyster for years old? All right, let's compare that to the thongs to highlight the differences and also to make sure that we get the pronunciation right. Repeat after me. Laos lawyers. A mouse boy is a house Hoy's ah balm boy man A wagon oik and that's it. Now you know how to spell and pronounce the German Deftones Owl and oy. 23. Congratulations!: congratulations on finishing the German pronunciation masterclass. I hope that you enjoy the lessons and I'm confident that by now you've made a huge leap towards speaking German like a native as always. If you have any questions or comments, please don't hesitate to get in touch with me. I wish you all the best on your ongoing language learning journey and would be happy to welcome you to one of my other courses. Good luck and alfyed Azzan.