Formality in Korean | Keehwan Kim | Skillshare
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30 Lessons (2h 49m)
    • 1. Course Introduction

      2:19
    • 2. Course Overview

      2:33
    • 3. Formality in Korean

      3:56
    • 4. Korean Age

      5:34
    • 5. Hierarchy in school

      5:39
    • 6. Hierarchy in Family

      3:30
    • 7. Hierarchy at work

      5:24
    • 8. Familiarity between people

      5:07
    • 9. Honorific language

      2:45
    • 10. Korean verbs

      3:04
    • 11. (으)시 Conjugation 1

      3:27
    • 12. (으)시 Conjugation 2

      2:56
    • 13. Using honorific verbs

      4:57
    • 14. Addressing peers

      3:54
    • 15. Addressing people respectfully

      3:20
    • 16. Saying how are you

      4:33
    • 17. Saying goodbye

      6:27
    • 18. Talking about name

      9:56
    • 19. Talking about age

      10:02
    • 20. Talking about birthday

      7:18
    • 21. Talking about eating food

      7:50
    • 22. Talking about sleeping

      5:29
    • 23. Talking about meeting people

      5:08
    • 24. Talking about speaking to people

      7:15
    • 25. Talking about asking questions

      7:37
    • 26. Talking about giving

      7:17
    • 27. Talking about being ill

      8:01
    • 28. Talking about children

      7:01
    • 29. Taking someone to a place

      7:15
    • 30. Talking about death

      9:23
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About This Class

Hi everyone, and welcome to my latest class on formal language in Korean.

This course is all about learning how we use either informal or formal language, depending on who we're speaking to. As well as learning how we use informal and formal language, we'll also take a deep dive into the Korean culture so that you have better awareness of why there are different levels of formality, and how we use different levels of formality depending on who we speak to.

This course has three core units

1. Hierarchy in Korea (Lessons 3 to 8)

In this unit, you will learn how hierarchy is established in different settings, such as in social, families, school and at work.

2. Honorific Language (Lessons 9 to 15)

In this unit, you will learn about different levels of formality, and different kinds of honorific nouns and verbs. You will also learn how we conjugate verbs into honorific forms.

3. Honorific Language in Context (Lessons 16 to 30)

In this unit, you will learn about how we use informal and formal language in different situations, such as saying goodbye, talking about asking questions, etc.

Only prerequisite for this course is that you should have a working knowledge of Hangul and some basic awareness of Korean sentence structure.

Hope to see you in the lessons!

Keehwan Kim

Meet Your Teacher

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Keehwan Kim

Language teaching professional

Teacher

Hi everyone!

My name's Keehwan Kim and welcome to my teacher profile page.

I have been a language teaching professional since 2005, teaching mainly English to Korean learners, but also teaching Korean to English speakers.

I have been creating online courses on and off since 2016, but since 2019, I have moved away from classroom teaching and have been creating Korean language courses.

I love everything about teaching and learning languages. I think best analogy of language learning is of trying to go up an escalator that's coming down. You have to work hard to make forward progress, and if you stop trying, it's easy to lose all that progress you have made.

