Fun With Figures: Create a Stylised Character With Confidence | Charly Clements | Skillshare

Fun With Figures: Create a Stylised Character With Confidence

Charly Clements, Greeting Card Designer and Illustrator

Fun With Figures: Create a Stylised Character With Confidence

Charly Clements, Greeting Card Designer and Illustrator

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18 Lessons (1h 32m)
    • 1. Intro

      1:32
    • 2. Classs Breakdown

      1:39
    • 3. The Stick Man Method

      0:52
    • 4. Basic Proportions

      3:53
    • 5. Exaggerated Proportions

      6:28
    • 6. 3 Ways To Add Movement

      6:54
    • 7. Mini Project: Stick Figure Poses

      5:51
    • 8. Mini Project: Body Types

      3:13
    • 9. Hairstyle Practice

      9:24
    • 10. Hands and Feet Practice

      13:20
    • 11. Outfits & Accessories

      6:23
    • 12. Mini Project: Tell a Story

      7:04
    • 13. Main Project: Pick a Prompt

      0:58
    • 14. Main Project: Reference Images

      3:37
    • 15. Main Project: Sketch Your Character

      6:00
    • 16. Main Project: Colour Thumbnails

      8:16
    • 17. Main Project: Final Character

      6:14
    • 18. Thank You

      0:44
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About This Class

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Resources:

Download all exercise and cheatsheets here

Tara Oval Sketch Brush - For Procreate

Inky Sketch Brush set by David Belliveau **Free download**

This class is jam packed full of exercises, cheatsheets and actionable steps to help build your confidence when drawing people.

What I'll be covering in the class:

  • Basic proportions
  • Exaggerated proportions
  • How to add movement to your characters
  • Tips on drawing hair
  • How to easily tell a story through outfits and props
  • Colour thumbnails
  • 15 brand new drawing prompts!
  • My whole process of drawing people

This class is for anyone who wants to create stylised characters with confidence. I'll be showing you my whole process in Procreate, but please feel free to follow along with any drawing app :)

Music by Bensound

Meet Your Teacher

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Charly Clements

Greeting Card Designer and Illustrator

Top Teacher

Hey, I'm charly!

I’m a greeting card designer and freelance illustrator from the UK, mostly known for my stylised portraits and fun colour palettes. 4 years ago I decided to sell all my belongings and travel around the world armed with only my iPad Pro. I now run my creative career full time from my laptop and iPad, working on projects that I love, collaborating with dream brands and licensing my work out to stores around the world.

You can find my work online and in stores internationally on mugs, greeting cards, apparel, and more. 

I love sharing my latest work, process videos and mini tutorials on Instagram and youtube so feel free to check them out :)

