Fusion 360 For 3D Printing 2021 - A Complete Class | Austen Hartley | Skillshare

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Fusion 360 For 3D Printing 2021 - A Complete Class

teacher avatar Austen Hartley, Entrepreneur | Engineer

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

39 Lessons (3h 47m)
    • 1. Introduction to Fusion 360

      3:10
    • 2. Download Fusion 360 + Free License Options

      2:14
    • 3. Why Fusion 360 4K

      2:51
    • 4. Fusion 360 Workspace and Units

      3:20
    • 5. How to learn fusion 360 4K

      2:47
    • 6. Creating Our First Project ! A Stencil !

      10:15
    • 7. 3D Printed Stencil

      2:07
    • 8. Saving and Exporting Files

      1:34
    • 9. Class 1 Summary

      2:25
    • 10. LESSON 2 - INTRODUCTION

      1:13
    • 11. Tips and Tricks Explained on Paper!

      5:29
    • 12. My Pencil Holder Design Explained

      5:00
    • 13. Fusion 360 Pencil Holder Design

      17:22
    • 14. Fillets are REALLY IMPORTANT !

      5:24
    • 15. Lesson 2 - Summary and 3D Print

      2:22
    • 16. Class 3 Intro

      1:38
    • 17. Class 3 Tools on Paper

      6:12
    • 18. Class 3 Designing Our Wrench

      21:53
    • 19. Class 3 Summary

      1:40
    • 20. Class 4 Introduction

      1:57
    • 21. Class 4 Designing our Vase !

      18:19
    • 22. Class 4 Summary

      2:57
    • 23. Class 5 - Intro to Tolerances

      1:53
    • 24. Class 5 - Tolerances Tested !

      11:16
    • 25. Class 5 - Tolerance Summary

      1:01
    • 26. Class 6 - Threads Introduction

      2:31
    • 27. Class 6 - Threads Design

      16:09
    • 28. Class 6 - Threads Review

      5:49
    • 29. Spline Tool Intro

      1:05
    • 30. Spline Lesson 1

      6:50
    • 31. Spline Lesson 2 ! - Guitar

      5:48
    • 32. Major Project 1 - The Mandalorian Design

      1:16
    • 33. Class 7 - Mandalorian Design !

      16:10
    • 34. Major Project 1 - Summary

      1:33
    • 35. Mold Making Intro

      1:34
    • 36. Mold Making

      7:42
    • 37. Mold Timelapse

      3:33
    • 38. Intro - Curved Surfaces

      1:42
    • 39. Curved Surface Modeling Example

      30:06
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About This Class

This is the first class of the Fusion 360 For 3D Printing 2021 course. My name is Austen Hartley, I'm a Mechanical Engineer based out of Canada. In this class I will be teaching you how to use Fusion 360, from the first time you open the software, all the way to exporting complete projects ready for 3D printing. 

This is a complete course that will teach you how to use every tool you could possibly need for designing and 3D printing. Every class includes an intro, an explanation of the tools, the full design process and the 3D print. 

At the end of this course you will have the tools and knowledge to design and 3D print almost anything you can think of. Additionally, if you are interested in doing freelance design work, you will have the confidence and ability to take on projects and begin your career. 

I cant wait to share this with you ! There is nothing better than bringing your ideas to life and Fusion 360 is an amazing and powerful piece of software for us to do just that.

Meet Your Teacher

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Austen Hartley

Entrepreneur | Engineer

Teacher

I'm a Canadian Entrepreneur. After graduating from Engineering School at the University of Calgary, I had to make the decision between a corporate or entrepreneurial career. I choose to be an Entrepreneur and have never looked back. Currently Building out Fusion 360 For 3D Printing ! 

Get in touch with me here - [email protected]
Check out my website for more information - austenhartley.com

