Food Illustration: Blueberry Soft Serve Ice Cream Cone in Watercolor | Eugenia Sudargo | Skillshare

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Food Illustration: Blueberry Soft Serve Ice Cream Cone in Watercolor

teacher avatar Eugenia Sudargo, Watercolorist and Graphic Designer

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

17 Lessons (1h 22m)
    • 1. INTRODUCTION

      3:23
    • 2. SUPPLIES AND COLORS

      4:32
    • 3. TRACING

      2:26
    • 4. VANILLA SWIRL

      9:54
    • 5. BERRY SWIRL

      8:06
    • 6. ENHANCING THE FORM

      8:15
    • 7. CONE BASE AND GLAZING

      4:06
    • 8. CONE DETAIL

      9:05
    • 9. BLUEBERRY BASE

      7:15
    • 10. BLUEBERRY SHADOWS AND DETAILS

      4:16
    • 11. SPOON

      2:30
    • 12. LEAVES

      5:19
    • 13. TEXTURES

      3:33
    • 14. CAST SHADOWS

      1:23
    • 15. HIGHLIGHTS AND DETAILS

      4:30
    • 16. FINAL ADJUSTMENTS

      2:37
    • 17. CLOSING AND CLASS PROJECT

      1:14
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About This Class

Hi everyone! This is Nia and today I’ll be painting this blueberry and vanilla soft serve ice cream cone. I love how cute this one turned out, and I’m super excited to share it with you guys today.

In this class, I’m going to show you all the steps of painting that I made from start to finish. This is quite simple to draw, so I did not include the drawing portion of the painting, but like usual it will be provided in the projects and resources section where you can trace it out before you paint. But of course, you’re also welcome to draw your own or create your own version.

Despite the simple look of this painting, in actually due to the simplicity of the shapes, sometimes it’s hard to depict the value of shadows in order to create the 3-dimensional form. I certainly think so when I first painted the trial of this class. But don’t worry because like usual, I’ll try to break it down and I’ll even sketch out the breakdown of values before we paint.

Just because of the subtlety of values that I mentioned earlier, I am going to rate this for Intermediate students who has a good understanding of water to paint and brush load ratio. But like usual, if you’re a beginner and looking for a challenge, you’re always invited, because I’ll help guide you step by step through small lessons in this class.

I’ll be skipping or speeding through parts of the painting slightly where I felt like the steps are repetitive or if my hand is inactive or off the frame for too long. So, if you’re new here, I always suggest for students who wishes to paint along to either watch the class first or watch each lesson prior to painting along. Just so you get an understanding of the speed and the steps which I’m going to make in certain lessons. Then once you’re ready to paint along, I’d suggest for you to re-watch the lesson and pause in between the steps, so there is no rush and you can paint at your own individual pace.

Hope you enjoy the class!

OUTLINE

  1. Introduction
  2. Supplies and List of Colours
  3. Tracing
  4. Vanilla Swirl
  5. Berry Swirl
  6. Enhancing form of swirl
  7. Cone Base and Glaze
  8. Cone Detail
  9. Blueberry Base
  10. Blueberry Details and Shadows
  11. Spoon
  12. Leaves
  13. Flavour Textures
  14. Cast Shadows
  15. Highlights and Details
  16. Final Adjustments
  17. Closing and Class Project

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Eugenia Sudargo

Watercolorist and Graphic Designer

Teacher

Hi, my name is Eugenia, and I go by Nia. I'm a graphic design graduate from Curtin University, Western Australia, who loves to paint with watercolours. In my final year, my teachers back in university noticed that most of my design works incorporate watercolours. So I guess I picked up the medium by accident, but now I'm totally in love with them. They're so versatile, flexible and wild at the same time. There are times you need to tame and control them, but there are also times you let the watercolour do its thing!