Join our amazing creative community&... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Intro: Hey, I'm Charlie. A greeting card designer and illustrator based in Thailand. Being able to draw people has opened up so many doors for me over the years. My characters have been seen on puzzles, in magazines, and even on bank cards. I used to find drawing people so difficult and would avoid it at all costs but I soon realized, like anything, it just takes practice and a little guidance. This class is jam-packed full of exercises, cheat-sheets, and actionable steps to help guide you through the whole process of drawing people. We'll learn the rules of basic proportions and how to break these rules to create exaggerated characters. I'll teach you how to draw different hairstyles, how to easily tell a story throughout outfits and props and give you a crash course on drawing hands and feet. Often, characters can look rigid and stiff, so I've put together lessons that will help you create movement in your poses. Once you've built up your confidence, we'll then move on to the main project. I want you to create a final character using one of the prompts I have provided. I'll walk you through my whole process of finding a reference image to work from, how I sketch out my character, and how to pick colors that pop. This class is for anyone who wants to build their confidence when drawing people. I'll be showing you my whole process in Procreate, but please feel free to follow along with any other drawing app. Drawing people doesn't have to be scary, so let's get started. 2. Classs Breakdown: For your main project, I would need to create a stylized character using one of the prompts I provided. Before we move on to the main project, I'll walk you through fun lessons and exercises to help you build your confidence when drawing people. We'll start with basic proportions and how to exaggerate them. I'll also share all my tips on how I create stylized characters. Throughout the class, I'll be using the Tara oval sketch brush. This is a brush that I use in all of my sketches. Unfortunately, it's only available in Procreate. If you're working with Photoshop, I found a great alternative. This brush is called grainy ink, and it's by an amazing artists called David Belliveau. He's been so kind to gift his inky sketch brush to you guys for free, and you can download it in the resource section below. This brush is actually part of a free brush bundle on David's website. If you'd like this brush, I'd highly recommend downloading the whole set. They're really great. I've left a link in the description below. I'll also be using the monoline brush to outline my final character. You can find it under calligraphy here. I've included lots of exercises and cheat sheets to help guide you through each lesson. You can find these in the resources section below. If you have any issues finding them, I've also added a Dropbox link where you can access them there too. You can find all the information you need under the About section of this class. Ready to get better at drawing people? Let's get started. 3. The Stick Man Method: Drawing characters that look in proportion can be really tricky, especially if you're adding movement. There is so much to cover with anatomy, but I don't want you to feel overwhelmed. What I've learned over the years is you don't need to know everything about anatomy in order to draw stylized characters. You just need to know some of those basic rules. Rather than going to the final illustration first, create the pose with a simple stick man. Then you can go in, and flesh it out. I don't want this process to be overwhelming, so I'm going to break down everything into really simple steps. Over the next few videos, I'm going to teach you the basic rules of proportions and how to break those rules. We'll also look at how to add movement to your characters. So join me in the next video. 4. Basic Proportions: Okay. So in this video, I'm going to share some of my tips on how to create basic proportions, and it's really important to know some of these moves before we start drawing our characters. I have this as the download, and I want you to follow along. The body is normally made up of around eight heads. I have my canvas split into eight sections. Once you brought this into your Canvas, we're going to start to draw those basic proportions using that stick figure that I showed you in the last video. I want you to create a circle for the head, and then a simple line coming down one-third of the second section. Create a line for the shoulders, and this shouldn't come any wider than around three heads. Draw a circle next to the head to see if it's any wider, but this only applies to basic proportions. Then create another line about the same width as the shoulders, and this is where the hips go. The hips will come down exactly halfway between the top of the head and where the ankles will go. So this line here will then join it with a line for the spine, and I wan you to draw some circles where the joints will go. A really important role when you're creating your characters, always create the knees halfway between the ankles and the hip. This is four sections. I know my knees are going to come in halfway here. Create two circles where the knees will go. Then join these lines by this and create small circles for the ankles, and join these lines like this. This is really important when you're creating your characters, that you always draw the knees halfway between the hips and the ankles, and we'll just finish that off with some triangles for the feet. It's important to create the arms last. This is because we need to use the body to measure where the hand is going to be. The hand in a resting position will come halfway between the hip and the knee. Around here, and then we can join the arm like that. Now, I want you to draw the elbow halfway between the shoulder and the wrist. Repeat this on the other side. Just draw a really simple hand and join them up. Once you've created the arms, you know where the elbow will go. This is going to be really important later on. So just a quick recap of what we've learned so far. When it comes to basic proportions, the body is normally made up of around eight heads, and the shoulders and hips shouldn't be any wider than around three heads. The knees always come around halfway between the hip and the ankle and remember to create the arms last. In a resting position the hand to lay around halfway between the knee and the hip, and then the elbow, halfway between the shoulder joint and the wrist. Now you know all about basic proportions, and what to pay attention to. Join me in the next video, where we're going to be breaking these rules in creating exaggerated characters. 5. Exaggerated Proportions: Now we know some of the basic rules. In this video, we're going to break them. I'm going to create my character, seven heads tall. I'm going to bring this circle down. I want you to start playing around with creating different heights and shapes for your stick figures. I'll follow that simple rule again with going coming down about 1/3, and this time I'm going to make the shoulders less wide. I also want my character to be a little bit wider, so I don't need to have the hips on the same line, I'm going to move them down slightly. I'll put them above here. I've made the torso a lot shorter in this one compared to my basic proportions. So you can change the length of the torso and the length of the legs, but no matter what, I want you to always create the knees halfway between the hips and the ankles. The knees aren't going to be on this line anymore because I've moved the hips down slightly. I need to estimate the halfway point between here and here. This is going to be around there, so the knees come down a little bit. Because this character is a little bit larger, I'll make the knees wider like this, and then I can create the ankles again. Notice how I'm still maintaining those proportions even though I'm changing up the height. Now that I have all of the body created, I want you need to start estimating where the hand will go. Now that the knees are in a slightly different position, I have to now work out the new halfway point between the hip and the knees. Again, the hands will come down to about here. Even if you're making exaggerated characters, it's really important to follow that basic rule. I'll create a line coming down like this, and now I'm going to estimate the halfway point for the outlay, so it will be about here. Because this character is quite wide, the arms are going to be hidden slightly behind that hip. I'll do the same on the other side. Even though I created a character that is a lot shorter and wider, I still stuck to that basic rule of the hands coming in about halfway between the knee and hip, and also the knee coming in halfway between the ankle and the hip. These rules are really important if you want to create characters that look