Fingerstyle Guitar - Intermediate Level Fingerpicking | Kurt Berg | Skillshare

Fingerstyle Guitar - Intermediate Level Fingerpicking

Kurt Berg, 10+ Year Pro, 100% Success Guarantee

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103 Lessons (2h 48m)
    • 1. Introduction

      2:36
    • 2. Lecture 2: LET'S GET STARTED WITH GOOD RIDDANCE

      3:28
    • 3. Lecture 3: GOOD RIDDANCE 1ST HALF SLOW PLAY ALONG

      1:43
    • 4. Lecture 4: GOOD RIDDANCE 1ST HALF MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG

      0:50
    • 5. Lecture 5: GOOD RIDDANCE 1ST HALF FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG

      0:50
    • 6. Lecture 7: GOOD RIDDANCE 2ND HALF MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:42
    • 7. Lecture 8: GOOD RIDDANCE 2ND HALF MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG

      0:51
    • 8. Lecture 9: GOOD RIDDANCE 2ND HALF FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:00
    • 9. Lecture 10: LET'S PUT GOOD RIDDANCE TOGETHER

      0:50
    • 10. Lecture 11: CONCLUSION

      0:39
    • 11. Lecture 12: INTRODUCTION TO HAMMER-ONS AND PULLOFFS

      0:22
    • 12. Lecture 13: LET'S LOOK AT HAMMER-ONS

      2:04
    • 13. Lecture 14: TECHNIQUE TO GETTING A GOOD HAMMER-ON

      1:55
    • 14. Lecture 15: USING THE THIRD FINGER HAMMER-ON

      1:52
    • 15. Lecture 16: TEARS IN HEAVEN (PART 1)

      2:25
    • 16. Lecture 17: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 1 SLOW PLAY ALONG

      4:03
    • 17. Lecture 18: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 1 MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:13
    • 18. Lecture 19: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 1 FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:50
    • 19. Lecture 20: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 2

      0:50
    • 20. Lecture 21: LET'S TRY OUT PULLOFFS

      2:26
    • 21. Lecture 22: LET'S PRACTICE MORE WITH PULLOFFS

      1:37
    • 22. Lecture 23: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 3

      0:21
    • 23. Lecture 24: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 3 SLOW PLAY ALONG

      3:36
    • 24. Lecture 25: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 3 MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:49
    • 25. Lecture 26: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 3 FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:47
    • 26. Lecture 27: LET'S ADD A PULLOFF INTO THE SONG

      0:36
    • 27. Lecture 28: ADDING A PULLOFF SLOW PLAY ALONG

      2:56
    • 28. Lecture 29: ADDING A PULLOFF MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG

      0:55
    • 29. Lecture 30: ADDING A PULLOFF FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG

      0:29
    • 30. Lecture 31: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 4

      1:16
    • 31. Lecture 32: HAMMER-ON TO A PULLOFF

      1:25
    • 32. Lecture 33: HAMMER-ON TO A PULLOFF SLOW PLAY ALONG

      1:47
    • 33. Lecture 34: HAMMER-ON TO A PULLOFF MEDIUM PLAY ALONG

      0:41
    • 34. Lecture 35: HAMMER-ON TO A PULLOFF FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:08
    • 35. Lecture 36: CONCLUSION+ENTIRE RIFF

      1:46
    • 36. Lecture 37: INTRODUCTION

      0:27
    • 37. Lecture 38: LET'S LOOK AT SLIDES

      1:58
    • 38. Lecture 39: SCAR TISSUE PART 1

      2:05
    • 39. Lecture 40: SCAR TISSUE SLOW PLAY ALONG

      2:25
    • 40. Lecture 41: SCAR TISSUE MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:02
    • 41. Lecture 42: SCAR TISSUE FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:19
    • 42. Lecture 43: ADDING IN THE SLIDE

      1:17
    • 43. Lecture 44: BONUS FANCINESS (OPTIONAL)

      1:56
    • 44. Lecture 45: SCAR TISSUE FULL PLAY ALONG

      1:10
    • 45. Lecture 46: LET'S TAKE A LOOK AT HARMONICS

      2:09
    • 46. Lecture 47: LET'S LOOK AT BENDS PART 1

      1:14
    • 47. Lecture 48: LET'S LOOK AT BENDS PART 2

      1:36
    • 48. Lecture 49: LET'S TAKE A LOOK AT PERCUSSIVE HITS

      1:48
    • 49. Lecture 50: PERCUSSIVE HITS SLOW PLAY ALONG

      2:49
    • 50. Lecture 51: PERCUSSIVE HITS MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:29
    • 51. Lecture 52: PERCUSSIVE HITS FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:09
    • 52. Lecture 53: SCAR TISSUE PART 2

      1:36
    • 53. Lecture 54: SCAR TISSUE PART 3

      1:19
    • 54. Lecture 55: SCAR TISSUE PART 3 SLOW PLAY ALONG

      3:20
    • 55. Lecture 56: SCAR TISSUE PART 3 MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:07
    • 56. Lecture 57: SCAR TISSUE PART 3 FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:39
    • 57. Lecture 58: CONCLUSION

      0:25
    • 58. Lecture 59: INTRODUCTION

      0:29
    • 59. Lecture 60: STRUMMING

      1:35
    • 60. Lecture 61: STRUMMING PART 2

      1:36
    • 61. Lecture 62: LET HER GO

      1:00
    • 62. Lecture 63: LET HER GO SLOW PLAY ALONG

      1:56
    • 63. Lecture 64: LET HER GO MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:14
    • 64. Lecture 65: LET HER GO FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG

      0:56
    • 65. Lecture 66: TURNING ANY SONG INTO A FINGERSTYLE SONG (LET HER GO)

      1:38
    • 66. Lecture 67: SLOW PLAY ALONG

      3:13
    • 67. Lecture 68: MEDIUM PLAY ALONG

      1:48
    • 68. Lecture 69: FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:48
    • 69. Lecture 70: WALKTHROUGH