Mid 2017 I started a watercolor YouTube channel, nianiani and I was quite amazed at the response, I also realised how much I loved uploading videos and sharing tutorials. I started teaching art and watercolour end of last year to children and adults, as a part time jo... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. INTRODUCTION: Hi everyone, My name is Mia and I will be your teacher for today's class. Today I'm going to show you how I paint this blueberry and vanilla self-serve ice cream cone. I really love how this one turned out. So I'm really excited to share with you guys today in this class, I'm going to show you all the steps that I made from start to finish. It's quite simple to draw. So I didn't really include the drawing portion of this painting. However, I will have it available in the projects and resources section for you to download in case you want to trace from the original image. But like usual, you're always welcome to draw your own versions as well. The simple look off this painting, due to the simplicity, sometimes it's actually hard to depict the values in order to create the three-dimensional form due to the really subtle surface of the ice cream, at least I think so anyway, when I first started the trial for this painting, but don't worry, because I will try to break it down. And I'll also sketch out the breakdown of values that I create in this painting. So hopefully it's a bit easier for you to understand just because of the subtlety of values and the subtle transition of color that I mentioned earlier. I will rate this class for intermediate students who has a bit of experience with brush load control, also, paint to water ratio. But if you're a beginner and you're looking for a challenge, I will try my best and thus class to break down the steps for you to follow through the small lessons. I'll be skipping or speeding through parts of the painting where my hand is either an active or off frame or sometimes if the steps are a bit continuous. So if you're new here, I would always suggest for you to watch the class or the lessons prior to painting along. So when you're ready to paint along, you can re-watch the lesson and pause in between, and then just work at your own pace so there's no rush before we begin to paint. Let me go over the class outlines so you know the breakdown class. After this introduction, I will go over the list of supplies as well as the less of colors that I'm going to use for this painting. Then after that, we're going to trace the outline from the downloadable I not. Once we're done, we can start painting the vanilla swirl first. And of course, I'll explain the subtle valleys along the way. Then I'm going to follow this up by painting the blueberry swirl. And then to bring it all together, I'm going to enhance the soft serve ice cream as a whole. In the next lesson, I will be seeing the base of the cone as well as out of right glaze to the soft serve for added interests. Then after that, I'm going to add the details for the design of the cone. Moving along, I'm going to paint the blue very base, followed with the details and the shadows. Then I'm going to follow this up with a different decorative elements like the spoon and beliefs. After this, I'm going to go back to the ice cream again, where I'll paint on the slight texture of the flavor, along with the cost shadows off the ice cream and the blueberries. Then finished off by looking at the painting as a whole and adding highlights and details along with a final adjustments. And of course, the closing and class project right at the end of this class. If this sounds like something you're interested in, please join me in this class and let's begin. 2. SUPPLIES AND COLORS: Before we start to paint, let me just go over the supplies that I'll be using for this painting. So I'm going to go over the paper first. And this is the paper that I'll be using. It's been cut into two. So this originally came from a pad and it's by Canson will underwrite, which is from a size A4, and it's a 100 percent cotton and cold pressed. I have cut this down into two. So from an A4, this becomes an E5, which comes to roughly 15 centimeters by 21 centimeters. With the other half of the paper, you can keep it for other projects. Or you can also cut a little bit down so you can swatch your colors before putting it down to paint, because we will be using very light washes and it will help a lot if you tried to switch the colors before you put it on paper in case your mixture is a bit too dark. And like usual, I'll also be including the line art. If you don't watch draw the ice cream yourself. But even if you are going to draw your own, you might still want to download the line art to practice placing the values before painting, which I will go through before demonstrating how to paint. Especially for the saucer section, where the shapes are quite large and there's a risk for it to look flat if you don't have the shadows and highlights placed in the right areas. Next are the brushes I'm going to use. And these are synthetic brushes by George urine. This comes to a fine point and it's fairly sturdy. I'll be using two sizes for this painting, which is a size six and this one are one is a size two. Pressures are fairly similar all across the board. And I know this brand is not easy to come by for some of you. So brands like Lyra or Reeves, which is very cheap and affordable, will be doable for this as well. You can also use a smaller brush, like a size 0 for smaller areas if you feel you need the extra control. I just want to mention when I first start to paint, I did pick up the wrong brush, which is too soft for this. So I apologize for that mistake. And I just want to let me know that this painting is better suited with these cheap synthetic brushes. Next year, of course, need a palette and some water color paints. You can use plastic or ceramic plates for your palette. I would just suggest for you to use white B, so it's easier for you to see the colors that you've mixed. In terms of the colors, I'll go over them as well as the brands that I use at the end of this lesson. Next, you'll need a clean jar for your water and also tissue or paper towel to dab your brush for a maximum water and paint control. The tissue is super-important, so always have them right next to you and you paint. Lastly, here are the additional stationary you'll need to draw or trace and prep your paper. I have my ruler to measure and prep the paper before painting. A pentose sharp lead pencil with each be filling scissors and my sad little eraser or washy tape to keep the paper in place as I trace the line art. And last but not least, my tracing tablet. And here are the colors I'm going to be using. First the rows of ultramarine by Daniel Smith, Chinese white by Holbein, Buff Titanium by Daniel Smith. You can vote by Daniel Smith. John Brilliant number two by Holbein, burnt sienna by Holbein, yellow ocher by Roman smile. Terre verte by Holbein, viridian by Holbein, cobalt green by Holbein, Hansa yellow medium by Daniel Smith, ultramarine deep by Holbein, and moon glow by Daniel Smith. I'm also going to use an additional two paint, which is Payne's gray bluish by Shanker. And last but not least, I'll also be using bleed proof white, which is a super opaque white by Dr. Ph. Martin's. So those are the colors you'll need along with the supplies. I'll just leave a list here that you can screenshot if it's easier for you to organize and prepare everything before painting along. 3. TRACING: In this lesson, I'm going to be tracing the line open which you can download in the projects and resources section. So here I have my outline and my watercolor paper. And after I fit the outline to where I want the trace on my watercolor paper. I taped one side so I can always open and close the paper if they are smaller parts which are harder to distinguish when you're tracing. This outline fits and to an E5 page, which is why I I have my paper cut out into one A5 piece. However, if you'd like, you can always resize the outline according to the size of the painting you want. So feel free to make it slightly smaller or bigger. I'm using my tracing tablet here, but of course you can also use any method of tracing you're used to. As for the pencil, I'm using a hard pencil. This is a Pentel sharp lit with each be filling. So you can get really nice and thin lines. But even then, I try to not press too hard when I'm tracing. So the pencil outline will be nice and light. It's pretty self-explanatory from here on, so I'll just skip through the tracing process so we can move on to the next step. If you are tracing along, feel free to pause the video so you can take your time. Before I clean up my outline. I'm done with the tracing here, but as he can see, the cone is a bit darker compared to the top or at the ice cream swirl. So I'm just going to lighten it using my eraser. You can also use a kneadable eraser for this. And what I'm going to do is just tap on the dark areas lightly so that your user can pick up some of the darker areas. So the pencil marks will be nice and light enough to paint over and cover with the colors. 