in proportion. I want you to create one more character and still stick into those rules, play around with height. I could create a head really small. Create a small head, have the shoulders really wide. Don't forget those shoulder joints. I could have the hips on this line here. You can play around with the width of the hips. If you want to create hips that are really long, you can make them a lot wider, or if you want them to have an hourglass figure, you can create the line a lot less wide. Maybe I'll do that, and then create the spine. As you can see, this character's torso is a lot shorter than this one. I've pushed those hips up at least one head, and that's okay. It's fine for the legs to be really long. But if I was to create the torso down here, my character would look really strange. I want you to play around with making the torso shorter, but you don't want the torso to be longer than the legs. I'll have their hips about here, and I just want you to have fun with this. Have the spine, and again, I'm just creating those joints for the legs. I want you to count again how many sections there is to the last line, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. I know that my knees are going to come in two-and-a-half sections down, so around here. The more you practice with this, that the better you'll get at estimating that halfway point. I'll join these knees. Again, notice that I'm leaving the arms till last. This character is very exaggerated. The legs are a lot longer, but again, I stuck to those basic rules. I'm just going to see where the hand will go, about here and join those up. Then I can create the elbows. There are a few things I want you to remember when you're creating your own exaggerated characters. I want you to play around with the height of your character by changing the length of the torso and legs. I also want you to play around with the shape of your character through the width of the hips and shoulders. Even when you're creating exaggerated characters, I still want to follow some of those basic rules. Remember to have the hand halfway between the hip and the knee, and the knees halfway between the hip and the ankles. Lastly, avoid making the torso longer than the legs. It could make your character look strange. Now over to you. I want you to create two stick figures with exaggerated proportions. Remember to follow some of those basic rules but also have fun with it. See you in the next video. 6. 3 Ways To Add Movement: It can be really difficult to create characters that look in proportion as soon as you add movement. In this video, I'm going to share my top three tips on how you can create movement while still keeping those proportions. Number 1, through the arms. We've learned how to measure the arm against the body in a resting position. But I want to show you how you can add movement. I don't want to create my arm, just resting by my character side, it can look really boring and stiff. I want you to start playing around with different ways that you can move the arms. I could have my character's arms sticking up like this, but it's now really difficult for me to know if those arms are long enough in comparison to the body. I have a little hack. If you go to the Lasso and select your arm, you can pivot it round to see where it comes in comparison to the body. This is really short in comparison to the body. I need my hands to come at least here. So I know that I need to resize this arm to fit that proportion, because that's really important. I can just drag my arm down to make sure that it's in proportion to the body, and then I can just rotate it back and bring it up like this. Then on the other side, I can just drag that arm to match the new length. So if you're doubting whether the arms are long enough, you can always use that tip. Having the elbow as a halfway point is really important. I don't want you to create your arms really long hair and quite short there. Again, the arm will look out of proportion. It's important to keep those lengths very similar. This will make your character look a lot more in proportion. I want you to create different arms for your characters. Remember, if you're struggling to keep them in proportion, you can always use the Lasso tool. Number 2, the legs. We're now going to start to add movement to our legs. I could have this character's leg out straight like this, and this leg kicking out like that. My character's foot is now off the ground, so I need to move this leg in order for it to hold this character's weight. Again, we can just pivot that leg around. Now this leg is strong enough to hold up my character's pose. If you're creating a character where the foot is off the ground, always make sure that that other leg is directly under the body so it can hold that weight. I can also have my character's leg poking out like this, I'm still keeping the same length on all of these parts. I want you to have a play around with different positions of the legs. If you're creating one foot off the ground, make sure that you have a leg that's start directly under the body to hold that weight. Number 3, through the shoulders and hips. You can add a lot of movement through the shoulders and hips. If I was to create the shoulders tilted this way, and then the hips, I could curve that spine round like this. I've added a lot of movement already to my character's torso. If I was to add a leg coming down like this. This is five sections, so I know the knee will come back here. I can't have the leg coming down like this because the hip has been shifted up, I need to make this leg come up as well. I'm just looking to see where the new knee will be. About here, so I'm following that line, the same line as the new hips. I know that this foot will come up about here. This foot is flat on the ground and this foot is raised a little bit. I can create the arms straight up again, and because this shoulder is raised slightly, I'll bring that hand up a little bit more, just because their body is shifted slightly. This is one way of adding movement to your character. If you were to create your shoulders at the same angle, so not opposite. Your character would be at different perspective. This character is now looking this way, so I'm not going to be covering perspective in this class. I'd recommend that you create your shoulders and hips up opposite angles like this. Create a character that is more head-on. Again, the knee is going to go here because this hip has now been shifted down. Then you can have this leg the same length as this part here. You can see that I'm creating movement with my characters or still paying attention to those basic rules of the arms and the legs. I'm just going to go over some of those points one more time. You can use the Lasso tool to check if the arm is the right length in comparison to the body. If you're creating a character with one leg off the ground, remember to add the other leg directly under the body. This will help to support the weight. Add lots of movement to your character by creating opposite angles for the shoulders and hips. But try to avoid creating them at the same angle unless you want to create a character that's in perspective. Now we know how to add movement. Join me in the next video where we're going to create full stick figure poses without guidelines. 7. Mini Project: Stick Figure Poses: In this video, I want you to create full dynamic poses using the stick man method I showed in the last video, this time without guidelines. Once you've created these poses, we're then going to flesh them out using skin tones. If you struggle picking skin tones, don't worry I've put together a skin tone cheat sheet that you can find in the resources section below. Once you've downloaded the skin tone cheat sheet, I want you to bring it into your canvas. We're going to color pick from this to make a brand new palette. I'll click on the circle here, create a new palette. I'll just hold my finger down and start to color, pick all of these colors. What you'd be left with is this. I'll just delete this. I'll just remove this as well. I'll create a new layer. Now I'm going to start to create my stick man poses. draw a line. This is going to be the base for where my characters are standing. I will bring the opacity down. Just so I can see it and create a new layer. I'm just going to play around with different poses. I want to create four characters that vary in height and also body type. I'll have a tall character first with quite a small head. I'll have her shoulders quite straight, and also her hips. I'm going to draw little circles for where the joint are and this will just help me. I already made a mistake by drawing the arm. Try and create the body first and then the arms will fit in with that. I'll have her legs pointing inwards and this could indicate that she's quite nervous or uncomfortable. Am starting to try and get this personality across through the body language. Maybe I'll have