Many of us live in environments where interacting with the language you'r... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Course Introduction: Hi, everyone. My name is King Given and welcome to my course on learning about four more language in Korea. Now Korea is a highly hierarchical society. So whenever Korean people meet the incentive for my hierarchy, so some people become our peers, some people become our superiors, and some are below us in the hierarchy. And depending on who we're speaking to, it's important to use appropriate and respectful language, particularly when we're speaking to those who are higher up in the hierarchy. So in this course we learn how hierarchies are established in different contexts, such as in families, at work and at school. And we'll also learn the important role age, place in establishing hierarchy in Korea and how career uses its difference age system. We learn what formal and honorific language is and how they're used in different situations with different people. Well, then, look at different kinds of honorific now's and bulbs, as well as how verbs are conjugated into honorific forms. We'll also learn how we can address our friend as well as those who are higher than us in the hierarchy. Finally, we'll learn how we can be respectful when using Korea in specific settings, such as when with saying Good night when we talk about meeting people and when we talk about taking someone to a particular place by the end of this course, the aim is for you to have a clear idea off how you can speak Korean with your friends, as well as those who are higher up in the hierarchy. All our lessons on honorific language in context includes serious off guided speaking practices, and each lesson comes with worksheets, so that you can review what you learned in the lesson. Now this course is know for absolute beginners. So you do need to have a working knowledge of hunger and basic awareness off Korean sentence drunk. Okay, so you were keen to master how formal languages used in Korea coming to see you soon in the lesson. 2. Course Overview: Hi, everyone in this lecture, I'm going to explain how this course is structured so that you have a better idea on how to navigate this course and so that you have a better understanding off. How you're learning is going to be structured. So let's go over the three core units off this course. The following unit Unit two is on hierarchy in Korea. In this unit will first briefly go over what formal language is in Korea and how we use language with people in different levels of hierarchy. Then we'll take a look at how hierarchy is established in different settings. And although the most important element in establishing hierarchy is age in certain settings, such as in families, at work and at school, there are other factors that come into play. So we'll take a look at all these different factors in detail. Unit three is on honorific language and in this unit will learn more about different kinds of honorific language. Now there are specific honorific now owns involves which are different from the standard forms. So we'll take a look at these in detail, and there will also be a handout with a comprehensive list off honorific mounds and Bob's, which you can review in your own time. After that, we will learn how to congregate Bob's into honorific forms. Not all verbs have separate honorific forms. Some can be conjugated into honorific forms by adding she and we'll take a look through different patterns of verb conjugation in detail. Finally, in this unit we will learn how to address our peers and how to address those higher than us in the hierarchy. In Unit four, we'll look at how we use language in different situations with different people, will learn about honorific language. Used to talk about asking questions, giving something to someone and taking someone to a particular place. And by going over how language is used in different settings, it will help to improve your overall understanding off how honorific language is used in Korea. Each lesson is accompanied with work. She's so please download the worksheets so that you can review what you learned in practice writing the sentences from the lesson. Okay, so that's the overview off the whole course, and the next lesson is the first lesson on the unit on hierarchy in Korea, and we'll first take a look at what formal language is. I'll see you soon in that lesson, but by 3. Formality in Korean: hi, everyone. So in this unit, we're going to go over what formal language is in Korean. And we're also going to learn various cultural aspects which effects how and why we use formal and informal language in Korea. Now, Korean language can be categorized into either Pan Mei, which means informal or turned them may, which means for more slash respectful pan means half and by means words or speech. So the literal meaning off Pamuk doesn't make much sense. Pot Pam out refers to language we use with those who are off equal standing or when we can talk down to people, particularly to those who are younger than us. On the other hand, in June them My John debt comes from the world, John there, which means respect. So this phrase charm them married we first to language. We used to be respectful. The words Pan and Chanda come from Chinese characters, and there are equivalent native Korean phrases which are got chamber and dope. Ember Natural comes from the world that uda, which means to lower, and though Pim comes from the world, Dopita, which means to elevate. However, these phrases are less commonly used and Pama and turned them there. So the important question we need to consider is why we have these two types of language. And the reason why we have Pamela and turned Emma is because of the Korean culture, which is heavily influenced by Confucianism. Now we won't go into Confucianism in too much detail. But one of the key tenets off Confucianism is respectful age and authority, and to this day it's an integral part off Korean society and culture. Now the influence off Confucianism has led to the Korean society becoming highly hierarchical. Those who are older than us and those in positions of authority such as teachers and supervisors at work, are higher up in the hierarchy. And when we are with people with seniority, we have to use appropriate language, and we also have to behave appropriately. For example, in Korea, young people are not allowed to smoke cigarettes with older people. And if you want to have a cigarette when you're with older people, you have to excuse yourself and have a cigarette. Somewhere else is considered extremely rude to smoke together with people. You should be respectful toe. You can, however, smoked with people higher up in the hierarchy if they allow you to. These changes in our behavior as well as the language we use, is incredibly important if you don't keep to these social norms, and you're basically considered to be a very rude person, and it will be hard to maintain good relations with others. So the next important question is how this hierarchy is established. And there are different factors that come into play, depending on the setting off the hierarchy, such a social family and workplace. However, the most important factor in establishing hierarchy in Korea is age now. Age is the single most important factor, largely because it's one common denominator among all of us. But as we will find out in certain settings such as workplace, one's position or role within that setting is more important than aid. Now we will explain how hierarchy is established in different settings, but before we do that, in the next lecture will take a look at how age is calculated in Korea and how is used to establish social hierarchy. So Susan again in the next lecture, but by 4. Korean Age: hi, everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to learn about the Korean age system Now. It might seem a little strange, but age is calculated differently in Korea compared to other countries, and the eight system used in Korea is referred to as East Asian age reckoning. This A system originated from China. And while many other East Asian countries, such as Japan, have abandoned the system, it's still the common a system used in Korea. This a system is based on two key factors. One is that as soon as you're born, you are a year old, and this is because this age system accounts the time spent in the mother's womb, which is less than a full year. But it's roughly calculated as being one year. So once the baby's born, the baby instantly becomes a year old. The second important factor is that for the calendar year in which the baby is born, the baby is one, and at the turn of the next year, the baby, as well as everyone else in Korea becomes a year older. So regardless off when your birthday is, the whole population of Korea becomes a year older. Together in the new year. So this means that a baby born on December 31st is a year old for less than 24 hours and is then two on January 1st. And technically, this will be correct. But when Koreans refer to babies age, we tend to talk about the age in months rather than in years, which I think is quite similar in most other countries. So the two important points to note are one. You are one when you are born, and two. You become a year older at the turn off the following year. And this is the age system that determines social hierarchy in Korea, In Korea, those who are born in the same year as you are considered as your peers. Those who are older have seniority, and you have seniority over those who are younger than you. So if you were born in 1990 you need to be respectful towards those born in 1989 or earlier , and to those born in 1991 and later you could be more casual as you are older than them. And the key thing to note is that even if they're only a month older than you. Let's say that you were born in January and you meet someone born in December of the previous year. Then you have to be respectful to that person born in the previous year, even though that person is only a month older. Because of this in Korea, you can only be friends with those who are born in the same year as you. And you can never truly be friends with those who are older or younger, since you can never be equal in that relationship. Also, because of these reasons, quite often in Korea, rather than asking how old someone is, Koreans often ask each other what year they were born in. So if you were born in 1990 you can say Cruz him. Young thing Cruise ship refers to the year Young means year and sang means birth. When we say the year were born in, we use Sino Korean numbers. So do keep this in mind. And don't be surprised if a Korean person asks what year you were born in because they're trying to work out your age and where you fit in the social hierarchy now. One other key factor that influences. How we use language in Korea is how familiar we are with certain people. If we have close relations with people, we can use more informal language, whereas if we aren't familiar with people, it's very important to use formal language. So I might know someone who's five years older than me. But because I've known that person my entire life, I will actually use Pamela with that person. Whereas if I meet someone who's only two years older than me. But I've only known that person for a month, then it's important for me to use turned in there Now. This aspect, all familiarity and language use is something I would discuss in more detail later in this unit. Now, although the Korean A system is the main eight system we used to establish social hierarchy , the Western age system is also used in Korea is mainly used to state certain age requirements, such as medical procedures, where the patient has to be over a certain age, and also when referring to certain legal age requirements, such as for driving, drinking and marriage, and to refer to this Western age. We use the word man, so if we say, Ban, Yo yo, Doris, I then it means 18 years old in the Western age. And if we say mind your your so so, then it means 16 in Western age. So while Korean age system is the main age system that is used in everyday situation, and it's the one that we used to establish hierarchy when we meet people when we need to be more precise, especially with certain legal age requirements, we use the Western age system. Okay, so I hope you now have a pretty good understanding off how Korean age system works and how it's used to establish a social hierarchy in Korea. Over the next few lessons, we're going to look at how hierarchy is established in specific settings, and in the next lesson, we're going to look at hierarchy in schools. See you then. Bye bye. 5. Hierarchy in school: hi, everyone. So in this lesson that we're going to learn how hierarchy is established at school now. Although age is the most important factor in establishing social hierarchy, there are other factors that influence establishing hierarchy in other settings. Now there are two key relationships at school. One is between the teacher and the student, and the other is between students. The relationship between teachers and students is simple to understand, teachers are in the position of authority, so they have seniority, and in most settings they are also older than the students. So this relationship is simple to understand. However, in educational settings with mature students, the teacher can be younger than the students, such as in yoga classes or at language schools. And in these settings. Although the teacher has seniority, he or she has to be mindful and respectful off the fact that the students are older. And conversely, the students also have to be respectful off the teachers position, even if they're younger and in general these relationships work out fine. But it is something people need to be mindful off now, in terms of the relationship between students, the hierarchy is established based on year groups, which is called Hang Young, and in primary and secondary schools. This is fairly straightforward, as students tend to mix with their year group, and students in each year group tend to be off the same age. Those in year groups above are older and are called some bear, and those in year groups below are younger and are called hoob. The concept off, somber and food bear is really important in Korea. They're rather difficult to translate in English, but some but refers to someone with more experience than you. And who better is someone with less experience? The terms Humber and Filbert are not limited in the use in school settings. They can also be used in other settings, such as at workplace. Now, students in the same year group in primary and secondary schools tend to use Pamuk as soon as they meet, and they also use Pamela to their food, bed and use. Turn them out to this humble so hierarchy is fairly straightforward in primary and secondary schools, however, things get a little complicated when we start looking at year groups in universities at universities in Korea, seniority is also based on year group and the year group at University is called Hack Bun. It's similar to the phrase class off in the U. S. But Hack Bun refers to the year you started university rather than the year you graduating . So if you start a university in 1998 then you are. Cooper had one, and if you start in university in 2008 then you are compact bun. We use Sino Korean numbers and refer to the year by stating the numbers in single digits. Now same as in primary and secondary schools. Those who start the university before you have seniority and their calls. Humber and you have seniority over those that start the university after you, who are called hoob and those who are in your heart bun are called Tongi and Tongi refers to someone who begin something at the same time as you, and we can use Tongi in other settings, such as workplace. Now, most students in each hack bun tend to be off the same age, but for various reasons, there are some students who might be older, and one of the most common reasons is because some students retake the university entrance exam, which is called soon, and they do this so that they can go to a better university. These students who retake Sununu, a cold, cheese oozing chase who is the noun that refers to retaking soon and sang as in taxing, refers to the student. So chase. Using means repeating students. When Che Zuzang enters university, they are generally in hack bun, where most other students are a year younger. Nevertheless, they are the chest zings Tongi. So they are chasing things friends and those in hack bond from the previous year who are all the same age as chasing us humble. So this has the potential off becoming a problem. Chess using might find it difficult to be friends with Those who are younger or chasing might find it difficult to be respectful to those who are of the same age. And those Humber who are well aware off the situation might get a bit abusive and upset. The test using and problems in relationships can occur time to time. When these situations arise, it requires a student to use a bit of common sense to ensure problems avoid it, and I think Korean students do try hard to make sure everyone feels comfortable in such situations. So do keep in mind that although age is the single most important factor in establishing hierarchy in Korea, in certain settings such as a school, there are also other factors to consider, such as Hacked Bun. Okay, so let's now move on. And in the next lesson, we're going to look at how hierarchy is established in families. See you then. Bye bye. 6. Hierarchy in Family: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to look at the hierarchy levels in families. Okay, so