      2:30
    • 70. Lecture 71: USING THESE TECHNIQUES FOR ANY SONG

      2:12
    • 71. Lecture 72: CONCLUSION

      0:35
    • 72. Lecture 73: INTRODUCTION

      1:17
    • 73. Lecture 74: LEARNING THE 4 STRING F CHORD

      1:45
    • 74. Lecture 75: LET'S LEARN ABOUT THE B MINOR BAR CHORD

      1:55
    • 75. Lecture 76: LET'S LEARN ABOUT THE G MAJOR BAR CHORD

      2:27
    • 76. Lecture 77: SWITCHING BETWEEN BAR CHORDS

      2:20
    • 77. Lecture 78: WHAT'S THE POINT IN ALL THIS

      4:05
    • 78. Lecture 79: DESPACITO PART 1

      0:57
    • 79. Lecture 80: DESPACITO PART 2

      1:10
    • 80. Lecture 81: 6 STRING MINOR CHORDS

      1:43
    • 81. Lecture 82: 5 STRING MAJOR CHORDS

      2:26
    • 82. Lecture 83: DESPACITO PART 4

      1:25
    • 83. Lecture 84: DESPACITO PART 4 SLOW PLAY ALONG

      3:03
    • 84. Lecture 85: DESPACITO PART 4 MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:01
    • 85. Lecture 86: DESPACITO PART 4 FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:08
    • 86. Lecture 87: DESPACITO PART 5

      0:54
    • 87. Lecture 88: DESPACITO PART 5 SLOW PLAY ALONG

      2:02
    • 88. Lecture 89: DESPACITO PART 5 MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG

      0:37
    • 89. Lecture 90: DESPACITO PART 5 FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG

      0:46
    • 90. Lecture 91: DESPACITO PART 6

      1:22
    • 91. Lecture 92: ADDING PERCUSSIVE HITS

      3:03
    • 92. Lecture 93: ALTERNATE WAYS TO USE FINGERSTYLE

      1:49
    • 93. Lecture 94: ADDING IN FINGERPICKING

      0:48
    • 94. Lecture 95: SLOW PLAY ALONG

      3:02
    • 95. Lecture 96: MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:02
    • 96. Lecture 97: FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG

      1:19
    • 97. Lecture 98: USING ALL TECHNIQUES

      1:06
    • 98. Lecture 99: SLOW PLAY ALONG

      3:03
    • 99. Lecture 100: MEDIUM PLAY ALONG

      1:44
    • 100. Lecture 101: FAST PLAY ALONG

      1:42
    • 101. Lecture 102: LET'S BRING IT ALL TOGETHER

      0:50
    • 102. Lecture 103: FULL PLAY ALONG

      1:34
    • 103. Lecture 104: CONCLUSION

      1:34
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About This Class

Go beyond the basics of fingerstyle guitar by learning new techniques and playing more challenging songs!

What will you learn in this course?

  • Play various guitar techniques like hammer ons, pull offs, slides, harmonics, and more
  • Play riffs from several different  popular fingerstyle songs smoothly
  • Learn various fingerstyle specific techniques to help you create unique rhythms
  • Play barre chords in a fingerstyle song

What songs will I learn?

  • "Good Riddance" by Green Day
  • "Tears In Heaven" by Eric Clapton
  • "Scar Tissue" by the Red Hot Chili Peppers
  • "Despacito" by Luis Fonsi