her arms kind of behind her. This will just add to that awkwardness and just her spine curve in really slightly. For my second one, I'm going to go a little bit shorter. We'll have the head about here, the shoulders a little less wide than this one. Maybe I could exaggerate the hips. I have the hips really wide, like this. Then I could have her legs, just straight out like that. This is more of a power pose. This person is confident they're standing strong and it's very different to my first character. I'll do the spine. Maybe I could have the arms at her side. Maybe she's angry or just feeling confident. When you're creating your stick man poses, try think about the type of action or personality that you want to get across in those poses. I'll have one that is moving more. I'll do this by having the shoulders slanted up and maybe the hips coming down like this. She has this bend in her spine and I'll draw the knee about halfway down. Maybe she has this leg out like this. This arm could be brought up. I'll have this arm reaching out. I'm just estimating how long the arm is in comparison to the body. The more you practice, the better you get. But if you're really doubting it, then I'd recommend this trick. I want you to move the arm down and see where it would come down in comparison to the body. This is coming down to around halfway. I feel like it's actually a little bit long, so I can just make it smaller and then bring it back to wherever I had it before. You can always test it out by that. I'm on to my last pose now and they're varying in height a little bit. But maybe it could be fun to have a character kneeling on the floor just so it's completely different to the last three. This is a really good time for you to start playing around with the type of action you want your characters to be doing. I'm thinking this character is kneeling. I'll have the knees on the ground. I'll have this arm out like that, maybe they're doing something on the ground, so maybe they're reaching for something. I'm just trying to think of a type of story or narrative that my character will be doing. I have my four stick figure poses. I'm just going to remove this layer and bring the opacity down. We're now going to flesh out our characters. 8. Mini Project: Body Types: I'll create a new layer on top. Using the skin tones that we brought into our canvas earlier, we're now going to start to bring these characters to life. I'll pick a light skin tone for my first character and I'll follow the stick man as a guide. I'm using this line and I'm not coming out too much and I'm going to flesh it out more on this side so it's thicker inside and then I'm tracing over this outside line. This character is going to be quite thin, so I'm just following this line, and again, tracing over the outside of the legs and then creating the body type through the inside like this. By having her feet pointed in like this, it's just helping show this character's personality. Think about the body language as well as the action. I'll just drag and drop that in, and that's my first character, is quite tall. I'm just going to pick a darker skin tone for this character. Go for this tanned. I'll follow this curve and because she's got quite wide hips, I'm going to make this character quite curvy. I'm following this hip round. Don't worry about hands at this point, I just want you to build confidence with drawing poses. I'll bring the ankles in, and again, I'm just making this character quite curvy. For my next character, I'll go for this nice brown. It's important to represent different skin tones in your characters. This character is dancing. I'm just trying to think of the body type that this character would have. She'd be athletic, quite muscly, so I'm just going to try and show that through her body. You should be left with four characters that vary in height, body type, and ethnicity. Feel free to use the skin tones I provided. We're going to come back to this later on in the class, but in the next video, we're going to practice drawing hair. 9. Hairstyle Practice: In this video, we're going to practice drawing different hairstyles. I've put together this hairstyle practice sheet and cheat sheet to help you out. You can find this in the resources section below. Once you've imported your hairstyle practice sheet into your Canvas, we're going to bring in our cheat sheet as well. I'll drag and drop my photos and I'll have my cheat sheet that I can refer back to when I'm creating my hairstyles. I'll just make that a bit smaller. I can just see which hairstyles are going to inspire me for these characters. Really important, apply a new layer on top, and this will allow us to erase the hairstyle without affecting this bottom layer. I'm just going to start looking at my cheat sheet, and I think I'm going to create this hairstyle, but with a different headline. I'm just going to create this kind of parting. I always start my parting around one-third or halfway between the eyebrows and the top of the head. I'll just block these out before I add any volume. I'll then come up from the top of the head slightly, and this is where I start to add volume. I'll just bring this up and have this triangle here, and then I can follow it the head round by this. This just helps me add a bit of volume, and I can really start to show the type of hair that this person has. She has a lot of volume and I think I'm going to bring these curls down. I was going to start with this one, but actually I quite like the idea of having her curls coming down. I'm just going to bring it down into this triangle. Fill that in, and as you can see, I'm just blocking out the shape first. I've created the hair a lot thicker on this side because her face is at a slight angle. I could just add a bit more volume here. The next one, I am thinking this hairstyle. I really loved these buns, so I'm just going to focus on her fringe first. I'll block out this shape here and then bring some hair just a little bit more over like this, just to show that it's not completely flat to her head, and of course you got to remember that hairline and side bun. Her hair isn't going to be too wild because it's scraped up. This is enough volume on top of her head, and then I'll create the circle on top, and then a slightly smaller one as well. I can just bring some hairs out like this just to make it look more natural. Her hair could just come out a little bit more. Just by doing that, it doesn't look really flat to her head. I'm really happy with this one, so I'm just going to move on, and I'm looking at maybe I could create this one. I love this old school hairdo, so I'm just going to start with this fringe. Again, remember block out the shapes of your hairstyles first, and then you can start to add. I'm just bringing in her hair like this and her side bun and then her hairline. Bring it down a little bit, so just hint at it from this side. I'm going to start with the ponytail. It always starts quite thin and small at the base, and then you can bring it out, and it can come wider at the bottom like this. I'm going to start practicing with this girl, and I want to completely change up her hair type. I'm going to give her this type of Afro. A common mistake I see a lot of people do is though individually add curls for Afros. I used to do that as well, but as I've been practicing, I've noticed that it's a lot easier to just block out the whole shape of the hair first, and then we can always go in and add curls later on. I'm going to follow this kind of halo shape around her head, and I'm going to start her Afro around here. You can play around with how the Afro sits, but I think this is quite a good place to start, and then I'm going to bring it round into this kind of circles. As you can see, I've gone a bit flat at the top, so I'm just going to add a bit more volume and bring it down. I'm adding those little bumps to indicate where the curls are without actually drawing them. I'm just going to block out her whole hair, and then I'll focus on the hairline, and coming down about one third again for where her hair will stop. You can also add some flyaway hairs like this as well, just to show that her hair is curly. You can add more or less depending on how messy or neat her hair is. I'm going to go on to this one now. I'm going to show you how I create short hair. I'll bring that down to her ear, give it some volume at the top, and then I have her hair quite flat to her head until it starts coming past her ear. Then I'll come out into this kind of teardrop. You can see that this shape of the hair is just quite subtle, and then I can bring it round like this, and because her head's at an angle, I'm just going to hint on the other side. For this character, I love this 90s hair style. I'm just going to put this on her. Always paying attention to where the hair comes out from the top of the head and hair coming out like this, it's just not natural, and then problem is people will