4. VANILLA SWIRL: We're going to start by painting the swirl on the vanilla. This looks simple because we are a painting on a larger space. But because of this, it is essential to get the placement of the shadows and values correctly so we can depict the three-dimensional form. So with this outline, I'm just drawing out areas where I want to darken. As an example, the bottom, I want to darken a bit. And also this top section which might have a bit of cash shadow from the swirl on top. To make it less flat, I want to make the right section a bit larger for the core shadow and also for that site to be slightly darker and also have a bit more saturated color with the yellow compared to the left side, which I want to look more neutral. Then I want to combine the top and the bottom section using a value that is in-between. The color, then slowly grid eating the value to practically the color of the paper towards the mid section. So that midsection stays the lightest. And practically going to repeat the same thing for the swirls on top. But you can take this time to practice how to lay out the values with pencil first before painting it on. So this way, you know which areas to tackle. Keep in mind that because we are creating a vanilla flavor in which the color will be very light creamy color. You do have to be careful with how much pigment you use as you paint. So just try to use very light consistency paint and just layer on the color if you need to build up the value and saturation leader. For the areas where the blueberries are, you'll see that ice cream is a bit push, so it has a little bit of texture from the ice cream. So for this, I'm just going to paint a little bit off the shadow using a very light color to depict the form very subtly. This top section is very similar, but it is smaller and the swirl isn't as distinct. So despite placing the shadows in the same areas, please pay attention to where I'll add the subtle increase our value for the slight curve on the very top swirl. As you guys know, we're only going to be painting the vanilla swirl in this lesson. And these are the colors that I'm going to use. I'm going to begin from the bottom and I'm just going to start by wetting this whole area of the vanilla swirl. You'll also notice that I'm using the wrong brush here. This is what I mentioned in the supply lesson. I hope you guys bear with me. You're disposed to use that ordinary synthetic brush for more control. I just wanted the surface of the paper to be slightly damp and not soaking wet or paddling so the paint on travel too far and too fast. And starting with the first mix here with buff titanium and new gamboge. And as you can see them very light and watery. And I'm just going to paint the top section of the shadow as how I drew it out before. I'm going to follow this up by painting the bottom and the side continuously while also softening the edges as it gets towards the center using a clean damp brush. I'm essentially just mapping out all the areas first with this very light color. Now I'm just going to add a bit more at new gamboge and the previous mix to increase the saturation and the consistency very slightly. And I'm going to start to build on the darker values while the surface is still slightly damp. So I'm just placing it at the bottom and also the right-hand side of the top section. As they get towards the right-hand side, I added a bit more buff titanium as a continuous gradient from the more yellowish tone, and then also softening the edges as I get towards the left. I want to make sure that there are no hard edges because I want the ice cream to have an overall soft look to them. Because the surface is still slightly wet, the paint will move around a bit as it settles and also feed very slightly. So I'm just going to add a bit more pigment to the dark areas using the same mix and then move on to the next world. While I wait for that paint to dry. I'm just going to do the exact same thing here by wetting the area. And as you can see, I've swapped to my synthetic brush, which comes to a very fine point, and it's much easier to control how much water I have on the surface. A mixture was still a bit more yellow e because I added a bit more new gamboge compared to the buff titanium. So here I just added more buff titanium with a bit of water. And I'm just going to apply the paint on the same areas as how I drew them out before. But I am being a bit more brief by adding martha like consistency paint lower while leaving the midsection of the left-hand side, white. After this, I'm going to follow this up with more of a yellowy mix with added new gamboge. And please them on the same areas as the bottom swirl. You can see that the bottom soil has now settled a bit more and the paint has moved downwards towards the outline. So I'm just going to add a bit more of the same tone on the bottom. And this is something that you can go back and forth towards. And just keep waiting for them to dry and add a bit more paint layer by layer. And this way you'll lower the risk of making those areas too dark. For this little section here, I'm just going to use the tip of my brush to add the colors on the bottom and also the Ford or where the cream is being pushed. You can also switch to a smaller brush for this, if you would like. Again, I'm going to do the same thing for this. Well, but this time there's the added fold or the push cream. So I'm just going to add extra shadows there. Moving on to the very top swirl, I'm going to start by wetting the surface just like before. And because we are going to be painting on a smaller area, you can also switch to your small brush here. I'm essentially going to do the same and use the same color mixtures as before. But the only difference is that I'm going to paint this area just the slightest bit darker behind the rosemary leaves and the blueberries. Just like before, I'm starting with the lightest color first, and then I'm just going to slowly build it up layer by layer as the paper is still a bit damp. So it'll slowly soft and may itself. Don't forget to paint this section right here because there are no pencil marks or no drawing in this area. But it is going to create more of a swirly texture with this area painted with a darker value. If you accidentally pleased too much pigments here like I did, you can always take off the excess with a bit of clean tissue, so don't freak out if you accidentally made it too dark as long as the paint is still fairly wet, you can still take it off. This is where I start to introduce John Brilliant number two. And to the mixture, I'm going to use all three colors to increase the saturation. Color plays a role. So obviously, if you want the color to be a bit more yellow, you add new gamboge there, John Brilliant is there to warm up the color slightly and the buff titanium to neutralize the color. The paint should be dry by now. So I'm just going to use this color mixture in a medium consistency and layer it on the darker areas to increase the value and saturation. And also to just slowly build up the color and also definition around each swirl. The same concept still applies though, for the top section of each swirled to be darker on the right-hand side and it's softer as it gets to the left. And also all of the edges are going to be soft in with a clean damp brush. So it comes to a very light and soft colored towards the middle. So there are no hard edges. As an example here after I've please the darker colors you can see a little bit of hard edge. So I'm going back in with a clean, damp brush to just soft and the colors and while it's still a bit wet and get those soft edges. Lastly, I want to create a very soft outlines so there's more definition of the swirls and ice cream itself. So I just used the same color to just outline it. But I'm going to go back in with a clean, damp brush again and just soften those edges so it becomes even thinner and more subtle. It's a bit hard to explain it with words, but hopefully as I'm softening and now it's easier to see through this demonstration. 