Transcripts

1. Introduction: welcome to enter me finger style guitar, where you'll learn effective techniques and finger style guitar. My name is Kurt and I'll be your instructor. I've been playing guitar for 13 years, have shot hundreds of successful students that have gone on to love the guitar and play in front of thousands. People I still play daily and still love it at the end of this course will be able to play many complex songs smoothly at full speed, have a toolbox of cool techniques and, most importantly, be able to learn your favorite songs. You'll be confidently able to learn any song you want and have a proven, step by step method to follow on learning your socks. Coming to this course, people will be impressed with your plan. This course goes through intermediate level techniques in finger stock guitar. We'll focus on two million things of this course, teaching you a bunch of new, complex techniques you might not have been through before and playing more vets songs well at full speed to really level of your plan. We also learned briefs from a bunch of popular songs, so you come over the course already able to play real socks. I'll teach you a range of genres and years. So there's something for everyone, regardless of age, musical taste. They learn songs from Ed Sheeran, Green Day Air, Clapton Passenger Red Hot Chili Peppers and more. I designed this course for the guitarist of any age who's comfortable with the basics already on Wants to get into some more advanced plan. My ideal student is comfortable with chord changes, knows the basics of right hand finger style technique and is comfortable rating taps. This course picks up exactly where my beginner course ends, So if you took that, you're perfect candidate already. If not, if you can change chords of the pick and read tabs on are Looking into Finger Style for the first time, you might want to start with my beginner's course. You make it through it quickly, but finger style is a different beast, and your right hand playing will take you a while to get used to. If you've already always played with a pet, if you're new to finger style but already comfortable with techniques like hammer ons, pull offs and slides, you should be fine to start with this course and will pick up the right hand technique quickly 2. Lecture 2: LET'S GET STARTED WITH GOOD RIDDANCE: Okay, let's jump right in with a song to warm you up and set a baseline level to start out. In this course, we're going to start with good riddance by Green Day. Depending on what level you're out specifically, you might find the song pretty easy or kind of difficult. So if you took my begin, of course, you pretty used to be saying, Just take your time and go at your own pace Progress through this course of slowly or as quickly as you need to move on to the next exercise Onley. Once you can comfortably play the one year on, you don't need to be perfect to move into the next one. But you should be comfortable enough or else later exercise. They're going to be pretty tough. Most exercise in this course build on the previous ones. If you took my beginner course, one major difference in this course is gonna be that I'm not gonna walk you through every single note in every single song we play. It's expected by this point that you can comfortably read tabs and leave you to figure out most of the notes on your own. What I'm gonna do is explain specific techniques and positionings along with any relevant specific comments on the river plain. You should also be at a point where you're comfortable practicing riffs on your own and understand the importance of good technique and regular practice. So with all that out of the way, here's the tab for good riddance. If you don't know the song, head over to YouTube, Spotify or wherever you listen to music and listen to it a few times before trying this out to get the idea. Once you've done that, take a listen to be playing the ref. So this one's fairly straightforward. Just a few simple patterns here. Technically, it changes between a G A. C at nine and a D. But as always with finger picking, we don't have to hold down all the strings in the cords because there are lots strings we don't play. It's the first to run throughs you can do with your third finger on the third front of the second string and your second finger on the third for the sixth straight. As for positioning with your right hand, we're gonna be our standard finger style position. Your thumb plays the 4th 5th and sixth string's ah, whenever they come up, your first finger plays the third string, your second finger plays the second string, and your third finger plays the first string, although there are no first string notes in this song, so try it out. Your thumb is gonna be alternating between the sixth on the fourth string. In the first half of this drift, old notes are left to ring out. Throw this course. Whenever we have an exercise to play, I'll first show you how to do it. And then the following three videos will be play alongs at different speeds. I had these end because students often find it useful to play along and then gradually work up their speed by moving from one play along video to the next. So when you're practicing, encourage you to start by playing along with whichever videos at a comfortable speed and then move on to the faster play alongs. When you're ready, you can skip the slower ones if they're too slow for you. But you should be able to play along with the fastest one's somewhat comfortably before moving on. Feel free to start with which ever speed is a good starting point for you personally. One of the major goals in this course is to make sure able to play along at full speed with most songs. So because of this, the last play along video will always be at the full speed of the original song. So once you can play along with that last one, you know you can play along with the rial song, head on to the next videos for play alongs of this half and then the play along for the whole rift together. 3. Lecture 3: GOOD RIDDANCE 1ST HALF SLOW PLAY ALONG: 1234 way. 4. Lecture 4: GOOD RIDDANCE 1ST HALF MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG: - way . 5. Lecture 5: GOOD RIDDANCE 1ST HALF FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG: 6. Lecture 7: GOOD RIDDANCE 2ND HALF MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 way. 7. Lecture 8: GOOD RIDDANCE 2ND HALF MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG: way, way. 8. Lecture 9: GOOD RIDDANCE 2ND HALF FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG: 9. Lecture 10: LET'S PUT GOOD RIDDANCE TOGETHER: 10. Lecture 11: CONCLUSION: And if you can play along with that last few, there's your first song. That riff is played basically throughout the entire song of Good riddance, but uncover any new techniques here. But this song was basically to get everyone to the exact same starting point in this course . If you found that last easy, feel free to jump right into the next section, it's still challenge. I recommend practicing that one for a bit until it's comfortable for you. Once you can play that pretty comfortably. You had a good lease land level for this course. I wanted to make sure everyone starting in a similar point. Before we get into more advanced techniques, you don't mean to make it absolutely perfect before moving on, but it should be comfortable enough. 11. Lecture 12: INTRODUCTION TO HAMMER-ONS AND PULLOFFS: in this section we're gonna look at by far the two most common techniques used. An intermediate level finger style guitar, ham, Morones and pull offs. You'll see these everywhere and are basically a necessity is a good harvest. If you took my beginner's course, you may have gotten a brief introduction to these. Let's jump right in with Ham Ron's in the next video. 12. Lecture 13: LET'S LOOK AT HAMMER-ONS: hammer on is basically when you're playing one fret. And instead of pressing down to the next front and picking again, you hit your left hand finger down really hard to make this string make a sound without actually picking it again. This does two things for us. The first is that suddenly we can play a much faster. If I want to play these three notes in a row in the same string, I can only pick it so fast. But to play these three same notes by using ham Ron's suddenly I can play it much faster so you can drastically increase your playing speed by combining fast picking with fast hair. Montes. The second thing that Hamren's do is give us a smoother sound between notes. When you pick a note, you can hear that the initial part of the note has a much more pronounced sound than the rest of it here, as much sharper right when I play it, and then it kind of evens out so you can distinctively hear each note when you switch from one to the other. The the start of the note and music is known as the attack, but If you listen to me hammer on the same three notes, it has a much smoother transition or has a much smaller attack e uh in music. This is known as playing llegado or transitioning smoothly between notes, So in this instance, it's a stylistic choice. Sometimes you prefer to have a stronger attack and pick each note individually, typically when the notice part of the main melody. But if the notice more of a transition instead of a main melody note, often you won't want to emphasize it as much. And instead you'll hammered on to play llegada. So now that you know a bit more about them, let's get into the technique. 