let's first take a look at this family tree chart. Now, In general, the level of hierarchy is quite easy to understand in families, the family hierarchy is exactly the way it shown in this chart. Let's say that this is me. So this means that those above me are higher up in the hierarchy, and those below me are lower in the hierarchy. For those in the same level, such as my siblings and my cousins, the hierarchy is established through age, so it's fairly simple to understand. Now, when it comes to how we use Pama and turned them are in families. It depends on a couple of key factors. First, it depends on the family culture. Every family has its own culture. Some families have a very conservative culture, and then there are families that are very progressive and easy going in. The language used in these families can differ quite significantly. Also, another key factor with families is that unlike in other settings where you've only just met someone or you've known someone for a short time, families have known each other for a very long time and, in many cases, their entire lives. As such in many families, it's not unusual for parents and their Children to use promote each other or grandchildren to use Pamela with their grandparent's. So the use of language can be more casual between family members. So overall family hierarchy is simple to understand and between family members. The language used can be quite casual that we can depend on the family culture. However, one scenario in which this orderly hierarchy gets thrown into a bit of chaos is when someone gets married and a new family member joins. For example, let's imagine that I'm 35 years old and my younger sister is 32. Now I marry someone who's 29 my younger sister marries a man who's 38 Now. In this situation, the position off those new to the family is dependent on their partners position. So my wife, who's three years younger than my sister, has seniority over her because she's married to me, who is higher up in the hierarchy than my sister and I have seniority over my brother in law. Even though he's three years older because he's married to my younger sister. Now in general, this is not a big issue, and the proper thing to do is to disregard the age difference and accept one's position in the family tree. However, depending on the people involved, this can lead to problems in people's relationships. And quite often, Korean dramas play on this and show conflicts related to these situations, which I guess can make for more entertaining story line. Okay, so that's it for this lesson on hierarchy, off relationships and families, which are quite simple to understand and remember that language used in families is dependent on the hierarchy, closeness or family members and the family culture. In the next lesson, we're going to look at the level of hierarchy in workplace. See you then. Bye bye. 7. Hierarchy at work: hi, everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to look at the hierarchy levels in workplace. Now, the level of hierarchy at work place is all about one's job title. There are some common job titles, which are used in Korean corporate environments and these air used uniformly in or Korean companies, though depending on the nature off the industry that company operates in. They made the first slightly. So these are she nips How on new Employees and Sheen, it means a newcomer ends. How on means an employee. Then we have how on employees. After that you become Teddy, which means an assistant manager, and next we have quiet done, which means manager. After that we have Chad Yang and Poon Tang, and they are deputy head of department and head of department. This syllable tan comes from Chinese, and it refers to the head or the chief. Another title that's often used to refer to the head of department is Chilton, above that we have Visa, which means director, and then we have Sangmu en cha moo, and they kind of refer to vice presidents. But they can also refer to other sea level type of roles such as CFO or CTO. Lastly, we have sad Jiang and Region, which referred to the CEO and the chairman. The word Sagaing is also often used to refer to business owners. So if you want to speak to the owner off a restaurant, you can ask to speak to saddling name. Okay, so that's a general overview off the job titles in Korea. But as times have evolved, a Korean companies have also adopted other job titles, and the most common one is Tim Jang, which means team leader in Korean companies. If you're addressing a supervisor by their job title, it's important to add Nim at the end. So if you're us, how on and you want to address your manager than you have to say Kwa Jang Nim Putin name or tag Hyungnim, depending on who you're dressing, however, if you're addressing a subordinate, Koreans will add the person surname in front of the job title. So if you're quite Jang, you can address your teddy by saying Kim daddy or the daddy, depending on his or her surname, now similar to how students starting the school at the same time I called Tongi new employees joining the company. At the same time, I also referred to as Tongi, and donkeys at workplace tend to refer to each other by adding, see at the end of names when they first joined the company. In general, we used see to address people who are either off equal level or with those who are below us in the hierarchy we don't use see when addressing people with seniority. Now, in terms of language used at work place, it's important to recognize that workplace is a very formal setting. And whenever you speak to your supervisors, you need to use the formal form off turned Emma, which means that most of what you say will end in in nida, some nita and so on and with those in the same level as you. Even if you're close to that person, it's important to use turn them air, but in its polite form, as you need to be respectful to each other at work. Now there are certain work environments where language use can be more casual, partly because of the corporate culture, but partly because of the personality off individuals. However, in general language use at work is quite formal, Now, most of the time in Korea, those higher up in the corporate hierarchy tend to be older than those beneath them. And in the past, Korean companies intentionally only promoted people when they reached a certain age, which would help to avoid any issues that can arise from the conflict between job title and age. However, in modern times things are changing and there are people in management roles who are younger than the people they're managing now. While this is nothing new to people in other cultures, for many Korean people, this is an extremely uncomfortable situation. And I know many Korean men who would be extremely unhappy to work for an immediate supervisor who is younger than them. So this is a very sensitive situation now. This concept of hierarchy being established through positions in organizational structure is very common in Korea, and perhaps one other setting where it's also common is in the Army, which is compulsory for all Korean men. However, we weren't going to this in too much detail, as I think the Army hierarchy based on rank is probably quite similar in most other countries around the world. Okay, so over the last few lessons we have considered how hierarchy is established in various settings through factors other than age. And in this lesson, we focused on hierarchy in the workplace. In the next lesson will consider how language used changes, depending on how familiar with different people Susan again. But by 8. Familiarity between people: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to look at the influence or familiarity on language use. Now, before we go into this, it's important to note that Children as well as teenagers use Pamela with their peers as soon as they meet. There. Will, of course, used to condemn a if there is an age gap, but among peers, they will use Pamela with each other instantly. However, when two adults meet socially, even if there is an age gap, they will start off by using tongue them. I, for example, even though I'm 40 years old if I meet someone who's 30 when I first greet this person I will use, turned them my and the same applies. If two adults off the same age meet there will start off by using tongue them I and the main reason for this is because they don't know each other well. So at the start of relationship to adults were used to own them. And as the relationship bills and they form close relations, there were transition to using Pamela, and how they do this differs depending on whether the two people off the same age or whether there is an age gap. Let's first consider relationships where two people are off the same age. Imagine that to 30 year old meat through a mutual friend. Their first start off by using tuned in my But after meeting each other couple of times they're familiar with each other, and one of them might say, Woody by the worker. Do you buy the worker now? We learned earlier that by means words or speech and the verb daughter means to let go, So the literal meaning to let go off speech doesn't make much sense. But this phrase means to let go off the formality between the two people and start using informal language and between two people of the same age. Either person in the relationship could suggest using informal language, and they could even suggest this when they meet for the first time. And it wouldn't be a problem. However, things change when there is an age gap in the relationship. When two people with an age gap meat they still start off using turned them where and how they transition from using turned them over to Pama depends on how big the age gap is. If the age gap is only a few years, then the older person in my start using Pama after meeting the younger person two or three times, and the younger person might start using Pamela with the older person, maybe after sixth or seventh meeting. But this depends on how close they have gotten and whether the older person is the type of person who would be happy for the younger person to use casual language to them. Now. If the age gap is really big, let's say, about 10 years, then even if they become really close, the younger person will likely have to continue using turned them over. And the older person might use Pam O to the younger person at the second or the third meeting. Quite often, the younger person might say by those hair by those hell, and we use this sentence to suggest the older person to speak comfortably, and this is a way of being polite to the older person. One other factor to consider is that women tend to transition from formal to informal language much more quickly than men, even if there is an age gap. And in general, men in Korea tend to be more for more than women, which is why almost all men called the parents by the formal words all money and our body, while women tend to call the parents by the informal forms on my and back. Final point unknown in this lesson is that even if people have formed close relationships in some relationships, the language use has to be formal, for example, in relationships between teachers and students. Although teachers can use Pam out to the students, students can never use Palmer to their teachers. Another common example is in the relationship between workers and their supervisors. Depending on the corporate environment, the supervisor might use Pamela to the workers. But workers can never use Palmer to their supervisors. So do you keep that in mind? Okay, so that's it for this lesson on familiarity and language use. And the key point to note is that when people meet, they start off using toned them air, and once they get to know each other, they can transition to using pama. Though how this is done depends on the age gap in the relationship, people's gender and the nature off their relationship. Okay, so we've spent a lot of time developing our understanding off how hierarchy is established in Korea. In the next unit, we're going to start learning about different kinds of honorific language and how we use them. See you then. Bye bye. 9. Honorific language: hi, everyone. So in this unit, we're going to learn what honorific language is, how it's used. And we'll also look at how we can address people in this lesson. We're going to look at the overview off honorific language now, as we have learned in the previous unit, because Korea is, ah, hierarchical society is very important that we use appropriate language when we speak to people in different levels of hierarchy. In the previous unit, we learned that Korean language can be categorized into Pama and turned them by. Pama is a language we use when we talk to our piers and turned. Emery is the language we use when we talk to those with seniority within two them. Out there are various layers and the highest level off from them are is what we call honorific language. Due to the nature all the Korean society, where respect is an integral aspect off how we interact with each other. Use of honorific language is very common, and in many situations it's more common than other forms of turned in. My two main forms of honorific language are now owns, and Bob's a good example of an honorific. Now is the word for name in Korean. We have the standard word Etem in an honorific form song on, and we can use the honorific form when we refer to the name off someone who's higher up in the hierarchy. Now. Not all now's have standard and honorific words, and it's actually limited to certain words. In the resources section, you can find the document with a full list of now that I have honorific forms. Now the use off honorific verbs is much more widespread and more common in Korean. Some verbs have an entirely different honorific verbs, and a good example of this is the verb to give. The standard form is Judah, and it's honorific form is to Rita and similar to announce only a selection of OBS have a different honorific form. And again we have a document with a full list of verbs and the honorific forms. However, one difference between towns and verbs is that all Korean verbs can congregate into an honorific form by adding who she to the verbs. And this is something we will look at in detail in this unit now in general, the most important aspect of honorific language is the use of Bob's. So over the next few lessons will take a look at the use of verbs in their honorific form in more detail. And in the next lesson would take a look at the overview off Korean verbs. See you then. Bye bye. 10. Korean verbs: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to take a look at the overview. Off Cory involves the infinitive, forms off all Korean verbs and descriptive verbs which function like adjectives consists off the verb stem and path. Here are some examples I read I to know tadaa to sleep, not Buddha to be bad, so tired to be good. The red parts indicate the verb stem in Korean with generally used infinitive forms. When we talk about things in a matter of fact way. So we often see verbs, infinitive forms used in textbooks, and we generally don't use the infinitive form when we're talking to people. Now, these four verbs can be conjugated into Pama and turned Emma. And these are the casual form. These are the polite forms. And then we have the formal form, as we learned before, whether we use Pama or turned them my depends on who were talking to in the hierarchy, the setting off that hierarchy and the level of familiarity in our relationship. We generally use casual language with our peers or when we're talking down to people, and the polite form is what we use the most in everyday situation when we meet people for the first time. When we talked to older family members and we were out shopping, ordering food in restaurants or buying tickets a cinema, we can use the polite form, so this is the most commonly used evolved form. Lastly, we have the formal form and we used a formal form in very formal settings. And a good example is the workplace. Okay, so these are the three standard forms of obs and descriptive obs and how they're used. However, as mentioned in the previous lecture as well as thes forms, we also have another form of tuned in my and this is the honorific form and here are the honorific forms off these verbs again, as we learned before. Some barbs have a completely different honorific verb such as chador and Jew machida. But many verbs can be conjugated into honorific forms, and these are made by adding either she or who she. Additionally, these honorific forms can be conjugated into casual, polite and formal forms. The basis off how we use these three forms of honorific verbs is the same as the standard Bob's. We will take a look at how we use. Honorific evolves in more detail later. Okay, so that's a quick overview off different forms of verbs and honorific bulbs. Over the next two lessons, we're going to take a look at how we add she and sushi to form honorific verbs. So I'll see you soon again in the next lesson. But by 11. (으)시 Conjugation 1: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how verbs are conjugated into honorific forms by adding Khushi. Here's the first pattern. If the verb stem ends in a patch him, then we add who she to the verbs them. Here are some examples check that charges she there. So they're so good. She there, pat there, pad Ishida. So, as you can see in these examples, when the verb stem ends in a pack, Tim, we add Khushi to the verb stems to form honorific Bob's that when we add sushi to the verbs , then they are considered as part off the verbs then so they can congregate into casual, polite and formal forms in the same way as other verbs with a verb stem ends in the