5. BERRY SWIRL: So before we start dipping the blueberries squirrel, I'm going to again show you the placement of a darker value. So you know what I'm thinking about as we paint leader, because those areas can be a bit ambiguous sense the colors are very subtle. So for the base color or going to use a very light consistency on the overall area. Then I want to focus on adding a darker value in the middle as a rough oval for each of the swirl. This might be a bit odd, but I feel like this gives an extra depth. And it's also going to be very subtle as we paint it later. So that oval won't be as distinct. This sketch, of course, just like before, we're also going to soften the edges as I paint. I'm also going to color the edge of the top section and also the bottom slightly. And of course, softening the edges again until the lightest area comes to a small area on the right hand side. So here, as you can see, I'm just continuing on from the darker area that I painted on the vanilla section. So it comes across to the blueberries swirl as well. I don't know if you've noticed this as well, but the oval that I've drawn out here is slightly floating, so it's not touching the bottom portion of this swirl. This will help give the rounded volume of the soft serve. So be sure to remember to leave out that section ladder as we paint. Of course, I'm also going to show you how I paint this step-by-step. So I am going to remind you along the way. But before we move on to painting, you can take this time to edge and the rest of the swirls until you get a better understanding of the shadows if you feel the need to. Here are the two colors that I'm going to be using for this part of the painting. I want them blueberries where all three very, very bright and saturated. So I'm just going to make sure I have a clean palette so the color doesn't become muddy. You technically only need one color here, which is the rows of ultramarine. But since I'm going to use the color very, very lightly, and this paint as actually very pigmented. So for me to use a very light color, I would have to use a lot of water and a really runny paint is harder to control. So the whitest just there to thicken the paint slightly so it doesn't become too runny. But if that's something you can control or you have a lighter, more transparent color, you can also opt for that instead of using the why. Here, as you can see, I just started out by using a thin consistency off the mixture to get a very light pinkish purple color. I'm just starting out with a flat wash to also just dampen the surface of the papers so we can work with a wet on wet technique. Now, I'm going to take a bit of roads of ultramarine and just tap it very lightly with the tip of my brush along the edge. I'm just going to let the color run slowly. You can of course, control the movement of paint with your brush as well while the paper is still a bit damp. Then after this, I'm also going to add the oval in the middle of the swirl. And of course softening the edge as well. Even if I want this area to be darker, I'm still very careful when I'm adding the color. So instead of just using a thick consistency straight away, I'm just slowly building up pigments and also wetting the area. If it starts to dry out. You can't see as I'm going back and forth year, the form won't be too visible just yet, but I'm just slowly building it up. This doesn't have to be super accurate at this point because we are still going to layer it on a leader when the paint dries. But I still want the left side of the soil to be slightly darker compared to the right-hand side. And I'm just going to repeat this for the next worlds as well. For this next section, the area is getting smaller so you can switch to a smaller brush for this. But I'm just going to treat it the same way as before. I'm using off my brush to get to the very tiny spaces and made sure that the whole area as well with a thin consistency of this mixture. I'm also going to please the shadows in the same area which is at the top right corner. But this time as I'm placing the oval because it will touch the side of the ice cream which is being pushed by the blueberry. I'm just going to leave that folded area a bit lighter compared to that overall sense. That area should be protruding out slightly and with a little bit of the same color and with a tip of my brush, I'm just going to color directly underneath them blueberries and under the fault of the ice cream, to forget to paint the left side as well. There's a tiny bit of that purple cell. I'm just going to continue on with their arrest. But I just want to mention first, as you can see, this proposal bit different, but I am still using the same color. It's just that this are as of ultramarine uses two pigments and sometimes it doesn't combine with each other, but I personally feel like and that the pigments break and separate. Sometimes the color is bit more pink and sometimes it's a bit more purple. And I just feel like it gives a bit more interest when the tissue separates. For this top section, I'm just going to go in a bit closer so you can see exactly where I've please the darker values. As he can see, it's quite dark compared to the rest of the purple. So I'm going to go back in with a clean damp brush and I'm just going to soften the sides of the color becomes more subtle. 6. ENHANCING THE FORM: Let's just quickly go back to the value sketch in case any of you took a break in between. In this lesson, I'll be strengthening the contrast. So I'll be painting on the oval areas that I'm shading right now. At the end of this painting, this will look more abstract, but I'm just going to refer to them as the ovals for that area. So just to recap, we're going to paint that awful area darker. Soften the edge, leave the right-hand side, lighter, the bottom of the oval, lighter, and the edge of the right hand side a little bit darker. In this lesson. In this lesson I'm going to be enhancing the swirls. So I'm going to use rosa of ultramarine to enhance the blueberry swirl and general it number 2 for the vanilla swirl. Now that we've waited for the blueberry swirls to dry off, you can see how the paint has settled and the colors are much feeder now. So I'm just going to use the same color again, but this time without the white. And I'm going to layer on a bit more detail so the form can be more visible. I'm starting out with an oval in the middle and I'm just doing a very light wash. And after this, I'm cleaning my brush so I can have a clean damp brush to pull and soften the edges. You can see that as I'm doing this, I am pulling quite a fair bit amount of pigments as well. So what I do is I clean my brush in-between and dab the excess water off with tissue and continue on with softening the edges. The more I do this, the lighter the paint will become because your brush keeps picking up some of the pigments. But you'll see that there's a bit more paint towards the middle. And while you're doing this, the surface will also be slightly damp. This is the perfect time to add a bit more pigment and just let it naturally blend and travel across the damp surface. Of course, if they are traveling to the wrong direction, you can always move them around with your brush as long as the paint is still fairly wet. Moving on to the second swirl, I'm going to attempt to create the same thing, but I'm just going to use a different method. Just to show you that you can use different methods to achieve a similar looking result. So with this one, I started out by dampening the surface with clean water instead of the paint. Just to dampen the surface slightly. You don't want it to be paddling wet. And then I just took a bit of the paint and got it around. And as the paint moves and travel across the wet surface or the damp surface, you help it with your brush and soften the edges again while painting this, please keep in mind the form that we drew out before. So I want to leave out a sliver of line