13. Lecture 14: TECHNIQUE TO GETTING A GOOD HAMMER-ON: Okay, lets taken end up. Look at the technique. So the easiest hammer on weaken do is from an open string to your second finger. Your second finger is the strongest, so it's easier to do the ham. Wrong with that finger, you're gonna start by picking the open third string. After that, you're gonna move your second finger onto the second fret. The technique is exactly the same as if you're gonna play a pick note. Normally, the only difference is that you're not picking it with your right hand, which means that for your left hand you have to push your finger down a lot faster, almost like your fingers coming down like a hammer on the fretboard. Hence the name hammer on. Try just this out a few times on your own. To get a feel for the technique, you have to experiment a bit to see exactly how hard do you need to hammer In order to get a good sounding note. Remember, your position doesn't change. You're still using the very tip of your finger curled and just before the front, once you can get a decently clean sounding note, try playing along with me in the next exercise. Oh, I'm gonna do is plucked the open third string on And then on the next beat hammer on the second fret with my second finger. So one beato in the open string and then one beat on the second front. Try and make the volume of both the pick note and Hamburg. Note the same and not drastically different. 1234 way You can do this with me. Move on in the next video. 14. Lecture 15: USING THE THIRD FINGER HAMMER-ON: the third finger ham Ron is probably the most common hand. It's not as easy as the second finger, but there are lots of times when you're not playing the open string first, and you'll often be moving from your first finger to your third finger. The third finger isn't quite a strong is the second finger, though. When hammer and other third finger, it's often useful toe hammer on the second finger. At the same time, this often makes the motion easier and doesn't do anything to the sound of the note. So let's try this out. Put your first finger on the second fret of the third string and then hammer on your third finger on the fourth fret of the third string, moving your second finger down at the same time as you move the third finger down. The technique is exactly the same as the second finger hammer on. The only difference here is you're bringing down two fingers at the same time, tried it a few times on your own, and then see if you can do a similar exercise is the last lesson, starting with your first finger on the second front of the third string and ham around to the fourth threat with your third thing, your second finger. It will be hammering on the third fret at the same time, hold each note for one beat and moved to the next video once you could play this comfortably with all the notes at a similar value. One, 23 four way. 15. Lecture 16: TEARS IN HEAVEN (PART 1): Let's try some ham. Ron's in a song. We're gonna play Tears in Heaven by the one and only Eric Clapton as usual. If you don't know the song, take a listen to the intro to get a feel for it and then listen to me Play the ref. No way we're going to do here is start with a simplified version and gradually building up to the full riff over the course of the next few videos. So let's start with the main melody of the rift. Try the tab on the screen and practice that forbid until you can play it smoothly. Listen to me, play it and then work your way up until you could play with me in the final play along. Do you there No Hamren's yet. So no surprises here. Whether you play the 4th 5th or sixth string's, use your thumb first finger on the third string second finger on the second string on third finger on the first trip. Listen my timing and practice it yourself. 1234 All the to string chords are going to be played with your first and second finger on the right hand and the unique part about this rift is that all the to string chords are gonna be played with your second finger on the third string and your third finger on the second string on the left hand. So when you move up to the fifth fret, it's the same fingers as when you're playing on the second and third front or just the second friend. The only one that's different is when you're playing the first and the third fret cord, which will use your first and your third fingers. 16. Lecture 17: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 1 SLOW PLAY ALONG: one to three four you. 17. Lecture 18: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 1 MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG: 18. Lecture 19: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 1 FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 19. Lecture 20: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 2: Okay, now you got the base melody down. Let's add in a hand. Wrong and tabs. Hammer ons were written with an H between the two notes. So you gonna play the open sixth string than hammer onto the second front with your second finger? Use the same technique we tried in the previous exercise. 1234 Try that out to play. You can hear that. The purpose of this note is for both of the reasons we use hammer ons because it's too fast to play picked and because it's just a transition. Once you can play that comfortably, you used your first hammer on and a real song. 20. Lecture 21: LET'S TRY OUT PULLOFFS: Now let's try to pull off, which is basically the opposite of a hammer home. These are a little trickier, like a hammer on a pull off is exactly what it sounds like. You have a finger on a fret, and then you pull off the front to make the next note without picking. Oh, uh, now here's the tricky part. With a hammer on, you just have to hit down, but with a pull off, you kind of have to pluck the string with your left hand e. If I start with my third finger on the third fret of the second string and play that note on and then I just take my finger off. I'll sort of yet a sound. But it's pretty quiet and doesn't sound like much. So instead, what you actually have to do with the pull off is flick the string downwards just a little bit as you pull off. So you're gonna play the note on, then flicked down a little bit as you release it. It's a subtle motion, so you have to try this out a few times to get used to it and look closely at what I'm doing. If you do it right, you shouldn't have any trouble making a note that sounds justus louder, almost asl out as the first pick note. I'll emphasize the motion of it here so you can see it a little better. But in practice, it's a pretty subtle motion. Try that on your own a bunch of times until you sort of got the hang of it, and then we'll try similar exercise to the hammer on exercise. Start with your third finger on the third floor of the second string and then pull off to the open second string. Play each note for one beat and move on when you're comfortable with this one to three four . 21. Lecture 22: LET'S PRACTICE MORE WITH PULLOFFS: Let's try a few more practices for pull us first try pulling off the third front on the second string, but ending on the first fret of the second string. This time this'll means that you're gonna have to fret the first and the third fronts before you play the second string in order for the first spread to ring off once you pull it off one to 34 Once you can do that, try pulling off from the third to the second front, so the third will be with the third finger, and the second will be with second fair again. You'll need to fret both the second and the third frets before you play the second string with your right hand. Uh, thats one is a little bit tougher to get this both notes to be the same volume. Try this exercise until you can do it. 1234 22. Lecture 23: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 3: before we had a pull off to the song Let's fill in a few of our courts, practice this next tab until you've got the idea, and then we'll out of pull off later. The sixth string is fronted with your first finger. In all of these courts, the court progression basically just slides down the fretboard. The next three videos airplay along videos, so try the mode at your own pace. 23. Lecture 24: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 3 SLOW PLAY ALONG: one to three four way. 24. Lecture 25: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 3 MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 25. Lecture 26: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 3 FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 26. Lecture 27: LET'S ADD A PULLOFF INTO THE SONG: this time we're adding a pull off. Pull offs are denoted with a P and taps. The P will be in between the note you're pulling off and the song are Pull off is going to be on the second string just like we did in the pull off practice exercise. Listen to play this, then try playing along one to three four. 27. Lecture 28: ADDING A PULLOFF SLOW PLAY ALONG: one to three four. 28. Lecture 29: ADDING A PULLOFF MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG: one to three four. 29. Lecture 30: ADDING A PULLOFF FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 30. Lecture 31: TEARS IN HEAVEN PART 4: once you can do that, added into the full ref 1234 Now a lot in a few more notes throughout the rest of the rift to pretty much completed, listen to my timing and then fall along with the tap. 1234 31. Lecture 32: HAMMER-ON TO A PULLOFF: So you've had some practice with hammer ons and pull off. Now, let's add the final part to this room this time, instead of just pulling off when we get to the second stream, we're gonna hammer on as well beforehand. So you gonna play the second front with your second finger? Been hammer onto the third front that immediately pull off to the second foot again? Try just this motion out a few times with me. E you can do that. Play this full ascending riff on its own ascending meaning. Going from a low note to ah Hein up the one thing you're gonna have to do a little differently. Here is when you get up to the second fret of the third string, you gonna play that and and then you're gonna want to flatten your finger to play the second fret of the second string. And it's way too hard to switch from the third to the second string fast enough without flattening your fingers here. So this is gonna make your pull off and hammer on a little bit more awkward, but it's still pretty much the same motion. Use the following play along videos as you need to 32. Lecture 33: HAMMER-ON TO A PULLOFF SLOW PLAY ALONG: one to three. Four. Uh oh. Uh huh. 33. Lecture 34: HAMMER-ON TO A PULLOFF MEDIUM PLAY ALONG: one to 34 34. Lecture 35: HAMMER-ON TO A PULLOFF FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 35. Lecture 36: CONCLUSION+ENTIRE RIFF: okay. It's been quite the journey, but now it's finally time to play the riff in its entirety. Here's the riff altogether at full speed. Great work once you get it there. 1234 36. Lecture 37: INTRODUCTION: hammer ons and pull offs are probably the most common techniques you'll see, and tons of songs use those techniques. But there are a bunch of other techniques that you also see pretty frequently, and their equally is cool in this section will go over the most common of these and work on a bunch of cool songs to test them out with. By the end of this section, you'll have a toolbox filled with pretty much every technique you need to play the vast majority of sums, so let's get started. 37. Lecture 38: LET'S LOOK AT SLIDES: after hammer ons and pull offs. The next most common technique is definitely slides. A slide is also very obviously named. A slide is where you play one front on. Then, while still holding the front down, you slide to the next threat you want to play. Ah, this makes it pretty cool. Smooth gliding sound to go from one note to the next. Because you every tone in between you can slide any number of threats. But it's harder than more frets. You slide, but you can even do things like slide from the fifth to the Ninth front, which is sliding up. Four frets. The most common thing you'll do is slide to friends, though. Let's try this out, starting with your second figure on the second front of the second string. Play that note, then try sliding up to the fourth threat. The biggest thing, as far as technique goes here, is you want to make sure you keep pressing the strings hard enough so that the note doesn't stop playing as you slide. If you release pressure, your ending note will be muted. Ah, when sliding your starting and ending notes should be somewhat the same volume, but the second note will be quieter. Try it out a few times, then try playing along with me. 1234 38. Lecture 39: SCAR TISSUE PART 1: Okay, let's put our new skills with slides to the test by playing scar tissue by the Red Hot Chili Peppers. First, we'll start off just learning the general riff without the slides. You're pretty experience with learning risks by now. So listen to me and try and play it on your own. You use your thumb for the low notes and your third finger for the high notes. 1234 1234 The only thing to note for this riff is that it's probably easier to play both the second and the third strings with your first finger on the right hand in order to keep a similar pattern going. For the most part, we play in standard finger picking position, but sometimes it's just easier to play in a slightly different position. So there's no point in staying in standard position just for the sake of it. This is an example of a song like that, because we're basically just shifting down strings. It works pretty nicely to keep the same fingers on the right hand and just shift them down strings. Take a look at my right hand as I'm playing at this time, check out the next videos for some speed increases with play alongs. Try and work up to the full speed before moving on. 39. Lecture 40: SCAR TISSUE SLOW PLAY ALONG: one to three four. 40. Lecture 41: SCAR TISSUE MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 41. Lecture 42: SCAR TISSUE FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 42. Lecture 43: ADDING IN THE SLIDE: Okay, so now you should be able to play that at full speed. Next, we're gonna add in a slide. So when you shift down strings to the ninth foot on the third string, this time, instead of just playing the 10th fret you're gonna slide from the ninth to the 10th. The same technique is before. Just keep the pressure down enough so that both notes ring out, try it on your own, then try playing the full riff along with me. 1234 43. Lecture 44: BONUS FANCINESS (OPTIONAL): so the next part's gonna be kind of difficult. So I'm gonna leave. These exercises is optional. If you really feel like challenging yourself, feel free to not spend too much time on this because it's a bit more advanced. Especially since we just learned slides to start by placing your second finger on the eighth fret of the sixth drink and then try doing a slide up to the 10th. Fret when you can do that, we're gonna try playing that at the same time as our other slide on the third string. So you gonna slide from the ninth to the 10th. Fret on the third string. A same time is sliding from the eighth to the 10th fret on the sixth string. Thats kind of cool because it's a slid cord. So both notes slide up at the same time. And with the only thing to keep mind of is that your second finger's actually sliding up. Mawr frets than the third finger. This. Try that on your own a few times and then try it out with me. 1234 Once you can play that, you can try and play it in the next play along video, where I'll play the full riff at full speed with the double slide 44. Lecture 45: SCAR TISSUE FULL PLAY ALONG: 1234 45. Lecture 46: LET'S TAKE A LOOK AT HARMONICS: Here's a technique you don't see in songs too often, but it's really cool. They're called harmonics, and they really easy to do. I won't go into the physics behind them. And maybe you remember learning about waves in high school or college physics if your math nerd like I am. But if you cut a string in half, you could make both sides of the string of vibrate producing a frequency that's twice the frequency of an original note, basically just a fancy way of saying it's a lot higher. If you know any music theory cut in the length of a string in half produces a note one octave higher. Now the actual cool part of this is that it makes a unique effect and that we can get the same note as the 12th fret of any string without actually pressing the string down. Uh, you may want to play around with this for a little bit, because it's pretty fun. All you do is place your finger right on the 12th fret of any string and pluck the string with the right hand. It will bring out in a cool way. I'm not gonna bother going through exercise on this because you really don't see it that often or practical song. But it's cool to know boat and fund to Adam for an extra effect in certain places. The other interesting thing is that you can do this in a few other spots on the front board . If you divide the strings into either three, even sections or four even sections, you can get similar effects. This works out to being on the fifth or the seven threats. Now you have to be more careful about your placement on these ones because it's a bit more finicky, but it'll work the exact same. If you get the right spot, you might just want to play around with ease a little while because I'm pretty fun. 46. Lecture 47: LET'S LOOK AT BENDS PART 1: another technique. You don't see that often, but it does come up is Ben's. As with most techniques, it's named pretty. Obviously, Abend is when you bend the strength. If you take any string at any fret and bend it, it's pitch will increase or the note plate will get higher. The easiest way to bend the string is to place your third finger and your second finger both on the string and use them both to bend the strings. This way, it's pretty easy to control, and it makes it easier to push the strengths. You can bend the strings either way up or down, depending on your personal preference. Typically, though, you'll bend the top three strings up and on the bottom. Three strings down. Try this old for a little ologists. Get the hang of it. Just pick a string on a fret and try Bennett. The higher up you go on the fretboard, the easier it is to bend. Also, the higher strings are much easier to bend in the lower, thicker