create the hairstyle on top and the head will become long. We use this as a guide for where your head is going to go. Then bring it down like this, and we'll have her hair just flicking down, and going into this thin point. It's going to be a little bit loose hair where the buns are. Depending on how much volume you want your characters to have on the hair is, how much you add this bump hair. If you don't want them to have any volume, you can just bring that around like that, and then you can see that it looks really flat to her head. Here are my nine different hairstyles. I want you to follow along, and create different hairstyles for these characters. Remember to block out the shape first and then you can add detail afterwards. You can refer back to my cheat sheet, at anytime if you're feeling stuck. I can't wait to see what you guys come up with. 10. Hands and Feet Practice: In this video, we're going to practice drawing hands and feet. I want you to create a square canvas, go to the span here, and turn on drawing guide, and then edit drawing guide. I want you put the grid size to around 80 and you can play around with the opacity here as well. These are going to act as a guide for where we draw our hands and feet. I'm going to create a line, to separate my canvas, and just write hands up here, and feet. I know hands can be really intimidating, so don't worry, we're just going to break them down into simple shapes. I want you to pick a light color, I'm just going to go for this tail and make it quite like. This is going to be the color that we sketch out our hands and feet, and then afterwards, we're going to add detail, and meeting up with the black. We're going to break down the hands into really simple shapes. I want you to create a circle, I'm then going to box it off with a line here, and bring that up like that, just so it's flat on one side, and then create circles where the knuckles will go, and of course, that all important wrist as well. A common mistake I see a lot of people do is they create the hand, with no separation of the wrist like this, and this is just a really simple example, but if you can create the wrist separate to the hand, you'll be able to break down the shapes a lot easier. We're going to create a hand that is closed, so the fingers will be touching. I'm going to work out where the thumb is and create this triangle on the side, and then bring the thumb up straight, and then rounded like that. Now that I know where the thumb is, I can now start to draw the fingers. I know that the second finger from the thumb is the longest, so I'm just going to draw a line to indicate where the longest finger will go, and the fingers are about the same length as the palm, so use this as reference, and then draw a line sloping to a slight point. These pointy cylinders, and round it off at the top. Then I'm just going to bring these other fingers, closer to that and not reaching that line. It's really good to know the length of your fingers. Have a look at your hand if you are struggling. I know that this finger is going to be about the same height as this one, and for the smaller finger, it's normal for it to come out slightly so it's not touching. It can have it coming in like that. I'm going to create a new layer, and with a black, I'm going to trace over it and simplify it more. This is a really good exercise to improve your line work as well. You can see that there's a slight gap down here, and then I'll pull the finger up, and then there, just rounded at the end. Again, I'll have this web, and the back of the thumb is going to be quite straight. I'll draw the line where the palm is, and just a line to indicate where the wrist and palm comes out, and just like that, I was able to create a really simplified hand. We're going to repeat this process again, but this time, we're going to create the fingers splayed out. I'll create that circle again, with a straight edge on one side, and we'll create the thumb with this triangle, straight line, and then curve around like that. I want the fingers to be splayed out. I don't want them closed. So I'm just going to draw some rough lines to indicate where all four fingers are going to be coming out. I'll just create those circles again to show where the knuckles are. I know the fingers are going to come out to around here, and I'll create the longest finger first, and this is really important so you know how long to have the other fingers. Use this longest finger as a guide. I'll have the cylinder coming up like this, and then a webbing here, where the next finger comes out, and the little finger can come out quite a lot actually. Again, if you're struggling to see the movement on the hands, have a look at your own. I like to draw my fingers a little bit longer than fingers normally are. It's a little bit more forgiving than if you were to draw fingers that are really short and stumpy. Again, just draw that wrist. It starts quite thin, and comes out a little bit thicker at the end, and then I'm going to trace over the hand. You can see that the fingers are stretched where they are coming out. Here's a hand that is splayed out, and I'm going to create a hand that is in a resting position. Again, always remember to create the wrist first, just so you can see if your hand is in proportion. Then we'll create a line coming out, just a little bit past the wrist, and then create a line going down straight like this. We'll then join that line. So we'll create a triangle like this. One Long triangle coming down not quite as far as this triangle, and then we're going to create another triangle for the finger, and two more like this. This looks like claws at the moment. But what we can do when we create the outline is soften some of these edges. So I'll have the fingers really soft, and I'll have the thumb, and when we get to this corner, I want you to round it off like this. I just want you to simplify the shapes. We're going to create that again. Remember, some hands are very different. I'm going to create this as a petite hand. I'm going to bring the triangle down a little bit longer, and not have it come out as much from the wrist here. This line up here is a little bit thinner, and let's have the finger bending like this. We'll have that triangle again. The thumb is a lot thinner and we're just tracing over, but softening those edges. You can see that this hand is a little bit more petite than this one, and that's because this thumb muscle here is a lot more dominant than on this one. You can really soften these edges and make the triangles a little bit thinner to create a more petite hand. I'm going to create one more hand, and this time in a fist. You have the wrist coming out like this, and you have this triangle here, and the hand sloping up. Again, this is really simplified, but if we go over it now, we can add a bit more detail. We can add those bumps where the knuckles are and bring that round a bit more. This is just a really simple way of creating a clenched fist. If you are struggling with drawing hands, remember to simplify them into basic shapes, and you can always look at your hand for reference. Now it's time to practice feet. Feet can be just as difficult as hands, but don't worry, we're going to simplify these too. Again, we're going to go with the light color, and start to get some of these basic shapes down. I'll start with a circle like the hand, but this is going to be the heel of the foot. Then I'll create a smaller circle and this is going to be the ankle. I'm going to join these lines up like this, and I'm going to taper this line down to a point like this. I look at feet like triangles. I'll just bring that down for you. You taper it down, and you create this rectangle at the end, and this is going to be the toe, and we'll just flatten that shape. When I go over it, I can look at the bumps for the foot. The foot is quite flat on the ground, and I'm just going over these lines, and come up where the toe is. It's really important, to have this line coming down from the halfway point of the ankles. If you want to create someone on tip toes, here's the trick. Let's draw the ankle and then have the lines coming down like this. The circle can be a guide, and then you can create the heel about here and the toe about there. When you trace over, and this is a really quick way to create a character on their tiptoes. I want you to look at feet like triangles and not rectangles. I don't want you to create your feet like this, but remember that it tapers down like this. This is really important if you want to create realistic looking feet. If you want to create fee head on, you can create an ankle like this, and then the leg coming down. It's important to draw the leg and ankle first, just so you can see if the foot is in proportion. From a head-on angle, the feet will come down like this and come in flat like that. It's almost like a triangle. Create the big toe here and just create the smaller toes