with a light tone at the bottom of the oval or the midsection. And for the right side to practically stay as the base color in comparison to the darkest area, which is the middle portion. As CQI painting and the paint settles, you can keep adding more pigment to the previous swirls. Once you see the color slightly feeding to slowly build up the forearm. So those are the two methods you can go for and just pick the one that you're most comfortable with to continue on to the next few swirls. For this third swirl, you'll notice that we have that little fold or push up the ice cream from the blueberry, which I want to leave out like so and I'm dampening the surface. I intentionally left that part out so the pigment will not travel to that area. Instead, I'm going to work with wet on dry. So I have full control where the shadows are going and that small space. We are starting to move into tighter areas now. So feel free to switch to a smaller brush whenever you feel money to. Moving onto the previous swirls, you'll notice that my paint has traveled lower, so the bottom of the oval is darker than what I intend them to be. And when this happens, it's fine. If the surface is still down like mine, I can either pick up the color with tissue or a clean dry brush. But if that area is completely dry, you can use a clean damp brush to reactivate the paint and pick up the access pigments. Moving on to the next squirrel, I'm just going to treat it the same way as I did the previous ones. This last small squirrel as a bit different. But hopefully through this video you can see how and where I've placed the shadows. After this, I'll take you a little bit closer so you can see it more accurately. Using a medium consistency. Now I'm going to add the rows of ultramarine underneath all the blueberry swirls. Again, you can use a smaller brush for this. Don't forget to add a line and this tiny area as well. Once I've done all the swirls, now I'm going to enhance the folds. So I'm just going to add the same consistency paint underneath of the blueberry and where the fold off the ice cream is. And of course I'm just going to soften it so it blends with arrest. I'm going to do the same with the vanilla section. I just use a little bit. I've shown brilliant here. Going back to the rows of ultramarine, I'm going to paint the top right corner off the blueberry swirled too dark and that small area as well for each of the swirls. Going back to the vanilla section, now, I'm just using John Brilliant in a medium to thin consistency to connect the shadow from the blueberry swirl over to the vanilla. Going back to the rows of ultramarine, now, I'm going to use a slightly thicker consistency and continue on or have that line that I painted earlier but made this part darker. This is where I adjust the colors again. So I felt like the overall area was drying and feeding a bit too much. So I just believed or very light consistency over those areas. This will depend on the current state of your paintings. So if that area for your painting as darker, you can skip this part. But if yours is even lighter, you can use a slightly thicker consistency than what I'm using to glaze. Going back to the vanilla now I'm using a mix of John, brilliant and very thin consistency with a touch of rows of ultramarine from my palette. To give it that slight pop off. This is very subtle though, and it's still mostly cream color. And I just use this to glazed over certain areas like underneath the swirls behind the blueberry and the rosemary, and also the folds on ice cream. 7. CONE BASE AND GLAZING: In this lesson, I'm just going to use one color, which is yellow ocher. Before I start painting, I'm just going to clean up my palette first because the previous purple color can make a yellow ocher a bit more muddy. So I just want to make sure that everything is cleaned for me to work from. What I'm going to do here is just to create a light wash with the yellow ocher you think offend to medium consistency. And I'm just going to paint this all over the cone and the details of the cone. Just keep in mind that some areas of the cone are protruding out slightly. So for those smaller areas around the sides, you can use the tip of your brush to neaten it or use a small brush. As they come a bit closer, you can see those areas that I talked about. So as you can see, I just paint those areas very slowly and I use the very tip to move the paint around and avoiding painting outside the lines. When you run out of paint from your brush. Just what your brush again and get a bit more color and continue on as long as the edges off the previous parts you just painted. It's still a bit wet. You can still create a flat wash. So just make sure you use quite a heavy load when covering large areas like this one. So you have a lot of paint to spread around. I can see that the paint is settling and becoming a bit lighter. It is a bit damp still, but I'm just going to roughly add a bit more color. I'm mostly focusing on the middle areas. It's quite a large area, but as I get closer to the sides, I just use a clean, damp brush to soften the edges. I'm also not worrying too much about the details on the side as I paint the second layer, as long as I don't go over the lines as totally fine, but I don't need to spend extra time to paint right to the tiny edges. This is because the base color is still a touchdown. So the color I'm putting on top, we'll just slowly merge, especially when the colors on the sides are very light. After placing the second layer, I'm going to pour some off the paint using a clean, dry brush to take the excess pigment off the lines off the icon. For the last step, I'm going to use a light consistency of yellow ocher to glaze over the bottom section of the blueberry swirl where we left at slightly lighter under the oval. I'm using this yellow ocher, particularly because this brand of yellow ocher is very bright and transparent. I know some brands of yellow ocher can be a bit more opaque ever mix with white pigment, especially. So if that's the case, you can also use a thin consistency of new gamboge or some sort of deep yellow color for this part as well. What I'm trying to do here is create a slight color reflection from either the vanilla swirl or the cone. But this is very subtle. So be sure to use a very light consistency in that you might want to try out first on a scrap piece of paper. 8. CONE DETAIL: These are the colors that I'm going to be using for this lesson. I'm going to start by mixing burnt sienna with yellow ocher. And I'm going to use a thin, medium consistency of this mixture to paint the details for the top portion of the colon. So we're just going to paint all the diamond shapes now. And preferably, you can use a smaller brush for this, so it's a bit easier to control the colors. Basically, for this portion of the painting, I want those outlines of the diamond shapes to be protruding out. So this is why we're coloring it with a slightly darker value. So it looks like it's caved in. I want them diamond shapes on the slides to be a bit lighter. So instead of using the previous mixture, I just use a thin, medium consistency of yellow ocher by itself. Now, I'm going to use just the yellow ocher for the top section of the diamonds as well. So leaving the outline off the diamond with the base color it was previously painted with. Since we are painting small areas For this, be sure that the load on your brush is not too heavy. So the paint and the water doesn't run too fast. Autofill brush. And I'm going to repeat the same thing for the bottom portion as well. While the surface is still a bit down, but I'm going to add the previous mixture of burnt sienna with yellow ocher and just got those wet areas in the middle. So the middle of the cone is slightly darker than the side. Before darkening the next section, I'm just going to line this area with whatever was left on my brush, which is fairly thin, then I use the same color mixture and a medium consistency. So this bottom portion is in shadow underneath the top portion which is or in front, then this bottom section. Then moving on lower down the cone. I'm going to treat this the same way with the lines. Then for this larger area with a tiny squares or diamonds, I'm going to just paint sort of like a half circle using the same mixture of burnt sienna and yellow ocher. Then I'm going to clean my brush