Vow E, for example, the verb Chita means to hit, and it congregates into Char Child and Tim Nida. Similarly, these three honorific verbs can be conjugated into their casual, polite and formal forms in the same way to form casual verbs. The vow e changes to yard, and for the polite form, we add your at the end to form the formal form. We change shida to Shim Nida. We will talk more about how we use thes. Different forms of honorific evolves in a couple of lectures. Now, these honorific forms follow the same pattern of conjugation in the past and future tense. So the past tense off Tschida is Chest Soyo and the future tense is to oil. And these verbs change in the same way. So for the past tense, we have Chatichai, Soyo, Security, Soyo and traditional Soyo. And for the future tens, we have tactician Goyo so cocksure, Goyo and potentially coil. Okay, so let's now look at the second pattern. When a verbs them doesn't end in a pattern, we add she to develops them. Here are some examples he die Kishida Judah two she die. Saad, Uh, it's how she died. And the way we change these verbs into casual, polite and formal forms is exactly the same as the verb stems still end in the Vow E. And these verbs can change into past and future forms in the same way too. One thing to note is that although the verb to that has a different honorific bob to D, that we can still change to that to an honorific Bob Kushida. We will talk more about how these verbs air used later in the course. Now these are the two main patterns off adding who she to the verb stems to make the verbs into honorific Bob's do make sure that thou know the exercise worksheet to practice forming honorific forms following these patterns. Now there are also other irregular patterns of changing Bob's into honorific Bob's. So that's what we'll look at in the following lesson. See you then, Bye bye. 12. (으)시 Conjugation 2: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn about irregular patterns of adding who she to form honorific vote forms. The first irregular pattern is involved where the verb stem ends in a Lear Batam. In these verbs, we remove the legal battle him and add she to the verbs them. Here are some examples Cider sakashita I die, I see die Parada partida. So, as you can see in these examples, we remove the legal battle in the verb stem and then add she to the verbs them. And the way these honorific verbs change into casual, polite and formal forms as well as past and future tense is the same as what we saw in the previous lesson. However, there are two exceptions to this pattern. Qaida harder. She die by die body. She die. So in these examples we follow the pattern from the previous lesson where we add who she to the verb stems ending in a patch him. Now there is no real reason for this, but I think it's largely to avoid confusion. Since casita is an honorific form off cada and by Ashida is evolved, meaning to drink. So do keep in mind that there are certain exceptions even to irregular patterns. Now another irregular pattern with honorific verb conjugation is when the verb stem ends in Apia pattern. When the verbs them ends in appear pat him. We remove the P up and then add Khushi to the verb stem. Here are two examples Duke, that do see there I didn't up that Adam. How is she there? So as you can see the pew, Batam is removed and then we add Khushi to the verb stem. Also, the way we change them into different levels of formality and tenses is exactly the same as the verbs. Them ends in the vow E. However, as before, there is always an exception to the rule. And one exception to this pattern is in the verb tap that the honorific form off tap that is taboo Ishida. And this follows the same pattern we learned in the previous lesson where we add Khushi to the verb stems ending in a pattern. So this is one exception to this pattern off verb stems ending in Pupi tip. Okay, so that's it for this lesson on irregular patterns to form honorific verb forms, please download the worksheet to practice that irregular patterns you have learned in this lesson. In the next lesson, we're going to focus on how we use honorific verbs. See you then. Bye bye. 13. Using honorific verbs: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to look at the basics off how honorific verb forms are used, and I say the basics because in the next unit we're going to look at how honorific language is used in specific contexts. But in this lesson, I want to go over the fundamental concept off how honorific language is used. First, we use stand adverbs to describe actions off ourselves and others. Here are few example Sentences their guy has saw. I did it. The guy has saw a guy has Soyo. I did it. J Guy has Soyo. Jin's ooga has some Nida chin's Who did it? Tinsukia Haysom, Nida. The first sentence describes my own action using the casual verb and because it uses the casual form off, had a in the past tense. We use this sentence when we're talking to our piers or when we're talking down to people. In the second sentence, I described my own actions using the polite form off had a in the past tense and because it uses the polite form, we use this sentence when we need to be polite and respectful. Lastly, we used the formal form off Hodder in the past tense to describe someone else's action. And because the verb is informal form, we would use this sentence in formal settings only. So the key point to note is that we can use the standard verb to talk about actions off ourselves and others, and we use different forms of the verb with people in different levels of hierarchy. Now, in terms off honorific Bob's, we generally only describe the actions of those who are higher up in the hierarchy, and we still follow the same pattern off using casual, polite and formal forms with people off different seniority. Here are three example sentences. Our boards you got has your So the father did it I bought. You gotta has also Oh, Monica has a soya. The mother did it all. Money Guy has a soya bujang Nim e has a Sunita. The head of department did it. Bujang enemy has just simply there. So in the first sentence, we used a casual form off honorific verbs to describe the father's action. And since the honorific Bob is in its casual form, we would use this sentence with our peers or when we're talking down to people. The second sentence uses the polite form off the honorific Bob to describe the mother's action, and we will use this sentence when we need to be polite and respectful to someone. Lastly, we used a formal form off the honorific verbs to describe Bujang Nim, the head of department's action, so this sentence would be used in formal settings like workplace. Okay, so that's the basis off honorific Bob's. We use them to describe the actions off those higher up in the hierarchy, and we use casual, polite and formal forms depending on who we're talking to. The final point to note regarding honorific verbs is that when the verb describes an action directed to those higher up in the hierarchy than we use honorific verbs to describe the subjects action Here are two example sentences. Tega Our body a get tedious. I'll I gave it to my father. Take a bow. J get to Yes, I are. Our body got 20 Messiah. My father gave it to me. I bought you guys wanted you shall. So the first sentence describes me giving something to my father in this intense. Although we're describing my action because the action is towards somewhat higher up in the hierarchy. We used the honorific Bob Thida, however, in the second sentence. Although we're describing my father's action because the action is directed towards me, we use the standard Bob. But we used the honorific form off the standard verb Kushida. So this is how we used the honorific form off the standard Bob to describe the actions off someone with seniority when the action is directed at someone lower in the hierarchy. Okay, so that's probably a lot of information to take in. But Samos before do down or the exercise worksheet to practice using the honorific verbs appropriately in the next lesson, we're going to learn how we address people casually in Korean. See you then. Bye bye. 14. Addressing peers: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to look at how we address people casually in Korean now. Unlike English, the use of pronouns is far less common in Korean. In many situations, it's common for people to form sentences without pronounce as subjects as who or what the sentence is about his understood from the context. Moreover, while there are specific informal and formal forms of I and we, there are no universal prone, as we used to refer to he, she and they and even the pronoun you. There is only an informal form and not a formal form. So how we address people and how we refer to people differs in Korean in Korea, and you can only address people by their name. If they are either your friends or younger than you, you cannot address people by their name. If they're older, we'll talk more about addressing people who are older in the next lecture. Now, if you're calling your friend to catch his or her attention, you can add are all Yeah, at the end of names, we add our If the name ends in a part, Tim and we add, yeah, if the name doesn't end in a patch Him Here are some examples key. Wanna you wanna I mean young, uh, being younger means we are means Oh, yeah, hen I, uh And I uh So as you can see to call someone if the name ends in a pattern we add at the end. And if the name doesn't end in a patch him, we add, yeah, at the end in sentences, we could say he won a kata. Let's go key one. You wanna kata Hedaya or DHEA? Where are you? Hannah? Hannah O DEA. Okay, so that's how we address people by their name. Let's now learn how we can refer to people with their names. When we talk about friends or those younger than us. We add e after a name that ends in a pattern and then add one of the particles. Here are some example Sentences key. Juanita Casado key. One went key. One you got cast Soyo. He won in an castle. Yo ke one went key Juanin in Kosovo. So as you can see, we add e after the name that ends in a packed him before adding either the subject particle car or the object particle. And then now, although we would normally add the particle e And then when the name ends in a patch him. But because of E that comes after the name which doesn't have a patch him. We used a subject particle car and the topic particle. And then, on the other hand, if the name doesn't end in a pattern, then we just add the particles. Here are some example sentences means yoga. Caso means you went means a guy khoussa means in in cassava means a went means in and Khoussa So this time we don't add e we just add the subject particle car and the topic Particle Lynn. Okay, so that's it for this lesson on addressing people casually by using their names and we learned to add are all Yeah, when calling people and we learn how we can refer to people using their names and subject and topic particles. In the next lesson, we're going to learn how to address people with seniority. See, then bye bye. 15. Addressing people respectfully: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to look at how we address people respectfully in Korea. Now. How we address people with seniority depends on how we know them, as mentioned in an earlier lecture at workplace. If the age gap is minor and the other person is off the same level than we can address them by adding, See at the end, the use of C is quite formal, which makes it appropriate to use that workplace so we can say key one. She and Venus E. And we can also use she in social settings when we don't know the other person very well. Another word we often used to address people respectfully is Nim, and it's commonly used at the end of job titles. For example, the word Sagaing is often used to refer to a business owner. So if you're in a small cafe and you know that someone is the cafe owner, then you can address that person by sayings. Hajji name. Now addressing people by the job title is one of the most common ways of addressing people in Korea, so we can say things like sons and Nim. Keys are Nim and Kano's and name. We can also add it Nim at the end of certain family titles, and the most common are Hyungnim, Do Nim, Homonym and Abunimah. The use of name with Hung End Donna reflects how men use formal language more than women. As Unni and Opa, which are used by women, are not used with Nim. However, although these are family titles, when we address our actual family members, we don't use thes terms, mainly because we're so close to them and we don't need to be so respectful by adding name at the end. These family titles with Nim at the end are used when we address people outside of the family. For example, if we're addressing our friends, parents that we can use Almond Nim and about him, however, do know that this is from an adult perspective. When Children address friends, parents there were use Ajumma and ajusshi, which we used to refer to married men and women. Also, when men meet people in social settings that can refer to older men and older women as hung in and do name to be respectful. Now, this word ending name is used when we need to be respectful to people in general. Nim is not used with names in everyday situations, however informal settings. We can use NIMH with names. So in hospitals, if the reception wants to call a patient's name out there might say Kim Gyu a name Kim given name. But in everyday situation, we don't call on people by adding name at the end of names. Okay, so that's the end off this lesson. And today we learned the various ways off addressing people respectfully in Korea, and we're not going to move on. And in the next unit, we're going to start learning how honorific language is used in specific settings. See you soon again. Bye bye. 16. Saying how are you: hi there. So in this unit, we're going to explore how honorific language is used in specific context, such as talking about sleeping and eating. And as we go through how honorific language is used in specific context, it will help you to get a better understanding off how honorific language is used in Korean . In this lesson, we're going to learn honorific language we can use to say, How are you in Korean? That the two key verbs in this lesson are the standard verb. That and it's honorific Bob Casey data similar to English. There are several different ways of saying how you in Korean, but in this lesson that will focus on learning to say, How are you using the verbs that end casita? Now it That is one of the most commonly used verbs in Korea language, and it has many different uses, and one of those uses is to say to stay in Korean. When did that is used? In this way, it's honorific Bob. Is Casey data using need that we can say How you by saying Chaddy Sosa Chaddy so so tatty? Societa Talisa Soyo Tire means well, and the casual form is Sasa and the polite form is societal is used to mean Have you stayed or have you bean? So these two questions air used to ask, Have you bean? Well, the first question uses the casual verb ending. So we use this question when we're talking to our friends or when talking to young Children , as mentioned before when adults meat. They always start off by using polite language, and they transition to casual language pama when they have formed a close relations. The second question uses the polite verb ending this societal so it can be used when we need to be polite, such as when talking to people were fairly close to but are higher up in the hierarchy. And this could include older cousins or schools. Humber. I'm close to Okay, so let's first to a speaking practice off these two questions. Repeat after me, Chaddy. So So Chaddy. So So Chaddy Societa Chaddy Societa. Great job, Odone. Let's now look at how we asked the same question. Using the verb Kishida Tire, Keisha Sale, China. Occasional Celia Tight occasions. Some Nika Tareq, Asia Sinica. Now the first question uses the polite form off the honorific Bob and this way of saying how you is very common in Korea. We were used his polite form of the honorific Bob when we're greeting someone higher up in the hierarchy, such as when greeting relatives who are older than us, like uncles and grand parents or in greeting parents in law at workplace, we were used this greeting with those higher up in the hierarchy and those in the same level we're not familiar with. So this form off, How are you? Is very common in Korea. The former form off the honorific verb used in the second question is very rare, and it's only used in extremely formal settings, such as when you're greeting high level corporate or government officials. Okay, so let's practice these two ways of saying, Have you bean Well, how are you using the honorific Bob Casey Dah? Repeat after me, Tareq Asia, Sire Tareq, Asian Soil Tareq eight or some Nika Tara cater Some Nika Fantastic job today. Well done. Okay, so in this lesson, we learned to use the standard verb Eat that. An honorific Bob Casey dire toe. Ask how someone is in the next lesson. We're going to learn honorific language we can use to say goodbye in Korean. See you then. Bye bye. 17. Saying goodbye: Hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn the honorific language we use to say goodbye in Korean. Now there are four evolves we will focus on in this lesson. And they are it that in casita from the previous lesson and kata and casita first, if we're leaving a place such as someone's house, work place or a restaurant, then we say goodbye using the verbs that end casita to wish them a good stay. Here are two ways of saying could by using the bob it that Chaddy So Daddy so chatty Soyo Toddy Soyo! In the previous lesson, we use the past form off it. That