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Transcripts

1. Introduction to Fusion 360: Hey, and welcome to this course. My name is Austin. I graduated from the University of Calgary here in Canada, where I studied mechanical engineering. Now today I own and operate and engineering design and 3D printing company. So I personally use Fusion 360 every day for a couple of hours at the minimum. Now I've worked on everything from structural designs like buildings and bridges all the way to really fun things like the movie props that you see in Star Wars. You can think of it. It can be designed and by the time we finish this course, you too will be able to complete the design work. There are really two huge benefits to learning Fusion 360 number one is that we are bringing ideas to life by equipping you with the knowledge and tools to use this software, the world is truly your playground. You can bring your ideas to life like never before I remember the first time when I just started with engineering design software, being able to take something from idea to design and then all the way to a physical object by actually 3D printing it, it truly changed my life and it completely changed the trajectory of my career. I instantly knew that's what I wanted to do. And hey, here we are today, nothing has changed. So number two is that once you know how to use Fusion 360, you can instantly charge for your services. There's very, very few skills in life that once you learn, you can immediately start earning money from that skill. However, fusion 360 is one of them. So if you're here with the hopes of earning a little bit of extra income or even full-time income doing design work, you're definitely in the right spot now in this course, we're also focusing on 3D printing, which means that the end of every single lesson, every object we make, we're actually going to 3D printed. I think it's a fantastic way to learn. And then all of the files from this course will be available for you to download and print yourself as well as compare it, your design work too. I will be giving a ton of tips and tricks along the way about optimizing things for 3D printing, as well as explaining my experience in the 3D printing industry. So why take this course with me? Well, not only do I use a software in industry every single day, which I'll be talking about in the course. But the thing about design software is that there is always a way to build and design something, and then there is the correct and efficient way to build and design something. Let me explain. So take, for example, I was asked to make a simple cube. We can make this simple cube a variety of different ways. For example, option a, I can make any rectangular prism and then cut away all six sides so that they're even. And therefore we would have a cube or I can just make a sketch, equate the lines and extrude that square. Therefore, having a cube not doing it that way would take about one fit the time using weigh less operations, therefore being more efficient and keeping your design space clean and tidy if in the future you need to go edit that. Now that's a super simplistic example. But when you're making something complex, where you're building something that requires hundreds of operations. It can truly be the difference between say, 30 minutes of design time and 45 hours of design time. And if you're taking this course with the hopes of building quality work or charging for your service time and efficiency become really, really important. So hopefully we're on the same page. I'm gonna teach you how to build things efficiently with 3D printing in mind using the same methods that we use in industry. So let's jump into it. I'll see you guys in the course. 2. Download Fusion 360 + Free License Options: All right, You guys, So welcome to the first thing that we obviously need to do is to download and install fusion 360. Now, if you have already downloaded and installed it, you can I guess, skip this video. However, I do want to quickly cover the licenses with the time that I'm recording this, it's February 2021 and the licenses with Fusion 360 do occasionally change. However, it is worth noting that at this time you can completely download a free version that has everything that we need for 3D printing, which is amazing and awesome. So let's go ahead and do a Google search for Fusion 360 download, and let's go check out the licenses. So under the Autodesk dot CA1, click into this and we can see the three that are ready array here. So Fusion 360 for personal and hobby use. This is the one that you're likely going to use for in the future and after this course and going forward because it is free. So let's go ahead and let's click into this and let's see what we get from it. So we see here Fusion 360 for personal use and we get the dot STL exported file types. And then again, we can see here it says three. Fusion 360 for personal use features include 3D printing. So as long as we got our 3D printing and r dot STL file export, we're pretty much good to go on the 3D printing side. The only other one that we really need is dot, STEEEP and case. You want to share files with someone who's using another CAD design software. So let's go ahead, let's go back one more and we see Fusion 360 Free Trial Download. Now, this is one that I recommend getting off the bat because then what you'll see is absolutely everything that free Fusion 360 offers in case you do end up wanting to pay for the software when you're done this course. Again, totally not required. The personally use and hobby use is more than enough for what we need. The only other one that's worth noting is the Fusion 360 for educational use. If you are a student, you can go ahead and put in your student email address and they'll give you a one-year use for students or teachers. So that's it for now. Go ahead and like I said, probably just start with the Fusion 360 Free Trial Download, get that downloaded and installed on your computer, and then I'll see you guys in the next one. 3. Why Fusion 360 4K: Hey guys, welcome to this class. In this class I just want to talk about my personal experience using Fusion 360 and why I think you should use Fusion 360 yourself. Obviously, you're about to invest a couple hours of your time learning the software. So it's important to learn the capabilities of this software and compare the software to the other softwares that are available. Now first and foremost, fusion 360 is amazing because it's free and it's extremely powerful software. Most free software packages you get there free for like 14 days and then you have to spend all the money to actually continue using the software. However, Fusion 360 hobby license and educational licenses, our free so you can go ahead and use those licenses with all of the functionality that we need for this course and that you'll probably need for all of your future design work. Now if that hasn't sold you over enough, we could compare Fusion 360 to something like Solid Works, which the licensing can be anywhere from ten to $20 thousand a year depending what you're using it for. So when we look at something like that and then we see fusion is free and has basically the same functionality that we need. It's a pretty incredible package for us now, next up is that you can use Fusion 360 on a Mac and Windows machine if you're like me and you use both, that is absolutely necessary because SolidWorks, for example, is only available for Windows machines. Or if you have a Mac, you have to run some sort of Windows boot camp to actually operate SolidWorks and it slows down your machine. So the ability to use fusion on both operating systems is something that to some people is truly just the difference maker. Lastly, is an interface and support with Fusion 360. If you have a problem or you can't figure something out with Fusion 360, you can pretty much just Google any problem that you have. And there will be a YouTube tutorial or some sort of walkthrough or something from the Autodesk community telling you exactly what you need to know. And now that might not sound like a big deal at this time, but when you find yourself stuck on some sort of simple operation, you can't remember where it is or you can't remember how to use it. You can quickly just do a search and you will get the answers that you need. Now the other thing that I really like about fusion 360 is the organization and accessibility of the tools within the workspace. What I mean by that is that everything is your setup to optimize your workflow, meaning that it's optimized for efficiency. So things like creating a sketch, basic shapes, extrusions, all very intuitive and you will learn that as we go along in the course, there's a lot of things that will explain once and after I explain the ones, you'll know how to use them, how to experiment with them, and everything is very intuitive. There's no crazy fancy units or languages or anything else that you need to know using to understand how to complete operations and the order that the operation should be done in. So I can't stress it enough. I really, really do highly recommend Fusion 360. Like I said, I use it every day and I'm happy that you're here because if you're debating whether or not to use Fusion 360 or another software package, I believe you've come to the right spot and let's go ahead and jump into the course with Fusion 360. 4. Fusion 360 Workspace and Units: All right, So welcome to Fusion 360. If it's your first time, opening the software at your workspace should look something just like this. You can see that I'm on the educational teacher's license here. Again, the license that you selected doesn't matter. So don't worry if you're says something different up here before we get started and before I talk about any functions at all, what I wanna do is make sure that we're all working in the same units. So to do that, we're gonna do is on the right-hand side, go ahead and click up where your initials are. We're going to go ahead and click into preferences. Once you have preferences open, it's going to look just like that. From here, click on unit and value display. Once you're into unit and value display, you can see that at the bottom here we have the material unit display and we get all these options. Let's go ahead and click on metric. What this does is it puts our units of length into millimeters. Then we can see that we also have newtons and megapascals, but we don't need to worry about those. So go ahead and click that and press Apply. Now mine is already in those units, so it doesn't matter. Next thing that we're gonna do is under default units, we're going to click through these options and go ahead and just put them all into millimeters so that we're all working in the same units. Now the reason that we're putting these two millimeters is because when it comes to 3D printing, pretty much everything is expressed in units of liters. If you've looked into 3D printers or if you own 3D printers, you probably already know that all the other 3D printing software is expressed in units and the units as well as the dimensions of your actual 3D printer. So let's go ahead here. Click on metric SI units for the simulation. And again press, Apply and then press, Okay. After that, what we're gonna do is again, before we even talk about all these different functions up here, just follow me along step-by-step so that we can get our workspace setup. So right here we see in the left-hand side it says Create Sketch. Go ahead and click on Create Sketch. And then you're going to see the x, y, and z plane. Go ahead and just click on any one of those. And then let's scroll in a little bit using the scroll wheel on your mouse. This right here is the origin. So from here, we are now making a sketch. Let's just go ahead and click on this, which is line. Let's create a line from the origin out to the first grid line. Now yours may not be at 10 millimeters. That's what we're going to fix right now, after you have that line builds, you'll see it's asking you pretty much shade. You want to build another line, just press Escape on your keyboard. Now, once you press Escape on your keyboard, Let's go ahead down here and let's go to where it says grid and snaps. Go ahead and click on Grid settings, years maybe in adaptive or fixed. But what we want is we want it in fixed. We want our major grid spacing to 10 millimeters and we are major subdivisions to one that way. Every grid line is basically just 10 millimeters apart. This makes it really easy for us to visualize the 3D printed object actually on our printer, because now things are in grids in 10 millimeter increments. So go ahead and click Okay on that. And the last thing that I want to check is under Document Settings, drop that down and just make sure that unit says that it's in millimeters. If it's not, you can go ahead and click on Change active units and just put that two millimeters. So now we are working in the exact same space. We all have millimeters. And so let's talk about how we're going to navigate around this environment. In the next video, I'll see you there. 5. How to learn fusion 360 4K: Hey guys and welcome to this class. I just want jumping and give you a few quick tips and tricks on the fastest way to learn Fusion 360. Now this is just in my experience, obviously everyone learns differently. But with CAD design software, I've had to learn quite a few of them. And I will tell you that this is what I have found to be the best way. And I've already structured the class is such that we will first be talking about the individual skills before we actually use those to create the part in the class. However, if you ever get stuck using one of those skills, what I recommend doing is just going File new design and just experimenting with that skill. So for example, if we are learning how to sketch a circle, what I recommend doing is if you're having a tough time with it, stop the video for a minute, go file new design in your Fusion 360 software, and then just start sketching circles and playing around with it. Because with Fusion 360, the operations are pretty intuitive. But sometimes if you miss just one little click or one that'll dimension somewhere, it can throw the whole thing up. So it is important that we learn the order of operations correctly. So again, if you're ever stuck, just go file new design and just start working on that individual skill. But I'll try and give you a ton of examples. So you shouldn't have to do this too often. But again, just never be scared to open up a new design and experiment with that skill. Like I said, I've already structured the lessons to maximize the learning efficiency. But again, just do not be scared to press File new design and experiment on your own for a bit and then come back to the video. So I'll see you guys horse. 6. Creating Our First Project ! A Stencil !: All right, so now that our units are calibrated and our grid is calibrated, We're ready to start working on things again, I apologize if that first video was a little bit confusing because we were just making a sketch and a line without actually really knowing what we're doing. But it was just to calibrate so that we're working in the same space. So if you're wondering, hey, wait, where's your line? Go, go head and the top right-hand corner there and just click on Escape. Or you can go ahead and just click on File, new design and don't worry about saving the line that we made before. Like I mentioned, it was just so that we could set up our workspace units. So let's talk a little bit about the Fusion 360 workspace itself. This right here is our workspace. Right now we're in the design workspace. There's also Render Animation Simulation and all that good stuff. But for now, let's not get ahead of ourselves. Let's just start with the design workspace. Within the design workspace, we have these menus up here, which is solid surface, sheet metal and tools. Again, what we pretty much always work in is solid. So let's jump right into creating our very first sketch using this button right here it is The create a sketch button. We can go ahead and just click on that. And what we'll see is our three planes to choose from. I pretty much always start with just the bottom plane. So go ahead and let's just click on that bottom plane. Now if we zoom in here, zoom in. What we do is we just scroll on our mouse. If you're not using a mouse right now and you're on a laptop, I would highly, highly recommend using a mouse because doing any 3D design with O'Day most, well, while it's gonna take you a lot longer to complete, so it just get a mouse and use a mouse. Now using our scroll wheel is how we zoom in and out. Next to move left to right, what we do is we click the scroll wheel of the mouse in and then finally into rotate. What we do is we press Shift on our keyboard and we click in the scroll wheel of our mouse and we'll see that will be moving in three-dimensional space. So using those three tools, we can move left, right, zoom in and out, and then rotate. We can move absolutely anywhere we want within our workspace. Now, what I wanna do is basically show you how to create a sketch in this episode or in this lesson. So what we're gonna do is we're going to create a stencil. And what I mean by a stencil is something like a stencil to create basic geometric shapes like when you were a kid in elementary school and you'd be making squares and circles and things like that. That's what we're going to make. So first thing that we need to do is to make a square or a rectangle. Now, if we go up to the top hand corner here at the top left-hand corner, we can see the different operations. The one that we want to choose is rectangle. And then what I like to do is use center point rectangle. Now, all that is is a rectangle that is measured from the center out. So you'll see as I click on the origin here and I move this out, you can see that our rectangle moves from the center and that's how our dimension is controlled. So, so using our center rectangle tool, let's go ahead and let's just place it. Don't worry about the dimensions for now because that brings us to our very next tool. This is another thing that you will be using all the time. So what we're gonna do is we're going to press Escape key on our keyboard. And that will just bring up our cursor. And then what we're gonna do is under the create section, we will see that we have the option for a sketch dimension. You can also access this by just pressing D on your keyboard. And using this dimension tool, we basically control the dimensions of all of our shapes. So what we're gonna do is we're gonna go ahead and we're going to click on this one here. And let's make this 1150 millimeters in length. And let's then click on one of the sides here. And let's make this, let's say 90 millimeters in length. So now what we have is we have our rectangle. It's measured 150 by 90 millimeters. That is a good start. We have our first shape. Let's go ahead and let's click on Finish Sketch. Now what we have is in the left-hand side right here we can see under our sketches, sketch number 1. This is indeed our rectangle. So just one basic rectangle is kind of boring. So let's go in and let's edit that sketch a little bit more. To do this, we're gonna go on the sketch right-click and then we're just gonna go ahead and click Edit Sketch. And then now you can see that we might have to move it around a little bit again. I'm just doing this by clicking Shift on my keyboard. And then my most scroll wheel is also clipped in. But now we're back on our sketch. The point of that was just to show you how to get in and out of sketches. So if we're outside of a sketch again, right-click and then we can just go ahead and press Edit Sketch. It's now again shift and then click on the scroll wheel of my mouse. I'm now going to be looking at our rectangle that we made. Now, this rectangle is looking a little bit plane, so let's add some other shapes to it. Let's go ahead and under the create section, Let's go ahead and let's make a circle. Now, the circle that I commonly use in that most people start with is the center diameter circle. What this does is it just again, measures are units from the center outwards. So you'll see, let's just place this within our rectangle and let's go ahead again. You can either, once you click, you can either actually go straight to your keyboard and write, for example, 20, and it'll automatically adjust. And then you can see that it actually locks it in place. Or if you leave it like this, you can go ahead and click out, press D on your keyboard for the sketch dimension tool and then actually create a dimension. Let's go ahead and let's make this 25 millimeters. Now what we do is we have a circle, so we're off to a bit of a start. So let's go ahead and let's add another rectangle. Let's just use the standard rectangle tool up here. What this is gonna do is it's going to basically drag it from the top left corner to the bottom right-hand corner of our rectangle, as you can see right here. So I'm just gonna make that 20 by 30 millimeters. That looks good to me. So let's lock that in place. 20 by 30 millimeters Enter and we're good. So now what we have, we have our big rectangle, we have our circle, and we have our smaller rectangle over here. Now, the next tool that I'm going to go over is again, extremely important and we might use this all the time. This tool is called the trim tool. And what the trim tool does is we use the trim tool to combine sketches. So let's say, for example, that we wanted to make a shape that consists of a rectangle and a circle. Let's go ahead and let's make one of those now. So let's go into the rectangle, Let's go center point rectangle. And let's make one of these. Let's just end the shape. The size of the shape doesn't matter for now. So just go ahead, make a center point rectangle. And then let's go ahead and let's make a circle on the top right-hand corner. Again, we can zoom in using the scroll wheel of our mouse and then clicking the scroll wheel, we can navigate the planar motion. So from here, let's go ahead and let's click on this trim tool. Now what the trim tool does is it basically deletes lines that lets you connect objects. So using the trim tool, it's kinda like holding a pair of scissors. So once you click down, you can just scroll around just like this. And what that'll do is it will just delete all of the lines that cross its path. So these dotted lines here are basically just construction lines or constraint lines. We can get rid of these as well. And we can see that our new shape is now this rectangle that we have combined with this circle, which is pretty cool. So let's go ahead, Let's zoom out a little bit so we can see that a little bit better. And now we have our circle or rectangle and our combination of the two rate here. Let's go ahead and let's add one more shape. Let's add in a polygon. Now, under polygon, you have those three options. Let's go ahead and let's do the circumscribed polygon. What this is, is, it is creating a polygon measured from the circles. So our units will be in radius of the circle again, if this doesn't make too much sense right now, don't worry about it at all, honestly, we don't use polygons too much. Polygons are typically used for things like the head of bolts and screws. But let's go ahead and let's just set the radius of the circle inside of our polygon to say 15 millimeters, it's going to be quite small. And then the other measurement that we have is you'll see where it says six. This is just the number of sides of the polygon. So let's say that we want to change it to an octagon. We would then, OK, Go ahead. Let's go back 15 millimeters. We then change the six to eight and you'll see that now it's an octagon with eight sides. That looks good to me. Let's make that. So now you can see we have all of our basic shapes right here. Let's go ahead and let's actually press Finish Sketch, and let's do something with this sketch. What we're gonna do is we're actually going to extrude parts of this sketch. So the first thing that we want to extrude is this large rectangle. So go ahead, just click in a rectangular space. And right here you'll see we have the Extrude button. Let's extrude this. And then what you'll see is on the right-hand side here we have distance. Let's just simply extrude this five millimeters and then you can go ahead operation new body and just press OK. Again, we'll be doing an in-depth section on extruding things. I just want to make a shape that we can actually 3D print so we can see exactly what we have been doing. And now you see that by extruding just a rectangle, the other options are essentially cut out. And here we have our stencil. So in order to 3D print this, what we're gonna do is we're going to export this as a dot STL file now with Fusion 360, before you actually export any dot STL files, you have to save them locally. So first things first, let's go ahead. Let's go file in the top left-hand corner and click on Save. Now when we go to save this under location, my first project, we can leave this as it is. This is just saved within the Fusion 360 directory. But let's go ahead and let's rename this to pencil, and I'm going to write class 1. So now what we have is our Fusion 360 file is saved as that Fusion 360 file. But now what we wanna do is want to export this as a dot STL file. So to do that again File, now we're going to click on Export. And I'm going to go ahead and leave this as tensile class one and now just says V1 for version one. From here we're going to scroll down and we're going to click on STL file, which is at the very bottom. Go ahead and click on Export. I'm going to let that export and then send it to the printer. And I'll show you guys exactly what that looks like when it's done. So I'll see you there. 7. 3D Printed Stencil : All right, We are back, our stencil is done printing. You can check it out right here. I'll include a couple of close-up camera shots of it so that you can see it. And I'll show you a quick little video of the print rate now. Now this was printed on a piece of printer, the i3 MP3s plus, and it looks fantastic. I just use some sparkle black filament. And nonetheless here it is. We have our stencil, it is complete. Now, what this stencil is checking for is if you had a piece of paper and we have a bunch of basic shapes, we could simply just sketch out the shapes with a pen and pencil. And now we have perfectly sketched out geometric shapes. I know you can't see it from there, but I'll include a close-up of the actual stencil here right away. However, yeah, congratulations because your first design and print is done and you can go ahead and post a photo or a screenshot or something of your stencil in the project section of this class. And that way we call kinda see the different basic shapes that we have made using this simple stencil, which again, all we did is we sketched out the square, we then sketch out the individual shapes and then we extruded the square. So that's all there was to our first one and I'll see you guys in the next video. Oh, and one more thing before you go. This right here is a set of vernier calipers. If you don't have a set of vernier calipers and you plan on doing a lot of engineering design and 3D printing work and lots of designs and Fusion 360, I recommend getting a set of vernier calipers and get him for as low as $20. Basically what it is, is it as a measuring tool that is a lot more precise and something like say a ruler. So using a set of vernier calipers, we can actually compare the exact measurements on Fusion 360 with those two are 3D printed stencil. Now I'll put the camera here and get a close up view so you can see exactly what I mean. I do recommend doing this from time to time just to check the calibration of your 3D printer. So that's it for this one. And I'll see you guys in the next one. 8. Saving and Exporting Files: All right, so before we move on to the next class, There's just one more thing I wanted to cover and that is how to properly save your files in Fusion 360 because saving your files properly, his extremely important where you would never want to lose our work. So there's two ways to do this in Fusion 360. The first one is to go file save. And what file saved is using this, we are uploading our files to the Fusion 360 cloud or the Fusion 360 servers and their own network. So this will not store files on your desktop or on your computer. This is just uploading them to the Cloud. That's one way. The other way is we go File Export. And then using File Export, we can actually save the files locally to our computer. Here's how I usually do it. What I do is I have a folder on my desktop called Fusion 360 files. And then what I do is every single time I'm going to save a file. I'll go File Save, I'll save it to the Fusion 360 Cloud. And then after I'm done saving it to the cloud, I'll go File Export, and I will just export this to the folder sitting on my desktop. And that way I'm just always sure that I have a copy of it on the Fusion 360 server as well as a copy of it on my local hard drive, which will be on my desktop. The only other thing I will mention is that the dot f 3D files are the Fusion 360 file. So if I open up a dot f 3D file, it would look just like this and it would be our exact part file. So saving them as dot F 3D files is the standard. That's it for this one. I'll see you guys in class number two. 9. Class 1 Summary: All right, so this video here is just a demonstration video. Please do not try and follow along step-by-step. I'm just summarizing what we learned and what we did in this class. So essentially what we did is we downloaded and installed Fusion 360 for the first time. We then brought this up and made sure that we are all in millimeters using the same units. So from there, We learned how to create a sketch using this button right here. We also learned the navigation of our mouse. So by scrolling in and out of our mouth, we're zooming by pressing Shift and clicking in the mouse scroll button, we're moving around in rotation. And finally, if we're just clicking on the mouse scroll wheel, we're moving in planar motion using these three emotions, we can pretty much control the entire workspace. So from the Sketch button, what we do is we click on whatever sketch plane I typically always just click on the bottom one. We then see this right here, which is the origin. From the origin, we can create any sort of geometrical sketch that we want using the sketch tools right here. So let's go ahead and I'm just going to create a circle for this demonstration. Now what we have is our circle. Now after we make pretty much any sketch, we're just going to go ahead and click D on our keyboard. And then we're going to create our sketch dimension. So we can see here that our diameter is set to a 100 and 26 millimeters. Let's go ahead and make that 100 millimeters. We now have a circle with a 100 millimeter diameter. After we did this, we now have our basic shape, but we learned that we can combine shapes. So if we took a rectangle, for example, and we made this rectangle intersect with our circle. What we could then do is use our trim tool to make these the same shape. Again, our trim tool is basically just a pair of scissors that you go and you cut out all of the lines. So what we then did is we now have our basic geometry. We use the trim tool to combine those into one shape. We can then press Finish Sketch. Now once we have our sketch finished, we can extrude what this is doing is it's taking our 2D sketch and it's making it three-dimensional. Again, in a future video, we'll be going over all the specifics of the extrusion. But for now we just went to distance and let's go ahead and just make it ten millimeters. Again, pressing Shift and then clicking in the scroll wheel of our mouse pad, we can now see that we have a three-dimensional shape. So that's it for the summary. I'll see you guys in the next lesson. 