to get rid of any excess paint. Then you use this clean damp brush to pull the color downwards and slowly softening the transition. For this bottom portion, I'm just going to do a flat wash of the same color mixture using the same color. I'm going to line the top of the cone where it's the closest to the ice cream and paint it as a bit of shadow underneath the ice cream. To make the shadow less flat, I'm just going to darken up on the right-hand side. Now I'm going to create a darker brown. So for this I use a mixture of burnt sienna, yellow ocher, and I'm going to add a bit of rows of ultramarine. And I'm going to now build up on the shadows and the areas where I painted earlier. So for this section, I lined the top part and I also added more of a dark brown in the middle. And I'm going to treat the bottom of the cone the same way. At the same time, I'm going to start coloring and the tiny squares or the diamond pattern. So for this portion of the cone, I want the middle to be the darkest brown using the mixture of burnt sienna, yellow ocher and rose off ultra marine. And for the sides off the darkest area I used of burnt sienna and yellow ocher. And as for the sides, I'm going to use the lightest brown, which is either just the yellow ocher or a mixture of yellow ocher with a tiny bit of burnt sienna. You don't have to do this in order, but just keep this in mind as you paint. And if some sections doesn't look as dark as you wanted to, you can always layer on a bit more color once the layers dry so you can adjust and build the color Stoli. I also want this top portion of the diamond to be slightly darker. So I'm going to use the mixture of burnt sienna, yellow ocher and rows of ultramarine as well. So since we are going to be using a lot of those colors, what I like to do is just to prep the paint on my palate. So there's the darkest brown. So I just prep the darkest brown, the red brown, and also just the yellow ocher for easy access. Here's a rough indication of where I'm going to put those colors. So it's a bit easier for you to imagine. Don't worry too much about accuracy here. The changes and colors very subtle as he can't see. So you can always build up the darker tones. And if you miss play some, it's completely fine as well. As long as the diamonds are a bit darker, it'll give them pression that it's slightly moving inwards. So after I'm done with the bottom, I'm going to go back to the top portion where the design of the cone as a bit bigger. So for this, I'm going to enhance the shapes by using whatever is left on my palette. But I'm just looking for are basically a mid-tone brown here to paint little lines to give more of a three-dimensional form to the diamond outlines. I'm just painting one side of the shadow for the sides. So for the left portion, I'm painting the right side of each line. So whatever a points to the middle. And for the right hand side, I'm painting the left side of each of the line. And as I get towards the middle, I'm painting all of the sides. So once I'm done placing those lines, you can see that because the lines are so cleanly put their looks more two-dimensional instead of three-dimensional. So I went back again with a clean damp brush to soften the edges. Then after that, we've pretty much painted the whole Kwame that I just wanted to add details. So I'm just adding extra shadows in certain places, lining certain areas and layering some colors for the midsection of the colon. And this doesn't have to be neat because now I also want this to look a bit more textured. So on top of the shadows that I added, I'm going to just dot some random areas with a thin consistency of the mid-tone brown on random areas to create a textured, uneven surface. And lastly, I decided to just add a bit of shadow for this area on top of the line as well. 9. BLUEBERRY BASE: Here are the three colors that I'll be using for this lesson. We're going to be painting the base of the blueberries. My ultramarine deep is still a bit wet because I just took it out of the tube. So I just want a little bit on my palette that I can have easy access to. And after this, I'm going to take some of the white and mix it in with the real, but I want this to be quite watery since we're only doing the base color for now. I'm also going to add a little bit of the Payne's gray bluish to make sure that the color isn't as bright and has a bit more muted down. So using this mixture, I'm just going to first cover the base color of one blueberry. I'm going to do this one at a time so I can keep all the blueberries separate. You can see that even though I start with quiet a dipolar as they spread out the paint and becomes lighter and lighter. And of course, as it dries later, it's also going to slightly feet. While the surface is still damp, I'm going to take a very thick consistency of Payne's gray bluish mixed with the ultramarine deep. And I'm going to use this to dart around the blueberries, especially the area behind the two blueberries. And after I've shot them around, I'm just going to move the paint with my brush until it gets sort of like an uneven blueberry skin color. Because the other two blueberries are touching. I'm going to move to the one underneath. And I'm going to treat this the same way as the one that I previously painted. So I'm just starting out with the same mixture of the blues and whites in a thin consistency, just spreading it around like before. And while the surface is still damp, I'm going to use the thick consistency of the Payne's gray bluish with ultramarine deep. But this time I'm just going to place it on the right-hand side where I feel the shadows would be. But I'm also going to spread the color around to give the texture of the blueberry skin. I'm going to leave this one for now and move on to the next one. I think the top one is still a little bit wet, so I'm just going to move to the one next to this blueberry. And I'm going to treat it the exact same way as before. I'll leave the color mixtures in case you forget along the way. Apart from that, all the steps are basically the same. I'm just going to do the same thing for obese colors offer blueberries. The thing to keep in mind is the order in which blueberry to paint next. As I mentioned before, I want to keep each individual shapes separately. So after painting this one, instead of painting the blueberry next to this, I'm going to paint the wine at the top, then go back to the last blueberry at the bottom and paint the last blueberry at the top after that. The reason for this is if we paint to connecting wet areas at the same time those colors or just travel across and flatten the shapes. So for this, I prefer to paint it one by one separately. But anyway, I'll leave you guys to it and I'll get back to you what I'm going to layer on mark holidays and so on. Hello. As the paint dries, now you can see how much the colors have faded. So I'm going to lay around the same blue mixtures as before and a thin medium consistency now, to add a bit more saturation to some parts of the blueberry. If you feel like you want to add the darker color, then you can add the thick consistency of the Payne's gray bluish with ultramarine deep as well. But I'm just going to keep working with the base that I have now and enhance the texture where I feel the need to. As you guys know, blueberries have the white spots. So I try to avoid painting a flat surface. Instead, I want some parts to be darker than the other, creating an uneven surface. Sometimes it helps using tissue decree that white texture of the blueberry skin. So if I've accidentally pleased too much paint in some areas when it's traveling and it's starting to create a flat surface that I don't want. I would like to use a lightly rolled-up tissue to take off the excess paint and give it an, an even texture at the same time. You can see what I'm doing with my brush. I'm doing more of a dotting motion to give that uneven texture instead of just spreading the paint evenly. So for this layer, That's the way I like to apply my paint to depict. Hey. 10. BLUEBERRY SHADOWS AND DETAILS: In this lesson, I'm going to be painting the details in the shadow of the blueberries. So I'm going to start by using a thick consistency mixture of the ultramarine deep and the paints gray bluish. And I'm just going to start separating the shapes. So using this really deep and dark blue color, I just added the