strengths. Just play around with it for a little bit, and you'll see why 47. Lecture 48: LET'S LOOK AT BENDS PART 2: So the tricky part with Ben's is that you typically want to bend a string of specific note . So I've been 1/3 string at the fifth. Fret E may want to bend it up to, say the note of the six threat This just takes in practice and training your ear to recognize. When you're at the right spot, you can usually only bend up one fret more or two frets A to most. But a good way to practice bending is to try bending to a specific threat. Then play the note you're trying to bend to and user here to figure out whether you're to lower to high. This does take some serious practice to train your ear, though. Oh huh, No. Let's try this out. Play the fifth fret of the third string and try it. Bend it up to the sixth threat of the third string. See if you can figure out the right spot where you pretty much playing the same note as if you're playing the sixth Fret. This is something you just have to practice for a long time to get good at, so you don't need to spend too much time doing this now. It's just a cool technique I wanted to show you so that you're aware of it if you ever see it. Also, Benzo used a lot more electric than acoustic guitar and are much easier on electric because the strings are thinner, which makes them easier to bend, so you probably won't see this technique too much and finger style guitar. 48. Lecture 49: LET'S TAKE A LOOK AT PERCUSSIVE HITS: Let's finish this section off with one more technique that you do see a lot of finger style guitar percussive hits. If you took my beginner course, he saw little snippet of this technique, but we'll try it with the more advanced song this time. Ed Sheeran loves using this technique, and you'll see it in a good bunch of his songs. So try this technique and small bump bad share. So one of his most popular songs. But it does have a really cool finger style riff that I think you'll really enjoy and one of my favorite songs of his to play first. Let's start off with the foundations of the song. Check out the tab, listen to me and then try it yourself. - One thing to note for this song is that we're gonna venture way out of our standard finger style positioning for the song. For most of the riff, you're going to use your thumb, your first on your second finger to play the chords that are being played for The first court will be playing the 3rd 4th and fifth strings, and then you move to the 4th 5th and sixth string's for the next chord, they keep the same fingers. The chord at the end of the first repetition will use your first and second finger. But the court at the end of the second repetition will use all four fingers trying. Get used to that with the play alongs in the next video. 49. Lecture 50: PERCUSSIVE HITS SLOW PLAY ALONG: 123 four 50. Lecture 51: PERCUSSIVE HITS MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 51. Lecture 52: PERCUSSIVE HITS FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 way. 52. Lecture 53: SCAR TISSUE PART 2: The next part is to add in a hammer on at the end of the first repetition. You're gonna play the fourth and the third strings, but the hammer on is on Lee on the third string. What we're doing here is something called a Grace note. A Grace note is basically just a note that's only held for a very, very short period of time before moving to the next note, and it doesn't really get any specified time value. You do start on the note, but you immediately hammer onto the next. One thing is kind of a cool, subtle effect. Just try this a few times when you can play that along with me, try adding it into the full riff. 1234 53. Lecture 54: SCAR TISSUE PART 3: Now it's time to add in our percussive hits. A percussive hit looks like a bunch of exes on the tab. And to play it on finger style guitar, you basically just hit your fingernails on the strings. This does two things. It mutes the strings that were playing and adds a snare drum type sound. If you don't know what a snare drum is, it's a part of the drum kit that makes a high pitched sound like this often, especially in Ed songs. A percussive hit like this will be on the second and fourth beats. This is usually where a snare drum has played in the drumbeat. If I count along with this event riff, you can hear that the percussive hits are always on the second and fourth beats. One to three, four 123412 3412 341 to 34 Try doing this a few times on your own and then, as usual, fall along with the play along videos after this until you completed full speed. Once you can do that, you'll be playing the entire riff 54. Lecture 55: SCAR TISSUE PART 3 SLOW PLAY ALONG: 12 three four 55. Lecture 56: SCAR TISSUE PART 3 MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 56. Lecture 57: SCAR TISSUE PART 3 FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 57. Lecture 58: CONCLUSION: and with that, you've made it to the end of section three. You've now been over all of the main techniques you'll hear in most common finger style songs. But these techniques, you shouldn't be left guessing on just about any song you come across. It'll take you a while, the master these techniques, So just pay attention to your proper technique practice, and these things will come a lot easier with time, and with that, we'll see in Section four. 58. Lecture 59: INTRODUCTION: welcome to Section four in this section, we're going to start by taking a break from pure finger style to get better at strumming chords without a pick, because sometimes you want to strum along the songs or play individual chords within songs . After that, we'll look a little bit more at converting any song into a finger starts off. This will give you some more room for creativity and creating your own interpretations of songs. But turning cords into finger stop hearts, Let's get to it. 59. Lecture 60: STRUMMING: so there are lots of times when you'll want to strum a full chord. This is fairly easy to achieve with your fingers. Pick does make cords easier, so I would recommend using a pick wherever possible. But sometimes you just want to use your fingers, and sometimes you'll want to strum with your fingers because it is a finger style song. And as this is a figure stock course, it wouldn't make much sense for me to teach you with a pick. If you took my beginner course, you got a brief introduction to strumming with your fingers. The method I taught you in that course was easier to pick up quickly. But I mean, you use a slightly different technique right here. This technique is a little tougher to master, but in the end it produces a much nicer and fuller sound. Let's start with single beats drums on the record. What you're gonna do is use your second and third fingers at the same time to strum downwards. You keep a loose wrist, and basically using your fingernails picks. This part's not too tough, so try it a few times you're on your own and then play along with me on single beats. 123 four. How is that? Shouldn't be too tough because I imagine you've had some sort of experience with strumming in the past. Next is the part of technique that you might not have seen before. 60. Lecture 61: STRUMMING PART 2: so you may or may not have heard of up Stroman before alternating. Strumming up and down is the basis of strumming a guitar with the pick. This is pretty easy, cause the motions pretty similar with fingers, though it's a bit tougher because we're gonna combine a few motions you strum down with your second and third fingers, and then when you're going to strum up, you want to use your thumb again with your thumb. You're going to use your fingernails a pick your goal should be. Get it to get a smooth, even rhythm with your up strums and you're down strums. The tough part comes when you're trying to speed up because you have to move your fingers or thumb out of the way, depending on which direction you're strong. So I'm just your g chord. Try this out now in a smooth, even rhythm streaming down on the down beats and up on the up beats one, 23 four. Move on to the next video when you can play this comfortably with me and you're up and down strums sound similar. They shouldn't be drastically different if you're going to get a smooth strumming. There will be some difference of the sounds just naturally, but this should be relatively similar 61. Lecture 62: LET HER GO: Let's try this out by playing the strumming pattern of Let her go by passenger. You can see the chord progression on the screen, and I'll show you the strong pattern. The strawman pattern, if you know your timing, is 1/4 note, followed by 4/16 notes. Alternatively, this is a single beat, followed by 4/4 beats. You don't know your timing. Just fall along by listening to you play. That's often the easiest way to learn timing. Anyways, I tried out a few times on your own, and you can use to play along videos to fall on this lesson to get it up to full speed. 