like this. A little tip for you guys is the ankle on the big toe side will always come up a little bit higher than on this side. Then we can just draw the toes like this. If you want to draw feet with shoes, I'd recommend creating the foot first. So we'll have the foot coming out like this again, and then what you can do, is add the shoe onto this basic shape. If you want to create a sandal, you can create the straps coming up slightly above the foot, and then add the excess heel, like this. Maybe they are wearing platforms, and I'll come out slightly as well. Dressing up the foot like this just makes it look more natural. That's how you can create shoes for your characters. If you want to create a character with shoes head-on, again, we'll do the circle for the ankle, and then we'll bring this down into this diamond shape like this. This will be where the big toe is. Then what we can do is create the shoe on top again. We'll have the tongue, and just make it a little bit wider, and bring it down, and then draw some of the detail in, and that's how you can draw a shoe from a head-on angle. I want you to practice drawing hands and feet and fill your page up. Don't worry if it doesn't look good the first time, just keep going. Once you've practiced, join me in the next video, where we're going to be playing around with outfits and accessories. 11. Outfits & Accessories: Outfits and accessories can really help add personality and story to your characters. I've put together this exercise sheet, and I want you to address these characters up. Once you've imported it into your Canvas, we're going to create a new layer on top. I'm going to start to dress them up. I normally use Pinterest for inspiration, so I'm going to bring that into my Canvas. Don't worry if you don't have Pinterest here, you just need to go on the app and it will appear here once you've done that, I'll just drag and drop. I'm going to go over to my saved photos. I have poses here and I've got lots of outfit inspiration to help me out. I'm going to make that a bit smaller and I'll go into my first character. I really love this outfit. I'm going to start to dress him up. I'm going to pick a red and I'm going to look at how the t-shirt is on his body. He has long sleeves. I'm just going to trace over my character and come out slightly where I can see some [inaudible]. This just helps show that the t-shirt is a little bit loose. I'll create the neck line and I'll just drag and drop just to save some time. I'll then start with the color of the trousers, I'll create a new layer, and I'll pick yellow. I'm going to classic here and just change that up a little bit and go add a little bit more red. I can test that, just to see if it works with this red. It could be slightly lighter. Just so it contrasts with the t-shirt. Again, I'm going to trace over his leg, but come out slightly at the end. I can see that the crotch here is a lot lower. You can see that the trousers are baggy. I really love his glasses and bag. I'm going to add a new layer. Go down to brown and just draw his glasses and the bag as well. When you're creating your characters, look for different accessories that you can dress up your characters. I'll match the bag and shoes. I think that looks pretty good. I'm going to go onto my second character now. Again, I'm just having a look at some of these outfits to see if any of these inspire me. I really love these dungarees. Maybe I can incorporate this into my illustration. Again, a new layer. Maybe I'll give her a yellow t-shirt. I'll just have this t-shirt really tight to her body. I like to layer my clothes up, just like they're getting dressed. Instead of creating the illustration as a whole, I'm going to put her on a t-shirt, even though this is going to be hidden by the dungarees. I'll go for this nice green. I'm getting inspired by the colors, but it doesn't have to be exact. The straps come down like this. I can see that it's quite baggy at the bottom. I'll create a new layer. I'll go in with maybe a cream to add a polka dot pattern. I'll add some sandals. I'm getting inspired, but I can always change it up. That is my second character. For my last outfit, I want to put her in something more athletic. I found these outfits earlier and I really love this lilac. I'm just going to start adding this outfit to her. Because she is wearing workout clothes, it will be really tight to her body. This color goes really nicely with this contain. I'm just going to add her shorts. Again, having it quite tight to her skin. I think I'm going to just curve this round a bit so I can just always erase parts if I don't like it. Just to finish it off, I'll add something in her hair. When you're creating outfits for your characters, I want you to think about accessories you can add as well. We spend around five minutes on Pinterest, pinning lots of outfits that inspire you. Then pick your favorites and dress up these characters. Don't forget to post these in the project section for others to see. I can't wait to see what you guys come up with. 12. Mini Project: Tell a Story: Remember those characters that we created in the first section of the class, I want you to go back to that Canvas and we're going to start to add personality and story using outfits, hairstyles, and props. I want you to create a new layer on top of your characters, and we're going to start to dress them up. I'll go to my first character and I'm just looking at some of the colors I already have. I know that red goes really nicely with this skin tone, so I'm going to start to think about the type of outfit this character will have. I'm basing it of her body language and the way she stood, so I'm going to put her in just quite a plane boxy dress. I want you to also think about the type of outfit your characters will have and everything we add to these characters now are going to start to tell a type of story. How just drag and drop, and I will put her having some red shoes to match. For my second character, I feel she's quite confident in her own skin, so I'm thinking about putting her in bikini. Create a new layer, and I'll just show you a good example of picking a color that doesn't contrast with the skin tones. If picked this pink, It gets really lost against her tan skin, so you want to pick a color that will contrast well. Maybe I'll go for this green, and I'll create triangles for her bikini, and a large triangle for her bikini bottoms, and that looks pretty good. I'm not going put her on any shoes, just because she's at the beach so she wouldn't be wearing any shoes. Maybe I could put her having some flip flops. Think about the accessories and different shoes that your character could be wearing as well. Pink goes quite nicely with this skin tone. Again, if I was to pick a red, it would get quite lost on her skin. I covered this in a lot more detail in my drawing, expressive faces on Skillshare. If you're struggling in pairing colors with skin tones, then I'd recommend checking that out. I'm going to pick allylic or a pink. Because she's dancing, I could put her in a leotard or a tutti. I'm just following the shape of her, and because a leotard is quite tight to her body, I'm just going to go back and show you a little trick. On your character, create a new layer on top, tap and then add clipping mask. Then I can create her outfit without going out the lines. If you're creating clothes that are really tight to your character's body, then this is just a really quick way of getting that outfit down without going up the lines, like this. Some shoes as well. I can just add a new layer and then I could just add this tutti on her as well. I'm thinking about the type of action he's doing, so I'm trying to work out what outfit he would be wearing. I want to put him in some casual clothes because maybe he's gardening. I'm just gonna give him a yellow t-shirt and maybe some gloves as well. Now that I'm choosing a second color for the outfit, I want to make sure that I pick a color that works with the skin tone, but also the t-shirt. I want to pick that blue. I've got his outfit now, and I'm thinking about types of things that I can add to try and push that narrative even more. He's working in the garden, so I could put him in an apron as well. I want you to create your characters with a story in mind, and think about the different accessories and outfits that you can put a characters in that will tell that story. There's one more thing that we can do to our characters to really help tell a story, and that's three props. I'm going to create a new layer on top, and I'm just going to see what things I can add to my characters to really help drive that narrative even more. Because I already had in mind that he was in the garden, may be kneeling down deweeding, so I'm just going to add some plans in his hand. Just by adding a simple details, I was able to show exactly what he's doing. For this character, I'm just going to have her holding a ribbon so you can see that she's performing. I was able to tell a story through the outfits, hairstyles and props. I want you to start telling a story through your own characters. Now that we've built up our confidence, creating stylized characters, join me in the next video where we're going to start the main project. 