shadows along the edges of some of the blueberries. Once I'm done, I'm going to use the exact same mixture, but this time in more of a medium, defend consistency. And I'm going to paint a flat wash of the shadow at the top of the blueberries, which is that signature silhouette of a star. I'm just going to do this for all of the blueberries first and then build up the shadows and the forum afterwards. Because we are painting on small details and tiny areas now you can also switch to an even smaller brush than this. But since my brush come to a very fine point, I don't mind using this one. But as an extra tip, if you are painting with a fairly large brush, like what I'm doing here for this part of the painting. Make sure you use quite a light load on your brush so the paint doesn't puddle up. As he can probably tell from watching me paint the little details. I like to sometimes paint the outline first and I just find that it's easier to fill in the space after I've outline what I'm going to paint. If some of the pencil outline is a bit hard to see after you've painted the base color, you can always refer back to the downloadable outline. To have a better visualization of the shapes. Then you can try to make up for the loss pencil marks or if it's easier, you can also redraw the pencil outline for that particular area, then color it in. Or as a last resort, like me, you can also just make up some shapes and paint it freehand. You can probably notice that the shapes I just painted look quite flat. So I'm going to add on the shadows. And to place the shadows, I'm just going to follow where the blueberries are facing. But if it's a bit hard for you to imagine where the shadows would be. You can also refer back to the outline from the projects and resources section where I've kind of map that out already or just follow what I'm doing here. In terms of the color, I use the same dark blue mixture, which is from a mixture of paints, gray, bluish and ultramarine deep. But because I want us to even be a bit darker, I added more Payne's gray bluish compared to the ultramarine deep in terms of ratio. Next, using the same color, I'm going to draw a little circle around that area we just painted. And for this, I don't want it to stand out too much, which is why I'm just using a thin to medium consistency so it settles with the rest of the blueberry. Next I'm going to take whatever around I have left on my palette, add a little bit of new gamboge as well as a bit of blue, whatever is left. But if you've cleaned out your pellet, you can also use the Musharraf, new gamboge, burnt sienna, and also a bit of the pink, green and ultramarine deep. And with this color, I'm just going to use a very thick consistency to paint dots in the middle of the stars. Next, I'm going to take a thin consistency, whatever blue I have left on my palette. The tone doesn't matter too much because I'm only going to use this as a very light glaze, as a bit of a light reflection on the vanilla swirl off the ice cream and something that reflects the blue of the blueberry. So I'm just going to color this behind the rosemary and the blueberry and also where the fold on the vanilla swirl is. 11. SPOON: In this lesson, we're going to be painting the sperm. I'm going to start with a medium consistency, cobalt green to just cover a whole scorn and do basically a flat wash to also at the same time create adapt surface for me to write on. Then using a very thin consistency of the same color. I'm also going to use this color a bit on the blueberry swirl. And this will act as a reflection of the color just like what I did with the blueberries in the previous lesson. Next, I'm going to use a mixture of Payne's gray bluish with the cobalt green. And I'm going to place this on the lower part off the spoon and then I'm just going to soft and not with the rest of the cobalt green. After the surface is completely dry, I'm going to go back to a mixture of cobalt green with a bit of Payne's gray, but this time in a very thick consistency and I'm going to start painting the bottom area again. And this is just to build up on the darker part of the spoon. And I'm going to smooth it out with a clean, damp brush. After that, I'm going to add on the details. He can use a smaller brush for this as well. I'm just going to pin time the outline of the heart and also the line around the spoon. You want to make sure that the surface is almost dry for this f naught, the paint is going to spread. I'm going to follow this up by painting the site of the spoon as well using the same mixture and nothing Consistency. 12. LEAVES: So this color mixture is a bit complicated, but I'm going to use buff titanium with cobalt green, terre verte, and a little bit of Payne's gray bluish to cool down the color, but also muted at the same time. With this color, I'm just going to cover the whole area of the rosemary by just doing a flat wash as obese color. While I wait for that section to dry off, I'm going to mix another color to paint the base of the other leaves. So for this, I use a mixture of Hansa yellow and terre verte. And I'm going to use this to paint all over the blueberry relief. I'm doing one at a time because while the surface is still a bit damp, I'm going to also add on the darker green. And for the darker green, I'm going to use viridian with paint screen. I'm going to add this on while the surface of the previous color is still fairly wet. So the colors will blend nicely together. But at the same time, I want to make the bottom a bit darker than the top. So I'm leaving most of the dark green mixture on the bottom. I'm going to do the same for the other leaf as well. So I'm starting out with the first yellow-green mixture and I'm going to add the darker mixture for this as well. So while I wait for this part to dry off now I'm going to go back to the rosemary again. This time I'm going to add the darker green. And for this, I use the previous green mixture but with added paints, gray, bluish, and viridian. I'm going to use this dark green to paint some of the bottom parts of the lease for the top section of the rosemary. And as I get lower, I'm going to paint the whole leaf with the dark green. So I'm starting out with a top section first where I use a damp brush to soften the green. So the bottom of each leaves are but darker than the top. Then for the rosemary leaves at the bottom, I'm just going to cover the whole thing with this dark green mixture. Once I'm done with this layer, I'm just going to line the stem and make my next color, which is the same mixture but with even more viridian and Payne's gray to dark and the green further. With this, I'm just going to line the middle and sometimes the sides of the rosemary leaves. Then you using the previous lighter green, even if it has a bit more of a dark green mixture, it's also fine, but with this color I'm just going to add, finally leaves at the back of the ones that we previously painted. Just to add a bit more dimension. I personally like to overlap the leaves behind the leaves that I've painted earlier. But there's this opportunity can also paint on top of it if you'd like. Then with a very thin consistency of the base color, I'm just going to do a very light glaze as a reflection of color on the vanilla swirl as well, just like in the previous lessons. Moving back to the blueberry leaves now, I'm going to use the exact same color, but I'm just going to lay a read on. So firstly, I used the dark mixture to lie on this side because I want this side to have a very thin line which indicates that back off the leaf from the first layer. And then I use a medium to fit consistency of the yellow-green mixture followed with a dark green at the bottom. I'm going to do the same with the second leaf as well. But I'm also going to add a very dark green and a thick consistency just as a thin line underneath and belief. So it separates the leaf from the blueberry. 