10. LESSON 2 - INTRODUCTION: Welcome to class number 2 on how to use Fusion 360 if you're new here, my name is Austin, I'm your instructor and I'm a mechanical engineer based out of Canada. I own and operate and engineering design and 3D printing studio. So everything we do is and be focused on real life applications and 3D printing. Specifically in this class, we're building a pencil holder. Now if you are new here, I recommend first checking out class number 1, where we went, we design and we built our own stencil. We also went over basically how to download and how to start using Fusion 360. But nonetheless, that brings us to our class today. So for the class today, what we're gonna do is first I'm going to give you an overview of what we're doing, the skills that we're learning. And I'm gonna show you how that looks on a pen and paper. Then we're going to go ahead, we're gonna go into the design. We're going to work on skills like fillets. We're going to do extrusions and we're gonna do cuts. Now, fillets are a really big one and if you don't know what to fill it is, don't worry. I'm actually going to bring in a bunch of real life objects and show you examples. Because as I mentioned, that's how I think we're going to learn best, especially with 3D printing in mind. So let's jump right into it. I'll see you guys in the next lesson. Let's start building our cool, our very own pencil holder. We might even put our names on it. I'll see you there. 11. Tips and Tricks Explained on Paper!: All right, So when it comes to building and designing a pencil holder, there's basically two types of pencil holders we can make. The one that just looks like a cup and you kinda just throw all the pencils or pens in there and it's super messy. Or what we could do is we can make our own kind of custom one where we actually cut out individual holes for our pens. Now in doing that, we could also cut out and individual hole for something like scissors or whatever it may be, you have the freedom to make yours how ever you want and just follow the template that I'm going to give you. So what I wanna do first is show you on pen and paper exactly how this is going to look. And I have our handy dandy stencil here from before. So let's quickly talk about how we can make this in Fusion 360. Let's check this out. So first thing is first, let's obviously just make the square that we're going to have. So here we go. Again, you guys do not need to do this part. I just want to do this so that I can demonstrate a few points to you. So just watch along. There's no need for you to copy this out as well. Now what I mentioned before, We're working on fill it. So there's a reason that I didn't actually connect all of these lines. As I mentioned, perpendicular lines are made stronger by fillets. So instead of actually just making this a perfect rectangle in this class, what we're going to be doing is we are going to be adding in fillets to the sides here, meaning that these aren't just going to be at 90 degrees. Now I do apologize my drawing isn't the best. Thankfully, we do have our stencil, but the point of this right here is to illustrate these fillets that we're going to see in the four corners now, fillets are measured with radius. So if you took a fill it and you actually make a full circle from that fill it, you would have a radius. So this is kind of how it looks on software. Is this measurement value like the length of this arrow is our fill its value. So let's say for example, this one was two millimeters. That's how we would do our first fillets. Again, just watching for now I'll show you in the software, but it's good to have a little bit of a pre demonstration because there's one other really, really important thing that I want to get to. So let's pretend that on our stencil here, we made a circle from before. And let's pretend that this circle is the actual size of a pen. So we're going to make a couple individual circles for our pen holder. So I'm gonna go ahead and I'm going to just start making one of them. Now obviously the location of this circle is really important. For example, we want it to look symmetrical, we want it to look evenly space. So right now where I put it is okay, but when we think of it in Fusion 360, how would we make this circle perfectly aligned? Well, we would know that we can take a smart dimension from this line right here all the way to the center of the circle. And we could also take a smart dimension from this line right here or from this wall all the way to the center of the circle. Therefore, the location of that circle would be fixed. Now, for the first circle, that might not be super important. However, once we have a bunch of circles, for example, when we do the circle below it, Let's say actually, I'm going to purposely put this a little bit off to the side just so that you can see what I'm trying to illustrate. So if we just went in freehand and put these without using our smart dimensions are circles would not be perfectly aligned. And when it comes to building our parts, we always want them symmetrical and perfectly mathematically aligned. So there's two ways we can do it in this example. Number one is we're going to use our sketch dimension right here. So number 1 sketched, I mentioned again, we went over that you can just press D on the keyboard and then we'll be able to measure the distance from the very center of our circle all the way to the side walls, therefore, fixing the location of our circle. Then when we go ahead and we make another circle, Let's say that we put it right here. What we could do is we could take the sketch dimension from the center of our first circle over to the center of the second circle. That way we would have an even spacing between all of our circle. So that's method number 1. Now, method number 2, Let's say that we needed to make 500 circles. Now, that would be a nightmare if for every single one of them we had to sketched, I mentioned the distance between them. Now, method number two is using what's called a rectangular pattern. So I'm just going to write that down right here. Now again, you don't need to be writing this down, just follow along. So what rectangular pattern does is it lets us select the number of circles that we want, as well as the distance in between them. So again, if we were making something like 500 or one of the circles, which sounds crazy, but again, you'll see some designs that maybe have 10 or 20 or 30 of them using rectangular pattern will save us a ton of time again, like I said in the very first class, well we wanna do is make things as efficiently as possible. And usually by doing that, it actually also makes them as accurate as possible. Because for example, if there was 20 of these circles and you individually sketched the dimension between each one of them. There's a chance that somewhere along the line you put in a typo, especially if, for example, they needed to be something like 2.1 centimeters apart. Instead of doing every single one individually, we're going to use what's called rectangular pattern. And I'll show you guys that in the next video. And then lastly, like I mentioned, let's say that we wanted to make a little section on our pencil holder where we could put our scissors. Well, let's go ahead and we would just make a little square section. And again, just like when we did our stencil, we would go ahead and we were just extrude this and the rest would be cut out. So let's go ahead. I'm going to show you what that looks like in software. And let's just jump right into it. 12. My Pencil Holder Design Explained: All right, and we're going to jump into Fusion 360. And just one moment, like I mentioned, I think would be fun if we all made our own custom pen holder. So for example, if maybe you want yours to hold three pens or 20 pens, whatever you want, Let's go ahead and let's make our own. So for me, I know that I won't mind to hold pens. I'm gonna say I'm gonna hold six different pens. Also going to hold my exacto knife. And in addition, I'm going to hold my calipers as well as a pair of scissors, which means I'm going to have a few different shapes. So I'm going to go ahead and sketch mine. You guys don't have to do this, but I like to do this beforehand just so that I know my measurements and that way when I get into the Fusion 360 software, I can do it pretty quickly and efficiently. So if you want to just watch, you can do that too. So here we go. As I mentioned, please do not judge me based on my artistic skills because I know that they're not very good. But here's our top view, just like we did in this denser where we're then going to make those cut out. So for me, I know that I want six pen, so I'm just going to draw six circles here. Again, these are just free hand. The exact measurements are going to be done in the software itself. But this just gives me a good idea of exactly where I'm going to place the different cut out. So here's my six holes for my pens. Now, when it comes to the actual pens, I need to measure them. You don't have to measure them, but I do encourage it just so that you don't end up actually designing something and then 3D printing and just to find out that they don't fit, which brings me to 1 is in a future video we're going all over tolerances with 3D printing because tolerances are very important if you need two parts to just slide together with very minimal friction, that is a different class. So stay tuned for that. For this one, we just need the pen to simply fit in. So the diameter of this pen here is 9.5 millimeters. And I mean, here's another pen. So let's check out this one. This one's 10.5 at that, that good spot. So I'm just going to make these holes 13 millimeters to be safe and that way the pens will fit in each slot. So I'm going to go right here on my diagram. I'm just going to draw this right here, my dimension, 13 millimeters. Now, next step for me is my scissors, is I'll probably take the dimension around right here. Now, worth noting, this means that the overall extrusion is going to have to be about this much, but that's no problem. I'll make it pretty tall. So let's go ahead and I'm going to grab this dimension and it comes out to exactly 30 millimeters. So means that wherever I decided to put my square, this top part right here has to be 30 millimeters. I hope you can see that I do have the overhead camera running, so I'll show you a close up view of that. The scissors are pretty thin, so let's just go ahead. I mean, this is showing me 13.9 at the top. So this part right here, I'm going to make say 17 millimeters. As I mentioned, this is not drawn to scale, so this 17 line should actually probably be right here. But that's not a problem because again, I just want to see the location. Next up is my exacto knife. So for my exact dough knife, the thickness of it where I think it won't go in is around 35 millimeter. So again, we're just going to make a square right here and I'm going to write down, let's say I want this to fit in this way. Therefore, this side here is going to be 35 millimeters and the thickness of this one is going to be, I get 16.8 millimeters. So I'm just going to again play it safe and make this say 20 millimeters. Now last up is my calipers and I want this to fit in with a tight fit because it's heavy on top. I don't want it to be rotating around. So I'm going to try and get the most accurate dimension of kinda this bottom rectangle piece that I can. And obviously since I can't use my calipers for that part, I'm just going to simply use this ruler here. Now, the one thing I will note is that this, so for example, this ruler here is an inches and millimeters in Fusion 360, even though we set our units to millimeters, when you actually go to input a dimension, you can just write the abbreviation for the unit on there. So for example, even though it said in millimeters, I could write two and then just write IN for inches and the software itself will know that. So whatever measuring tool you're using, for example, if you're just using a tape measure that only has inches on it, that's totally fine too. You can enter the inches unit into our Fusion 360 software, even though our default is set to millimeters. So for this one, let's just go ahead and I'll set this one to say about two centimeters. So I'm going to have somewhere, I'm going to have a thin kind of rectangle area here. And this is going to be two centimeters and the thickness is going to be about 0. I'll put 0.9. And now we have our six circles for our pens as well as our ruler and our exact dough knife. So let's go ahead and jump into Fusion 360 and let's get this design. 13. Fusion 360 Pencil Holder Design: All right, So here we are in Fusion 360 now comes the fun part. So as always, let's go ahead and let's start with the top left corner here. Let's go sketch. And I always start on the bottom plane. So what I know first thing I'm gonna do is build a rectangle and I'm just going to go ahead and we can see that because we already set our snapping tools or are snapping distance to the ten millimeter increments. We have pretty good idea of our dimensions there. So I think for mine, I'm going to make it about a 100 and let's say 140 millimeters long by, I think 70 or 60 looks pretty good right there. I'm gonna go ahead actually. Actually, I might even a little bit more thin, so I'm just going to set that then what I'm going to press D on my keyboard. Go ahead and let's set the dimensions to this. And let's go 55 because I went online to sit kind of on the front of my desk and I wanted to be a little bit more. Then. Now, let's quickly review how we navigate around our workspace just in case you may have forgotten. So again, scrolling in and out of them most we'll, we'll zoom us in and out. Then what we can do is we can click into the mouse wheel to move in planar motion. And lastly, press Shift on your keyboard, clicking in the mouse, and we're now moving in 3 D space. So let's say that we get lost. Let's say, you know, our thing as, you know, it's just not perfect, but we want it to look perfect. We want to be looking right down on it. Well, in the top side here, top right corner of your screen, you can go ahead and click around just like this. And now we are at the top. So here we go, right into it. So this looks pretty good now, how tall do I want my pen holder to be? Well, for me, I think maybe something like 70 millimeters would be good. So I know that I'm going to extrude it 70 millimeters, but wait, before we do that, like we talked about was our fillets array here in the top-left corner we can see tools and we're going to add in some fillets. So when we scroll this over the corner or 90 degree connections, like I mentioned before, we can just go ahead and click here and we can see we have 15 millimeters selected now that is pretty big to start with. I'm going to go ahead and just make that may be five millimeters. Let's see how that looks. I kinda like that better. I think 15 was way too much, so I like that five millimeter fill it. Let's go ahead and press Enter. We now have our first fill it here. I'm gonna go ahead and add a five millimeter fill it on each side so you can just do that the same, whatever you think looks best for your pen holder. We're not too concerned with anything else at this point. Again, we're just trying to go through the steps, learn how to do it and make it look pretty good so that our 3D print is indeed functional and strong and useful. So Here we go. We now have our square here with our fillets. The next thing to do is to extrude this so we could go ahead and make all of our shapes first and then extrude it. But let's first extrude it because I want to talk about the extrusion options a little bit more in depth. So let's go up here, finished sketch, and then let's go ahead and click on our sketch and again, press extrude. Now, we haven't gone through these together yet, so let's go through our options. So first thing we have here is type. We're actually going to ignore the type right now. Let's just leave it on extrude. But let's go right into profiles or profiles is exactly what we are extruding. So you can see if I uncheck our sketch here, we lose our profile and now it says select. So let's go ahead and select that. And we can see we have one selected. Next up is our starts. Now this is where we want our extrusion to start. We can either start this, we could put it at an offset, we can start it at a different object, whatever it may be for. Now, let's just leave this on our profile plane so that we're starting from our sketch and we're extruding either upwards or downwards this way. But more than that, we already can see that we have direction. Now directions pretty straightforward. We can either extrude at one side, which is what we're doing right now. Or we can do a two-sided extrusion where now you see we have two arrows. You can see I can extrude this way or this way independently. But for now, again, let's stick with one side. The other option on there is symmetric, which is just going to duplicate your original extrusion distance and option. But again, for now, let's go one side and let's go ahead and set the distance. Like I said, I want mine to be 70 millimeters. So here we go. Now we have it at 70 millimeters and what's left is our taper angle. Now, what a taper angle is, is check this out. I'm just going to click the frontier. Now we have a front view is if I add a taper angle, what it's gonna do is it's actually going to extrude this at an angle this way right here. So let me show you if I put this to 30 degrees, you'll see there we go. Boom there. Now we have 30 degrees from the perpendicular, that is our taper angle. The other thing we can do actually add a negative taper angle. So let's say I put in, I don't know, negative seven degrees. You'll see it's now tapering off in words there. So that is our taper angle, not used very often, but I just wanted you to be aware of what the taper angle is. So let's go ahead, let's press. Okay, now what we have is basically just the base of our pencil holder. What we wanna do is we want to make another sketch at in our circles, the place for our, in my case, it was my exacto knife, my scissors and my calipers. But whatever it may be, the you want to add to your. So to do this, again, we're going to go create a sketch, and you'll see now we have the option to these, to sketch on these three planes. Now these three planes, Let's quickly talk about these. So you can see here we have this green line and you can see it up here as well. That's the y axis then the red one here, we have our x-axis. So this plane is actually our y, x plane right here. Moving down, we have our zx plane, and up here we have our z y plane. Now, not super important to actually know which one is which, but just so that you know the 3D space that you're working within. So let's go ahead and jump into it. What we're actually going to sketch on is anytime you make a solid body, that body contains basically plane. So you can go ahead and click on the top. And now we're creating a sketch on the top of our plane. So first one that we want is our pen. So let's go ahead and boom, let's create a circle. And as I mentioned before, the distance from my circle I want is 13 millimetres in diameter. That way it'll fit all of the pens that I have. So what I did there is I just made a circle. Now I'm going to press D on my keyboard and I'm going to make this 13 millimetres in diameter. And there we have it now. What we wanna do is we want to always make, are basically all of our parts. We always want them to be symmetrical. So, you know, the location of this circle is indeed important. For example, you can just drag it around and put it wherever you want it. Like It looks good here, but that might not be perfect. So how we do that is we want it to be perfect. Let's press D on your keyboard again. Let's click on the middle of our circle as well as this line right here. And now you can see that we're setting the distance from the center of our circle to this top line. And let's just set that to 15 millimeters to keep it nice and simple. And then let's go ahead and let's set the distance from the side here as well. Let's just set that to 15 millimeters. Again. This way, everything is just set and it looks really nice. Now what happens is when we go and we make more circles, we know that we can make these each 15 millimeters and 15 millimeters from the side. So now, when it comes to it, we need six circles. And as I mentioned before, there's two ways to do this. Method. Number one would be to go here and go ahead and make six circles and set the dimensions of each of them to this wall, to this wall, and then the dimension of the circle as well. You would also have to add a dimension from the middle of this circle to the middle of the first one. You would do that over and over five more times, giving us six circles or, and this is how we should do it, as I mentioned in this course, the point is to teach you how to do things efficiently and rights basically, there is indeed a right way of doing things and doing it the right way just improves our accuracies. So let's go ahead and let's actually delete this circle. You can either right-click on it and press Delete. Or what I usually do is if I make a mistake, if you're on a Windows or PC machine, it's usually control Z or if you're on a Mac, it's Option Z. But using that functionality, we can just go ahead and we can press Option Z because I'm on a Mac and you can see that just takes us back one operation. So now instead of creating a bunch of circles, what we're gonna do, let's click on this circle right here, Create. And then we'll see this option down here for rectangular pattern. Let's click on that now. I know it does indeed look a little bit intimidating, but don't worry, we're gonna go through each option. So first things versus objects, we can see it has one selected that's just our circle. You see if I press out, it goes away. Let's click. It's our circle is indeed selected. Next one is our direction. So the first direction that I want is going in a line from left to right. Now the easiest and best way to select your directions is to just click on something that is perpendicular. So for me, it would be this line or this line. If that doesn't make sense, just bear with me. Just click on a perpendicular line to the Earth, sorry, a parallel line to the direction that you want it to be. So let's go ahead and press on that one right here. So we have our first direction is defined. Now, once your direction is defined, you can either go to the left or to the right. So going to the left is actually positive, whereas going to the right is negative. Let me show you what I mean right here we have distance. So if I set this distance to 10 millimeters, you see it's going to start making circles to the left, but I actually want them to the right. So you can see if I put a negative there, now we're going to the right. And now what the distance is, is that's going to be the distance from the center of your very first circle to the center of your last circle. So let's go ahead and let's make that, OK, not 45, but negative. 45. So now the distance between this circle here and this circle here is exactly 45 millimeters. We can see there are quantity or number of instances is three, which is exactly what I want because I did 166 total pens to be on my pen holder, so that is already set up pretty good. I think I could actually know 45 looks good. So now what we need is essentially another row of circles. Now, if we look in our rectangular patterns section here we see that we have quantity, distance, and direction type. So this is for the first part which we have already set up here, but there's also this second part and we can see again quantity, distance and direction type under quantity it says three. So you might be wondering, where are these three circles while they're actually rate on top of this existing three. And that is because our distance is set to 0. Let me show you what I mean. If I go ahead and I set this to say ten, you'll see another three circles, or I guess another six circles popped up because our quantity is three, what I want is 6 totals are, what I want is six circles in total. So I'm going to set this quantity to two, and then I'm going to set this distance to 25 millimeters. That looks fantastic right there. This is good for me Now, the other thing worth noting is that we can see this dimension right here is 15 millimeters. That's the one that we said at the beginning. This is the dimension from the top rates in the middle of the circle is 15 millimeters. Now, if we have 15 millimeters there, plus 25 millimeters here, plus 15 millimeters here will give us our total of 55 millimeters, which is what this side length is set to if if I just lost you there, don't worry about that at all. We're just pretty much making sure that everything is symmetrical. I'll show you again in just one moment. So I'm gonna go ahead. I'm going to press Okay right there and now let me show you what I was talking about. So if I press D on my keyboard, I now have the dimension tool up. And if I click the center of this circle to the bottom here, we can see that it has 15 millimeters, just like the top one. Now if I click here, it's actually going to give me a little error. That's because this dimension is already controlled. So the next shape we have, like I said, I wanted to make one for my scissors. So I'm going to go ahead. I'm just gonna do a simple rectangle tool right here, press D on my keyboard, and then I already grabbed these dimensions earlier. So this one I know is going to be 30 millimeters, going to go ahead and put that in there. And then this one here is going to be 17 millimeters, which I did on pen and paper before. And again, you can just kinda measure your own or set it however you want. So now that we have our rectangle made, again, what I could do is I could dimension this rectangle from the top or from the sides and put it wherever I want. Or I can simply just click on it. Oops, we have to be outside of our dimension tool, so just press Escape. So what happened there is I had D, which is our dimension tool set. But if I just press Escape now it's just our pointer tool. I can click on it and I can actually just move it around wherever I want. And since it doesn't really matter for this, I'm just gonna put it here for now. Next one that I had is I wanted one for the exact dough knife. So again, that's going to be a rectangle and I already have the dimensions for that. So I'm going to go ahead and press D on my keyboard, set this up. I know that this one's 35 millimeters. And press Enter. There. There we go. We can see how big that one is. So the next one here is 20 millimeters. And again, this is just for the exacto knife. So this one is now complete with the dimensions. Again, Escape on my keyboard and now clicking on one of the sides, I can move it around. So I'm just going to set it right here. That looks fine to me. And then finally the last one is a one from my caliper. So again, I'm just going to go there D on my keyboard and we can go ahead and set this. Let's just go 10 millimeters. And then we need this dimension here, which I'm going to go 20. We are all set, so we have three here. We have the holes that are going to be there for our pens. We then have this part right here which we made for a scissors, this part for our exact dough knife, and this part down here for our calipers. Now, there's a few other tools that we're going to use or go over it in a future video on how to make things parallel, perpendicular and their relationships to each other. That's essentially using the constraints up here. But I think we've done enough content in this material. So there I just pressed a that brought up appearance. We don't want that, so I'm just going to press escape. But what do we wanna do is be able to kinda just move these around. And I'm just going to make these look pretty good for our print. Again, like I mentioned, we'll go over more specifics in the next class on how to and make things parallel and perpendicular and using the constraints. So this looks good to me. I'm gonna go ahead and press Finish Sketch. And now what we can see is we have our individual components here. So the next thing to do is to cut these out. Now we could have gone ahead and added fillets to these rectangles here as well. But I think they're actually going to be fine without because they are on the inside of our object. And again, we're just putting pens and scissors and stuff inside here. So I'm not going to add anything too fancy right now. Let's just go ahead and let's cut these out. So what we do, we click on one of them and then pressing Shift on your keyboard. We can go ahead and we can select all of the shapes that we just made. And boom, boom, boom, we now have them all selected. So again, we can now click on Extrude and don't worry, I know what you're thinking. We don't want them to come up, but actually what we can do is cut them out so you can see our direction right here is set to up. So we could indeed make these sketches extrude up. Or what we can do is we can actually extrude them down into cutouts. And now again, similar to what we did for the extrusion. Now what we have is just a negative distance and you'll see the operation automatically changes to cuts, which is exactly what we want. And now the distance of our cutouts, let's just say I want mine to be probably around 60 or 70 millimeters, so it's set to negative 55 right now, I'm going to make mine negative 65. And let's see how that looks. You can see that we have the 3D view of exactly how deep that goes. And I actually think that's a little bit too much. So I'm going to go negative 60. And for me right there, that looks perfect. So we now have our pencil holder. This looks good. I'm going to go ahead and save this and send it to the printer. The only other thing I want to mention is that the other way we do fill it is after the sketches done. So for example, what I could do is click on these sides right here. Again, I'm just clicking and shift on my keyboard as well as clicking and selecting the sides of our rectangle here. Let's do this one, and let's do this one as well, just so that I can show you the fill and option. And then by doing this, what I'll be able to do is compare the print of the fillets with the one that doesn't have a fill it. So what we can do, go ahead up here. This option right here is to again add a fill it. Now, now this filter here we can see is being applied to our actual 3D objects. So let me show you what this looks like. A two millimeter. I just pressed the wrong key there. A two millimeter. Fill it. There you go. You can go ahead and you can see that we now have a fill it on the edge of our objects. So I'm gonna go ahead and leave that one on there so that we can see it. This is just called a rolling ball fill it. Don't worry, we'll be going over Hall of that in another, a future class. But nonetheless, we now have our pencil holder. We have a fill it on the outside of these two. No, fill it on this one. We have our circles and everything is set. I'm going to go ahead and send this to the printer and I'll look forward to seeing what you guys came up with and I hope that you guys post those below. So I'll show you the point when this is done and I'll see you guys in the next lesson. 