13. Main Project: Pick a Prompt: Time for the main projects. I've put together 15 different prompts for you to choose from. Each prompt has three words that you can include in your own characters. Here's an example of one of the prompts. The words are, gardener, white hair, and flowers. I wanted to show you that she's a gardener through the outfit, but also the props. I'm not only focusing on the words on the list, but also on the small details that will help lead the viewer's eye, so I added bees, a rake, and grass as well. The second example is space, red lipstick, and freckles. I added these Saturn rings around her space buns to help tie my count in with the background. When creating your own character, try and find unique ways of incorporating the words, this will make for a really interesting illustration. The prompt that I've chosen for my main project is summer dress, socks, and daisies. Once you've chosen a prompt, join me in the next video where we'll be picking reference images to work from. 14. Main Project: Reference Images: We've picked our prompts and now it's time to look for reference images for our main character. I want you to pick one reference image to base your character's pose off and then we're going to look at the words in our prompt list and start to look for inspiration for that as well. I'm just going to type in funky fashion and see what comes out. Straight away, I'm seeing some really great poses. I don't want you to pick a pose where the image is cut-off. It's really good to have the whole pose in the shot. I'll click on this to see if there's any similar poses, and I want you to pick a pose where the character is at a slight angle or head-on. Picking really complicated poses will make your life a lot harder. You can get inspired by the fashion as well. I want to pick a pose, so I'm just looking at some of these poses, and I'm just going to pin them to my board. Because it's a plain background, it's not too distracting. These are really clear readable photos. Just go back to my poses, and these are all of the images that I've been pinning. As you can see, I'm getting inspired by different outfits and colors, but I'm also picking reference images that are really clear and readable, and this is really important when you pick your reference image for your main character. The words in my prompt list are summer dress, daisies, and socks. Although she's not wearing socks, she is wearing a summer dress with a flow pattern. I'm already taking two of those words off my prompt list. I could add some socks and sandals to this character and maybe change up the pattern to make it a little bit more unique. I'm going to use this reference image as my main pace. I want you to find inspiration for your prompt list words as well. I'm just going to look for daisies to get inspired. I love this yellow and green combo. I'm just going to save that in my poses and also look for sock fashion. I'll just have a look to see if there's anything that inspires me. Straight away, I love the fact that these are socks with daisies on them. Again, this takes of two words off my list. I'm just going to save that to Poses and maybe I could come back to this. I really love this high sock with the stripes. I'm just thinking of fun ways I can bring these elements into my final. I now have all of my inspiration pinned to my board. I have one reference image that I'm going to base my main character of and lots of small elements I'm going to bring into my illustration. I want you to spend around 5-10 minutes on Pinterest pinning lots of inspiration to your board. Remember, pick one reference image as your main pose and also think about fun ways that you can bring in those words from your prompt list. In the next video, we're going to start sketching out our main character. 15. Main Project: Sketch Your Character: Now time to sketch out my character. I have one reference image and I'm going to sketch out my character based off this pose. I'm going to change it up so it doesn't look like the reference image at the end. I'm going to start to sketch out my character, I'm going to use the stigma method like I showed earlier in the class. I enjoy my sketch quite small at this point, just so it's less daunting. This is a really good way for you to get the basic shapes and pose down without feeling like you have to add too much detail. I'm going to create the legs coming out from the hips, and I can see that her leg is just poked out a little bit. When I'm happy with this basic pose, I can then go in and start to flesh it out a bit. Still not focusing too much on detail at this point, I really want to make sure that I've got the general pose down before I do that. Now that I'm happy with the overall pose, I'm just going in to add her outfit. Again, not worrying too much about accuracy at this point. It's also really good to try and change up the pose slightly or experiment with different proportions. As you can see, her head is a lot smaller and her feet a lot bigger, this is just a style preference that I like. This is a good chance for you to start playing around with pushing the basic proportions. If it doesn't look like the reference image, don't worry, that's actually a good thing. I want you to start getting in the habit of changing up your characters so they don't look identical. To help me remember what words were in my prompt list, I'm just going to write them down. I've got daisy, summer dress, and socks. This will just help me know exactly what I want to add into my character. I've just added in the socks and trainers, I think this looks really key with her summer address. I'm going to start working on the hair. I don't want to copy the reference image, so I'm going to use my hairstyle cheat-sheet that I showed earlier. I'm going to swipe up the bottom and drag and drop my photos again. If you are struggling at this stage, please refer back to the hairstyle cheat-sheet to help you out. I want her hair to be long and flowing and I really like having her hair behind her shoulders. As you can see, I'm just adding as I go. I'm just looking to see what parts need more detail and because I've drawn it in small, it's easy to erase parts because I haven't focused on detail yet. If you're not fully happy with your character, you can erase parts really easily. I can see that her legs are a little bit too long, so if you're unhappy with some of the proportions, you can always go in and edit them. I'm just going to click up here and select this area and just pull the legs up slightly. Really roughly, draw on her face now. I think I want her to be wearing glasses, and I'm just filling out the hair. Because I want to include daisies, I'm just going to see how I can incorporate those daisies into this illustration. I like the idea of having daisies on her dress but I don't have to stop there, I can also add them on the ground and around her. When you're creating your illustration, look at the prompts and see if there are creative ways that you can include some of the words into your characters. Again, because I wasn't fully happy with the head, I could just select it and move it down. I'm just going over it until I'm happy with the overall sketch and then I can go in and clean up the lines afterwards. I'm just going to bring the opacity down, add a new layer, and I'm just going to trace over my image neatly. This means that I won't be left with any rough lines or parts that I've erased. Here's my final detailed sketch. I was really inspired by this pose but as you can see, I've changed up enough that it doesn't look like the reference image and this is really important if you want to create unique characters. Hopefully, you were able to create the hair using the cheat-sheet or maybe you're inspired by something else. There's nothing wrong with using the hairstyle from the pose as long as you change it up enough that it is your own. Join me in the next video where we're going to play around with colors. 