13. TEXTURES: Here are the two simple colors that I'm going to be using in this lesson, as we're going to paint on the textures of the blueberry swirls. I started out with a thin consistency of rows of ultramarine. And then I'm just going to dot this around the blueberry swirl randomly. I tried to make the shapes nice and small. And because the paint puddle up a bit too much, says the Lord of my brush was a bit too heavy. I'm just going to take the excess off with a dry brush or you can also dab it off with a piece of tissue. So you have different shades of this texture. With this texture that I've placed as the base. I'm going to keep layering on the textures. I dotting it the same way. And whenever I feel the color is but to strong, again, you can take it off with a tissue or with a dry brush. The point is to make very subtle textures because I don't want those textures to pop out too much against the soft colors of the blueberry swell. But I'm just basically going to do this over a few years on all of the soils. This is up to your preference, but I like to layer on around three layers. So you can see a bit of depth within the texture. But if you like the simplicity of just having one layer of texture, you can also go for that. For this part of the soil, I felt like it needed to be a bit darker because the blueberries right in front of it. So I just smudged out some of the Roosevelt from Marine to make that side darker. And on top of that, I also added a little bit of ultramarine deep. After this, I'm going to add a little bit more texture. And you'll notice that I don't mind using a slightly darker color compared to the bottom because I want this colored the pop-up more against light textures that I've painted earlier. And the dots are also a bit smaller. As last addition, I'm also going to use this color, which is the rows of ultramarine to line a little bit off the spoon detail added pop off to you. 14. CAST SHADOWS: In this lesson, I'm going to be painting the shadows or the cache shadows. But as you can see, they are a bit of the colors already on my paper. That's because my camera run out of battery when I was doing this. So I tried my best to erase and start again. So to start this, I just wet the paper underneath all the elements. And then I started with paints gray bluish to add a bit of the shadows on the wet surface. After this, I add a bit of burnt sienna and I just to soften the edges as best as I can at this point, I use a thick consistency of the Payne's gray and I only added it to small areas because the wet surface will help it spread. And you're also going to do this with your brush leader. So if you only use a thin consistency, it's going to become even lighter as it spreads over the wet surface. Even after that, once it's dry or it will fade. So I'm going to add another layer of thick consistency while the surface is still a bit damp, closer to the elements of the painting. So directly under the cone and directly under the blueberries. 15. HIGHLIGHTS AND DETAILS: As we are getting closer to completion, we are going to be using many of the previous colors since we're going to be jumping around in the painting onto the details, I'm going to use my bleed proof white here. And I'm going to use this to paint the highlights on this 1. First, I'm going to make two lines which fits diagonally across the spoon. And I'm going to connect them together and between the lines. For the cytosol spoon, I added a thin line going from the bottom up. And as I'm around 1 third up, I'm just going to softer net using a clean damp brush. So there's a slight gradation from the bottom up. Going back to the bleed proof white, I'm going to add on a little bit of whatever blue I have left on my palette to tint the Whites slightly. And I'm going to use this to paint a tiny little dot in the middle of the blueberry and also adding a little line going around it. Next with my brush still loaded with the bleed proof white, I'm going to add a little bit of Hansa yellow to create a yellow tint. And I'm going to use this to line the middle of the blueberry leaves and add some veins. You can also switch to a very small brush for this, like a size 0 if you feel you need the extra control. Using whatever was left on my brush load, I'm using this yellow tint. If you just add the extra little textures on the cone as well. I felt like this bottom section was a bit too light, so I added a mixture of burnt sienna with yellow ocher. And I'm just going to add on the darker areas again, wherever I feel the need to, especially for this bottom section. I'm going to go back to the bleed proof white again. And I'm going to use this to redefine some of the shapes that I feel needs a bit of a separation. So I'm just going to line those areas very familiar with this opaque white. At this, we're still a bit unsure about the blueberries, whether I want them a bit darker or not. So I decided to just add a very thin layer with the same mixture of the ultramarine deep and Payne's gray bluish in a very thin consistency. I also just added some of the darker areas again for the shadows to define some of the shapes. For the conception behind the blueberry, I also decided to add the same mixture, but in a very thin consistency this time to just do the same thing that I did with the ice creams, swirls. So I decided to add a little bit off the blueberry color as color reflection on the corner. Going back to the reproof wired again, I'm also going to add a little bit of highlights on the swirls of the ice cream. This is optional though. I just found that it looks a bit, you did it this way, but I feel like in a way it sort of flattens it, but I just like the cute look. So this is completely up to your preference. As you know, bleed proof white as very opaque. So worth whatever I have left on my palette, which isn't very much. I added a bit of water, and I also added a little bit of rows of ultra marine. This way I create a light pastel version of the color that is slightly opaque, but it's not completely opaque. And it's going to slightly blend in with the rest of the textures as I am around on the blueberry swells. 16. FINAL ADJUSTMENTS: In this lesson, I'm going to firstly add in a bit more blue on my blueberries. So that's using the same mixture as before with ultramarine deep Payne's gray and also Chinese white. And I'm going to just darken some areas and make the blueberries pop a little more because I felt like everything is just too light and blending in together. So I wanted the blueberries to add a pop of contrast in value. The stage of the lesson is for final adjustments. So this is up to your preference. And everything will just depend on the state of your painting right now. Whether you want to add any other things to fix your painting or you feel like it's finished, that's completely up to you. So at the moment, I'm just going to fix the blueberries until I'm happy with the value of the colors. Because I've darkened the value of my blueberries, I also want to darken the value of the shadows as well. So for the bottom of the blueberries, I added a thick consistency of the paint scree bluish. Lastly, here for the shadows, I decided to add moon glow because I felt like at the current state, the cache shadows look a bit too cold in comparison to the warmth of the ice cream itself. So I decided to add moon glow, which are sort of like Payne's gray bluish, but it has more of a purple hue. I think compliments the purple off the ice cream really well. So with this color, I just use it to glaze under the cone. And I'm just going to extend some of the cast shadow of the blueberries with this color as well. 17. CLOSING AND CLASS PROJECT: Congratulations on completing this class. I hope you guys enjoyed watching the paint through. For the class project, I would love for you to paint along by either using the outline that I provided for you to download or by drawing your own. You can also add your own flair by changing the flavor or even adding more decorative elements to jazz up the painting even more. Once you're done with your paintings, please don't forget to post it in the project section so you can share it with me and other students as well. Hello, how, even if we start from the same base in the same colors and the steps, you guys still manage to have your own flair and creativity and is always very interesting for me to have a look at it. If he goes into this class and would like to see more work by me, you can also follow me on my YouTube channel, neon Yani, where I post weekly videos and watercolor tutorials. Or if you would like to see more art by me, you can follow me on my Instagram, IG underscoring and Yani, if you guys are still here. Thank you so much for watching till the end. I hope you guys enjoyed this class and learn something new, happy painting. And I'll see you at the next one. Bye.