14. Fillets are REALLY IMPORTANT !: All right, In this lesson we're talking about what fillets are used for in the real-world now what we know right now is how to design fillets in Fusion 360. But what we want to know is, why are we designing fillets now, trust me, I took an entire engineering course on fillets. Well, the course was actually on reducing stress concentrations, but in order to do that we use fill. It's, let me explain. So here's just two boxes. Let's pretend that these are two walls of an object. And if they're just connected like this at 90 degrees, if we go and we apply opposing forces to these, the connection between them is just not very strong. So Here's a real-world example of that. Let's take this toolbox. I'll give you a close up view. But anywhere on this toolbox where there's two 90 degree phase is attach, There's also fill. It's the reason for this is to reduce stress concentrations and it also serves as it looks better aesthetically for the end user. Here's a couple other quick examples. So here's the Apple Watch, which is pretty much the pinnacle of engineering or hardware engineering. And we'll see that there is Phil, It's all over this thing. Next up we have a calculator, basic calculator, but you'll notice again, fill it's all over it now. Again, they serve two purposes. Number 1 is it reduces stress concentration. So for example, if I was to drop this calculator and it had no fillets, all of those 90 degree angles would have a large amount of stress applied to them. However, with the fillets, it basically versus the stress around the corner. Now, next up is that it actually feels better for the end user. Again, if this was just 90 degrees, it would almost be sharp to the touch, but with the fillets, it's more comfortable. So look around the room that you're in right now. And I bet you that you'll actually see some fillets. Again, once you start doing engineering design, everything you look at, you'll now be looking at it with a different perspective where you'll think, how could I make that in Fusion 360? And you'll see a lot of these items have fill it. So I hope that helps. I'll see you guys in the next class. 15. Lesson 2 - Summary and 3D Print : Alright, and we are back, check this out. Our print is done. A printed really, really well. I'll include a time-lapse video of it and hopefully you can see that. Yeah, that looks pretty good. I'll include some close-up shots of the print as well. So I use the multi-color filament there. I always just love using that for time-lapse videos. And like I mentioned, I'll show you how I actually set up those time-lapse videos and if future class in case that's something you're interested in, but back to the present. So I printed it at 0.3 layer height with just 10 percent infill. And I think it looks fantastic. But for the moment of truth, Let's actually see if everything fits the way we wanted it to. So starting out with the first one was the exact dough knife. Let's go ahead and bingo, it fits really nice. Then we have six pens. I'm just going to grab a handful from my drawer here and let's see. Perfect. Perfect. These are all going to fit even though they are different. Like I said, we made the tolerance just enough that it will accommodate basically any pen that you really could have. And I think that looks really clean. Next step was the calipers. Now remember for the calibers, what we did is we made the opening actually a little bit smaller and that way they wouldn't be moving around so much so bingo fits. And lastly, the scissors. Let's go ahead and hard pencil case is complete. Hopefully you can see that like I said, I'll include some close-ups. It looks really good. All of our measurements worked out. Now we are going to put our name on the next one. I didn't want to include too, too much in this class just in case things got carried away. But yeah, so in the next one will also be going over adding text to our 3D printed objects. And lastly, let's check out those fillets. Again, I'll include a close-up camera shy here so you can see actually what I'm talking about, but we can see the top fillets here are rounded. We can see these rounded corners just like that toolbox that I had and then I showed you earlier so our fillets are looking really good. And then lastly is those top fill. It's all include a close-up camera shot, but we can see this one has a fill it, this one has a fill it and this one does not. However, like I mentioned, since these edges are on the inside of our object and it's just being used to hold things. I think we're fine without, but I did just want you guys to see that. So that's it for this class. I hope you enjoyed it and please let me know what you think and I'll see you guys in the next class. Bye for now. 16. Class 3 Intro: Hey, what's up, guys, welcome to class number 3 of our Fusion 360 course. Before we go any further, you'll probably notice that background and everything is different. Well, we are indeed back in the studio. It is 2021 and with the pandemic going on, we were working from home for a while, but nonetheless, we're back. And now you can see that there is some printers around us. There are some filament, there's lots of stuff going on. And I do apologize because with the microphone right here, it is probably going to pick up a little bit of sound from the rays protein machinery here I'll show you some clips of what that sprinting as well because it's kinda neat. But nonetheless, for the future lessons, I'll make sure that this machine is off when we are recording, but let's just jump right into it. So today's lesson, we're printing the combination wrench here. We're going to learn how to design this and print it. And what's kinda fun is that we're going to learn also how to put someone's name on it or your name on it if you want. I'll show you some close-ups of this one, but it does indeed have my name on it. So this is a really cool project. This is probably one of, if not my favorite lessons in Fusion 360 because this is actually how I got started with design. I remember way back like designing a wrench is a very classic lesson in CAD design courses. And I remember this is one of the first ones that I did as well. Once you know all of the skills required to actually design a wrench, you can really start designing a lot of things. So as usual, what we're gonna do is I'm going to show you the skills first on pen and paper, and then we'll actually jump into Fusion 360, design our own. And then I'll go ahead and show you the time-lapse video of the print talk a little bit about it. And yeah, that's it for this lesson. So let's jump right into it. I'll see you guys in the lesson. 17. Class 3 Tools on Paper: Okay, So as I mentioned at the beginning, one of the things that I personally like to do is to always have kind of a notebook or a journal of all the functions that I use in whether it be Fusion 360 or Solid Works or really any software. And that way whenever you're stuck, you can just quickly flip to your own kind of how to guide. It just helps save time in the long run. If you don't want the pen and pencil explanation of these functions, just go ahead and skip this video, jump into the excellent Marie actually do it on Fusion 360. But what I'm gonna do right now is just cover the three main or most commonly used functions that we're going to be using when we make the wrench, because these three functions are going to be used pretty much in every design from here on out. Let's just get them down on pen and paper so that we have a good understanding of it. So let's go over that right now. All right, so in this lesson we're going to go over and learn a few new tools. But there is indeed three in particular that I really want to emphasize, one of which is angle. Now it sounds pretty simple, but let's just go over it because not only will we use it in this lesson, but also probably every future lesson. So let's say that we're in Fusion 360 and let's just say that we draw a line from right here to right here. And let's call this line number one. Let's say that we set the dimension or the length of line number one. Let's say that we set it to 15 millimeters. So now we have line number 1, which is fully defined. So after that, what we do is we click on this spot right here. And let's say that we bring up another line to this spot right here. And so now we have two lines in Fusion 360. But in reality what we have is we have one fully defined line and one line that isn't actually defined at all. And when I mean not defined at all, I mean it's position is not defined and also the length of this is not defined until we actually go in and define those. So what we know already is that we could use our dimension tool and we can go ahead and let's say that we made this 20 millimeters. So what we have is the length of line number two will be defined, but the position of line number 2 will not be defined. And how we define that is we use our dimension tool. What we'll do is we'll click on line number 1, then we'll click on line number two. And that will bring up a place where we can put in the angle. And let's say that we set this to 60 degrees in Fusion 360. You'll see it when we jump in there. But nonetheless, doing that well, therefore, define line number 2 completely because we will have its position defined as well as its length defined so that there is angle. Let's just quickly jump into the next one. And the next one is constraints. Constraints are used when we create sketches. And what this is doing is basically just telling Fusion 360 that hey, we have, let's say a line a, and let's just draw a line a. So here we go. Let's call this line a. And let's say that line a is straight up and down. And then let's say that we draw line B. Now. You can tell right now that line B ray here is not at 90 degrees. So let's just say that line a is indeed at 90 degrees from the horizontal, so it is straight up and down the line number, line B, we can tell that line B isn't actually at 90 degrees. And I've emphasized that here. However, in software, what might happen is you might draw line, line be at say, 89 degrees or maybe 92 degrees. So to the visual eye, you can't actually tell that line B is off, but it isn't actually at 90 degrees. So it's always important that we actually constrain our lines so that we know indeed this is a perfectly geometrically oriented lines. So how we do that is we'll just simply click on line number a. And then what we're gonna do is we're going to use the parallel constraint. And in Fusion 360, it's actually a symbol that looks like this. But what we do is click a, click on the parallel constraint and then click on B. And what that will do is it will actually take B and it will therefore match b to the same angle is a, which would be 90 degrees, making them both parallel. So this would be our new line, be that indeed is our parallel constraint. Now there is other constraints such as the perpendicular constraint. The diagram for that in Fusion 360 looks like this. And the other one that we use often is the equal constraint, which is again just a simple equal sign. Perpendicular is pretty straightforward. It just makes those lines perpendicular to each other. And equal is also pretty straightforward. What it does is it makes the length of those lines equal. So that is constraints using our sketch tools. You'll see that in just a minute. And last up, I just want to go over arc because Arc tools are used pretty often as well. So let's say that I had two lines. Let's just go like this. And let's call these lines a and line B again. Now what we're gonna do is let's say that we want to connect these and just kinda like brown this corner off if you will. But instead of actually drawing maybe like a perfect circle, what we can do is we can actually just use our arc tool and what we're going to use for this lesson. And what I usually use, my favorite is just the three-point arc. Now, when you see it, when you hear three-point arc, obviously what we're gonna have to do is define three actual points. So the way that this works is we'll go up, we'll click on three-point arc. I'll show you that in software. But then what we're gonna do is we're actually going to define the start and the end 0.1. And then what you'll see is we have a curve will show up. But once we have this curve, the woman need to understand is that this will still be undefined. The radius of this circle will be undefined. So what we actually do is we dimension this arc and that will set the radius of it. So let's just say that we clicked on dementia and clicked on this arc, and then we set it to something like five millimeters. We would therefore have a five millimeter, three-point arc where the five millimeters would indeed be the radius of the arc. And that is our arts will again, what this does is basically what the other option would have been to say draw a full circle and then use something like the trim tool. So if we had a full circle, it would look like this. And then we would actually go in with the trim tool and we cut out this line as we've done before. But instead we're just gonna go ahead and use the three-point arc. So that is it for this, let's actually jump into Fusion 360 and get the job done. And I'll see you in the next lesson. 18. Class 3 Designing Our Wrench: All right you guys and welcome to this fusion 360 tutorial. Now in this one, we are indeed designing the wrench, like I mentioned before, probably one of, if not my favorite projects. So let's just jump right into it as usual, open up your Fusion 360. You will have R project file open here. And let's start with create a sketch. Now, when it comes to creating a sketch, we should be a little bit familiar with this by now we have our different planes that we can choose from. So go ahead and choose one of those. Now, after we have our plane selected, let's go ahead and create a line. Make sure that we've just started at the center point and click, well, you can click pretty much anywhere. I'm just going to set mine to 140, but we will create dimensions for this later. And then as usual, press escape to get out of that tool. Now the next shape that we're going to create for our sketch is actually an ellipse tool. If you're not familiar with an ellipse, It's basically just a circle that has two axis options on it and you can define those. So let's go ahead and just set one of them here. And we can set the other one here as usual, we will define these later. And again, let's press Escape on our keyboard. But now we can see this ellipse is completely undefined. We can rotate it, we can change the axis values. And so now what we have is our line and our ellipse. All right, Now that our ellipse is indeed made, what we have to do is define it. So we want to define position as well as its dimensions. So let's go ahead. Let's use our dimension tool. Either click D on your keyboard or as usual, you can just click up here and you can see that there is the two axis's or axes, whatever it is for the ellipse. So let's go ahead and let's make this one here, say 55 millimeters. And let's go ahead and let's dimension this one here, let's say 50 millimeters. And those two are done. Now the other thing that we need to do is to define the position. So that is basically what we're gonna do is define it as an angle. If you watched the previous video with the pen and paper, you'll know kinda what we're doing here. But if not, that's okay. All we're doing is defining the angle. So using our dimension tool, let's click on our center line, as well as this kind of almost all horizontal line on our lips. And then you'll see that this actually gives us the option to define the angle here. Let's go ahead and let's just set this to say 17 degrees. And now what we have is our ellipse is fully defined. And you can see that if I get out of the dimension tool, I'll no longer be able to rotate it or move it around at all. So our ellipse right now is defined. Ok, So at this point what we wanna do is start basically adding in some details to our lives. So as I zoomed out here, you can see on the left-hand side, we're basically going to have our ellipse. And this is going to have that kind of U-shaped cut out that all wrenches have. And that is a part that you actually put onto the nut or bolt. Whereas on the right-hand side is going to be a circle and that's just going to be the back-end of the wrench. So let's go ahead and let's start adding in these details. The first thing that we're gonna do is we're going to add a line and you'll see that the x shows up here. Let's just make sure that that line is indeed touching the outside of the ellipse. And then the actual angle and length of this line don't matter because we are going to fully define those in just a second. So once you have that down, again, Escape on the keyboard. And now we can see that this line is free to kinda just move around because it is not dimensional eyes. So let's add those in right now. The first thing that we should do is press D on your keyboard. Let's go ahead. Let's add in a dimension for this line. I'm gonna go ahead and I'm gonna make this 20 millimeters. That looks pretty good there. And then now what we wanna do is we want to actually fix the angle of this line. And how we're going to do that is we're going to use the constraints tool. Now if you watched the previous video, which was the pen and paper diagram of constraints, that's great. You'll know exactly what we're talking about. If not no worries at all, it is pretty simple, but let me just show you so. What we want is we want this line here to be parallel to the center line of the ellipse here. And the thing about this is it even kind of looks parallel right now, but it's not perfect now, we make our designs, we need them to be 100% perfect. Meaning if something is supposed to be 90 degrees, it needs to actually be 90 degrees in software. It can't be 89 or 91, it needs to be perfect. And that's what we use constraints for, is just to make sure that everything is mathematically perfect. And that also helps us in 3D printing because, for example, when your printer moves at 90 degrees, Let's take, for example, the extreme your axis of your printer. It moves very easy at 90 degrees, but if it has to move at, let's say 89 degrees, well now you have two axis movement along a line. So again, let's just try and make everything perfect. So here we go. Let's click on the center line here of our ellipse. And then under constraints, Let's go ahead and click on parallel and click on that line and you'll see we get the little logo here that shows it is indeed parallel. That's awesome. So let's go ahead. Let's add in a line on this side again angle. And none of that stuff matters because we do fully constrain our lines and add the dimensions. So let's go ahead and let's do that for this one at the bottom right now. So D on my keyboard, I'm gonna go ahead and add in this dimension here, 20 millimeters just like that. And once again, I'm going to click here constraint and parallel. Click this one and now that one is also parallel. Now the next thing they don't want to do is actually make sure that these are kind of symmetric. So I'm going to define the distance between this center line and this line, as well as the distance between the center line and this line. So again, D on my keyboard and click on that central line. And then right here, Let's go ahead and let's just make this I don't know. Let's say 12.5 millimeters. And let's go ahead and let's do it to this one as well. Right up here, 12.5 millimeters. Now, this is looking pretty good. We can see it is indeed symmetric. Everything is fully defined. The lines here are black. You'll see we can't move them around. So the next thing that we wanna do is add on this arc or this U-shape. Now again, if you watched the previous lesson, you would have seen it. We did the three-point arc tool, if not, no worries, but let's go ahead and let's add that in right now. So under Arc, we'd go three-point arc and then we click on the first two points to define them. And then you'll see that we have this free moving arc. So let's just say that looks good right there. But again, it doesn't matter because you'll see it is in blue, but no worries because we are going to define that as well. So again, let's go D on our keyboard, Let's click on that arc and then we'll see this one says it's at 16.159 are now what does it look like at say, 13 millimeters. So let's see what that does. That looks pretty good to me. Let's just leave that at 13. So now we do indeed have this U-shape arc. Now you could go here and you can trim entities and get rid of this line as well, but it doesn't really matter and I'll show you what I mean in just a second. So we are indeed getting there. All right, so now that we have the left-hand side of our wrench pretty much fully defined. What we're going to start doing is working on the right-hand side of our wrench. So first thing they don't want to do D on my keyboard, I'm going to set, oh, that's the wrong thing. There we go, D on my keyboard and I'm going to set a dimension for this kind of central line that we've been using. I'm gonna go ahead and I'm gonna make that 220 millimeters. The reason I'm making this 220 is just because I know that I'm going to print this on a Prusa printer and I want it to be big enough that I can do a time-lapse for you guys so that you can actually see the physical model that I do make. Now if you wanted to, you could go look up the metric, exact standard dimensions of a wrench. But nonetheless, this is perfectly good for us. So here we go. Let's go ahead and let's make a circle on this side. And here we go. We've done this many times, but again, once we set the circle, we know that once again it's not fully defined. So let's go ahead Dee on our keyboard, and let's set this dimension here. Now this is 50 by 50, five, I believe it was, let's say 33 millimeters for this one. And that there looks, yeah, that looks good right there. So next thing that we wanna do is actually what a wrench, this side of a wrenches actually going to be two polygons. So let's go ahead and create polygon for the first one. Let's go ahead and let's do an inscribed polygon. Let's start this right here, and we go set that D on our keyboard and then we can set the dimensions right here. So let's go ahead with these two. Let's go 25 millimeters for our first polygon. And then we're going to go up again. We're going to go create polygon. And now what we're gonna do is we're actually going to use a circumscribed polygon. We can click on this, Let's bring it up. So we can see that by doing that, we just have two perpendicular polygons. Now you could have done this in a variety of different ways using whatever polygon you wanted to. But nonetheless, this just set some perpendicular. You'll use this in a few other tools or basic design aspects. But like I said, any polygon tool that you use, all we want is to polygons that have six sides each and that are indeed perpendicular to each other. So let's just set this one here. And then again D, I'm going to set the dimensions of this. This needs to be the exact same as the other one. So 25 millimeters and there we do have it. Now at this point what we can see is that we have these two polygons, so Escape on my keyboard, but you can see all of the different and the different areas or features of them. So now what we're gonna do is we're actually going to use our trim tool. And we're going to go ahead and we're going to click away the sort of internal features here so that we just get left with one single shape. So I'm just going to click away these and you'll see that as I do this, we have all of the constraints basically show up. We have all of the constraint symbols around here that are showing. If you do want to get rid of those, you can actually go into the sketch palette here and you can go to show constraints and we can get rid of those just so we can make sure that we get every single line. And it looks like we indeed did. So that looks really good, right there. There is a few other pieces that we still need to add. The first of which is that kinda main part of our wrench here. So I'm gonna go up, use my line tool. Again. I'm just going to connect both of the circles. I mean, I mean, I know that one of them is an ellipse and the other one is a circle. But what we're gonna do is we're going to just connect these like that. And then D on my keyboard. Dimension. Here we go. Let's create this distance here, and let's set that to 10 millimeters. Let's go ahead and let's do that on the opposite side as well. And we could also use the mirror function, but honestly I just kind of prefer to do it this way. So here we go D on our keyboard, and now there we go. We can set this to 10 millimeters as well. And now we can see that we actually have what looks like a wrench. It looks really, really good to be honest. So now what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna go Escape on my keyboard. And what I'm gonna do is I'm actually going to right-click on this center line. And right now it's a solid line that can be used for actually making solid shapes. You can see that it does indeed split the top from the bottom. If we right-click on this line and we actually go down to the bottom, we can change it into what's called a normal center line. And basically what this does is it just now it's just a reference line basically. So that's what we're gonna do at this point. And let's keep going because our wrenches looking really good. So at this point our sketch is pretty much complete. Now what we wanna do is make this into a 3D objects. And let's go ahead and let's actually start extruding this. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to click Finish Sketch. And then now you can see that we have the different features here. So because let's just kinda show you this is in 2D, so it looks kinda funny like this, but we're gonna make this 3D. So it is worth noting. What we're going to want to do is we're going to want them to take the very front and the back. And we're going to want to symmetrically extrude these first. And then we'll go and we'll do the middle because we do want That's sort of classic wrench shape where the middle part is thinner than the front and the back. If that's not making sense, just pull along because you'll see what I mean just a second. So what we can do is we can click on the individual components here holding shift on our keyboard, we can highlight them all. Let's zoom in here, click on this one. And now you can see that we have the front and the back selected, whereas this part here is going to be the cutoff. Now, if you remember earlier I said we could have just gone and use the trim tool and actually got rid of this in total. But because fusion 360 and most CAD programs work in this way where you can select the individual pieces of your 3D objects. So let's go ahead and let's go over our extrude options for these now, as I mentioned, what we're going to want to do is we're actually going to want to symmetrically extrude these. And what that's gonna do is it's going to basically extruded. If you're looking at this on your computer, it's going to extrude it coming out at you as well as going into the computer screen. And if that doesn't make sense, I'll show you what I mean just a second. So here we go. So direction symmetric, and now let's just give this a value. So right here, let's say what would be a good extrusion? Let's say 14 millimeters. And now here we go, 14 millimeters and now we can see that we have kind of our wrench and that is looking really good. But you'll notice it looks like very thick, like it's definitely too big of an extrusion. And that's because if we go to the measurement side here, we can see that our whole length, the length is the length that we said they're the 14 millimeters. If we have whole selected, it will be 14 millimeters in total, the extrusion. So therefore it would be seven millimeters going backwards as well as 70 millimeters going forward. But if we click on this one right here, what it does is it basically does 14 millimeters in both ways. So let's go ahead and let's leave this at the whole length to 14 millimeters. The operation here, new body because there's nothing. That's already been extruded. So let's go ahead and let's just press. Okay. And now you can see that we have the front and the back of our wrench. So now what we need to do is we need to do the middle section. But you might be wondering, Hey, where did our, the middle section of our wrench go? If we go down into sketches, sketch one, click on this here and now it is indeed back. So let's go ahead and let's create that extrusion for the middle portion of our wrench. So we're going to click here, shift on our keyboard, click here, and now they're both highlighted again, extrude. So directions symmetric. We're going to want to make it the whole length. And let's make this one 10 millimeters, which is going to be just less than the 40 millimeter one before. And you can see there is indeed just a little bit of space on both sides and that just looks really good. It adds, it's aesthetically pleasing and also it will use less material. So let's go ahead and let's make sure that we have join, which is going to just join it all into one piece. And there we go, press. Okay, and now you can see that our wrench is really starting to take form. Now, let's get rid of the sketch by pressing the little icon here. And now, Yeah, there we go. That looks really nice. So what I wanna do is up here in the top right hand corner, and you can see that there is this, you know, it's a cube that gives us the orientation. Let's go ahead and let's set this to write or whatever it is for you that you're looking right onto your wrench or wrenches just about complete, but there is a couple of finishing touches that I do want to add. One of which is putting our name on it. Any other is what's called an offset. So if we go and we click on this face here and we click on create a sketch. You'll now see that up in our tool section there is actually what's called an offset tool. What we're gonna do is we're going to click on that and then we're going to click on the part that I have highlighted right here. And then you'll see that that brings up our offset panel. Now, you can do a positive or a negative value for the offset. Typically what I usually do is indeed a negative value. What this does is it basically just shrinks the outline of what we have selected. So let me show you by going negative three millimeters press Okay, and you'll see that we now have this new sketch, which is indeed just an offset of the outer portion that we had selected before. So from that I can go ahead, I can go Finish Sketch and then we can click on this extrude. And let's go ahead and let's actually do a little cut. Let's just do a two millimeter cut. And that should look really good there. So there we go two millimeters and not join. What we wanna do is we want to actually cut out. There we go, it needs a negative. So here we go, negative two millimeters. Now it's a cut and that will work there. So now you can see that we have just this nice little kinda detail or feature right here so that there is looking pretty good. But before we add on the text, as you guys know, like I've said in previous lessons, fillets are extremely important. So let's go ahead and let's actually go and add in some fill it. So first ones, Let's start with kind of the big fillets. So I'm going to go press Fill it right here and you'll see that we have our selection tools so that one there is highlighted now there's a fill it right here as well. And the other main ones are this line and this line. So now we have our four biggest Phillips sections that we want selected. Let's go ahead and let's actually give it a fill it of say, 20 millimeters and let's see how that looks. And yeah, that looks pretty good right there. Those are generally bigger fillets and you usually use, but because it is a wrench that is just the shape of a wrench. So I'm gonna go ahead and press. Okay, and again, this is looking really good. Our wrench is certainly coming together. Now there is a few more fillets that I want to add in. And I can see right