1234 62. Lecture 63: LET HER GO SLOW PLAY ALONG: one to three four. Oh! 63. Lecture 64: LET HER GO MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG: one to 34 64. Lecture 65: LET HER GO FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 65. Lecture 66: TURNING ANY SONG INTO A FINGERSTYLE SONG (LET HER GO): So the cool thing about music is that nothing is set in stone, and you can play the same song many different ways to give it an entirely different field. Many songs or just a strumming pattern on cords is the background music. If you want to, you can turn pretty much any song into a finger style song by just picking out the courts. So it's useful to be able to think of your own finger picking patterns and doesn't really take that much to turn a simple, courted song. Do you really fancy sounding figure picks on Let's Try This Out aflutter ago, we played the chord progression of the song strummed out in the last few videos. So this time let's play. Try playing the same court of Russian just finger picked instead. Because this exercise is primarily about getting uncomfortable making your own finger picking patterns. I'm not gonna walk you through this top. I'll play it for you and keep the time on the screen. But I want you to try and figure out all of your own fingering on your own as usual, I've got play along videos to follow this lesson so that you can work your speed up to the full speed, try it out on your own and get it up to full speed, paying attention to your ideal finger placement, meaning which fingers play which strings on the right hand and which finger is fretting, which frets on the left hand. 1234 66. Lecture 67: SLOW PLAY ALONG: one to three, four way , way, way, way. 67. Lecture 68: MEDIUM PLAY ALONG: 123 four way , way, way, way. 68. Lecture 69: FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 way , way. 69. Lecture 70: WALKTHROUGH: so hopefully you didn't have too much trouble figuring out how to play this tab on your own . Now I'll quickly walk you through a few notes on it just to make sure we're on the same page. So there are two main ways to play this riff. The first is just to use the standard finger picking position to your thumb, playing the 4th 5th and sixth string's first finger playing 1/3 string second finger playing second string on third finger playing the first trip. Simple and easy and what we're used to the second way to play this is to use your thumb for the fifth and sixth string's Your first finger for the fourth string second finger for the third string on third finger for the second string. This sometimes an easier position because we have no first string notes in this song. So it sort of makes sense with all the three string chords we play and the layout of the tab. 1234 Both methods are acceptable, so feel free to try both methods and see which one feels more natural for you. The thing to be aware of here is that there are multiple ways to play any riff, so sometimes you want to experiment to figure out which finger placement works best for the song and hat. Next is the left hand. So if you'll notice, as with many finger style riff, the left hand can basically just hold cords. You're playing it. Even with ham runs, you still just hold the cord and place the finger that gets hammered on afterwards. The best way to play this song with left hand is definitely to hold cords, which allows all the streams to ring out nicely. It makes it easy for the left hand, so knows you want to modify cords to make them easier, but in this case, it's pretty much just the easiest to hold the courts. 70. Lecture 71: USING THESE TECHNIQUES FOR ANY SONG: so you can pretty much do this for any strum song, the only formula you really need to follow to do this effectively is to change chords at the right time, as long as you change chords in the same place you would if you were strumming them, it will work with a song. So the thing to do as faras, which pattern to play, is just to experiment, picking the strings of the cords until you find a pattern that sounds good to you. It's usually something pretty easy to find something that sounds good and making a song finger style sounds really impressive to people who don't play guitar. It's an instant way to make your playing sound way more difficult than it ISS. It really is an experimentation process, but it is pretty simple to make something that sounds good. Even if you don't any hammer ons, pull offs records and just pick up the strings and an order, it still sounds pretty nice. I take it on the cords and ham runs and let er go That we just played still sounds pretty cool. I know this is all really vague advice, but I'm doing this intentionally because they don't want you to get bogged down with rules . It really is pretty simple to make something that sounds good. And it almost doesn't matter much which order you play the strings. For the most part, you can really just improvise a finger picking pattern on the spot. It really doesn't have to be that well thought out to show you this. I'm gonna improvise the pattern on the court changes of letter go. Right now, I haven't planned this out in advance, and I'm really not thinking about much more about what I'm gonna play. Just picking out the cord and various orders of the strange to pick and usually sounds pretty cool. See how that works? Obviously, if you put a little more effort into figuring out a really cool pattern, it sounds even better. But just be aware that you don't have to make it difficult. Often you can produce pretty much the same results really easily 71. Lecture 72: CONCLUSION: And with that, the finished section for in this section we looked into strumming and then converting that strumming pattern into a finger stop. You can use these skills to play most songs pretty quickly by just using either a symbol, simple finger picking pattern or a symbol strumming pattern. Remember that most of the time it's not worth it to get bogged down with the details, and often, just doing it simply gets the same results with a lot less stress and headache guitars, mostly fun. So making it a hassle for yourself is often way more effort than its work. I'll see in the next section for some final interesting techniques on a few more fun songs . 72. Lecture 73: INTRODUCTION: welcome to the fifth and final section of this course. Up to now, you've learned a ton of different techniques to play finger style guitar and had a lot of practice using them in different intermediate level socks. You feel their toolbox with a whole bunch of new techniques and now allowed one final thing to your toolbox. Bar chords. If you've been playing guitar for a little while, you may have come across the term bar chords before they're in fitness in the world of guitar because they're pretty tough and take a while to get used to. So many people avoid ever learning them all together. But there are a lot of really useful reasons for bar chords, and they really are relevant to play many things on guitar. So what is a bar card? The bar chord is when you use one of your fingers to fret down multiple strings at once, which is known as barring a fret. The F court is the simplest example of a bar chord, so you've had some experience with them already, and an F court. Use your first finger on the first front of the first and second strengths. If you already comfortable playing this off court is, I've got it here. You can skip to the next video. If you've never seen enough court before or have tried it a few times but struggled with it , we'll do some practice with it in the next video. 73. Lecture 74: LEARNING THE 4 STRING F CHORD: Okay, let's try out this F court we introduced in the last video is usually a pretty tricky cord for people who are noted new to it. So take your time. So you're gonna start by placing your first finger on the first fret of both the first and the second strips. To do this, you're gonna want to lay your finger flat across both of the frets on. Place your finger just slightly before the front, just like any other string. Now try Get in just these two strings during out nicely. If they're not working, readjust your fingers and try again until you could get both of these ringing out smoothly . Once you can do that comfortably keeping your first finger completely in place. Put your second finger on the second fret of the third straight. Now see if you can get just these three strings during out. Finally, once you have those three in place and ringing out smoothly, put your third finger on the third fret of the fourth string. Now try and get all these four strings to ring out nicely and you've got the full court. Try switching from F to A C to a G help for four b teach to get some practice with this court, we're gonna do some things that are more difficult in the next videos to take your time here. 1234 74. Lecture 75: LET'S LEARN ABOUT THE B MINOR BAR CHORD: eso. Let's try out our first full bark work. You can see the core diagram on the screen here, and this court is a B minor. Start by putting your first finger on the second fret of the fifth string then, but your third finger on the fifth fret of the fourth string. After that, your pinky goes on the fourth front of the third string and your second finger goes on the third fret of the second string. That's all fine and dandy, but here's where the tricky part comes in. You're now going to use your first finger to play the second fret of the first string, so it's actually gonna be the base of your finger that's fretting down this fret right here , or depending on the length of your finger. The most important thing you want to do here is make sure that the crease