16. Main Project: Colour Thumbnails: In this video, I'm going to show you the importance of color thumbnails. I always use color thumbnails to try and work out the exact colors I want to use in my work. I have my final sketch that I created in the last video, and I'm just going to duplicate this layer and hide the original sketch. I don't want to edit this or resize it, so it's good to keep a spare. I'll then head up to the [inaudible] , and I'm just going to resize it small; this is going to be one color thumbnail. I'll then swipe and duplicate this wall and just bring it down like this. I'll then merge these two layers together and bring the opacity down like this. Now I can start to add colors onto these illustrations. I have a library of colors to work with. But don't worry if you don't, I have a class all about picking unique color palettes so if you struggle with color, I'd recommend checking that out. I'm now just going to start playing around with different colors. I love this pink so I'm just going to make sure my brush is a bit bigger and broke out the background first. Just create a really imperfect square or create a new layer. I want you to add the colors on separate layers so you can easily change them. When you're building up your color palettes, I want you to pick the background color first and then followed by a skin tone. That's really important because you want to make sure the skin tone is working with the background. I'm going to go for maybe this brown, and you can see my brush is just a little bit thick for this; I'm just going to bring it down slightly and block out her body. Again, I'm not being neat with this. This is just, block out the colors and then I'll work on her hair so maybe I could give her some red hair and I know red and pink go nicely together. It's just about using colors so I know it'll work. Okay. Once you've created your first color thumbnail, I want you to go in with a black and start to add some of those details just to highlight some of those areas that are getting lost. I'm just going to bring my layer back and create one underneath and just with a black, I'll just start shading some of those areas to adapt. You don't need to be perfect here, this is just about trying to get your illustration as close to the final as possible so you can really start to see if those colors are working. Just by adding that line under her chin and lines on her dress, I was able to add that detail back. This is my first color thumbnail and I really like how it's going, but I want to create a second just to see if I can find something better and I'll repeat the process again. I'm going to duplicate that square and drag it down just to save some time. I'm just going to look for a background color to add to this thumbnail. I'll just drag and drop, and I really love this slide look. Again, I'm going to choose a skin tone that works with this slide. Maybe I could have this light color and I just feel that this background is too light to create enough contrast with that skin tone; I could go in with maybe a darker brown. Okay, I have my two color thumbnails and I'm really happy with both. But I want to see which one has the most contrast. There are two ways you can do this. You can squint to see if your illustrations are popping, but if you're still struggling, I have a little trick for you. If you create a new layer above all of your illustrations and drag and drop a black to fill this Canvas and then click on the "End," and go down to saturation, and this will put your color thumbnails in grayscale. Straight away, I can see that there are a few problem areas I need to fix. On this first illustration, the headband is completely getting lost against this background and that's something I didn't see when my illustration was in color. I can also see that her hair is definitely merging too much with her skin tone, so something would have to change here. Putting your Canvas in grayscale is really good if you're struggling to see those problem areas. For my second illustration, she is definitely popping more against that background. But there are still a few tweaks that I want to make to this illustration. Her dress is merging slightly with her skin tone. Maybe I could make her skin tone darker just to help with that contrast. I want you to put your illustrations in grayscale to see if you can notice those problem areas too. I'm Just going to hide this black layer and go down to the skin tone to see if I can tweak it slightly. I know that I need to make it a little bit darker to contrast her dress. I just color pick that brown, I'll go to classic and I'll just bring the brown down a little bit more. I can just add a little bit more saturation, and I can also play around with the darkness hair as well. Maybe I'll add a bit more pink just so it's further away from that orange. I'll Drag and Drop my new color onto her skin and I can see if that works a little bit better. If you can't notice it again, just add that black layer back to put it in grayscale, and straight away, I can see that her skin is popping a lot more against her dress. I'm going to choose this color palette just because the colors are contrasting a lot more. This is going to translate really well to my final illustration. I want you to create two color thumbnails, playing around with contrast. Don't forget if you're struggling to notice those problem areas, you can always put your canvas in grayscale. Because I've chosen these colors, I'm just going to create a color palette. I'll go to palettes, click on the "x" here, create new pallet, and I'll just color Drop these in. Once you've created your color palette, I want you to head over to the spanner here, Share, and Save as a JPEG and we're going to bring this in as a reference in the next video. 17. Main Project: Final Character: Okay guys, so it's now time to create our final. You should have two color from now that you created. Remember that sketch that we hit, I want you to bring it back, tap on the layer, and copy it. We'll go to Gallery up here and we're going to create a new canvas. Click on the "X" up here and then tap on this, and I'm just going to put 4,000 by 4,000, "Create". The reason why I want you to create your illustration in this size is because it gives you a lot of layers. When we create a character, that are going to be a lot of layers, so I don't want you to run out. We'll click the "Spanner" here and we're just going to paste our sketch into this new canvas. I want to have a frame around my character. I think I'm going to put her there. I'll just check to see if she's centered. I want you to use your color thumbnails as reference for where the colors are going to go. Head back up to the Spanner and we're going to toggle Reference here and this will pop up. I'm just going to go over to the Image, "Import", and bring back my color thumbnail. I'm just going to zoom in on the color palette that I want to use as reference. This is just a great way for you to see where the colors go without it interfering with the sketch. We have our canvas setup. I want you to bring the opacity down on your sketch to around 30. Create a new layer on top and bring that underneath your sketch. We're going to start to color in our character. This is my color palette and I'm just going to set it to default. I'm just going to drag and drop the background color first. I'll create a new layer and I'm going to outline the skin tone first. I'll use the monoline brush for this and you can find this under Calligraphy here. With my skin tone, I'm going to trace around her face. I'm just outlining the shapes and filling them in. I'll create a separate layer for the neck, and make sure that it's below the head. This is going to come in handy when I go to shade later. If your character's hair is really long and you want it to go behind the shoulders, create one layer where the hair is going in front of the face, and then you can create another layer and move it below all the other layers. This way, that layer will go behind it so you don't have to always trace around the shoulders. I'm going to work on the pattern of her dress now and I have these stamp brushes I've already made. I'll create a new layer above her dress and put it to Clipping Mask. This is a really quick way of creating repeat patterns for your outfits. If you want to learn more about how to make your own stamp brushes, be sure to check out my Fun with Symmetry class. Remember when we created the neck separate to the head, this is why. I'll create a new layer on top and add it to clipping mask and I'm going to start with a textured brush. Because it's on a separate layer, it won't interfere with her head. Here is my final character design. Even though it took me a long time, I really enjoyed the process. I hope you guys did too. Remember, take it at your own pace, you don't need to rush through this. Drawing people is a difficult topic, so I thank you guys for showing up and putting in the work. 18. Thank You: Thank you so much for taking the time to watch this class. I hope you now have more confidence when it comes to drawing people. The only way you can improve is if you practice. Take everything you've learned today, and keep going. I always love seeing what you guys come up with, so don't forget to post all your exercises and final character to the project section below. You can find me over on Instagram, @charlyclements, and you can also find more of my classes over my Skillshare profile. I have classes on how to create stylized portraits, how to get more expressive with your characters, and how to create unique color palettes. Thanks again guys. Bye.