off the bat that I'm going to want to put fillets inside of the offset that we made. Now these are probably a little bit optional, like they're not actually going to maybe enhance the structural properties of the wrench that we're building. But it is just going to make it more aesthetically pleasing and maybe a little bit nicer to handle. So I'm gonna go ahead and click on one of those, press fill it and then I'm just going to make sure that I click on all four corners of it. One thing that I can note, fillets, I know that some people like doing this, I don't like doing it. So if I'm going to click this, fill it right here, I'd like to be able to actually see the line that I'm pressing, but Fusion 360 is pretty smart. And if you're in some weird orientation or if you have a super complicated part, you can actually kind of see it in 3D and you'll see there's the fill it as well. So you don't actually have to be looking at the fill it. You can press them through the part, but I don't recommend doing that. So nonetheless, here we go. Let's make these, say, let's set these fillets to maybe five millimeters and that should be good there. Let's see how that looks. Yeah, that looks really, really good. Our wrenches definitely taking shape. And the last fillets that I want to mention, these ones maybe kind of optional because it's going to be it's probably just give me a one millimeter fill it. But nonetheless, I do want to just fill it these kind of sharp edges right here. So I'm going to click on one of them. I'm gonna press Fill it ends now I just have to highlight all of them. And so I'll probably fast-forward this so that you don't have to watch it. All I'm doing is I'm just clicking on all of the edges within the circular section of our wrench. All right, and now that I have all those selected, I'm gonna go ahead and I'm just going to add in a one millimeter fill it actually doubt that he would even let me let's see, two millimeters, three? Yes, it does. Let me put them in but let's just go ahead with a one millimeter fill it. I think that is more than enough. But basically what we're doing is we're taking a really sharp edges off. And this would, if it was a real wrench, it would lower the concentration points of the stress. For example, if we just had that one really sharp edge and you put that around and saturable, you turned it, you might break off or chip a small piece. So we just add in these fillets here. And there we go. That is looking really good. The last thing that I want to do, and probably my favorite is indeed the finishing touches and that is adding our name onto the wrench. So we're just about done. Let's add in my favorite feature, which is indeed the text feature. Let's put our name on this wrench because we've worked hard to get this far. So let's go ahead and let's add this feature in with 3D printing. This is an awesome, awesome feature. One of the major advantages of 3D printing is the ability to add in or remove or just make those modular changes, those customizations. And that's exactly what we're gonna do. So let's go ahead and let's click on that kind of internal face of the wrench that we created from that offset feature. From there, let's go create. Well, just click on the Create Sketch button. And then what we're gonna do is under the Create panel here we have the option for Sketch, so go ahead and press on that and then it'll bring this up. So you'll see that there's two different types of texts. Text option number one is just a free text where basically you'll write out the text and then you have to position it in 3D space. The other one is text on path. Now, I pretty much always use text on path. And what this does is it takes a reference, so you'll see path here. What we can do is we can assign a reference. So now you can see that our sample text is along the bottom reference line here that I had selected. This is definitely how I recommend doing it. And the reason is mostly for this alignment. So you'll see by clicks Enter it puts it in the center of this line, or on the right, there on the left. And that they're just makes it a lot better because the computer does all the math and it puts it in the middle versus trying to free hand place this text in the middle. So let's go ahead. Let's put, you know, just put your name on it or I'm going to put my name on it. And then what we can do is we can select the height. Let's just say 12 millimeters. Do you want to change the font? You can do that as well. You can change the spacing. You can do all kinds of things within the text panel, but that there looks pretty good to me now my name is indeed on this wrench. I'm gonna go ahead and press Finish Sketch. And now as usual, what we can do is we can actually click on it. We can extrude it, and now we can create this and make our name that is basically physically on our wrench. So let's go ahead and let's just set this to something like two millimeters should be fine. And it looks pretty good right there now the operation obviously we want to join it with the other, you know what, the base of our wrench. So go ahead and press Okay there and you'll see now we have My name is indeed on this wrench and hopefully your name is on this ranch or maybe someone else's name and you can use it as a fun little giveaway or a gift. But nonetheless, I hope, I hope you guys enjoyed this lesson and this is probably one of my favorites because all of our skills are starting to build up and come together. So that is indeed it for this. And I'll see you guys in the next lesson. Please do remember to either post like a picture of your wrench below or the file or something just so that everyone from the class can indeed see it. So I'll see you guys in the next lesson. 19. Class 3 Summary: All right, So our wrench is indeed done. Now I did go ahead and print this in a marble base PLA filament. So when I show you the close up and just 1 second, you will indeed see the pleasing aesthetic of it. I do love printing things in either glitter black or marble base PLA filament whenever it's just something that's mostly for aesthetics, it looks fantastic. Now, couple of things that I do want to mention, and the first of which is that the offset that we put for the wrench. It just, it looks fantastic. I use it in lots and lots of design. So being familiar with the offset feature and then creating whether it be an extrusion or it cuts. You'll see the detail of that in a second and it looks fantastic now, you can also even see down to every last detail, even the small fillets in the circular part of the wrench here. You can see them all and it looks really good now we did go ahead and use symmetric extrusion. And when we did that, we didn't actually extrude it all the way down to the base plane. So when we printed this, I did indeed have to use supports. Now for me, I don't personally mine using supports and whenever I use supports, I often put the offset distance between the support and the model to 0.2 millimeters. That way they come off really easy and it still looks pretty clean. So here we have our wrench nephew did want to print it without supports. You could simply just extrude it all the way down to the base and then you have to use any supports for your wrench. So here's some close-ups and anyways, I hope you enjoyed this lesson. I'll see you guys in the next one. We learned a lot of really useful tools from here. And I bet right now, you're already thinking like, Hey, do I even need this guy anymore? But trust me, there's lots of really good information coming up. So I'll see you guys in the next lesson. 20. Class 4 Introduction: Hey guys, welcome to class number 4. This is another one of my absolute favorite classes because today we're actually jumping into more solid features and we're going to be doing all kinds of cool stuff with the sketches and schedule. So let me just show you one of the things that we're making today. We're actually going to make three items today, all of which are flower pots or vases or vases, whatever you call them. But yes, so how are we going to be doing? This is in three different ways. The first of which is using what's called a loft. Now, you don't have to write this down because you will see it again in the next video. But basically what a loft is is we're taking two sketches. They will be separated from each other and then we loved them together. So for example, if we had a small circle on the bottom, just like the base of this, we had a small circle here. Maybe we had a larger circle halfway up. And then again we had a smaller circle at the top. We can loft these together to make solid objects or solid bodies. And then the next feature that we're going to use is called a revolve. What a revolve is is we take a sketch and then we revolve it around to make a solid body. Now, usually we revolve it 360 degrees, but you can revolve it as much as you want. And again, you'll see that in the very next video. Lastly, we're using what's called form. Now the forum feature in Fusion 360 is a little bit more of an advanced feature, but I do want to jump in and just show you guys that now in case maybe you're playing around and he'd just want to dive into it and see what you can do and what you can create with that feature. So again, that's all three features. We're making three different phases or vases or flower pots, whatever you call them today. But go ahead, don't just copy the exact steps that I do in this video. Go ahead and make your sketches different so that your vases or vases or flower plots will look different than mine. So that's it. Let's jump right into it. 21. Class 4 Designing our Vase !: All righty guys and welcome back to yet another Fusion 360 tutorial. Today is a really fun one. Again, you're going to really see the power of Fusion 360 in this tutorial. What we're gonna do today is we're going to make three different phases or vases. However, her, however, you pronounce that word wherever you are, the thing that holds plants, that's what we're going to make today. So let's go ahead and let's just jump into the first one. You can see right away I'm going to go sketch and we're just going to click a plane. And let's go ahead and let's actually just make a circle on this plane. Now, for me, I'm going to make mine probably, let's say 50 millimeters because I do want to print these again so that you guys can see that. So there we go. We're going to go 50 millimeters. And now what we're gonna do is we're actually gonna go ahead and we're going to click on Finish Sketch. We're going to click on this sketch right here. You can see, there we go. We'll click on that sketch. Then we're gonna go construct, and now we're going to use an offset plane. Now, what an offset plane is, is, well, it is exactly what it sounds like is we're creating a new plane and this plane is going to be offset from our sketch there by whatever dimension we put in here. So what this does is it allows us to create a new sketch on this plane right here, instead of just the three standard planes that were used to. So you see, you can see our three standard planes right here. And what we're doing is we're actually creating a new one. And then we're just creating this plane offset from our original sketch. So I'm gonna go ahead and I'm gonna make this one. Let's say 50 seems a little bit small. I'm going to go with 80 millimeters for mine. And again, you guys can create yours however you want to because, you know, to take advantage and use it as a learning opportunity so you can make different shapes for this. Again, like I said, we're creating a vase, so do, do whatever you want. You have lots of freedom with this one. But what we're gonna do now is I'm gonna go ahead and I'm going to create another sketch. What we're doing is we're putting a bunch of sketches on top of each other at different distances apart. So let me just show you the plane. So now you can see it. This is what we're sketching on this plane right here. So again, I'm gonna go to the top view so that I can see it. And then what I'm gonna do is I'm going to actually go ahead and I'm just going to create another circle again. Go ahead and use a different shape or experiment around, do whatever you want, however you want your vase or vase to look. So there we go. You can see I now have another circle. And now yet again, I'm going to go ahead. I'm going to click on this circle and I'm going to go construct yet another offset plane. Now, this plane here, I'm going to just make it, let's say, again, this is all just an approximation. Nothing here actually needs to be exact. So you know, at 20 millimeters, looks good to me. I'm gonna go ahead. I'm going to press Okay, I'm going to hide the first plane, which was the one down here. Now you can see we still have Plane 2. I'm then going to click on plane two. I'm going to go ahead and create a sketch, and now let's just bring them back so you can indeed see this is what we're sketching on is the area above our last circle there. So let's go to the top just to center it. And now what we can do is let's actually just create another shape from the center. I'm going to do another circle and I'm going to make this one pretty small. Let's go this big. So there we go. Now I have yet another one. I'm going to repeat this process just one more time. Like I said, you can do this as many times as you want depending on whatever shape you want to make for your veins. So here we go. Click on this plane construct and then right away into offset plane. Now again, I'm just going to make this one, I'm going to put this on another 20 millimeters above, and that there looks good to me. Once again, I'm going to hide the plane below just so that you guys can see what we're doing. And this is the plane that I'm going to make my last sketch on. So here we go and sketch. I'm going to just do another circle and I'm gonna make this one maybe. That looks about good to me. So now that they are all different sizes, we can see now from the side view what we have is a bunch of circular sketches on top of one another. And now this is where things get pretty cool. So first thing that is worth noting is that feature that we were using there, which is construct and an offset plane will be using that quite a bit. And I will go through all these other options later. But for now, the main two ones are offset, plane and plane at an angle. So just remember that you will probably find that really useful throughout your design process. But nonetheless, jumping into our kinda main cool feature today, which is a solid feature. So under solids we're going to go Create, and now we're actually going to create a loft. So you can kinda see from the picture there in the description, what this does is it really just connects two profiles together. So we're going to select that bottom one. And then here we go. Now you can see that is pretty neat as is. But furthermore, what we can do is we can actually click another one and yet another one. And you can see that we have now created what looks like a vase or a vase or whatever you wanna call it. Now, like I mentioned, make yours with whatever shapes you want and whatever dimensions you want. But nonetheless, I'm gonna go ahead, I'm going to press OK. And you can now see that we have this solid body that yeah, I mean, it looks pretty cool. Looks like something you would see in a pottery shop or something like that. But now you might be wondering, well there, it's just a big solid feature right now. So we actually have to hello this out so that we could indeed put some plants in, some water in there. And how we're gonna do that. This is the next thing. The next big kind of function that you're going to learn today is that what we're gonna do is we're going to go up here. We're going to click on the top. You can also click on the bottom. But the reason that we click on the top is because when we use this feature, it's going to eliminate the surface that we originally click on. So for example, if I clicked on the bottom and we did this, it would then eliminate the bottom and our bot would have a big hole in the bottom. So let's go ahead and let's start with the top because this is where we want there to be that opening. So from there we're going to press shell. And then now what we can do is we can see the inside, outside or both thickness. For now, let's just go with the inside thickness. And what this is is the actual thickness of our vase or our pots or whatever you wanna call it. Let's go ahead and let's just make this two millimeters for now. And there we go. You can see It's a little bit hard to see as it is. If I go to Inspect, I can show you guys a side view of this. Let's just go to sectional analysis and let me show you. You can see that we have indeed hollowed it out. And now this distance right here is two millimeters so that there is our very first VAs. And yeah, it looks pretty good. Like I said, the features that we use here or we used the offset plane. Let's go ahead, let's go through them quick. So we used offset plane. And then after that we went into Create. We use the solid feature of loft. And then what we did is we just connected all of the different circles and then we went and we actually shelled it out, making it a hollow vein is the one thing I will know. If you too my name and you use the inspect sectional analysis, sometimes you do have to actually get out of it. And there we go. We can see this here is our very first one and that one is done. So let's, let's go ahead and let's actually make another one. So I'm just gonna go and I'm going to jump right into that right now. So let's go ahead and the next one that we're going to make is done actually using what's called the revolve feature. So let me show you what I mean. The first thing I'm gonna do, I'm gonna select a plane. And now this step is going to be maybe a little bit different than what we're used to, but let's go ahead and let's create a line. The first one that I'm going to do is basically what this is going to be as the distance from the top to the bottom of our vase. So I'm gonna go ahead. I know that I want to print this on the Prusa for you guys. So I'm gonna make this 150 millimeters long at 90 degrees. That's perfect right there. And then what I'm gonna do is right off the bat, I'm actually going to turn this into a normal or construction line. This is kind of optional, but I do really like doing this. And now what we're gonna do is we're actually going to essentially sketch the outline of our vase. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna go back to the other one and I'm gonna just show you what I mean. So if I click back and then let me go to create a sketch just so that you can see. I'm going to make a line. Let's just say that this line that I'm making right here, Let's say that this line right here is this line that we've made. What we're doing is we are sketching the outer profile of the vase. And then what we're gonna do is we're going to revolve it around this center line right here to make the solid structure. So let me show you what I mean again, this is pretty much what we would be sketching is this area right here. Now I know if this is your first time doing it, it seems a little bit confusing. So nonetheless, maybe watched through once and then, and then go ahead and do it yourself. So what I'm gonna do, let's go ahead. Let's just make the top there like that. So again, let me just show you quickly that would be this top line right here, and we are just making the half profile for it. So here we go. Let's make the top and then let's go to creates articles to our three-point arc. We should be a little bit familiar with that right now. And then what we're gonna do is we're gonna make kinda this part of it right here. Now again, I'm not actually making this with exact dimensions. I'm just making the shape of it. So let's say that we want it, something, maybe like this, and I think that looks pretty good right there. So we had the first little bit of our vase made. Now, the next thing that I'm going to do, again, this is kind of optional, but I just like to keep things clean. I'm gonna make another construction line right here because I know that this is going to be the base of my vase. So again, right-click, I'm just going to go normal construction. And so now what? I can tell us that we need a big kind of archiving feature to go to connect with this line and this one up here. So again, I'm gonna go to Create and I'm gonna go arc, three-point arc. And let's just go ahead and yeah, we can just put it right here for now. Again, we can move this line as we go because it's not locked in. So I think let's say we want it to be, Let's make this one kind of a smaller one. Let's make it right here. And again, you could dimensionless radius and change the arc as much as you want. But I think that looks pretty good right there. So I'm gonna go ahead. I'm going to connect it up right here and then I'm actually going to connect the top and the bottom. And so you can see that we kind of have our side profile of our vase from the very first example. Just this one obviously looks a little bit different. So now, now that we have this sketched on, this is kind of where the cool part comes in is I'm going to click on this sketch and I'm going to go, oh, sorry, finished sketch. I'm going to click on the Sketch and then I'm going to go Create. And now we are using the revolve feature. And right, once I click this line, you'll see exactly what it does. There we go. If I go up, you can see it actually revolve the entire thing 360 degrees. So over here we have our options. Obviously, we have the angle we can choose to or full. We'll be going over those in a future video. But for now, and usually at what this is used for is full 360 degree, 360 degree revolutions of a sketch. So this right here looks pretty good. I'm going to leave it as new body and I'm going to press, okay, we can go ahead up here as normal, press the shell command and let's also make this 12 millimeters. And you can see that we now have our second vase or VA has made, and that looks pretty good to me. The one thing that I will know is if you ever run into troubles with the shell feature, let me just show you in a new example here. So let's just say that I made a square and you, and you may never run into this, but if you do, it's good to be ready for it. So let's go ahead and I'm just going to extrude this square up. And there we go. So let's say that I wanted to share this out. So what I'm gonna do is I'm just going to show you kind of what might happen. So we can see that this square is all just one solid body. And if I shall this out, there's no option to really select a top like the open part of this. So if I selected this and I shall it out by one millimeter, well, now we have a hollow square, but there is no There's no lid, There's no place to actually like if this was a pot you and be able to put the flowers in this way. And so if this ever happens to you, what you can do is you can actually like let me show you suspect. And then again, I can go to the section analysis. We can go ahead and we can just click on here and then you'll see. So now we have it's completely hollowed out there, but there's no hole anywhere that you would put the flowers. And if this does happen, you one thing that you can do, you can actually just create a sketch on top of the item. So here we go, sketch. And again, I could quickly actually just cut off the lid. So just like this, I would then be able to select this one extrude. And then we could just say negative two millimeters. And now you would have basically the lid removed. So let me show you that example on here. If this thing was upside down and let's say that this was the top of our vase and I was unable to hollowed out with this section here being gone. What we would do is we would just click on here. We will go sketch. Then we would create basically any sketch a covers the entire top surface here. We will go Finish Sketch, then we'll click this one. We would extrude it negative two millimeters, and now you would see that it would be completely hollowed out. So that does, that is just something that you'll run into if you do enough of this basically. But nonetheless, we have our second phase. I'm gonna go ahead and just do a Control Z and make sure that we have are our bottom on this one because I will indeed be 3D printing this one. So r. Now let's move on to the third method for making a vase. Now this one is a little bit more complicated. This is more of an advanced feature within Fusion 360. We will be using it fairly often, but in future videos. So the first thing, the first step is to do it just like normal. So we're going to go ahead and we're going to create our circle. Let's go ahead and make this one 50 millimeters. And there we go. So we have our 50 millimeter circle, just like normal, but now is when things are going to change a little bit. So you can see up here, we have the create form option. This is a whole new panel that we haven't really been into yet. And let me show you the difference right here. If I go under the Create menu, I'm going to go ahead and extrude. And you'll see that now we are extruding the sketch and not the full circle. So now we're just working with a shape. So you can see here it already extruded at 120 millimeters because that's just the previous entry that I had in there. But just like always, we can control the height with this. So let's go ahead and let's just make it maybe 110 millimeters. And that looks pretty good to me. But you can see that the shape is kinda separated by these vertical lines. This is again, just different points on the shape that we can control and maneuver and kinda move within free space, which I'll be showing you in just a second. But what we want is we want some horizontal lines because this is indeed a vase or a vase. So let's go ahead and under front faces, I'm just going to add a couple of these n. Well, I had quite a few and that looks pretty good to me. So from there, I'm gonna go ahead. I'm going to press Okay. But I will note, don't worry about these options if you are following along, we'll be going through at all later. But like I said, let's just, let me show you a little bit about what Fusion 360 is capable of. So now what we have is essentially just a shape. But what we wanna do, I'm going to modify this shape and change it into an actual vase. So how are we gonna do that is we're going to use the modified form. And then now you can see that we can actually select on all these little different points, the grid that has been made on our objects. Let's go ahead. And if I click once, you'll see that it will select that, that one line or section. If I click twice, it'll give us the entire perimeter. And now what we can do is actually using this perimeter. You'll see that within the kinda options panel here we have a bunch of different selection and modification options. If we actually just use the center one here, we can go ahead and we can expand or contract this entire ring. And now you can see that we can really, really play with the shape of our objects. So I'm gonna go ahead and that one looks pretty good to me and I'll, let's go ahead and let's do another one. So let's make this one here. Maybe we'll make this one also bigger, and then maybe we'll make this row in R3 here. Let's contract this one in a little bit. I think that looks kinda cool. Let's do it to this one as well. And then now you can see that is a pretty cool looking bays or vase again. But at this point you might be wondering, Well, hey, it doesn't have a top or a bottom, and it is just a shape with basically no thickness right now and you're right. So, so the first thing that we gotta do is actually add a top or a bottom. And how we're going to do that. Again, it's under the Modify panel. What you'll notice is that this is basically a whole. There's a hole at the top and there's a bottom. So what we can do, we can use the fill whole selection. And then again, just click on here and there'll be the different options. What we pretty much always use or what I usually use is the collapse feature and then make sure that you have maintain edge creases selected. If you don't have that selected, I'll show you, uh, kinda like, yeah, just makes it a little bit messy. So let's go like that. And then again, Let's do this for the bottom circle right here. So again, I can just go modify and Phil Hall. And there we go Again, we have the collapse selection for the fill whole mode. And now if I press OK, You can see that we have a really nice looking vase. And like I mentioned, go ahead and make your own play around with the shape of it so that, you know, you have something that's customed to you. You can even put your name on the top or the bottom of it using the text feature that we did before. But at this point what I can do is I can press Finish Form. And now you'll see we're back into our normal tool menu. And what we can do is just like in the very first one, we can click on the top and we can go shell. And let's again make this a two millimeter thickness Enter. And here we go, we now have our third veins. So now you can kind of see as we build on and we use the different skills that we learn infusion. We can really put them together in some pretty cool ways. And this is just one example and see how we went from kind of our basic loft feature here. And the first one, we have made our second phase here using the revolve feature, and we ended up with this kinda cool shape here. And then we used the actual panel of create form and we took that into our third one. And now you can see we have this really cool curved geometric shapes. So I hope that helps. I'm gonna go print these right now and I'll show you how they all turn out and how they look. I'll see you guys in the very next lesson. 