s Sasa Toe. Ask how someone has bean. However, when we use the present form its R and D So we're wishing someone to stay well so the verb becomes an imperative form commanding the other person to do something. And these phrases become a way of saying goodbye in Korean. We can use the casual form when we talk to our piers or when we talked down on those below us in the hierarchy. The second sentence that uses the polite form of the verb the soil is generally used when we need to be a little more polite. So if we're saying goodbye to someone younger, who we don't know very well or when we're saying goodbye to those were familiar with and a higher up in the hierarchy, then we can use this phrase now. As we learned in the previous lesson, we can use the honorific Bob Casey that to be more respectful using Casey that we can say China que sale tighter que se o and unique. A sale on young Nikkei sale. Using the polite form off Casey Di Matteo, we can say goodbye using the adverbs tire meaning well, or an young E, which means comfortably or peacefully. So the literal meaning of these phrases is, Please stay well, or please they comfortably or peacefully. Now we don't use the formal form off K shida Katie Hnida because the casual form and the polite form function as imperative forms. As in, they command the other person to do something. However, the formal form does not function as an imperative form, so it's not used to say goodbye in Korea Now, in terms of usage, these phrases are used when we're talking to those higher up in the hierarchy, but they're also commonly used when we're saying goodbye to those were not familiar with. And in Korea, if you're ever in doubt, it's always best to be respectful. So this is a very common way of saying goodbye in Korea. Okay, so let's do a speaking practice off saying goodbye when the other person is staying. Toddy saw Toddy saw Chaddy Soyo, Toddy Soyo Toddy que se o toddy que se o and young nikkei Seo and young. You guys say, Oh, that was great, Baudone. Let's now look at how we say goodbye. Using the verbs cada and casita, which means to go, we used a verbs cada and kashinda to say goodbye. When the other person is leaving a place, let's first look at two ways of saying goodbye using Kada terra cotta tile guy China, Chiyo Chiyo. So in the first sentence, we used the adverb chariot, which means well and the casual form off cada car. So the literal meaning off tiger is go well, and this is how we say goodbye in Korean, as this phrase uses the casual verb car. This is Pama, so we commonly say this to our friends. The second phrase uses the polite form off Cada Chiyo and we use this when we need to be polite So we can say this phrase to those who are higher up in the hierarchy or when we're talking to people we're not familiar with. Let's now look at how we use the honorific Bob Casita, Toshimi, Casio to see me, Casale and Young You got Seo on Young. You got Seo choosy me means carefully. And as we learned before on young, it means comfortably or peacefully. So the literal meaning of these phrases is Please go carefully or please go comfortably peacefully. And these two phrases are the two comma respectful ways of saying goodbye. We used these phrases when we're saying goodbye to those higher up in the hierarchy such as older relatives, our teachers and our supervisors at workplace. Okay, so let's practice these phrases which we used to say goodbye to those leaving a place. Tai chi tai chi, china Chiyo tighter Chiyo, Toshimi, Casio to see me, Casio and Young, You got Seo and Young. You got Seo fantastic effort today. Whoa! Done. Okay, so today we learn to different ways of saying goodbye in Korean Using the valves. Eat that in Case CDA and CADA and Casita in the next lesson it, we're going to look at honorific language you used to talk about names. Season a gain, but by 18. Talking about name: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how to use honorific language to talk about names. First, there are two key words for the noun name Etem and someone. Etem is the standard word, and the honorific form is song. Um, when we say this word sung on the here, it is barely audible. So it's song, Um, it's hung on. Here's how we can ask the other person's name using Etem Eating Me Boyata Eating me boy eating me Boil eating me boil The first question is very casual. We use bore meaning what? And the casual form off Aida. Yeah, which means to be. And if you're an adult, this casual question should only be used when you're talking to young Children. Students at primary and secondary schools will often use this question when they meet their peers, as they already know that they are off equal level. The second question uses the polite form off Eder Yayo, and this question can be used by adults when they're asking young adults what their names are. And college students can also ask this question to each other. As college students tend to use slightly more formal language than teenagers. Now, another use off using it, um, is if I'm asking a friend what his friend or girlfriend's name is. In such case, I can ask doyou that single leading me boy? No, yo, that's ingredient me, boy. So even though I have never met my friend's girlfriend since my friend is my peer, she instantly becomes my peer. And I can use casual language to talk about his girlfriend as I'm close to my friend So you can use eating when asking someone's name who's off equal level in the hierarchy. Okay, so let's practice asking these questions. Repeat after me, eating me, boy, eating me, boy, eating me, boyo, eating me boyo. No, yo, that's ingredient me boy. Know what? I'm getting greedy me, boy, That was great, Baudone. Let's now look at how we use Hung them toe. Ask what people's names are. Here are two questions song Army or Tokyo Sauna me or talk radio? Sauna me or talk it. His hair song Amiel took it is a a the phrase art docutech. That means what is, and it's used in many other questions about personal information, such as asking other persons age birthday and phone numbers. The verb Tedder has many different uses, but in this question it functions like the Beaver been English. And in the first question, we use the polite form tale. But in the second question, we used the honorific form Tesio. Both of these questions are polite and respectful, but in general, when two adults meet for the first time in Korea, it's more common and appropriate to use. The second question with a verb is in its honorific form. The first question is more appropriate if two people meeting each other know that they are off similar age now. We can also use these questions with verbs in casual forms when we're asking our peers for the name of someone higher up in the hierarchy. So if we want to ask our friends father's name, we can ask our bodies, hung army or talking. I bought his hunger meal, took it a show. So in this question, every word is in its formal or honorific form apology song them and tasty die because the question is about my friend's father, who I should be respectful towards. But since I'm asking, my friend, I used a casual form off the honorific form. Casey Dire Tasia. So the key thing about using casual form off honorific verbs is that we use then when we're talking about those in seniority with our peers. Okay, so let's do a speaking practice off these questions. Repeat after me song at me or talk a two here song a meal, Tokyo song at me or talk It is here. Songhai Meal docket is here. Our bodies hung army or talk it Asia Apologies, Hunger meal talk it a show. Fantastic job again. Well done. Now, when it comes to saying our names, there are several ways to say our names in Korean and one of them is by using the word Etem . Remember that we used the honorific language to be respectful to the other person, not to ourselves. So we don't use Hung on to talk about our names. So, using it, um, we can say day demon Kim Diwaniyah Datum and Kim Gagne tell you them in Kim you on the a l . Tatum and Kim Diwaniyah j them and Kim given in Nida Jade And when Kim given him Nida. So regardless of whether we're using casual, polite or formal form of the verb either. As we're talking about ourselves, we use Etem. And the verb is also in its standard form rather than its honorific form. Ishida And just like other verbs, we use the casual form mainly with our peers. And we mostly used a polite form. When we saying our name to others, the formal form is only used in formal settings. Do you remember that the casual form off Eder can be? Yeah, if the name ends in a patch him. But if it doesn't, then we just add Yeah. However, if we're saying what our father's name is, then we use hung out and we can say Woody. Apologies, Homan. Kim Dae doing a show, Woody. Apologies Homan Kim Dredging issue Toy Apologies Holdeman Kim, Did you inhale toy apologies? Hong Hye Min Kim Do Jin is hell. In the first sentence, I use a casual form off the honorific Bob Ishida. Isha! So I used the first intends to tell my peers what my father's name is and to talk about my father's name I use is hung up also, Since I'm talking to my friend, I use Woody the standard form off our which can also mean by On the other hand we used the second sentence to tell someone off seniority our father's name. So not only do we use Hung Am but we also use the formal form off Woody Chai and detail which is the polite form of the honorific verb Ishida. We can also use the formal form off Ishida Isham Nida, depending on the context. So do know that if we're talking about our name, we use the now and eat. Um but if we're talking about someone we need to be respectful towards we use hung them to say what their names are. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off these phrases. Repeat after me daydream in Kim Diwaniyah Day Demon Kim given. Yeah, que them in Kim Gilani A l teii them in Kim Gilani a l che them and Kim given in Nida Che them and Kim given in Nida Woody, our bodies hung Chairman Kim, Did you Woody Our bodies hung Chairman Kim, Did you toy our bodies home? And Kim Dae Jung Izale toy our bodies home. And Kim Dae Jung is hell. Excellent job today. Well done. Okay, so in this lesson, we went over the use off standard and honor. If it was for the noun name Etem ends hung on. And how to use these terms using the standard and honorific verbs eater Ishida and Hedda Ishida. In the next lesson, we will take a look at the honorific language we used to talk about age. See you then. Bye bye. 19. Talking about age: Hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how to use honorific language to talk about age. Now, in general, there are two keywords related to age and they are so and I ni is the general noun for the word age ends higher is the counter word for age. But when we ask how old someone is, we can use both of these now owns. When we ask someone's age in a more casual way, we tend to use the word this hair. Here are two examples Bill Saadiya, Bill Saadiya Bill Saudi A l Your Sad e a l. So in the first question we have got and got means how many in questions. Then we use the counter words higher and it's used with a casual form of the verb eater. Yeah, this question is very casual, and it's commonly used by young people. Toe Ask each other's age, and as an adult you can use this question toe. Ask young Children's age. The second question has the same structure but uses the polite form off Eder e ao so we can use this question if we want to be more polite, similar to before university students might use this question when they meet other students for the first time. Just as we had learned in the previous lesson on names. We can also use this structure. Toe asked the age of those who are friends with our friends. For example, if I want to ask how old a friend's girlfriend is, that I can ask Dorio judging Goob your saadiya Doyou attaching Google Saadiya? And as before, I can ask this question in a casual way because I'm asking my friends Peer, who also becomes my peer instantly. Okay, so let's first was speaking practice off these questions. Repeat after me Bill Saadiya, Bill Saadiya Bill Saudi ao bill Saudi A l No, you're getting go your saadiya! No, I'm guessing Google Saadiya! That was great! Well done! Now, to ask how old someone is in a more respectful way, we can use the noun Die now You got auto, Kitale. Now you go, Locadia. Now I gotta talk. It has hail. No, I go talk it a sale. Now, if you recall the previous lesson, the question structure is essentially the same off dot care Te'o. Tesio means what is in the noun in this question is die age similar to how we use this question structure in the previous lesson? Toe. Ask people's names when we first meet them. In general. When two adults meet for the first time, it's more common to ask the second question, which uses the polite form off the honorific Bob Ishida Tae Seo. The first question might be used if you're fairly sure the other person is off the same age , or if you're sure the other person is much younger than you. Now if we want to ask our friends fathers a heat, then we can ask Obon named Aiga Talk radio show. I want him, ***, talk it a show. So we address the friend's father with Aban name, which we learned in an earlier lesson. And the rest of the question is the same except for the verb ending, which is the casual form off the honorific Bob Tae Shida Tasia. And the reason for using the casual form is because we're talking to our friend. If the person was speaking to has seniority than we can use the polite form off the honorific Bob Aban name *** off talk, it has a lot. Okay, so in nearly all situations, we can use the I gotta talk. It is a are to be polite when asking someone's age. However, when we're talking to someone much older who's at least 60 years of age. Then instead of Di, we should use Young's there and ask young Sega or talk. It has hail young Sager or talk. It is Seo the noun. Iansa is the honorific form off day, but it's only used to ask elderly people's age. So unless you're sure that the other person is at least 60 you shouldn't use this word as some people may be offended by you assuming them to be that old. Okay, so let's do a speaking practice off asking these questions. Repeat after me now I got auto koto. Now I go Tokyo Now you got or took it His hail Daigo Tok to sail. Aban named I gotta talk it Asia upon named I go talk it Asia Jones eager or talk it his hair. Young single tok this air. Great job, Odone. Now to say how old we are, we use the word aside so we can say Nannan Sumo's Hadiya Don in some whose idea Tonin Sumo's had a year. Tonin Sam was at Yale. John in sumo's I really need a Tom and Symbols, adding Nida. So the first sentence uses the standard form of the pronoun I now and the casual form of the beef up. So we mainly use this sentence with our friends. The second sentence that uses the four more prone Alan Char and the polite form of the verb vida is the one that's commonly used when we're talking to those with seniority and the third sentence that uses the formal form of the verb. Eder is only used in formal settings. When we say our age using sire, we use Native Korean numbers. Now, if we want to talk about the age of our elders than we generally used, announce hair, which also means age so we can say toy harmony. Nen. You ship to say toy high money and you ship to say toy Harry money, and then you shipped to the same leader Toy. How money? No, you ships, you're saying nida now. Depending on who you speak to, you can use either the polite or the formal verb ending, and the other interesting point to note is that unlike Sarah, we use signer Korean numbers with this head. So with this higher we can say toy had a body in in Eden who started me there. Choi had about in in Eden. Two sided me there. So with this Hyatt, we use Native Korean numbers. But with this hey, we can say toy had a body in in chills. She be saying, Need I? Choi had about in in Chile, she be saying me that so with that, we use Sino Korean numbers. So do you remember this difference off using different number systems with announces higher ends here? Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off. Talking about age, you zings higher and say Repeat after me. Dannon Sumo's Hadiya Don in sumo's Hadiya telling in similar Saudi a L John in sumo's idea . John in sumo's Higher in Nida, Ceylon in sumo's Adam, need I toy high money in in your ship to say, oh, toy having money. And then you keep to say, uh, Choi Hye money. And then you shipped your same nida toy High money in and you shipped your same Nida. Excellent job. Well done. Okay, So that's it for this lesson on honorific language related to talking about age. And today we learned various ways of asking and saying our and other people's age in the next lesson that we're going to learn honorific language related to talking about birthdays . Season again. Bye bye. 20. Talking about birthday: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn honorific language to talk about birthdays. Now there are two key words for birthday. The standard word is is hanging, and the honorific form is sanction. Let's first look at how we can ask when someone's birthday is using sang it. Sanity on Djair. Sanity on JAIA. Sanity on jail. Sanity on J. R. Sanity on Just Hail Sanity on J Sale. In the first question we used, a standard word is hanging. Then we have on JAIA, and this is made up off on J, meaning when and the casual form of the verb, either. Yeah, as with all statements and questions ending in casual form of obs, we use this question mainly with our friends. The second question uses the polite form of the verb. Either your and we will use this question when we want to ask our colleagues who we aren't familiar with and those who are a little higher up in the hierarchy. The third question uses the polite form of the honorific Bob Ishida sale, and we use this question when asking those who are higher up in the hierarchy, such as those who are 5 to 10 years older or senior managers in the corporate hierarchy. However, just as we had learned with age when we asked the birthday off elderly people, then we should use sanction and say Sanction e on. Just hail sanction e on Just hail. So we change is hanging to sanction if we want to ask an elderly person's birthday and we use the polite form of the honorific Bob Ishida sale. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off these ways of asking when someone's birthdays repeat after me. Sanity on JAIA. Sanity on JAIA. Sanity on jail, Sanity on jail, sanity on Jessica Sanity on jail sanction e on Just hail Second, she Neil on just hail. That was great. Well done. Now let's consider how we say Happy birthday in Korean in Korean, the standard way off saying Happy Birthday is to say, saying u kada This combines Sangin meeting birthday with Takada, meaning to congratulate. And this phrase means Happy birthday. The verb Takada can be conjugated into three forms so we can say, saying you chuka Hey, saying it took a here saying It's OK Oh singer Chaka Heo, saying it took a ham Nida singing to come need I? So we generally used a casual form with our peers or those younger than us. And we use the polite form when we say Happy birthday to those a little higher up in the hierarchy into those who are off similar level. But we aren't familiar with the former form is used in formal settings. Okay, so let's first practice saying these phrases repeat after me saying it took a hair saying It's OK Sangin chuka heo saying you took a hair saying You took a home. Nida saying you to come. Nida, That was great. Baudone. Now there is an honorific form off Okada and its Jakarta Rita. Florida is the honorific form off to that, meaning to give and using this verb we can say saying is true cardio saying it to Canada, saying it your car to dim Nida saying it to coddle him. Nida, we used the honorific Bob took Arditti that to be more respectful. So if we're saying happy birthday to someone much older, our teachers or people in senior roles at work, then we can say these two sentences, However, other than at very formal settings, it's more common to use. The first sentence with a verb ends in a polite form. Finally, if we want to say Happy Birthday to an elderly person, someone who's at least 60 years of age, then we can say sanction cardio sayings into cardio sanction to cut it in Media Section two . Academy there so we can substitute Sang it with sanction. Generally, if you're saying Happy birthday to your own grandparent's or one elderly person you're familiar with, then you should use the first sentence. But if you're saying happy birthday to someone you don't know, then you can say either phrases okay, so let's do a speaking practice off these sentences that used the honorific form off Okada Jakarta. Rita Repeat after me saying you took cardio saying it through crowded area saying is true. Carted him. Nida send you to cut it in the there. Sanction cardio sayings in Trocadero Sanction took carted in need I sayings into cutter in media. Great job. Whoa! Done. Okay, so today we went over many different expressions related to asking when someone's birthday is and wishing someone Happy birthday. In the next lesson, we're going to look at honorific language or used to talk about eating food. So Susan again in the next lesson. But why 21. Talking about eating food: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn honorific language to talk about eating food in Korea is very common for people to ask one another whether they have eaten or not. And we asked this question almost as a way off greeting each other, particularly around the meal time. So let's first take a look at the casual way of asking if someone has eaten pop mogul So Pam Agassa, Pam Mogo Soya Pamela Soya in Korean We use the world Pap, which means cooked rice to refer to a meal when we pronounce this word in this sentence the pew. But Tim changes to a medium sound. So we say Pam Agassa Bamogo. So the verb box that which means to eat, is in the past tense body out there. Now we can use the first question, which uses the casual form of the bob mainly when we ask our peers, and we can use the second question when we're asking those who are a little higher up in the hierarchy. However, there is an honorific form off the Bob doctor, and it's Tudor, and this verb to that is mainly used in its honorific form. to Shida. So to be more respectful, we can ask Pap, too, shall SIA pap to just CYA. First. It's important to know that the Pew Batam sound is maintained because the following bob to share sale begins with a ticket sound. So it's Pap Togusa and not Pam. Teach Messiah now, although this is a more respectful phrase because of the barb. Two shots. So the word pap is a rather casual term, so this phrase is more commonly used with older family members who you are close to. And as we will learn shortly, there is a more formal way of asking this question, which is more commonly used than PAP to society. But before we get to that, let's first to a speaking practice off these questions using Pap. Repeat after me Pam Agassa, Pam Agassa, Pam Moga, SIA Padma Gasana, Pap Teacher Sire Pap Viciosa That was great. Swot Done. Now Pap is the standard way off, referring to Mills, and the more formal form is shiksa with shiksa. However, we don't use the Bob box that all the honorific form to CDA. It's always used with the Bob Hodder, which means to do so to ask if someone has eaten. We can ask shiksa his soil. She excise soya shiksa has a soya sheikhs. I shall so in general, because shiksa is quite a formal word is more often used with the honorific verb hasher sire rather than the standard Bob Hesse. However, if we're talking to a colleague who's on the same level but on closed toe at work and we can use Hess audio rather than Hodja. So having said that, there is no definitive guideline on which expression is correct to use, and it all depends on the situation in the person using the language. Personally, I prefer using formal and respectful language in workplace. So unless I'm talking to someone I'm very close to at work, I will ask Shiksa, hash a soil regardless of the person's age or rank. And much of this is because workplace is a formal setting, and using formal and respectful language of workplace is the north. One other thing to note is that shiksa had a is a formal language and not on honorific term so we can use shiksa had a to talk about ourselves eating a meal. Now this differs from other honorific language, which we only use to talk about actions off others. So if a senior manager at workplace asked, Shiksa has soil, then we can respond by saying there she excise some leader so we can use the same phrase and use either the polite or the formal verb ending in our response. And here I use the form over bending as we're talking to a senior manager at Workplace. So do keep in mind that we can use the phrase shiksa had a to talk about our own actions. Okay, so let's practice asking these questions. Using shiksa had a repeat after me. Shiksa has soya XIX. Isola Shiksa has a soil shiksa. National Soyo. Excellent job, Odone. Finally, we have one more formal word for a meal, and it's tingey now. Gingy is a formal word, and it's also quite an old term, and it's rarely used in everyday speech, especially by young people. It's more often used by older people. The noun tingey can be used with either the verb to cedar or tap Sudha so we can ask Kinji tee shot SIA Team GT just CYA, Tingey tap social Sire. Tingey Tab, Social Sire. So we can use the polite form off either of OBS. So far, we've only seen involves in their polite forms when we ask someone if they're eating a meal . And this is largely because eating a meal is a fairly casual activity. So even if we're asking people much higher up in the hierarchy, it's more appropriate to ask using the verbs polite form now in terms of usage, As mentioned already, Tingey is more often used by older people. So my aunt in her fifties might ask my grandmother in her seventies if she has eaten by using Tingey. Also, it's generally used Mawr with elderly people, so I would use Chian Jie to my grandparent's, but not to senior managers at workplace. However, in the last 10 years, I actually can't remember a time when I used the word Gingy. So I think it's a useful word to be aware off. But you can just use shiksa as that's formal enough in all situations. Now, with that being said, let's still do a speaking practice using the word Chian Jie. Repeat after me, Kinji to Shasta. Change it! Ishasha Tingey Tap Social sale! Tingey Taps is just sire. Excellent effort again. Well done. Okay, so in this lesson, we went over various ways of asking someone if they're eating a meal using the now owns Pap shiksa and Kinji And we also learned to use various verbs with these now owns In the next lesson, we're going to look at honorific language. We used to talk about sleeping season again. Bye bye. 22. Talking about sleeping: Hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn honorific language to talk about sleeping. When we talk about sleep, there are two key verbs. One is the standard verb Tad I and the other is the honorific bob to Machida. Let's first consider how we say goodnight. Using these bulbs using Tada, we can say Choda, how did I tight I o tired ir? The word terror means well, So the literal translation off these phrases is sleep well or good night. The first phrase Talaja uses the casual form of the verb chador, so this phrase is commonly used with our peers. The second phrase charity Te'o, uses the polite verb ending off Chadha Te'o. So this is a more respectful term and we can use it with those who are slightly above us in the hierarchy. And those were not close to. Now if we want to say good night to those who are much older than us, or to those who are much higher than us in the hierarchy than we can say, and you need to move sale and young engine losail and young, if you recall an earlier lesson means peacefully or comfortably and to Museo is the polite form off to Machida. This is the respectful way of saying good night so we can say this to our parents and older relatives. Quite often people leave out and young me and just say Jew Museo Museo. And this is perfectly fine to Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off these different ways of saying Good night. Tired? Uh, Tida Tiaoyutai. Oh, tight. I, uh que museo two Museo and young need you, Museo and Young each Museo great job. Well done. Now, another way of using chador and to Machida is to say good morning. Now Koreans don't say good morning in the same way it is said in English to greet people in the morning time. In modern times, some people do say tool And that Tim Sean at him, which is a literal translation off the English phrase. Good morning. However, this phrase is not widely used and Koreans are more likely to just say and young assail to greet people any time during the day. However, after a night's sleep, Koreans ask each other whether they have slept well and they do this using the verbs chatter and to Machida First using Chadha, we can say tire test so tire test so China Tasso, Caritas, Australia. Now these phrases literally mean. Did you sleep well? And the verb chador is used in the past tense. Kasa and Tassio We can use the first question that uses the casual form of the verb toe. Ask our peers if they slept well and we can use the second question with polite verb ending toe. Ask those who are slightly above us in the hierarchy and those were not familiar with. However, if we need to be more respectful, we can ask and young age Moshe, SIA and Young, each of Messiah. So with this question, we use the polite and past form of the verb to machida to Musha Seo and similar to how we just say to Maceo to say goodnight. We can also just ask to Musha SIA, June usia, SIA, and that is still a respectful way of asking. Did you sleep well? Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice of asking Did you sleep well using the verbs chador and to machida tire test? So Carrie Tessa tired Tassio, Caritas Celje to Musha SIA to Malaysia, SIA and Young each Musha, sire. And young each of Moshe SIA. Great effort today. Well done. Okay, so in this lesson, we learn to say good night. And did you sleep well using the verb chatter? And it's honorific bob to Machida. In the next lesson, we're going to learn the honorific language we can use to talk about meeting people. See you then. Bye bye. 23. Talking about meeting people: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn honorific language we can use to talk about meeting people now similar to how we can use the verb to see to talk about meeting people. We can also use the Korean Bob poor there, which means to see to talk about meeting people and the honorific form off Porta is PETA. I do know that the W glide via where is pronounced like the vow air in far speech. So it's paired there paid that. Now when we talk about meeting people who are our peers, then we used a verb poor that here are two example sentences using this VUB Dannon they Suki polka done in days, Fuji bore clear Chandon. They been super Kaya tone and a beans abarca in the sentences we combined the verbs then pour with U kada which means will or be going to so combining porta and you gotta pull Ghada means we'll see or be going to see. And in the first sentence, the verb phrase is in its casual form. So we would mainly use this sentence with our peers and as mentioned already we used the standard the Porta because we're talking about meeting Susie, who is my friend in the second sentence develop is in its polite form. So we use this sentence to those we need to be respectful to, such as those higher up in the hierarchy and those who we aren't familiar with. And for this reason, we also used a formal form of the pronoun I char. And again, as we're talking about meeting Benzo, who is a friend, we still use the standard Bob Poor that we can, of course, use the formal verb ending If we're saying this sentence in a formal setting. Okay, so let's practice these sentences that use poured out to talk about meeting our peers. Repeat after me. Dannon Day, Suki Bolkiah done and a Suji Bolkiah Tonin dated been super Kaaya John and a beans uber quail. Great job. Well done. Now, on the other hand, if we're talking about meeting people who are higher up in the hierarchy than we used of ob peta, here are two example sentences donning they something in America dining days, Something in back Kyra Tonin They e more Perica John and a Eema Bertoia Thonon Day poontang impaired Romney die 10 and a poor Jiangnan Pehr Kalm Nida So in all these sentences were talking about seeing those higher up in the hierarchy the teacher, auntie and the manager from the company. So we used a Bob PETA with Goya. The first sentence uses the casual verb ending so we would use this sentence mainly with our peers. The second sentence uses the bulbs polite form. So we will use this sentence with those higher up in the hierarchy and with those who we aren't familiar with. The last sentence uses the verbs formal form. So we will use this sentence in formal settings only. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off using Peric oye Peric Oil and Pehr Kalm Nida Repeat after me Done And they something empirical yah done in days on the second in America Children, they anymore Peric Oil tone and a A move. Erica Ariel Thonon day Putin name Peric Omni Die China and they'll put Jiangnan Pehr Kalm Nita. Excellent job today. Well done. Okay, so today we learned to used evolves poor there and pay their to talk about meeting our friends and those higher up in the hierarchy in the next lesson. We're going to learn the honorific language. We used to talk about speaking to people, so I'll see you soon in that lesson, but by 24. Talking about speaking to people: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn the honorific language we can use to talk about speaking now in Korean , the noun by can be used to mean words, speech and language, depending on the context it is used in, and to talk about someone speaking or talking, we can combine by with a Bob Hodder, which means to do so by Honda or Barada means to speak, talk or tell, and the honorific form off Barada is by Sim had a bias, Um, is the honorific form off by and we can add harder to buy Cem to form by Sinha. However, in most situations we don't just use by Sim Hata, we actually change harder to its honorific form Hashiba. So it's commonly used as Buy a Sim Ashida. So let's first consider sentences using the standard Bob Barrada to talk about someone talking, speaking and telling. They got something name and tear body, so they got something. Name antibodies, So check got beans. Winter Barry Soyo Tega means want a body soil in both sentences. I'm describing myself telling someone so we use the standard form barada and we use the past form Marisa and Marisol Yo, and we generally used the standard Bob when describing our own actions or actions of our peers. And those below us in the hierarchy do note that with most verbs where the action is directed to someone if the action is directed to someone with seniority, we used the honorific verbs to describe our own actions. These verbs include to give Judah and teda and to ask robo there and your job. However, with the verb bad idea, we used the standard verb to describe our own actions regardless of who the action is directed to. So in the first sentence, I use the past and casual form of the verb barada body saw to describe me, telling my teacher, and as the verb is in its casual form, we mainly use this sentence with our peers. The second sentence uses the past and polite form of the verb Bharatha Barrasso, so we can say this sentence to those higher up in the hierarchy or those we aren't familiar with. Also, we can use the formal former Madison Nida if the setting is formal. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off these sentences. Repeat after me. They got something. New monetary bodies. So they got something. Name antibodies. So check our Benzo antibodies. Soyo, check out being so antibodies. Soyo! That was great. Wot done. Now, if we want to describe someone higher up in the hierarchy doing the talking we can use by a Simha Ashida. Here are some example Sentences. Hi, Money! God! And by Simha shall saw Hi money God! And thereby similar saw causing them. Gazeau Toe and Care by Simha Sire causing them Kids are trying Tae by Samassa Sale It's hard Jiangnan Ghetto Poor young The mega by Somehow it's hard Jiangnan kids are playing the mega by semi Justin Nida. So in the first sentence we used the honorific Bob Bison Hashiba to talk about my grandmother doing the talking. But the verb form is in its casual form so we can use this sentence to our piers. The second sentence also uses the honorific Bob buy a Sim Hattie that But this time the VOD is in its polite form. So we will use this sentence to tell someone with seniority or someone. We're not close to that. The teacher spoke to me. This sentence also uses the particle guesser, and Gazza is an honorific subject particle, and we can use this instead of the regular subject particles e and car to refer to people with seniority. It's actually perfectly fine to use the subject particles e n car in nearly all situations . But in certain formal situations such as a workplace or when referring to someone higher up in the hierarchy, such as professors, it's more appropriate to use guesser. The final sentence uses the formal form off the honorific Bob by Simha Ashida by Simha Sumida. So we were used this sentence in formal settings, and because the sentence is used in formal settings, it's more appropriate to use guesser than the regular subject particle e. Additionally, we used a particle egger instead off Hunter. And this is because a girl is more formal than Hanta. Okay, so let's do a speaking practice off using the honorific Bob by Simha Ashida. Repeat after me Hi, Ramon IGA non Ted by a Simha shall saw Hi money, God and Tae by so much. Also using name Gesell Time tear by civil society using them kids are trying Tae by Simagina, Sire. It's hard jangling keys or put Jangmi megabytes Simm. Hi, Justin. Need I sidelining gays are pretty young The mega by semi Jasem Nida Excellent job today. Well done. Okay, so today we learned to describe people talking using barada and it's honorific Bob by Sinha . We also learned that we further congregate this far into its honorific form My Simha Ashida . Additionally, we learned to use the honorific subject particle guesser. In the next lesson, we're going to learn the honorific language. We used to talk about asking questions So you sit again, but by 25. Talking about asking questions: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn the honorific language. We used to talk about asking questions. Now the standard verb to ask is, but that and the honorific form is your Judah. However, when we used these verbs in sentences, we often combine these verbs with our porta, which means to try doing something. In essence, these four Bob's have the same meaning. But the combined forms are less direct than with their end yacht Judah, so they're more commonly used in everyday situations. Now honorific verbs are used to describe the actions of those above us in the hierarchy, and we use standard verbs to describe our own actions. However, as mentioned in the previous lecture with the verbs such as Buddha, Buddha and your job order, the focus is more on the person the action is directed towards. So to describe our actions towards people with seniority, we used the honorific Bob and to describe our actions towards our peers or those below us in the hierarchy. We use the standard bob. There are also situations where we used the honorific form off boodle board. There would are bullshit, they're and we learn this in today's lesson also. So let's first look at some sentences that used of obs robo there and Buddha Bullshit something Name Gazeau on a bra. Botia saw something them casar than table Rob. We just saw Cheka beans. Want a robot soya? Check our beans on table Obasanjo, Bujang Nim, Gazeau Dante Bravo, Justin Nida In case so in each sentence, the person asking the question is asking to someone lower in the hierarchy or to someone off the same level as in the second sentence. So we use either the standard Bob Boudreau border or is honorific form Buddha Bush era. The first sentence uses the casual form of the Bob so we can use this sentence to our piers . However, the verb is the honorific form off Buddha, Buddha, Buddha, Botia. And this is because we're describing the action off someone higher up in the hierarchy so we can use the honorific form to be more respectful. Whether you use Bravo, that or bravo, she depends on who's action you're describing and whether you need to be more respectful in that situation. The second sentence uses the polite form of the verb, so we use this sentence to those higher up in the hierarchy or to those were not familiar with. And because we're describing my own action, We used to standard Bob Buddha Buddha with regards to pronunciation that w glide via Why in Paseo is weakened and it sounds like are so This is pronounced pass oil pass oil Buddha Obasanjo, Roba, Soyo Lastly, the final sentence uses the formal form of the verb So this sentence is used in formal settings And again we used the honorific Bob Buddha bushy that because we describing a senior manager from work asking questions. Okay, So with that in mind, let's now do a speaking practice off the sentences. Repeat after me Something name gets old and rob OSHA saw something them casar than table rob saw Check out beans. Want a bra? Basada tega beans Juan Tabo Basada Bujang Nim Gazeau Dante Bravo, Justin Nida Vagina. Excellent job. Well done. Let's now look at how we used the honorific form. Your job or that Here are some example Sentences their guys hunting him gay Your job a saw They got something. Name? Gay Your job, Asa tega oven. Emcare your messiah. Check out about him. Care your Messiah. Take us hijacking him. Gay your job. Awesome. Nida tier guys hijacked him. Gear your job. Us A. Media. In each of these sentences, I am asking someone higher up in the hierarchy. Therefore, we describe my actions using the honorific Bob your job order in the past tense. The first sentence uses the casual form of the Bob. So we use this sentence mainly without piers. The second sentence uses the polite form of the Bob. So we use this with those higher up in the hierarchy or with those were not familiar with the final sentence uses the formal form of the verb. So we use this sentence in formal settings. Now there's an additional element to this sentence and it's the particle gay. When we talk about asking a question to someone, we have to use a particle that means to in Korean and common particles, we use our again and hunting. Generally, Egger is more for more than hunter, so we can use a get in these sentences. However, there is an honorific form of these particles and that's gay. So if you need to be more formal and respectful, you can use care instead of a gay to refer to those higher up in the hierarchy. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off these sentences. Repeat after me. They got something. Name. Get your job. I saw they got something. Name Gary Togusa. Tech guy upon him. Get your job. Take Carbon name gay or Togusa. Check guys hijacking him. Gay your job. Assembly! Die! Hey, guys. How dog named Gear. Your Tobias Anita. Great effort today. Well done. Okay, so in this lesson, we learned to use the Bobs, Boudreau, Borda and your job over there to talk about asking questions. We also looked at the use off the honorific particle gay, which means to in English. In the next lesson, we're going to learn the honorific language. We used to talk about giving something to someone season again. Bye bye. 26. Talking about giving: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn the honorific language. We used to talk about giving something to someone. The standard verb for to give is Ceuta, and the honorific form is Thida and similar to the votes we learned in the previous lesson . We used to stand a verb when we talk about giving something to someone off the same level or those below us in the hierarchy. And we used the honorific verbs when we talk about giving something to someone higher up in the hierarchy. Also, just like in the previous lesson, the standard verb choda can be used in the honorific form True Shida to be respectful when describing actions of those higher up in the hierarchy. So let's first look at some example sentences that use through that and Kushida being Sogard and touch or so means Oh God! And take JoSosa sons Enemy John Ted Messiah Something. The Mito Until radjasa our body gets or trying to twitch awesomely die. Our budget gets out time there to just a media. So in all these sentences were talking about giving something to someone off the same level or to someone lower in the hierarchy. So we use either Choda or choose Ishida in the first sentence I am talking about been zoo Who is my peer giving something to me. So I used the verb Ceuta. And because the verb is in its casual form, the sentence is mainly used with our peers. Now, in terms of pronunciation, the W glide vow war is weakened and sounds like all. So this verb is pronounced cha Soyo Chasseriau. In the second sentence, we're talking about the teacher giving something to me. And since the teacher is someone I should be respectful to, we used the honorific Bob Chew Ishida and the Bob is in the polite form. So we were used this sentence to those higher up in the hierarchy or to those we're not close to. Lastly, in the final sentence, we're talking about my father giving something to me. So we also used the honorific form choosy there. And this time we use the particle Gazza, which makes this sentence more formal and respectful. And the verb is in its formal form, which means this sentence is mainly used in formal settings such as at workplace. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off these sentences that used of Obs, Ceuta and Rasheeda. Repeat after me Beans ooga dan, take salsa. Been so God and take salsa sons enemy to want a messiah Sons Agni mito untouched A budget gets are taunted just simply there our budget gets auto and tear to Justin Leader That was great. Wot done. Let's now look at how we used of ob to Di Di to talk about giving something to someone higher up in the hierarchy. They guys hunting me Mega studio saw they got some Segni may get you just saw Cheka all my name. Get to just CYA check out all my name, get it? Yes, I are Check guys Hijacked name. Get to Justin. Need I check us hijacking him? Get to Yes, Certainly die. So in a lot these sentences we used of ob to D that because we're talking about me giving something to people higher up in the hierarchy the teacher, my mother in law and the CEO off the company. And as we have learned many times already, we use a casual form of the verb in the first sentence. If we're talking to our piers and we use the polite form of the verb in the second sentence if we're talking to those higher up in the hierarchy or to those we're not close to. And lastly, the formal form of the verb is used. If we're speaking in formal settings also, we can use the particle egger in the first sentence, which is more for more than Han Tae. All we can use gay, which is the honorific form off again. And Hanta in sentences where the verb is in its polite and formal form. The use off get is more appropriate. Okay, so let's do a speaking practice off using the verb to D day. Repeat after me. They got something we may get todo saw. They got something. Me may get todo So chair guy or Moneim, get to the Messiah. Check out our money may get it. Yes, Iowa. Okay. God's Ha Giang name. Get to the awesome Nida. Check us hijack name. Care to Justin me there. Great job today. Well done now. One other points in our regarding the verbs chewed our entity there is that they're commonly combined with other verbs to talk about doing something two or four someone. And the way we used to that entity that depending on whom the action is directed to, is exactly the same. Some examples of these combinations include Pull your do that. Pull your titty Dire head. You there, head. Did he die? Hi, Joe. That you there? Hi, Joe. Don t die and you go to that. You go. Did he that? And as we have seen in this lesson, we can also congregate these standard verbs into honorific forms by adding she so do keep in mind that as well as using them individually to the entity that are frequently used by combining with other evolves. Okay, so that's it for this lesson on the use of verbs Trudeau and today to talk about giving something to someone in the next lesson, we're going to learn the honorific involved we can use to talk about being ill. Susan again. Bye bye. 27. Talking about being ill: Hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn the honorific language we can use to talk about feeling unwell. Now, the standard verb we used to talk about feeling unwell or being in pain is a put that and we can congregate this verb into its honorific form. Pushy There the honorific bob off rapida is plant ente. But when we use this verb, we generally use its honorific form plan Tennessee that Okay, so let's first look at how we ask where someone is feeling pain. Here are two example questions using the Bob Put that or digga UPA OD got pie already got a Piau Odinga Piau Now the two questions look very similar We use rd meaning well and the subject particle car and we use a casual form of the Bob put there in the first question upper while the second question uses the polite form a pyro. So we use the first question with our piers while the second question is used with those who we need to be more polite. So however, as we will see shortly when we need to be respectful the use off the honorific bob Pushy that is more common. So using the polite form of Apple Oda, a pale is more appropriate when we're talking to those who we aren't close to but are off the same level or those below us in the hierarchy now, Toe asked the same question to those higher up in the hierarchy we can use of obs at pushy there and plan Chan Ishida. Here are two example questions or d gotta put sale old IGA for sale or D got punch Anna's hair. Oh, do you got from China's sale? In the first question, we use the polite form of the honorific Bob up Ouda a pushy there. And when we're talking to those higher up in the hierarchy into those were not close to, we generally use this question. The final question that uses the polite form of the honorific Bob Plan Chan issued there is generally used when we have to be extra respectful. So I would only use this question when talking to my parents in law or elderly people. Okay, so with that in mind, let's now do a speaking practice off these questions. Repeat after me. Old iga UPA Oh, dear God. Huh? OD guy a piau oldie got Piau od guy put sale Oh dear God puts Hail Old Iga content is hale oldie Got content is a oh, excellent job Well done Let's now consider how we answer these questions now when we're talking about ourselves or those below us in the hierarchy being ill We used of ob app for that But if we're talking about those higher up in the hierarchy being ill, we used of obs at pushy that or plan Tennessee that here are two example sentences using the verb up put there nine in body got pie dining bodyguard pie chillin in paddy got up i O tonin Taiga Piau with the verb up with their weaken first specify where the pain is and then used a verb apunta. The first sentence is what we can say to our friends as it uses the casual form of the Bob Apunta upper and here body means head. So the sentence means I have a headache. The second sentence uses a polite form of the Bob so we can use this sentence with those higher up in the hierarchy or those were not close to toddy means leg. So this sentence means I have a leg hole. My leg hurts. Let's now look at sentences that used evolves are pushy there and plan Chan Ishida to talk about those higher up in the hierarchy being ill. Here are two example. Sentences are voting in Pair Guy push up Aborigine and peg up Whishaw Sons Inc. Neiman Plan. China's A Are Sons Inc Neiman Putting China's hail. So in the first sentence, we're talking about my father being ill, so we used the honorific form off a Porta a Porta. However, the vote is in its casual form, so we will use this sentence without piers. Pair means stomach. So this sentence means I have a stomachache or I have pain in my stomach. The last sentence talks about the teacher being on well, so we used the honorific Bob Plan Tennessee there, and we use the polite form of the honorific Bob plan. Chan issued their plan China's Ale, so we can use this sentence with those above us in the hierarchy and those were not close to. Also this intense describes the teacher being unwell in a more general sense rather than a specific body part, and this is a key difference between up ODA and plant ente. While up with that or a pushy there can be used to specify where in the body the person is in pain, plant entire and plunge Vanity. There is more commonly used to talk about being unwell generally, so when it comes to usage, both are pretty dire and punch an ishida are commonly used, but there used differently depending on what you want to describe. Also do keep in mind that there are other ways of describing someone being unwell. So these two verbs aren't the only verbs used to describe someone being unwell in Korean. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off these sentences. Repeat after me None in body Got a pot nine and body got pie. Children in Patty Guy a Piau Tony and Heidi got Piau are bulging in Peguy push up Arvo Jinan Peg are pretty sons and Neiman Clinton is here something The moment content is here Excellent jobs that I won't on. Okay, so in this lesson we learned to use the evolves I put that and Planche anti to talk about being on well and we also learned the use off the honorific forms. Pushy that and plan China. See that in the next lesson, we're going to learn the honorific language we used to talk about other people's Children. See you then. Bye bye. 28. Talking about children: hi there. So in this lesson that we're going to learn the honorific language we can use to talk about Children in families. When we talk about our Children or other people's Children, there are two. Key now owns the standard, now is I. And the honorific now is Tanya. The word I has the same meaning as the English word Children so we can use it to refer to Children in a general way. All people, Children, the honor. If it word Tanya is only used to refer to people Children, it's not used to refer to Children in a general sense. Okay, so using IE and Tanya, let's take a look at how we asked people whether they have kids or not. Here are two example questions using I Ah Iga is so I guys. So I You guys Soyo are you guys saw you first? If you recall an earlier lesson on saying how you We learned that the bob it that has many different uses and it can be used to mean to stay however another common use off it that is too mean to have. So in the first sentence, we use the standard word for Children. I toe ask if the other person has Children and we use the casual form of the verb it that Issa. So we mainly use this question when talking to our piers. In the second question, we use the standard word for Children I and the polite form of the verb There is soil, and we would generally ask this question to those who are off a similar level but on close to us now. At this point, it's important to note that even though I E is the standard word, it's not a nim polite word. So even if you've just met someone who's a few years older, it's perfectly fine to ask this question, though, as we will learn shortly. If you're speaking to someone much higher in the hierarchy, you will need to use the honorific word Tanya. Okay, so let's now take a look at two example questions using Tanno Tan yoga is soya channel guy soya tan yoga, he says. Hail Tanya guys says hail. So in both questions, we use Tania, and we use Tanya when we're referring to the Children of someone much higher in the hierarchy. In the first question the verb it that is used in its polite form so we can use this question if we're speaking to someone higher in the hierarchy. The second question uses the polite form off the honorific Bob Isoc. There is's hail, so this question is more respectful than the first question. When he comes to usage, I would more often use the second question that uses the honorific Bob Easter's Hail. And the reason is because if I'm using the word Tanya, then I'm likely speaking to someone who I need to be respectful to. So it's more appropriate to use the honorific involved and the standard fob. So the second question is more commonly used. And the first question when we need to be respectful. Now there is an even more honorific were then Tanya, and that's tragic. But when we ask if someone has Children, the use off channa is more common than charger in Korean. Okay, so let's now practice these questions to ask if the other person has Children. Rip it off to me. I got is So are you guys So aiga is soya. Are you guys saw tan Yoga is soya tan your guy soya tan yoga, he says. Hail Tanya, Guy says, Hail. That was great. Wot done. Now let's say that your professor tells you that he has a daughter and a son who are both at secondary school. So you want to ask what year they're in the words for daughter and son in Korean, our town, and added. But when referring to sons and daughters off those higher up in the hierarchy, we add name to these now owns, so that becomes tannin and other becomes added name. Using these downs toe ask what year the Children are in. We can ask. Don Eamon built 10 Unirea Danny Manure 10 year on year. I didn't Neiman your tenure. I didn't Even your 10 year on year, not as we learn before, can be used to mean how many. But it can also be used to mean what, and Hanyang is school year and yea or is the polite form of the Bob, either, which is similar to the beaver in English. So Bill Tanyon year means what year are you in? And in front of this question, we can add Dan, Eamon or Adam Neiman toe. Ask what year the professor's daughter and son in. If you're asking someone who's off similar level or maybe slightly above you in the hierarchy, then you can just use down and other instead off Dannion and addendum as that becomes too formal. Okay, so let's do a speaking practice off these questions that use the noun. Stand him and had him repeat after me. Hahnemann your 10 year on year, that demon bill tenure near here at the Nieman Dartanyon year. I didn't even built Onion Year Great job today. Well done. Okay, so in this lesson, we learned to use Announce I and Kanye to refer to people's Children. And we also learned to refer to people, sons and daughters respectfully by using Dannion and Adan in in the next lesson, we're going to learn the honorific language we can use to talk about taking someone to a particular place season again. But by 29. Taking someone to a place: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn the honorific language we can use to talk about taking someone to a particular place. Now the verbs we're going to learn today. I used to describe escorting someone to a particular destination. So if you're taking your mother to the airport or you're taking your Children to a birthday party, you would use thes verbs. There are two votes we used to talk about taking someone to a place. The standard verb is Theriot, die to that. And the honorific verb is Moshe that to leader the standard verb combines Terry DHA, which means to keep people and animals close with the verb ending Our to that which, as we mentioned in an earlier lesson, means to do something for someone. And this combined form means to escort someone to a particular place. The honorific form combines bushy data, which means to take someone to someplace with the honorific form off our Choda or Thida. And the combined form is the honorific form off. Theriot, that Judah Bouchard? Aye. Thida now similar to how we use the verbs. True that end teda. We use Teddy O that through that when the action is directed to those off the same level or below us in the hierarchy. And we use Moshe there to be there when the action is directed to those higher up in the hierarchy. Let's first take a look at some sentences that used terrio that through that they got Sujit todo that also Dega Sujit Otavio da jososa young each holder pterodactyl, soil young each other Taito Dodge Also our bodyguards Holder Theriot, that usual sale I bought you got older Taito Duchy Asseo. In these sentences, the action is directed to either someone off the same level as in the first sentence or someone below as in the second in the third sentence. So we used the verbs Taito that you that was in the third sentence. It's honorific form Terrio the cheetah. The first sentence uses the casual form of the verb as well as the standard form of the pronoun I not. So we will use this sentence mainly without piers. The second sentence uses the polite form of the Bob and the formal form of the pronoun I. So we were used this sentence when speaking to those higher up in the hierarchy or those were not familiar with now Judah in terrier, that UDA should never be changed to Thida. However, if we want to talk about someone higher up in the hierarchy taking someone to a particular place, we can change your debt to its honorific form. Juicy there. So, as you can see in the third sentence to talk about my father, who is higher than me in the hierarchy taking me somewhere, I used the honorific form Theriot, that Kushida This sentence uses the polite form of the verb, so it's used with those higher up in the hierarchy and with those were not familiar with. We can also use the formal form of the verb in formal situations. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off these sentences that use the verbs terrio that Ceuta and Theriot that Kushida repeat after me. They got suited Theriot data. Also, they got security data that also young me told Teddy Oh, that'll SIA young is holder irritated, agile SIA a body God's holder. Theriot, that crucial SIA How about you guys holder Tater that you just CYA Excellent job. Well done. Let's now look at how we use Bouchard R two d there, as mentioned before, we use Bouchard artery there when the action is directed to someone higher up in the hierarchy, here are some example sentences. They got all more Niedere Bushel that you just saw. They got all monetary. Bouchard. I did. Yes, sir. Check in motor Bouchard dietary Assata Check out the motor bushe that Did you Tech guy, Omani MMA Bouchard that to the awesome need I check out all money Marie Bouchard. That adjusted me that So in each of these sentences were talking about me taking someone higher up in the hierarchy to a particular place. So we used the honorific verb Bouchard R two d. There, the first sentence uses the Vibe's casual form, so it's mainly used without piers. The second sentence uses the vibes polite form, so it's used with those higher up in the hierarchy and with those were not familiar with. Lastly, the third sentence uses of obs formal form. So we use this sentence in formal settings. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off these sentences that used the honorific verb Bouchard that two D that they got all money. The bushel dietary a saw Decca or monetary? Bouchard added. Yes. So check i e. Motor Bouchard, I tell ya. SIA check. I motor Bush adopted a CYA check. I all money My Bouchard that to just simply die Check out our money. Memorable Showed that he doesn't need I Excellent job today. Well done. Okay, so today we learned to use the verbs terrio that true there and Bush a dietary there to talk about escorting someone to a particular place. And we also learned that we can change Theriot, that you there too. It's honorific form. Teddy Yoda, Trischitta. The next lesson is our last lesson on honorific language, and it's a bit of a dark topic, but will be going over the language we use to talk about people dying. So our Susan again in that lesson, But by 30. Talking about death: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn the honorific language we can use to talk about people dying now in Korean. There are many different Bob's we can use to talk about people dying, and each one has specific uses in this lesson will focus on these four Bob's. Let's first consider these two verbs. Gupta ends Ham Anggada. The most common verb we used to talk about someone dying in Korean is there. There is neither a formal no, an informal word, but that is very direct. And it's not a respectful word, so it's not used to talk about the death all those higher up in the hierarchy. We mainly used to that to talk about our peers, all those younger than us dying. We can also use it to talk about people dying from tragic events. Here are two example Sentences. Sutjipto saying into Gaza. Suji Dongxing into Gaza. Taszar goto, handsome young. Each Gosta has a goat, has, um, young into Gaza. So in the first sentence, because we're talking about the death off Susie's younger sibling, who is below us in the hierarchy, we used a verb, took their in the past tense in the second sentence to talk about a current event where people have died. We can use the verb to say how many people have died in that event in terms of formality, same as with other verbs. The first sentence uses the verbs casual form. So we use this sentence with our peers mainly, and the second sentence uses the verbs polite form. So we use this sentence with those higher up in the hierarchy and with those were not familiar with. We can also use develops formal form, informal situations. Last point to note is that the verb but that is also used to talk about the death off animals. And if you're a fan of video games, you can use that to talk about characters in computer games. Dying Now the verb salmon Hodder is made up off the noun salmon, which means death and the verb Hodder, which means to do this verb is more four more than took their, and it comes across a little less direct. However, Osama Ghada is never used to talk about people's death in everyday situations. Instead, it's mainly used in formal situations to talk about people's death, such as in the news. Here are two example phrases, Sam. Under your has, um young salmon Dalio. It does. I'm young. Taszar, Goto Tossem Younis Harmonies and media. Taszar gold has, um, young use Hmong Essam Nida to report how many people have died. The noun salmon is combined with a Suffolk star which refers to people. So Sam Manda means a dead person or the dead. The second phrase is what a news reader might say to report how many people have died from a car accident. Newsreaders always use formal language. So the bob is used in its formal Former. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice of using the verbs. There ends. Hamadeh. Repeat after me. Su ji Dong Zang each Gaza Su jeong's any Tribasa tazhayakov door has a milne to Gaza. Taszar. Goat has, um, young each Ragusa Sam under your handsome young salmon Jr that some young times have gold orgasm. Younis, Hmong Essam Nida Taszar. Goat has, um, Young is Haman? Yes, indeed. I Excellent job. Well done. Let's now look at two. Honorific evolved. We used to talk about people dying and they are told Agassi there and closer had that Both of these verbs are respectful ways of talking about someone's death. But Posada is more formal and less commonly used. Let's first take a look at two sentences using Tor Agassi die means we had our body guy told I got salsa means we're had about you got what I gotta saw says him Tony told a guy I shall say are some to need what I got s i r as mentioned already told I got you that is more commonly used in everyday situations And we use this verb to talk about the death off someone higher up in the hierarchy. And one of the distinctions between these verbs is that Torre I gotta can be used to describe the death of those close to us and not close to us. However, Posada is only ever used to describe the death of those not close to us. Now, in terms of the verbs formality, the first sentence uses the verbs casual form. So we will use this sentence with our peers mainly. And the second sentence uses the verbs polite form. So we will use this sentence with those higher up in the hierarchy and with those were not familiar with. We can also use the bulbs formal form in formal situations. Now the verb close a had that is made up off the now on the pro se, which is a formal word that means death and of up Hodder, which means to do. Posada, however, is almost always used in its honorific form. Carisa Ashida, similar to talk I got you that we use close air has you there to talk about the death of those higher up in the hierarchy. But as mentioned already, we mainly use poster. Has she there to talk about the death of people we are close to? Additionally, Posada is mainly used in formal settings, such as in the news or at funerals. Here are two example Sentences. Chong Tatham Young e Paras as awesome Nida John their tongue young IPO says US A. Media Sajani Me, Carisa Ashe. Awesomely there Jangmi Paris are just a media. So in the first sentence to talk about the death off the previous president, we used a verb poster Haggadah informal form Paris. There has just a media, and this sentence could be said by a news reader. The second sentence talks about the death off the company's CEO. So we use Posa, has you that in its formal form coast Say hi, Justin Leader. This sentence might be used in a company announcement to let everyone know off the CEO is passing. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off the sentences that use toward a grassy there and Paris say how she died. Repeat after me beans. We had our body guy told our guys saw means we had a party. Got Saragossa saw chairs. Having Tony toward our guys are, sire. Tears Haven't you need? What I gotta say are John had tongue young people media Tom that Tom Young a Posada simply die. It's hard Jiangnan me. Marissa has just some Nida It's has acne. Me posi, I just simply die. Fantastic job today. Well done. Okay, so today we learned four different verbs we can use to talk about people dying and they were there. It's how, among other toward I've actually there. And Paris they had a which is mainly used in its honorific form para se hayashida. So this was the last lesson on honorific language used in different settings. I hope these lessons focused on specific settings has given you a clear idea off how honorific language is used in Korean. We have one final lesson for a farewell. So I'll see you one last time in the next video. See you then. Bye bye.