22. Class 4 Summary: All right, welcome back. I got three prints fresh off the printer and let's check these out now I hope that last lesson was pretty clear. And hopefully at this point you're thinking, wow, fusion 360 is great. I can make lots of stuff in Fusion 360. Again, what we're doing is we're expanding your own personal kind of toolbox, if you will, of skills that you can use to design and create things. So without further ado, here is the very first phase or a vase that we made. And this one is pretty cool. It does look more like an urn than a VAE is, but nonetheless, it's turned out great. What I did is I printed all of these at 0.2 layer height on the Prusa with that kind of galaxy black sparkle filament. I'm not sure if you can't see it from there. The one thing that I will note is when you are printing objects that have this sort of like sharp curvature here. If I printed this at say, 0.32 layer high, the printer would probably have a really tough time keeping the quality of this intact. So anytime that you have basically a very steep overhang like this was printed with no support at all. And I can tell it on the inside the surface finish isn't perfect. But nonetheless, the outside of it does look absolutely fantastic. But basically, if you have a larger overhang like that, do kinda drop down that layer height, at least 0.2. What I recommend if you do want to maintain equality, but again, this one was made using our loft feature. So what we did is we took a bunch of different circles, a bunch of different sketches, and we set them different heights using our offset plane feature. Another thing that you'll find extremely useful as you progress your skills and your talents as a 3D designer and as a 3D printer. All right, moving on. The next one that we have here is this vase right here. This one was made using the revolve tool. So remember, you're looking at this straight on what we did is we sketched half of this. We then just revolved it 360 degrees. Again, revolve is an extremely powerful tool. I use it all the time. I know lots of people prefer to do that over all of the other different options that you have in Fusion 360, just a phenomenal tool. And here is the end result again, printed a zero-point two layer height in that galaxy black PLA filament. And finally, we have probably the kind of fanciest and coolest looking one of the group. Also worth noting, I did shrink these down a little bit so I could put all of them on the build plate at the same time for that cool time-lapse video that you'll see again here shortly. But nonetheless, this almost bill here using the form of function in Fusion 360. Again, you can kinda see, I mean, personally this is my favorite from them. It's kinda like the most artistic looking along with the nicest looking curves. The form function is and extremely powerful function that we'll be getting into later in the course. But I did just want to introduce that right now so that you could indeed mess around with that and have that tool kind of in the back your mind for when you are designing things. So that is it for this lesson. I'll see you guys in the next one. I hope you enjoyed it. And here is those time-lapse videos. I think they look pretty cool. 23. Class 5 - Intro to Tolerances: Hey guys, Welcome to this lesson. This lesson is a little bit different because now we're not actually doing any complicated design work. But in this lesson we're just going to be talking about an experimenting with different tolerances. Now, first thing we should cover is what is a tolerance? Well, a tolerance is a difference in two-dimensions onto objects that have to fit together. So let me just give you a proper example. So remember our handy-dandy pencil case from the first lesson that we did? I actually do leave it on my desk. I use it all the time. But what a tolerance is is you can see that we will have a dimension of the circular cutout on the pencil case that we made. And then also there is a dimension on the circular diameter of each pen, so the pens to actually fit inside of there. But the question is, how tight do we want that fit to be? And that's basically what a tolerance is. So one more time. A tolerance is the difference in dimensions of two objects that have to fit together. And how I'm gonna be showing you that today is with this piece right here now it looks like a funny kind of Lego or tetris piece. But what I've done is I've taken this piece and I've gone ahead and I have designed and printed out a bunch of different cubes with different dimensions. Some of these cubes will fit through here and some of them will not depending on the dimensions of these cubes. So for example, the cube ket 0 in this kind of Tetris piece, you can see right through here, this is exactly 25 millimeters. So that gives us the question of, will a 25 millimeter cube actually fit through there? And in this episode we're going to be learning that in figuring out, well, here's one that's 24.5 millimeters, should have be 24.99 millimeters. We have all these different cubes and we're going to be testing these tolerances. Now, I do encourage you to actually print these out for you and for yourself because based on what printer you have and maybe your settings, this can indeed changed, but we'll be talking about that in the next lesson. So anyways, that's what we're doing in this one. It's really fun. I'll see you guys in the next lesson. 24. Class 5 - Tolerances Tested !: All right guys, welcome to this lesson. In this lesson we're actually going to be testing all of our little cubes here and seeing if they do indeed fit through our Lego piece. So like I mentioned, the dimension here, which is the space between these two cubes is exactly 25 millimeters. And so the question that we're here to answer is, will a 25 millimeter cube fit through there? And if not, what dimension cube will actually fit through there is at 24.90, is at 24.5 millimeters, whatever it may be, That's what we're figuring out today. But even before that, let's talk about quickly why it's so important and why this is a very, very practical test and why you actually need to know this. And the answer to all that is because when you go to design something, whether it's for you or for a client, if it has more than one piece and those pieces need to fit together, we need to know what tolerance to apply for those pieces. So instead of me just giving you a bunch of random numbers, the best way to do this and why I've structured the lesson this way is because you should actually print out all of these cube tier for yourself and always just keep them handy so that you can test different tolerances because based on the different design and based on the different application of whatever it is you are designing, you may want a different tolerance. For example, maybe we want something that gets stuck as we put it in here, or maybe we want something that's slides rates through to depending on the different application, you will want a different tolerance and a different amount of friction as those pieces kinda interfere with each other. So that's why we do this test. Now, the other thing that I do want to mention is if you're someone who likes to print with different sized nozzles, this is a really, really great test to be. Did you first print with their new nozzle? So for example, if you throw on a zero-point six millimeter nozzle from your 0.4 millimeter nozzle. Then go ahead and print these out with your 0.6 millimeter nozzle. That way you will have a different test based on the nozzle that you're using for your printer. Again, if this isn't making sense or if you haven't quite got to that point in maybe you're printing career or your design career or wherever you're at, that's totally fine, but just trust me, always having these on your desk. I use them all the time, every time that I'm designing some part and I know that they need to fit together. I literally just reach into my bag and I always pull these out and I always am just fiddling with them and testing them. So it's extremely important, I can't stress that enough. Let's actually jump into TO, before we jump into testing them, you will notice that there is a couple of missing cubes in the files that is on purpose because I do want you to make a few of your own cubes anyways, again, it's just a simple cube that has some numbers on top. And so yeah, let's jump in and let's actually test these and see which ones work. And then I'm going to talk a little bit about tolerances specifically for 3D printing. All right, so here is a really close up view so that you can really see just the effect of the different tolerance values that we will be using. I hope this looks really good. It looks pretty good through the camera here. So let's just go ahead and jump right into it. Now the first thing that's worth noting, again, this side length right here is exactly 25 0 millimeters. So what we wanna do is we want to test what size cubes are going to fit through here and what kind of friction it creates on the side. So let's go ahead and let's just pull one in. And I'm going to start with the smallest cubes that I have first. So this one here is exactly 24.50 millimeters. So again, what that means is that this side length right here on this cube is 24.5 millimeters. And we're going to see if it does indeed fit through this 25 millimeter gap. Because again, worth noting, your nozzle is 0.4 millimeters. So that's why it's important to do these tests. So. Twenty-four point 500 millimeters and we can see it gets through no problem. There's lots of room kind of on either side with 24 point 500 and there's actually not even really any friction at all. I can drop that block rate through there. So 24 point 500 is gives you lots of spacing on each side. I wouldn't actually recommend using 24.50 for any tolerance tests. Let's go ahead and let's move up in size to 24.60. So now we're up by 0.1 millimeters. So let's go ahead and let's see how 24.60 fits in. And we can see It's pretty similar to the 24 point 500. Again, there's lots of room on both sides, so there is virtually 0 friction between the sides and there is just friction on the bottom because of the angle that I'm holding this at. So again, 24.60 is actually pretty small, probably too small for most applications. Let's go ahead and let's go up in size again. So here we have 24.70. Now let's go ahead and see if this one doesn't need work. And now we can see we're still not really getting much friction on the side. Again, I can wiggle it kinda left and right, and there's not much going on. This cube can easily pass through the slot. So again, 24.70 millimeters would indeed still be quite small to use for a tolerance. Let's keep going 24.80 millimeters. Now let's go ahead and let's see how this fits. Now we have maybe a small amount of friction, but again, I can just lightly wiggle it both left and right. So again, personally and what I use for design 24 point 800 would still be too small for a 25 millimeter gap. So just one more time you can see that there is indeed kind of free motion. Again, I can wiggle it once it is in there and there is room on both sides. So moving up one more in size here we go to 24.90. Now, 24.90 is one that is commonly used for tolerance values, that 0.1 millimeter difference. Let's go ahead and let's see how that looks. So with the 24 point 900, I can see that there is just a small amount of friction on both sides here. And so 24.90 leaves you with that 0.1 millimeter difference in dimensions. And that one is a pretty common one that I have seen used and that lots of 3D printers and I know like to use. You can see if I wiggle it left and right here, there's just a little bit of wiggle room. And there is indeed now a little bit of friction as I do pass it through. So 24.90 is indeed a good one to keep aside, but we're here and we are testing things. So let's go ahead and let's test the 24.95 millimeter cube now, again, just one more time. This length right here is exactly 25 millimeters. I tested this not only infusion using the measure tool, but I also use my calipers. And again, it did turn out to be exactly 25 millimeters. Let's go ahead and let's check out this 24.95 millimeter cube. Let's see how this fits in here. And we can see that there is quite a bit of friction, but it will, it will fit through and it will fall through. One of the tests that I kind of like to do is just kinda release it with my hands. Is gravity enough to pull this cube through? And indeed it is. But you can see there's our most just no wiggle room on either side so that there would be a 24 points 95 cube inside of a 25 millimeter length right here. But the one thing worth noting is that when we look at these tolerance values, it applies to both sides. So for example, if we use the 24.90 millimeter cubed, just to kinda math, easy when we put this in to our kinda Lego block right here. This tolerance value applies to both sides. So although the length of this cube here at the top is 24 point 900 millimetres, and then this length right here is 25 millimeters. The difference is actually applied to both sides, so that gap would indeed be on both sides. I'll show you that on fusion again just to kind of reiterate that. But there is the 24.901 and then here is the 24.951. So we can see quite a bit more friction with that 24.951. It just hardly falls through when I do kinda the gravity test, but let's go ahead and let's keep going. Let's go all the way up here. Now we have a 24.96 millimeter cube. And let's go ahead and you can see that one will not actually even fall through. There's lots of friction now we're really, really pushing it here. So again, this one, like I wouldn't ever use 24.96 when I'm actually doing my design work if the gap was 25 millimeters. But nonetheless, I just want you guys to see. So now this is at 24.96 and I would say that there, there's too much friction, four parts to kind of go together unless that kinda tight friction fit is what you're looking for, then that 0.04 millimeter difference may actually indeed be what you want. But again, like I said, make sure that you do print out these cubes, do your own testing. And you may always want different tolerances for different designs, but let's go ahead. Let's keep going out. So now we have a 24.97 millimeter cubed. So now what we have is 0.03 millimeter difference. So let's see here we know that this one's going to be quite tight already. I have to kinda like really pushed this one into the gap. And honestly at this point we were dealing with 0.01 millimeters and kind of precision. So at this point it's not the most accurate test anymore because maybe even the friction of the bricks being pushed through here have kind of affected the tolerances. But nonetheless, let's just keep going up. So now we're at the 24.98. And yeah, I mean, we can see that these, you know, you really gotta give these a decent push to get them through here so that there's 24.98. Let's go all the way up here. We have 24.99. And now, you know, now where like this would be a super friction fit, this would not be something that we would want to be putting in and out often so that there is 24.99 just so that you can see, I am really pushing this into there and that's not going anywhere. So let's go ahead, let's get this guy out. And lastly, the kind of test of all is will the 25 millimeter cubed fit inside of the 25 millimeter gap? And so let's see if that will work. Here we go again, just like the other one. Really got to push it in there. Now once it is in there again, it's not moving anywhere so that there is the 25 millimeter cubed. Now, just to reiterate, the 24.9 millimeter cube is indeed my kind of go-to when I'm working with simple tolerances or simple design and features. But yeah, so that's a like I mentioned, I do recommend that you do indeed print all of these cubes and do your own testing for your own printer. And based on whatever design you may need to alter your tolerances to fit you. But that is it for this lesson I hope you enjoyed and I'll see you guys in the next one. 25. Class 5 - Tolerance Summary : Are you guys and that is it for this lesson here. I hope this one really, really helped. I hope that it was really, really practical. I plan on doing a few more of these, just kinda printing and testing videos throughout the class as I personally really like them and they are pretty much as practical as it gets because I use things like this every single day when I'm doing my design work. So for one last time, I strongly, strongly recommend that you go ahead and you print out your own little Lego calibration tolerance meter, if you will, and also printing out a bunch of your own cubes. Now the reason that it's so important for you to do it instead of just watching the video and taking my numbers is because your printer and your printer setup may also differ. As I mentioned earlier, if you switch nozzles on your printer, go ahead and just run this test one more time. And I was just kinda keep these cubes handy because trust me, if you don't use them a bunch now later on in your design or printing career, you definitely will. So that isn't eat it for this lesson. I'll see you guys in the next one. 26. Class 6 - Threads Introduction: Hey, welcome to this lesson. This one we're going over threads and specifically applying those threads to nuts and bolts. Now why this lesson is important is because once you have an understanding of threads, you can actually design in 3D print things at fastened together, just like the pieces in front of me here you can see that we have a basic nuts and bolts, and these do indeed screwed together. Now, from a geometric standpoint, it does look extremely complicated and it can definitely be a little bit intimidating. However, it is truly quite simple and frankly, most of it is actually standardize with a couple simple clicks in Fusion 360, we should be on our way. However, it is worth pointing out that in Fusion 360 after we create a standardized thread, for example, this one here is a store bought em 420 millimeter hex socket head Cap Screw. We're going to try and 3D prints a not for this one, it would be really difficult to do because they're just too small. So obviously with 3D printing, there is some limitations to the threads and that I will be explaining in the next video. So I'll see you guys there. 27. Class 6 - Threads Design: All right guys and welcome back to this lesson on Fusion 360. Today what we're doing is we are making bolts and nuts now, one of the reasons why I absolutely loved this lesson, and I know I do say that about most lessons is that after we do this one, we can now make components that fastened together. So let's just, yeah, let's just jump right into it. So we're going to start a little bit differently today. We're actually going to start out in our assembly panel. So let's go ahead and let's click on new component. What an assembly is, is it's two pieces that are designed to fit together. Using the assembly panel, what we can do is we can actually create motion. We're going to be doing that in a future video. But basically, what kind of motion in simulations are is, for example, if we had the nut screw, we could create Infusion 360, a motion diagram of them actually fascinating together, but like I said, we're gonna do that in maybe the next or maybe two lessons from now. But it's good to just get used to using the assembly panels. So here we go under the name, let's call this one bolt. And there we go. As you can see on the left-hand side here we do have our bolts and I'll just go ahead and let's just go to Create and let's go cylinder now again, I could have just obviously drawn a circle and extruded it. But let's just start with a cylinder. And let's go ahead and start this at the origin. And let's make that 20 millimeters. Let's extrude that out by say, 30 millimeter or so. Just like we should be pretty familiar with where we're at here, we have just a very simple cylinder, but now this is where things get pretty interesting because what we're gonna do is we're actually going to go into the Create panel and we're going to go down to where it says threads. Let's go ahead and let's go through these options right here. So first, the first one that we see is faces. Now obviously we're familiar with this already. We're just going to select the face that we want. So here we go. We can see that now the threads are on that face that we selected. The next one here is actually modeled. Now, you might be wondering why this is even here, because what it does is it actually, it actually toggles whether or not it kind of cuts out that material. And the reason for this is because sometimes you will design something that's meant to be used pre-existing screw. So for example, if I made a big engine, I wouldn't also design the bolts to go with that engine because you can just go to the store pretty much and pickup pre-existing bolts. However, if you wanted to model those on your diagram, you might just leave these or you might just leave this setting as modeled. I hope that makes sense. Nonetheless, basically, if we're actually going to 3D print it, we do indeed want to have the modeled box they're checked in because then we'll actually be printing the threads. So that's an out for that one, but let's keep going. So full length, this one is pretty straightforward. What that's doing is it's just asking, do you want the threads to make up the full length? And I'll just show you here, you see you can adjust the actual length that you want the threads again for right now, let's just leave it at full length. But there are some circumstances in the future where you actually might not want to leave it at full length, but we'll see that as it comes up. So next up is thread type. This one is isometric profile. Basically, ISO is probably the most common one that is used worldwide. Now some of these different ones kind of depends on your geographic location. I know that certain places in the world do use different standards. However, ISO is by far the most common ones. So let's go ahead and let's just leave that on ISO. Next up is the size. Now you can see their size. This is actually the diameter. It's already set to 20 millimeters because the our first circle there that we put was 20 millimeters in diameter. I'll just show you. So for example, let's just make this huge. You can see that it does indeed adjust the size of what is basically our original diameter. So let's just go ahead and let's leave this at 20 so that there is our diameter. Now, the next one is a designation, so you can see it says M 20 by 2.5. So what that is, M2 is our diameter. So you see up here it's 20 millimeters. If I change this to say nine, it'll go to M9. So that right there is a diameter that is just mentioned by the m 20. Next one is 2.5. Now this right here is called our pitch. Pitches. Basically the difference or the distance between the threads maybe. Let me just show you the easiest way to explain this. I'm going to you don't have to do this part, but I just want to show you what the actual pitch is. So I'm just going to use sectional analysis. And so our pitch is the distance between these threads. So this distance from here to right here is exactly 2.5 millimeters. So let's go ahead and let's get back into our last function, which was this one Edit Feature. And I'm not sure if we'd have actually gone over this. But at the bottom here, there is indeed the tool panel, which is kind of like a back step, front step of the functions that you have done before as a useful tool for editing. If you do want to go back and change something while leaving the existing features already done, but more on that later. So let's go ahead. Here we are classics G, That's just, just leave that, that standard and then direction is right hand again, right hand is the standard. That's basically which way you're going to turn the screw to tighten or loosen it. So let's just leave that as right hand. And there we go. We can see here that we have are kind of threaded piece and this one is at 20 millimeters in diameter. But so now that we have our Bolton, what we need to do is create the actual and nut that this bolt will screw into. So what we're gonna do is we're going to go up to the assembly panel again and we're going to go click on new components. And let's just call this one the nut. And again, let's just press Enter there. You can see it kind of hid the bolt here. If we go over the selection, you can see if you kinda hold your cursor on the title there you scroll over it lets you select which item from the components in the assembly that you want to work on. So let's go ahead and let's just go back to the actual knot. And now we have a reference for the bolt here. So let's go ahead and let's make the nuts. So what we want to do for that, let's go ahead, let's create a sketch. Now let's select a plane. This one is fine. And again, let's make a circle. Let's go ahead and let's just make this 20 millimeters against. Now we have our basic diameter there, but now we're gonna do is we're going to actually go ahead, let's go Sketch and let's do a circumscribed polygon. This is pretty common for most of the nuts that you'll see. So let's go ahead and let's just make this on here, 15 millimeters. And there we go. You can see that we have the sketch of that circumscribed polygon in here now, so let's go ahead and let's click on this and let's go to solid. Let's extrude this up. And you can see that we are just kinda building the nut that this is going to fit into. Let's just go 10 millimeters to keep it even. So now we have the basic shape of the nut to the bolt is going to screw into. However, that doesn't have any threads on it yet. So what we have to do is we have to again thread the actual nuts piece there. And what I wanna do is just kinda get rid of the reference bowl for now. So I believe that will be this one. There we go. Yes. So that was just body number one. But again, just like we did before, what we're gonna do is we're gonna go into the Create and then we're gonna click on thread again the same thing as before. Let's click on this. And now the really important thing to note right here is that these need to match. So basically whatever values you put in on the side of your bolt have to be the exact same for the nut if you do want them to fit together as a standard, two pieces that are going to fit together. So let's go ahead and as usual, let's click on the model. There we go. Now we actually have our nut. So let's go ahead and let's show the bolts now as well. And let's click this one. So now you can see as they come together, we have the nuts and bolts. So there we have sort of the standard nut and bolt assembly. But there is one thing that I do want to show you that is very specific to 3D printing. So this right here would be like a classic. I believe it was M 20 by 2.5 we had that you might pull off the shelf, but as we know with 3D printing, we have to consider the tolerance values. So because of that, what we might want to do is actually change the tolerance to just loosen it up a little bit so that it is indeed friendly for 3D printing. So let me show you what I mean by that. Once again, I'm going to go ahead and I'm going to do a sectional analysis. And I'm just going to click on the knot right here. And let's go all the way to somewhere right around the center. I'm just going to click Okay, and now you can see that this here is basically the tolerance that we're working with. It's the distance between the actual bolt and the nut. And you can see it is pretty tight indeed. So what happens is maybe if we are deciding to actually 3D print these as a fastening method for two components. What we might want to do is increase the tolerance. Now again, just like we did with the cubes, it does require a little bit of trial and error, but I am obviously going to provide you with the kinda baseline numbers that I think you should work with and test. So before I even do that, just like I did with the squares, let's go ahead and let's print out a couple different ones so that we do have a concrete example. So the first thing I'm gonna do is save this one as are totally standard one with the standard tolerances rate out of Fusion 360. So I'm gonna go ahead and save that now and export those STL files. And then what I'm gonna do is I'm actually going to increase the distance between the bolt and the knots. And I'm gonna give you three different options for that and we can test the fit of those. So I'm gonna go ahead and save these right now. So I can click on the nuts and I can go to save as STL. Here we go. That is fine. I want this on the desktop has not standard saved desktop. There we go and just popped up on my desktop. So now I'm gonna do the same thing for the actual bolts. So here we go, save as STL, okay, and I'm gonna go bolts standard. There we go. Okay, so now I do have the nut and bolt saved as just they're kind of standard radar to Fusion 360, 720 by 2.5 millimeters in pitch is, I believe what this one was. So with that being said, now let's actually go and increase that tolerance value so that once I print these, we can kind of test the friction between the bolt and the nut. Because if you do want to passing two things together using a Bolden, it's important to understand the actual kinda friction involved in turning those and how tight you want those parts fit together. So in order to do that, what I'm gonna do is I'm going to actually hide the bolt. And now you can see that we're looking at the threads of the nut p. So let me just get out and kinda rotate around again, I'm in sectional view. You don't need to be in sectional view for this, but I do highly recommend that. To get in that view again one more time. You just go into inspect and then sectional analysis. It just makes it a lot cleaner to work with. So now what we can see is the profile right here. And the profile is pretty much consists of three faces. So this, I'm going to call this our top face. This is kind of our middle face and this is our bottom face. And what we're gonna do is in order to create more space between the bolt and the nut, we're actually just going to take some material off from the top, from the middle and from the bottom. So let me show you how we're going to do that. We're going to click on the top space to start. Then what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna go modify offset face. And now we can actually reassess the distance of this by a little bit. So what I'm gonna do, Let's start with the very first smallest value that I'm going to take off to start is negative 0.05 m. And there we go. We have this just because it's in caps lock. There we go, negative 0.05 millimeters and we're going to take that distance off. But the thing is, is I do have to repeat it on all sides. I'm gonna go ahead and do this one offset face negative 0.05 MM. And one more time on the bottom face here and modify offset face and negative 0.05 m m. So now what happens is we have some increased distance between the actual nut and the bolt. And I'm going to bring that back here. And now you can actually see that distance here. So now we have more room and when I fit these two pieces together, they will screwed together easier. And so let's go ahead and let's actually export this not N, this bolt as kind of the version two so that we can indeed test sums. I'm just gonna go here, save as STL again, and let's call this knots to desktop. There we go, and let's go ahead and do the exact same. Well the voltage the exact same, so we don't actually have to, it is indeed just the nut that we are changing. So let's go ahead and let's do that two more times. Like I can just show you the different kind of friction fit values and then I can talk about which ones I recommend that you use on a daily basis for 3D printing. So I'm gonna go ahead here, just again, I'm gonna go modify and I'm going to again do the offset face. And now we are already a negative 0.05 millimeters recessed. And now we have two options. We can kind of work from there and just remove another 0.05. Or what we can do is I want to show you using this bottom panel right here. Again, we just have all of the different actions that we've done. So you can see right here we have the offset face, the offset face, and the offset face. And again that's just the top, the middle, and the bottom. If I scroll this 123 back, we now pretty much just removed those offset features. And now we're pretty much back at the very standard out of Fusion 360, the 20 by 2.5 millimeter. So I do, the reason that I'm showing you this is just so that we can become familiar with this bottom panel because instead of actually going Control Z to remove the function that you just did, you can actually just kinda go back in time. And then if you want to adjust forward in time, you can go ahead and you can just kinda scroll this thing right here. As you can see, it is indeed changing. It's basically just adding and removing the offsets. But let's go ahead and let's go back to our 0 value. So now this is our standard and 20 by 2.5 millimeters. And let's go ahead and I'm just gonna go and I'm going to remove negative 0.10. So I'm going to do that right now. Opposite face. I might be able to do all three of these at the same time. There we go. Negative 0.10 M, M Enter. And now we have our kind of third nut that we're going to use. And again, we're just doing this to test a friction. I'm gonna go ahead save this as an STL. And this is now going to be not number 3. There we go. And now again, like I said, I'm gonna go back one more. Here we go. And let's actually just remove one more so that we can test the friction on a further improved clearance. And then I'm going to show you the comparison between the bolt at the beginning and the bolts where it is now as you can see, the actual space in-between the two objects. So once again, we're going to click on our 123 phases here we're gonna go modify offset face. And now for the, the third and final one, we're going to go negative 0.15 millimeters. I'm gonna go ahead. I'm going to click Okay. And now you can see, let's bring back the bolts rate here. Or is that guy there we go. Now you can see there's a ton of space in between the threads as well as the not. So this one will definitely screw in pretty easily. But let's go ahead and let me show you the difference between now and how it was at the very beginning. Again, what we're doing is we're just using this feature here at the bottom. So you can tell, look at that difference. So we could go ahead and actually measure the difference in between using I on our keyboard and actually measure all the distances. But again, we know those values are 0.15.1.05 that we removed. So what I'm gonna do, I'm going to export this one right here as the nut, save as an STL. And let's go ahead and press Okay, and let's call this number for now. What I'm gonna do is I'm going to send these to the printer. And then again, let's review these and let's talk about kind of what standard, what standard numbers I recommend using in your design. So that's it for this one, and I'll see you guys in the next video. I hope this out. I hope that you can kind of picture how if you had two pieces, you can now start using threads and bolts to actually hold those together. So I'm gonna go ahead and send those to the printer right now. And I'll see you guys in the next video. 28. Class 6 - Threads Review: All right, Here we are now for this lesson, I'm not going to attach the project files because honestly, it only takes maybe two or three minutes to make them yourself. And it might be something that you're going to use really often. So definitely go ahead design and print your own set of nuts and bolts. If you wanted to, you can even make them giants that you have. At the end you have one giant nuts and bolts. It could be a display peace use if you wanted to. Remember somewhere on my very first major engineering project, I have a 3D printed gear and I keep that up. Just kind of a cool piece to have. So anyways, in front of me, here are the four nuts and bolts. Now, I should have put some text on them while in Fusion 360, however, I just went ahead and actually wrote on them in marker. Now, I did try like maybe ten different camera angles to try and demonstrate the fit of these bolts. It is tough to tell on camera because again, we're working in fractions of a millimeter. So what I'm gonna do is, I think you should write this down. My standard recommendation for when designing threads intended for use with 3D printing, use a minimum of a two millimeter pitch with a 0.1 millimeter offset value. Again, one more time. Good to say to some art, these are just numbers that you should use as reference. A minimum of a two millimeter pitch with a 0.1 millimeter offset value. Now, obviously, those are just recommendations based on what I you use, based on what I use. You definitely don't need to use those, but those are a really good starting points. So now that that's out of the way, let's go ahead and let's look at these four here that I actually have. So I will give you a close-up camera angles so you can see what's going on. But basically, they're numbered 1, 2, 4, and number one is the loosest bolts. So this is one that we took negative 0.15 millimeters off of where as number four is just the standard. I'm Ray out of Fusion 360. This is just a complete standard. What would be a shelf bots? Not that you would find with no offset value. So it's not actually going to work that well for 3D printing. Now, when I go through these, I'm actually going to start with the very first one. I'm going to use not number one. And now this is a one like I said, it has a negative 0.15 millimeter offset value. The reason that I'm starting with number one is because I already know that if I use number 4, it's going to be extremely tight. It might actually even damage the threads on the bolt. So I don't want that to interfere with kind of our testing for nuts 1, 2, and 3. So let's go ahead and I'm gonna show you a closer value. I'm just going to go ahead and I'm gonna put the bolts number 1. And then let's kinda see how much tolerance it has, how much wiggle room it has and I guess if it even fit. So let's do that right now. And so we can see here it's cruisin really easy. You can screw it in as fast as you want. But the interesting part and the part that we're mostly concerned with is the actual fit of once a bolt is inside the nut. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to try and translate this around. And you can see I'm just moving it side to side and up and down. Now again, this might be hard to see on camera, but there is indeed some wiggle in here. And that is expected because this is the one that we took negative 0.15 millimeters off of. So just now that we have a little bit of a visual, we also have confirmation that the bolt fits inside of the nut. So that's great. We know that our threads were properly made and the R and D both the same thread. So let's move on to number 2. Now, number 2 is going to be the one. I believe we used a 2.5 millimeter pitch, which is totally fine. I do recommend the minimum of a two millimeter pitch, but not number 2 is the one that has that negative 0.1 millimeter offset, which is kinda my golden rule and my standard where if I'm making parts that are going to be 3D printed and then I do want to fit together using threads. I always use that negative 0.1 millimeter offset. And so let's see how this one fits in here. Now similar to number 1, it is pretty easy to turn, but I do feel just the slightest bit of friction. And now if I go to try and translate that up and down, left and right, Even kinda rotate it around. There is really almost no movement and that is exactly what I'm going for with that 0.1 millimeter offset. So for example, if this was a really long Bolton and not like it would never just naturally fall down. There is indeed some friction in there and that is definitely what I like to see so that their number 2, this is kinda my golden, golden standard, if you will, is that 0.1 millimeter offset. I highly recommend that when you do design, Let's test out number 3. So number 3 is going to be the negative 0 millimeter offset. And so now I'm actually having a little bit of difficulties threading the bolt into the nut. It can absolutely be done, but I am really putting some effort on it and there's absolutely 0 wiggle room within this one. So again, that there is number three and that is a very tight fit, is just with the negative 0.05 millimeter offset. Ok. And finally on to number 4. And now number four would be with absolutely no offset. So if you had just gone to buy some screws from Home Depot or rho naught or wherever it may be, that is how they would be threaded. So let's go ahead and let's try and actually put the bowl into number 4. Now, you can see here it's hardly in and I do have to put a lot of effort to turn this in. Um, again, right now, I'm pretty confident that I'm damaging the threads. So yeah, you can see it's pretty well stuck if this is definitely not something that you'd want to use for 3D printing parts if you wanted to thread this and then say unthreaded. So if you had a part that is meant to go together and be taken apart frequently, this is not what you would want to use. And so that pretty much concludes this lesson on using threading. I hope now in your designs you can indeed go ahead and make pieces that fit together using threads. Now, again, just to reiterate one more time, number 2 with that negative 0.1 millimeter offset is kind of my standard or at least my go-to when I'm making parts that are meant to be threaded using 3D printing. So that's it for this lesson. I hope it helped. I hope you guys are getting excited because there's lots more coming. So I'll see you guys in the next video. 29. Spline Tool Intro: Hey guys, Welcome to this lesson. In this lesson we're going to be learning how to use the spline tool. Now, this blind tool is basically a another tool that we use within our sketch profile to create curved lines. We already have the Arc tool that we've been using and that we've used many times by now. But what we're doing, again, we're always just adding to our toolbox and today we're adding the spline tool. In addition, in this lesson, I'm going to show you how to import a photo into your Fusion 360 window that we can actually trace over to create that object. So in this one, I'll use a guitar. What we're gonna do, we're going to import the guitar and then we're going to use the spline tool to trace around the guitar and then extrude that into a 3D object. Now, what I'll do is for the very first video, we're going to build a bottle. It's really quick. The spline tool is quite easy, but we'll build the first one together. And then I'm going to add two or three videos in this series of me just using the spline tool and just going over some quick shapes so that if you want to, you can follow along or go ahead and just build your own object. If that doesn't make sense, you'll see a great wants to get in there, but without further ado, let's jump right into that lesson. 30. Spline Lesson 1: All right, So here we go, welcome to our lesson on using this blind. So like I said from the very first one here, what I'm gonna do is I'm going to go and just create a simple water bottle that's kinda the easiest, most basic version of using the spline tool. But before that, I'll go over a couple quick things about using the spline tool and how we can use it really efficiently. And even before that first things first, I just want to show you how you can import a picture into your Fusion 360 workspace so that if you wanted to, you can actually trace it. So it's an important picture what you wanna do, you wanna go up to the Insert tab right here in the top right. Click on that and then you'll see Canvas. You can click on Canvas. Now, I've already uploaded one here, but if you have one on your desktop or in a folder somewhere on your computer, you can go ahead and click on Insert from my computer. Once you have it, go ahead, press Insert and then you'll select the plane. I'm just going to click this one. It does sometimes take even up to a minute. You can see right here it says it's loading and there is. So here's my picture. You can see I can freely move it. I can scale it in any direction. You have full control over this. But the reason that I'm showing you this right now is because sometimes what we'll do is we'll actually import a photo of something and then it's basically just trace over the photo and extrude that to create a 3D object, which you will see in the guitar lesson coming up soon. But enough of that one, I'm gonna go ahead and I'll press okay, so you can see it. And now you can see our photo is just here. So for example, if I wanted to sketch over this board right here, I could do something like that, but I'm just going to go Control Z and get out of this. I'm going to start from the very beginning, a brand new workspace. And let's go ahead and let's just, let me just give you an introduction to using this blind tool and basically what we're going to be using it for us. So I'm gonna go ahead and create scheduled Zoom out here. I'm just going to click on any plane. Then what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna go ahead and click on this one right here, which is the fifth spline. And basically what you can see is that as I click around, we'll get these curved lines. So let's just click a few times. What I'm gonna do is I'm going to press the check mark here. And now this is where things get interesting. Once you have pressed on the checkmark, you press Escape on your keyboard and you'll see that we now have all of these different arrows. What we're doing with the spline tool is we're basically just adjusting the different curves. But more interesting than that is we can actually click on the points that we use and we can move these points around individually. So for example, if I wanted to move this one here and then I could actually change the angle and the arc of this individual points. So sometimes you might want to use two clicks and sometimes you might want to click maybe 15 times if you really want to adjust for the perfect shape. Let me show you what I mean by that. So again, I'm just going to Control Z back to the main part. Click on right here. So if I click just maybe twice, I can make a two points arc that we can work with here again, go over, press on the check mark and you'll see that I now have 1, 2, 3 because of the origin points that I can work with. So pressing Escape, you can see that I can drag these points around, click on them one time, and you'll see that you can actually edit the curve. And when edit one curve, it does affect the entire sketch that you're making. So for example, if I move this one here, you can see that it does affect all three points on the curve. Now I can also expand or contract this one. And so you have full freedom when using the spline tool. Personally, I don't use this tool a ton. I consider this more of almost an artistic tool. If you're making shapes that have basically non-perfect geometric relations, you might use this a lot. But the last thing that I want to show you is that with the spline tool, you can actually use constraints. So for example, if I click on this up here, I can go up into our constraints. And let's say that I want to make this one perpendicular to this line right here. You can see that now these two are at 90 degrees to each other, and I can still actually move this as it is. So you can, you use constraints with the spline tool. So there's basically just a quick introduction now let's go ahead and see how we can use the spline tool to build something really basic like a bottle. So again, I'm just gonna go Control Z, bring us out to the very beginning here. And let's go ahead and let's make the shape of a bottle. And then what we'll do is we'll just revolve that around to make a solid body. So first things first, let's make a line and let's say that we make this. It doesn't really matter, let's say 130 millimeters. And that looks pretty good as at it. So this is basically going to be half of our bottle. Let's go ahead and let's make kinda what would be the bottle cap section of that. So let's go ahead and let's make this 20 millimeters. Again, the size of this doesn't really matter. I'm just using this to show you this blind tools. So now let's go ahead and let's click on the spline tool. And let's connect this to our line here. Let's make a kinda curvy looking cool water bottle just because we are learning how to use this tool. And I think something like this looks pretty good. I'm gonna go ahead and press the OK button there. And you can see that from here we can now press Escape on our keyboard and we can adjust the shape of this water bottle and get it perfect to how we like it. So I'm just going to move this again. Don't, don't try and copy exactly what I'm doing. Make your own cool water bottle shape or make whatever it is you want. So let's say that I think that looks pretty good right there. The one thing that I'm going to do is I do want this splines be perfectly connected to our vertical line. So what I'll do is I'll create a line just like this. And I'm actually just gonna make this a construction line. So here we go, right-click and I'm going to go normal slash center line. And then I'm going to bring our spline line up just a little bit, and let's just add in. Let's connect this blind to this one press. Okay? And we might actually be able to get away with making this just a nice curve at the bottom. I think that is fine, how it is. And then let's complete this with a solid line from the vertical line over to the end of our spline. And now you can see that we have our water bottle shape, if you will. So I'm gonna go ahead and finish sketch. And then what we're gonna do is we're actually going to revolve this sketch, okay, Not like that. That's revolving it 360. So let's go ahead and select profile and then access. I want it on this one. And now you can see we have kinda of our unique shaped water bottle. So obviously this waterfall looks a little bit funny, but there you go, you have it. That is how the spline tool work. So I'm going to add another two or three videos. You're showing you the different objects that you can make using the spline tool. I hope that's helpful. I will note the one thing with the spline tool is the first couple of times you use it, it won't make a ton of sense. It's hard to actually make the shape that you have in your head, or at least it was when I did it, you might be far better at it than I am off the bat. Again, I kind of consider it some sort of artistic tool, but try and play around with it. And then what we'll do is we'll insert an actual photograph and then sketch or trace that photograph. So that's it for this one. Go ahead Washington, next couple and you'll see the different applications of the spline tool. I'll see you guys in the next one. 31. Spline Lesson 2 ! - Guitar: Two. Or if this is true. So if this is true, to take this, this is true. So there it is. This is it. Yes. In this lesson. 34. Major Project 1 - Summary: All right, Here we are. As you can see, the prop is done and it is massive. Let's see if I get the whole thing in the camera frame there. Okay, I think you can see it, but nonetheless, it's massive and honestly I printed this at 0.32 layer high at 90 millimeters per second. So only took about 15 hours between two printers. And again, the reason that we could do that is because I had 3D printing in mind when I designed this. So that being said, there was very, very little support is required. And again, like I said, 90 millimeters per second, 0, 32 layer height 5% infill, super, super fast prints. Now, again, the whole point of this first major project, and I hope you guys did enjoy it. I will also note right now that all of the files are linked below. Those are free for your personal use. Not only are the STL files link, but I also actually went in lengthy actual design file. So even if you just want to grab that file, make some modifications, maybe put your name on the side of it, something like that, whatever you want, those files are there for you, so please do go check those out. The facts where I was saying the point of this project show you that using basic geometry and simple features within Fusion 360, we can create something pretty extraordinary. And here is just one example of what we are capable of now with our skill set. So I hope you guys like this major project. Stay tuned because there's also a really fun next major project coming up. But before we jump into that next major project, let's learn a couple more Fusion 360 skills. So that's it for this lesson, and I'll see you guys in the next one. 35. Mold Making Intro: Hey guys and welcome back. In this lesson, we're actually going to be making a mold. Yes, what that means is you can take something that you built or an existing file and we can actually create a mold around that file. Now, first of all, I do apologize if it kinda looks a little bit different than before. It is late and I pretty much just have the fluorescent lights on, but that doesn't matter. Let me show you exactly what I made with this mold of you, right back. All right. And I'm back. Check this out. I hope you can see it from where you are. This is made of 100% chocolate, yes, 100% chocolate. Now traditionally or typically what we would do is we would use moles per tooling or injection molding brother manufacturing methods, stuff like that. But I thought what the heck, Let's make something fun with this, because it's still serves the same purpose. So this is a chocolate squirrels girdles, just a Pokemon. And what I did is I took an existing dot STL file, I imported that into Fusion 360. Then what I did is basically subtracted that STL file from a giant cube. And then what that is is it creates a mole that we can then pour something in from the top, and in this case chocolate. So that's what we're doing today. The reason for this is because we're going to learn how to work with dot STL files within Fusion 360 and how to go ahead and actually subtract that dot STL file from something that we have built, which would be a solid body in Fusion 360, therefore, leaving us with just the impression or a mold. This one's super cool. What I'll do is in the next lesson, I'm going to show you all the steps then. Kind of as usual, I'll show you a time-lapse of the exact more than I made art that I use to make this guy right here. So let's jump right into it. 36. Mold Making: Hey guys, Welcome to this fusion 360 lesson. Like I said, in this lesson, we're working with a dot STL files. And what we're doing is we're creating a mold for the dot STL file. And in this case, the squirrel dot STL file that I actually filled with chocolate and made the Moldova. So let's jump right into it. How we do it in Fusion 360 right here, the first thing you wanna do is click on your initials up at the top right, go into your preferences and let that load for a second under preview features, just make sure that you have mesh repair analysis checks. Go ahead and press Apply or if you already haven't pressed, just go ahead and click Okay, from here, what we wanna do is we want to import our dot STL file. Now for this one, like I said, I'm using that squirrel character, but if you want to use a dot STL file that maybe you even previously made in this course. You can go ahead and do that. How we do it, Go up to mash right under here, insert mesh, and then just go find your dot STL file from your computer. I have mine right here, so I'm gonna go ahead and press open and let that load. I will note that when working with dot STL file, sometimes it does take a second or maybe even a minute or two to complete the operations on dot STL files or mesh files because they are really big file. So once we have that, we can see our little squirrel guys right here. What we're going to want to do is select the unit type. Basically, a dot STL file has numbers associated with the dimensions, but they are unitless, so you have to tell the certain software in our case here, Fusion 360, what the units are going to be. So we see millimeters and yes, I know that this one is in millimeters and then under position you see that we have center or move to ground. Let me just show you the origin quickly and you can see it's on the bottom right here. So I'm just going to center our little guy here alone. And that looks pretty good to me. I'm gonna go ahead and press Okay, and you can see that we now have this mesh here of our little squirrel Pokemon guy. So how we see this under bodies, you can see the little yellow icon here we are in all mesh analysis or mesh section of our tool. So what we're gonna do, we're gonna go over to solid and we're going to create a sketch. Now this part here is nothing new, so I'm going to click on a plane. And then basically all we're doing is we are creating a box around or little Pokemon guy here that we're going to then later split up into making our mold. So from there I'm gonna go ahead and I'm just going to extrude this box. Let's do a two-sided extrusion so that we can make sure to get all of the squirrel guy in there. And we can see that looks pretty good right there. I'll give it an extra couple millimeters just to be safe. And then on this side the same thing. So you can see that now he is totally covered up under operation. Just make sure that we have new bodies selective because we do want to be able to work with this one individually. So here we go, press OK, and now we have our new body. So basically when we're working with mixture of meshes and solid bodies, again, a solid bodies what we just made, whereas the mesh is the STL file, you cannot interchange them. So what we have to do is we have to convert them all to one or the other. In this case, we're going to be converting the solid body that we just made, which is this box here into a mesh. So how I do that under mesh, you can go up there and we can go on the top left-hand corner here, you'll see the option of tessellate. You can read it there. But all this is doing is creating that solid into a mesh. We're going to click on tessellate, click on that body. You can also press on it in your tool panel over here. And then let's go ahead and let's just press on. Okay, now that should not take too long. And now we have our two mesh files, which is great. You can see here that our little squirrel guy inside of that box, and now that we have our two meshes here, what we need to do is we need to actually subtract that squirrel guy there from the box that we have around him, therefore creating an indentation or a void space of where he used to be. And then what we can do is we can split the box in half and then we will have a mould. So how we do this and go up to modify, combine. And now what we're gonna wanna do is under target body, this is going to be r mod p. So this is our big box. And then under tool bodies we want to click on the little squirrel guy there for operation, it's important that we leave this as cuts and then we want this as a new component and then keep tools. What that does is it keeps the tool Bonnie. So for us in this case, it will just keep the mesh of the little squirrel guy. I'm gonna go ahead and press okay. And then sometimes this point might take a minute or two minutes or five minutes, whatever it may be, depending on your computer and your operating system. So I'm going to pause the video here and then come back. Once that's loaded, it should only take about 45 seconds, but I'll see you in just a second. Okay, now that that operation is complete, you can see that we have this new component down here. And basically, this new component is the box that we have there with the void space. So let me show you if we get rid of the squirrel, they're in the middle and we get rid of body one. We will still have this one here. So let's go ahead and let's do a sectional analysis so that we can actually see the whole inside of this. And there is, it looks fantastic. This is the void space. Again showing you the outline of the little squirrel guy there. So what we need to do now is we need to split this box into two pieces so that we have the two sides of the mole that would then be put together and then filled in with some sort of liquid. And in manufacturing it could be anything from a metal to a plastic to a silicone or whatever maybe, or chocolate if you want to do it. How we did so, how are we gonna do this is we're just going to simply use the plane cut feature within our mesh tool. So what we do, we go and modify. And then from there there will be plane cuts. Bodies select on the body and then the cut plane again just from our origin. And then now let me go over these options here with you quickly. So we have the option of trim. Now if you use the trim tool, what it'll do is it'll actually get rid of half of it. Let me show you. There you go. You can see you will actually delete half of the body. We don't want that because we need to keep both of the sides. So we can then export these as Don STL files and actually 3D print them. So instead of trend, let's just go ahead and use split body. And then under fill type, this is also really important. Do not choose No Fill. Otherwise. The space between our void squared on the outside of our box will be empty. What we need to do is go ahead and press on uniform. You can press on minimal if you want, but I always just use uniform. And then let's go ahead and press okay with that one and give that a second As always, let that load. There we go, that one complete pretty quick. So now if I go under my components and I go to bodies, you'll see that there is now two of them. So if I hide one of these bodies, we should see the hallway or our squirrel guy is in there we go. You can see it right there. Let me get rid of the origin. And now this is indeed our side of the mole. Now, I will point out that at this point how I usually do things as I do everything out of a solid body first, then I import the mesh and then I just delete the mesh. So that way instead of creating a bunch of different features and then converting them over to mesh, we can create everything is a solid body. And then for the very last step, go ahead, insert that mesh and then basically delete the mesh making the hole. And that you will see in the next video because the next video is the time-lapse of my actual mole that I use for this entire process. Now, the other thing that you can do is in order to hold the two sides of the molds together, you could use something like pay hole. You could use a nut and bolt. You can use whatever may be for me. For this one, I just created a hole on both sides of the mole. And then that way I could use pretty much any bolt they would fit through in any nut and then just tighten them using a wrench or something like that. So you'll see that in the next video. I hope this helps again, let me give you a quick recap. Basically, we have a dot STL file that's a mesh, and then we have a solid body that we create within Fusion 360. When we import a dot STL file, it's always a mash and we have to be working with either all solid bodies or all mesh files. So if you're going to import a dot STL file, it's usually easiest to convert all the solid bodies over to mesh versus the alternative. So that's what we did here and I'll see you guys in the next lesson. 37. Mold Timelapse: To this in the fifties and sixties. Hi, it, to determine if this is true. That's not true. Security. 38. Intro - Curved Surfaces: Hey guys and welcome to this lesson. I hope you enjoyed the last lesson on The Mandalorian prop. Again, what we're trying to do is move to more and more practical uses. So we're taking those basic shapes and we're turning them into functional objects, things that we can use. Hopefully you're getting more and more comfortable with Fusion 360. Now, I have received a few emails from you guys from the students taking this class that are asking about how we can model with curved shapes. So curved shape modelling is more of an advanced technique, Let's put it that way. However, what I did is I went through the archives of a hairdryer design that I did a long time ago. And what I've done is I've actually adding that in as our next lesson. So if you're still feeling maybe new and hesitant with Fusion 360, then you can skip this LET next lesson if you want or just go watch it and maybe skip through. Just kinda see what we're doing. Basically, curved shape modeling is used for obviously making anything with curved shapes. But examples of that are like the hairdryer or maybe something like a gas tank for a motorcycle, items like that that have that really unique geometry that there's no sort of straight edges or angles. It's all just based on curves that are not perfectly geometric. So tool that we use will not create those curves. But nonetheless, I'll stop talking. Basically, this next lesson is a little bit advanced, but it is super practical if you're someone who's interested in modelling with curved shapes, so check it out. I'm gonna put it in the next one. It's going to be a bit of a longer lesson and you may have to play sound and then maybe playback and 50 percent speed or something like that because I do go through it pretty quickly, but here it is for you guys. So check that out in the next lesson. And again, I'm gonna keep uploading more and more stuff. So let's jump right into it. 39. Curved Surface Modeling Example: All right guys and welcome back. Today we are making this hairdryers you saw before. It's not easy, It is a little bit complicated, but we are going to learn a lot and this is all very practical. So without further ado, let's jump into it first step, create this sketch. Let's put it on the front plane, and let's go ahead and let's start with the circle as this is going to be kinda the main portion of the hairdryer that we're making now, I think a realistic kinda thickness or diameter of a hairdryer, maybe somewhere between 60 and 100 millimeters. I'm just going to pick something in between there, pick whatever you want for yours. It doesn't really matter. I'm gonna go with 80 millimeters. That looks good to me now. That looks good. Let's go ahead Finish Sketch. And now here we're going into, we're jumping right into it. We're going to create form. I know we use this once in the vase project. It can be a little complicated, but let's go ahead create and we're going to extrude. So let's simply click on our profile that we made there, just that circle. We're going to use that as our profile. And then from here we can control pretty much everything, but let's go through it one by one. So obviously using the arrow here, we could control the size of it. We can make it bigger, we can make it smaller. Alternatively, we can just punch in the numbers on our keyboard or over in the right-hand panel. We can obviously control it here as well. I think something like 60 millimeters is going to be perfect. So I'm gonna go ahead and fill that in as 60 millimeters. And yeah, I think that looks good. Now, at the top there you can see that we have faces, eight of them. Now, eight of them as you can see them as we go along here. Those faces, That's a lot. Let's drop this down to something like four as remember, we are controlling those individually. So the less the kinda easier it is to control. And you can see it still looks good. Nothing's really changed that I think that's all we need. There we go. Yep. Okay. So continuing on, let's go ahead. Let's go to modify and hopefully you remember this, but we're gonna go ahead and we're going to click on the edge panel. Remember, we can use vertices, we can use faces, Let's use edges now. First thing is first one-click will let us view the options to modify just this single edge. I'll show you here. Or we can double-click on the edge and it'll select the entire border. Now, using the entire border, if we move these arrows, we can control and contort this entire edge. What I'm gonna do is in the video that you're watching right now, I'm going to just speed up the process of manipulating it. Let's do that now. So go ahead and play with that yourself. It's good to get a little bit familiar with the different applications of this. But what we're doing for this one is we're turning it into a hairdryer. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to make four sections in total for this, what we do is we go modify. Let's double-click on the edge. So we're selecting all, press the Alt button and then drag it out. Now pressing the Alt button, what it does is it creates that one more section. So you can see now we have three sections there. Don't worry about the distance in between here, make it somewhere between say, 30 and 50. Let's build one more. So modify, double-click, and let's pull this out while holding Alt. So you can see that we now have four sections. That looks good right there. Okay. So we have four sections of our hairdryer. Like I said, this is going to be the main body component of it. And I think that that is looking pretty good so far. Let's go modify. And what we need to do is we need to obviously could choose one end to the front, the back. Let's make this the front. And here we go. I'm going to just play with this. I encourage you to do this part all on your own. I'm going to speed this up in the video as well, but just play with those different rings and try and make the shape of a hairdryer. Hope that helps for some reference. Again, don't copy exactly what I did. Just do your best to make the shape of your hairdryer or whatever hairdryer comes to mind. So I think this is looking pretty good so far. I'm going to rotate this front up a bit. And then there we go. I'm gonna have to fix up the back. It looks a little bit long as well. Let's take some off the front and back now again, modified double-click on that. Let's pull this back. There we go. Okay, I'm happy with that, but we do need to do is fill the hole at the end. We did this with the base as well, just go fill hole. And then again, there's all the different options. Pick whatever one you think looks best. I like the collapse feature, so I'm going to leave mine on collapse. And just like that, we've pretty much have the top end or at least the base shape of the top end of our hairdryer done. You can play with the whole settings if you want. But to me, that looks the best, that looks the most realistic. I'm going to leave it like that. I like it. Let's keep moving on with the handle. Okay, so for our handle, we are going to be obviously creating a new sketch. So let's click on, create a new sketch. Let's click on this plane, right here. There we go. That's the side plane, I believe. And now what we're going to be doing is we are going to be using these spline tool. So here we go, boom, boom. And now what we can do with the spline tool is obviously adjust the shape however we want to. But the other thing that we need to know is the length of the handle, okay, now we can obviously change this at any point in time, but just do your best to guess something that's semi realistic or relative to the top portion. I think this looks pretty good. Let's adjust it a little bit more and finish up. There we go. Okay, so here we go. We're gonna do construct and we're gonna do a plane along a path is what it's called. So here we go, plane along a path. This is a feature that we don't use often, but it is really, really important and very useful. Basically, what it does is it creates a plane that is a 100 percent perpendicular to the path. So you can see that we can move this plane up and down. Along the path that we had selected. So what we're gonna do, let's actually put this at the very top. And what we're gonna do here kind of as an overview, we're going to make a shape on the top and a shape on the bottom and connect them. So now we have this plane that is on that path. Indeed, you could hide this top body if you need to so that all you have is that plane, but I'm okay with that there. So now let's create a sketch. You can either press the Sketch button in the top left corner or you can right-click on it. And here we go. Let's go create a sketch and you'll see that we are now acting on that plane. Now you can't see it here. Like I said, if this, if it's difficult for you here, then just go ahead and hide the body of the main panel. But let's make an ellipse on our new plane. So here we go. Like I said, it's difficult to see, but you can see that we do have our center point. So let's go ahead and let's put our ellipse on here. And the dimensions again, they're not important. Just pick whatever you think looks good, but let's go ahead, let's give it some dimensions. Let's go 45 by maybe 30 or 35 and see a 30 looks, that looks good to me. Okay, so now what we have is our ellipse at the very top, but what we want is a shape on the bottom. So again, playing along a path, Let's go ahead. Let's put this, scroll that down to the bottom. And now we have a perpendicular plane to our path that we can make a shape on the bottom. So let's go ahead and same thing, create a sketch, and let's make a circle for this one. So here we go. Let's create a circle again. Diameter not super-important, and let's just go with 25. I think that looks pretty good. So maybe you guessed it, maybe not, but we're actually going to create a loft here. And we'd done this again, similar to the vase tutorial. Let's go ahead. The difference here is that what we're going to have is this loft running along our sketch line that we just made using the spline tool. But you'll see we have two kind of program that in by itself. So let's go ahead and let's select our top and our bottom. You'll see straight up and straight down. So now we use the guide type feature and we're actually going to create the guide along our spline line there. And that way our Loft will be connecting the top to the bottom on that curve line. So it's like that. And boom, there we go. You can see that we now have that and yeah, wow, that looks good. This thing is slowly coming along and let's adjust the faces here. Let's just make it four as it was before. And here we go. That looks great. I think this is pretty much ready now I'm going to adjust the bottom shape a little bit. Again, you can make any adjustments here, change it however you want, just using our modified tool. Let's go ahead and double-click here. And again, this is just personal preference, so modify years, make it look however you want. I'm just going to adjust mine here quick. I think that looks pretty good there. So now you can see we have two bodies. We have the topline. I can show you this, get rid of it and we also have the bottom one. So we are on our way. I'd say we're about 1 third of the way done this design. Alright, so let's go ahead here. Let's press on Finish Form. And now there is still one more thing that we have to do and that's that part of the handle is now inside of the top body portion as you can see there. So let's go ahead, let's go surface and let's go trim. And what we're trying to do is get rid of that portion of the handle, like I said, that's extruding up into the top body there. So all we have to do, Let's click on the top surface there. Let me just show you so you can see it right in there. That's the portion that we're trying to get rid of. Click on OK, and you can see that it is gone. However, it's on a whole and we want it to be a whole. So let's go ahead. So let me open this up since sectional analysis so that we can see, here we go, sectional analysis. Let's do the side view and now you can tell exactly what I'm talking about. You see we want this part right here to be a whole, but right now it's actually covering the portion that leads to the handle. So we are going to have to do one more Trim function. So let's get that done right now so that the body is completely hollow. So here we go, trim, click on this, and then let's see if we can click on the handle itself. There we go. There we go. Okay, so here we go. You can see that the part that we're trying to get rid of there is highlighted as red. It's a little bit tough to tell because we are in sectional analysis, but nonetheless, let's go ahead and click on Okay, and that should hollow it out. There we go. You can see we are getting there. The shape of our hairdryer is getting pretty close. Let me just show you that we still have our two bodies. So the next thing that we are going to do is actually combine these two bodies. And we can do that by using the stitch feature. However, first let's get out of the, let's get out of sectional analysis here so that we can have a better look. So here we go, sectional analysis. Again, we'll click on that side plane. Let's bring that out. And okay, there we go. Thanks, should go away. There we go. Okay, So what we wanna do is we want these two bodies that we can see on the side to be one. So let's go ahead and let's press on the stitch feature. And then let's actually combine these two together so that we only have one solid body. Now you'll see that the intersection point between them, It's kinda highlighted by this green line. That is the part that we are essentially stitching together. And then this is kinda the only hard edge that's left on our surface. Let's stitch this and then you guessed it probably. Now what we're gonna do is we are going to fill it that connection point as we did have a whole class on fill it. So let's create that, fill it right now we can do this out of the Modify and then fill it should be there, There we go. Or I guess you can just press F, but let's go ahead and let's actually fill it in that connection point between them. And let's clean up the look of that because. Again, if it was, you know, if it was connected like that, it definitely won't be very strong. So go ahead and make the fill it, whatever you want it to be. I'm going to play with it for a second here and get what I think looks good. And I think that looks pretty good at 50 millimeters. So there we go. You can see we are indeed one step closer, 8 finally, and it actually looks like a hairdryer. We are definitely getting there, but we have a lot of detailing left to add, and I hope that you're still here. I hope that you're still along with me if you need to slow it down or restart, don't worry at all. It is a little bit of a complicated project, but again, we finally have a completely curved body occurred figure. You could use this for something like a creating a car or a gas tank for a motorcycle, something like that. But let's keep going. So, so now what we're gonna do is we're going to actually use the spline tool up here again, but this time we're using the spline tool to actually create a cut. And let me show you what I mean. So basically what I want to do at this point is to start adding detail to our hairdryer. So let's use the spline tool and let's create a cut on the backside of the hairdryer so that we can start adding some detail. If you actually look at a hairdryer, It's usually two different pieces or at least the ones that I looked at before I'm making this video. So let's adjust the spline, this line right here. And we're going to be cutting this into a completely different piece. Again, you can adjust yours however you want. I'm just kinda messy around with the shape here until I find something that I think is going to look, look decent. So I think that looks pretty good right there. Let's Finish Sketch. And then now what we're gonna do is we're actually going to go into the Split Body feature here under Modify. And then what we do is we click on the body that we want to split. And then we need to go ahead and we need to actually select our spline Line and you'll see it makes it really cool kinda feature. And now there is indeed that line right there. And on the left-hand side, you see we have the two different bodies as it has indeed been split. So we now have our first kind of separate piece that we're going to be using for details within our design. So let's go ahead, let's do create. And then what we're gonna do is we're actually going to start adding thickness and changing this from a surface into a real body so easily that they could tool. Let's actually select the main face, the main portion of our hairdryer so far and let's add some thickness to this. Remember, you can thicken it in the positive or the negative direction or both if you wanted to. So let's go ahead and let's just go negative two millimeters to say. And let's add in this thickness. So once I add this in here and let's go. Okay, you should be able to see this. Let me show you from the front where it shows that kinda hollow view. And you'll be able to see that this is now a solid body. So now we can see on the left-hand side we have the solid body. As before, it was just a surface body. Now, if you look at the front side of the actual hairdryer, you can see that there is indeed thickness and it is now a solid body, so that's good. That is step number 1. Now, what we wanna do is obviously do that to the backside as well. However, before I do that to the back, I think it's time that we actually start adding in some real details like some high, high Hen, kind of like fancier details. This will be the first time in the course that we've done something like this so far. So, but let's go ahead and let's create a sketch. And let's put this on the backside here of a real hairdryer. So let's go ahead. Let's create this sketch on the back. Now this sketch that we're going to make on the back should hopefully be nothing new to us. So what we're gonna do, I think let's go with something like a polygon. Square would be two planes. So let's go ahead and let's go Create, and then let's actually create a sketch for some polygons. And then what we're gonna do is maybe you are, hopefully you guessed it. We're going to make kind of a circle and then we'll do a pattern circles. So here we go, circumscribed polygon. Let's go ahead. Let's put one of these in the middle. Again, dimensions don't really matter at this point. Do not pay too much attention to your dimensions. This is just for appearance. So from there, let's go ahead. Let's make a circle. The reason that we're making this circle, we're actually just making it into a construction line is because we're going to use this circle to create a circular pattern of our circumscribed polygons. Let's go ahead. Let's make another polygon. Let's put this right above the other one. And then let's for the size, well, let's make them all the same size. Let's go ahead and let's equate that one line here and this line, click on the equal sign. There we go. Now we have both of them are equal. And then let's go ahead and let's actually make the circular pattern. What we're going to have to do is click on all of the sides of this one polygon. And then hopefully again, hopefully this is not anything new. Let's just make a circular pattern of this polygon. So I'm gonna do that right now. And you can just follow along or hopefully you can do this on your own at this point. All right, now that sketches done here, now this is a little bit before. What we could do is just kinda extrude these through as holes as if this was kinda just a normal sketch and a solid body. But now what we actually have to do is kind of split the surface body. So first thing, let's get rid of this body here so that now this is all we can see, that's much better. And now let me show you kinda how this goes. So we go modify and then more we're actually going to be doing for this one. This is something that we haven't used a lot. So again, split body. Let's go ahead and click on this one. Then let's actually click on the shape. But this one, like I said, it's a little bit monotonous. We actually have to do this over and over again. So I'm going to just press Okay. And then I'm going to go ahead and I'm going to do this for every single shape. I do have to do these one-by-one. Maybe it works to do them all at once for you. But for me right now, I'm actually on my office computer, so I'm gonna do these one by one and then we'll proceed. Okay, Now that all of those are done, we can definitely see the shapes on the back of the item. But what you'll see is that it's just the sketches that are projected on there. So now we go ahead and go modify, delete, select all of them, and then boom, OK, and now we actually have the shape that we're looking for. If I add the body back here, you can see that it is indeed coming along. There is some extra detail now, we can add even more detail by thickening it, but we're actually going to thicken it different from the main body. So the first one, what we did is we did minus two millimeters, I believe this one. Let's go ahead and let's symmetrically thicken it by either negative or just two millimeters so that we have kind of an increased or a raised edge. And again, all that does is it adds some really nice detail to looks like a lot. Let's maybe try one. And then again, symmetric, so that looks pretty good right there. And I think this is starting to look more realistic and more like a real hairdryer. So Let me know what you guys think of that again, hopefully maybe you did the same pattern or something different, but nonetheless, we finally have some shape coming together. Now, let's keep going. What we want to do now is keep adding detail. So let's create a sketch on the front plane here. And what we wanna do is start adding in some buttons and some other neat features. So let's start by creating a slot. So center to center slot. With that being said, we do need a center line. So let's go ahead, Let's zoom out here and let's create a center line so that we can start adding in the slot. So here we go line, go ahead and add in a center line. And then remember that these sketches are going to be projected back onto that front plane. We're then going to put those sketches and we're going to basically project goes onto our surface bodies. Let's add in this center to center slot right here. Let me show you exactly what I mean. So first thing is first, here we go. Let's add this in here. Let's make this okay, 15, that looks pretty good as it is. And you can see here that out the back is where it is. But we have one problem is if we go to Split Face, this, we're going to want to split the face. However, what would happen is that this is going to be projected through the back and the front of our handles. So before we actually go ahead and split that face, what we have to do a split our handle here into two pieces. Now, if you're wondering how we do this, well basically we've actually already done this because that handle is made up using our spline line. So you can see here if I went and I actually want to split the face, this is the sketches. Now I'm going to be on both sides of the handle. So let me show you here. If I rotate around, you'll see there it is. So how we solve this, basically what we're gonna do is we're going to split the handle itself into two pieces because we do not want this on the front and the back, we just want it on the front. So here we go. Let's go ahead and delete. Let's get rid of this piece here. Now, that is not going to work either actually. So how are we going to get rid of this? Now, let's go ahead and let's actually just delete the function that we did. So here we go to Lee and now they're both gone. There we go. So first thing that we need to do is we need to split this handle into two pieces. Like I said, we have our spline line that we made. So let's go ahead and let's find that spline Line Sketch. And then we'll use that spline sketch to actually split this handle in two pieces. So let's find it here. There it is. So under sketch number two we have our spline, and this is what we're going to use to split the handle in half. So here we go. Let's go split, split the face. This is split face, and then let's go ahead and use the splitting tool. We already know exactly the line that we're going to use as well as a face that we want to split, that is our handles. And you'll see now this is indeed split into two pieces. And so because that's going to be 22 pieces now it can actually go all the way back and we can find our sketch of the buttons or a button panel. Here it is n. Let's now put this sketch onto the front side only of our handle. So what we're going to need to do that, Let's go modify. Again. We're gonna go split face and we're just going to select the front face. And then we're going to click on our original sketch there. And now you can see only on the front, which is exactly what we were looking for. So next thing we wanna do is, well, first let's actually get rid of this sketch that's on the back. So let's go ahead and we can actually hide this in the side panel there. And there we go. That's a little bit more clean. Now what we wanna do is pretty much just keep on adding different buttons and different detailing. As I mentioned before, you can kind of do this however you want. You can add whatever features you want. But here I'm just going to pull this out. This is basically just extruding it out to a small distance to add just that little bit of extra detail. So go ahead. There's some whatever buttons you put in there as well then will definitely add a little fill it after just to clean things up. So I'm going to go ahead right now and I'm just going to add a few more buttons using that exact same technique. And then what I'm gonna do is just fill IT them just like this here, just to clean this up and yeah, I think that looks pretty good there. So I'm going to fast forward this a little bit as I go through and I add these buttons, go ahead and make your own. If you're following along closely, do you know whatever buttons you want, make it a little bit different from mine. And so I'm going to fast forward this right now. All right, and I think that that looks really good right about there we have the top kind of power button, if you will, and then the bottom maybe that's like a heat button, something like that. Now what I wanna do is add some detailing on the back. So I'm gonna use the spline tool here and I'm going to add kind of a additional little holder that maybe the battery goes or some sort of feature like that. What I'm gonna do here is just kinda play with the shape using the spline tool. And then I'm just going to add this feature. And now remember this sketch is now on the side plane, not the front or the back plane. So yeah, here we go. I'm going to speed up through this a little bit as it is the exact same process. But all I'm doing here is playing with the size of this kind of back panel that I'm adding until I get it to somewhere that I want it. So here we go. Split face. In. Here we go, I'm going to split it from this body here. And now we can see that we have this new panel and this one looks a little bit big. Yeah, I see that looks too big. So I'm going to edit this sketch using the spline tool again, I'm just going to go ahead and adjust the splines to make that a little bit smaller because I think let's see how it looks. Yeah. Yes, I'm just gonna go ahead and edit this and play with the size again, this is just another feature. You guys can go ahead and add that in own if you want this feature or go ahead and make a completely different feature. Alright, and we got that panel part done. Now it's time to put in some additional details on here as well. Basically, I'm going to add sort of repeating pattern that goes up and down. You can see it right here. Again, we're using the exact same process or just making one good shape and then a center line. And we're just using a rectangular pattern and we're just making multiples of this one to go ahead and add in that detail. So again, I'm going to speed this process up because it is the exact same thing over and over like we've been doing. So again, like I said, you can add in whatever details you want. I think that this one looks pretty good as it is. So here again, I'm just splitting the faces and then I'm probably gonna have to do this one by one. Let's go ahead and see how the first one lungs. There we go. Let's see. Yeah, I'm going to have to do these one by one. There we go. Okay, so I'm gonna go ahead and do these and then I'll jump back in in just a moment. Okay, you can see we have all of those details added now with the fillets. I think those look pretty good, but there is one more thing we got to do that is the bottom. So what we're going to create and we're going to use patch, okay, but I'm not sure if we'd use patch before, but let's just go ahead and patch the bottom and then we can just go ahead. Solid earth soil surface thicken and we can now thick in the bottom again, I'm sorry, I know I'm going through this quickly. You can slow down the video if you need to or go back and play it. But then right now we're just going to basically go ahead and join the bodies there. That one's a little bit optional, but from there we can go ahead and we can add in a fill it to this one. And we can go ahead and extrude. Let's make this one a little bit bigger. So yeah, press pull. I'm just kind of playing around with the shape of it at this point. Again, just do it however you want to. I'm just trying to make it kinda look like the hairdryer now I'm looking at, so I'm going to taper this a little bit. And there we go to justice. Okay, so what I'm doing is I'm setting this up because I think I'm going to add a chord like some sort of wire cord or something like that at the bottom. Let's just fill it this in here quickly too, and that looks good. Okay, now we have this. I think this is looking pretty good before we go ahead and add a wire, let's do something we haven't done before and that is adding an appearance. I think adding an appearance is a really cool part. I know we haven't done it so far in the course, but what we can do is basically just add in some colors to our designs. You can right-click after you right-clicking, go ahead and just go down and click on appearance. Once you have appearance clicked, you will be given this kinda toolbar. And then from here, let's bring that up 1 second here. Bring up our appearance to a bar. I think it's just sitting there it is. Okay, So from here, there's basically all these different folders and you can go through and you can kind of select on the different material that you're using. And then within that, there'll be different colors. So for example, here is 0. First thing at the top is bodies and components and there's faces. I will be going through the shortly play with that on your own as well. It's basically just letting us select the amount of things that we apply, the different material to you. So here you can see I just drag and drop the white ABS, which would be plastic. You're into 3D printing Obviously you know what ABS is. So. Here we go over the next. I'll probably just speed this up because what I'm gonna do is just add in a bunch different appearances that I think look good. Now I would encourage you just do the same thing. Don't follow my Appearance. Make yours look however you want. Play around with it. Experiment. This is kind of a cool part of Fusion 360. And the other thing that I want to know is that some of them will look the same. For example, if you click on metal and plastic and you add a white metal or a white plastic, they will look very similar. So you might be wondering what's the difference between the actual material selection. But when we go to actually make a render of this, like when we render a final high-definition image, it will look a little bit different. So do try and pick the right material. All right, and here's mine. Let's just quickly change up this visual style. Let's set this to standard. And now we have a kind of render like appearance to it. I think that looks pretty good. We're just about done. Let's add in that last little detail, which is that electrical cord. So to do this, I'm gonna use the spline tool as usual. We're gonna go ahead, let's just put this spline tool. Whatever pattern you want, you can go ahead and add this. It's even completely optional if you do want to add this. But again, what I'm gonna do is use the plane along a path tool. Like I said, we use this not super often in different designs, but in a design such as a hairdryer with this many curves surfaces and the spline tool is very useful. So let's create that sketch. Let's go ahead and make a circle and pick whatever diameter you think is sufficient. This looks good. Bow right here, eight millimeters and then hopefully maybe by now you guessed it. We're going to sweep and we're just going to click on our little circle there. And let's click on our path for the spline there. And we have that looks pretty good as it is. For some reason it's hidden right now. It should be here. There we go. It was cut, but instead of cut, we do need a new body. So now we have our electrical cord and I think that looks pretty good. We can add in some appearance if we want to it, Let's go ahead. Let's do a fabric as if it had kind of a fabric outside of it. Let's just add this in here and that there is the final detail of our hairdryer. I hope this lesson was useful. I know it's a ton. We're jumping right into a complex shape. But I did wanna kinda challenge you guys and show you all the different things that we can do within Fusion 360 so that there is how to create basically any object that has a lot of curves you can see where we started versus where he's finished. It is quite impressive and that is the hairdryer lesson. So that's it for this one. I'll see you guys in the next lesson.