of your finger where your finger joints are isn't the part of your finger that's over top of the string, because if it's there, then you're gonna have to push down further. Instead, you want to speak. You want the string to be on top of one of the flat parts of your finger in between the joints. So if it is, or depending on the length of your finger, you're gonna want to shift your fingers up or down so that neither the fifth string or the first string are below a finger joint. You want to fill around with us for a bit to try and get all the strings ringing out, set it up, played string individually and then fix any mistakes. If these their strings that aren't ringing out. You didn't want to play around with this for a bit before moving on. 75. Lecture 76: LET'S LEARN ABOUT THE G MAJOR BAR CHORD: the next bar chord we're gonna try is a G major. Yes, this is the same G major. We always play just in a bar chord format so you can see the core diagram on the screen. This court is almost the same shape as the B minor Just shifted down a string and over one friend Start by putting your first finger on the third for the 63 Then your third finger goes on the fifth front of the fifth string. Pinky goes on the fifth fret of the fourth string, and then your second finger goes on the fourth fret of the third strike Nice and simple up to this point. But here's where the tricky part comes in, just like with the B minor. Your first finger is gonna bar multiple strengths. This time, though, your first finger is gonna play the sixth, the second and the first strikes. The technique is gonna be the same as their B minor bar chord. Except this time you got that one extra string to part out. So the easiest way to do this with the extra string is place your first finger flat against the fretboard and pretty much burn down all the strings. You can't really curve your first finger at all. We're all so of difficult to get in the second and first strings to both ring out as usual , set up the cord, play each string individually and finally, strings aren't playing right and then readjust and try again. Chances are the second on the first stranger. The ones that are gonna give you trouble again fiddle around with this court for a while to try and get it ringing out the most common issue with bar chords, which I'm sure you'll struggle with. If you're not already struggling with it, it's finger soreness. It takes a long time to build up the strength to play bar chords effectively. So it's definitely something you're gonna wanna work on gradually over time, when your fingers get to sort of play, just take a break for a while and come back to later. I can almost guarantee, unless you're a competitive rock climber gymnast, that is gonna take you several weeks or even months to work up the finger strength to play bar chords. Well, this is the kind of technique that you just practice a little bit each day at over time. It does get easier 76. Lecture 77: SWITCHING BETWEEN BAR CHORDS: Okay. Hopefully, you've taken some time to figure out how to play both the B minor and G major biker bar chords. The next step as a guest is to try switching between. Try playing each chord for four beats than switcher. Your right hand strumming is gonna be just like we did in the last section. He's your second and third fingers and strum downwards motion with focus on making each chord sound a similar volume and smooth flow. 1234 1234 Play that a few times. Then once you're comfortable with that, a lot in a simple strumming pattern to make it a little bit more interesting. 1234 77. Lecture 78: WHAT'S THE POINT IN ALL THIS: So I'm showing you these big fancy bar chords that are way more difficult than our standard cords and are just the same chords we could play otherwise. So what's the point? While there are few main advantages to bar chords over standard courts, the first of these is consistent patterns. Unlike our standard cords, which are referred to his open chords, each bar chord can be moved up or down the fretboard and the exact same shape to play an entirely different court. For example, if I'm playing open chords to switch from a G two and a looks like that, I have to move all of my fingers into a completely different position to play this court. But if I switch from a G to in a in a bar chord form, I can keep the exact same shape and just slide my court up. Two frets so often times the switches between chords or much easier with bar chords, you didn't have to change your position. They're really only a few different forms of bar chords that could be switched around anywhere. So once you're comfortable with bar chords, often you'll prefer them to standard open chords. For that reason, the second main advantage to bark hordes is in the open strings or lack thereof. Open strings. An open court. You've got lots of open strings. Has the name open courts. This is nice because it makes it easy to get lots of open rain chords that sound good, but when you do this, you'll is a bit of control. You can't get his complicated rhythms because it's harder to mute an individual string. So if I play an open G chord in order to mute it, I have to use my right hand and press down on the strengths. Or else my open strings will continue to ring, even if I take the rest of my fingers off. But if I play the same G hoard in bar form in order to mute the strings, all I have to do is release the pressure in my left hand. This makes it much easier to play interesting rhythms. The easiest way to demonstrate this isn't an upbeat rhythm. Upbeat rhythms are common in Latin music, especially, but she'll see them all over the place. An upbeat rhythm is where you play on the up beats instead of the down beats. So in a standard downbeat rhythm, I'll play on the one, 234 or the down beats. But in an upbeat rhythm, I'll play on the ends. That would be one end two and three and four. And now, often in this type of beat, you don't want to let your cord bring out because it ruins the feel of the rhythm. Instead, you want to pause the notes to accentuate the up beats. Now, if I do this with an open cord, it's kind of complicated. Motion is after strum the cord and then mute it with my right hand like this. This isn't so bad if it's slow, but when the speed goes up, it becomes pretty difficult to keep up. If I do the same thing with the G bar chord, it's pretty effortless because I just have to release some of the pressure on my left hand . Nothing has to move, and it's easy for both hands. Most common recent example of this is in a song like Esposito by Louis Fonzie. It's got a full, upbeat rhythm, and it's much easier to play with this with bar chords. Then, with open courts. You can see how that makes it much easier to play that kind of rhythm. So bar chords, often at a lot of extra room for creativity with riffs, because they're a lot more versatile. Those are the main advantages to bar chords and the calm pretty handy. So it's definitely something worth learning. Let's see if we can played Esposito. Move on in the next video when you're ready to try it out. 78. Lecture 79: DESPACITO PART 1: So we already learned the 1st 2 chords of this court progression our first quarters B minor and our second chords G major. Let's start by trying to switch between these two held performance each. 1234 Once you can do that, try playing each chord four times for one beach before switching. 1234 Move on to the next video where you can do that reasonably. 79. Lecture 80: DESPACITO PART 2: the next court. Adam is an A. Now you get to see the advantage of our courts. The A is the exact same finger pattern as a G shifted to friends down the fretboard. So your first finger's on the fifth spread and everything else is the same. Basic pattern is the record. Try and set this up, played string individually and see if you can get everything during out smoothly. Once you can do that, let's try adding that into the chord progression from the last video. Start with the B minor and play G major and then moved to a major. Please scored four times for one beat each before switching. Try this out until you get the hang of the corporation. 1234 80. Lecture 81: 6 STRING MINOR CHORDS: Let's take a quick break from death Sposito and take a look at another court shape with bar chords. Like I said earlier, there are a few different patterns that you could move anyone on the fretboard, and it makes a court. The four main patterns will use are the five string major court by three minor chord sixth string major court and the 63 minor core. So for both the five and six string chords, there's a major and a minor finger pattern. So far, we've seen the five string minor chord and the six string major. Let's take a look at the six string minor chord, so grab your six string G major court to make this minor chord. All you have to do is take off your second finger and bar that string and set so you'll plead playing the 1st 2nd 3rd and sixth string's all with your first finger on the left hand. That's a lot of strings to Bharat. Once the technique is the same as we've done for all our bars, though, place your finger flooding on the fretboard. Make sure the creases of your finger joints aren't on any of the strings you're playing, if possible to avoid and play the strange individually and until you figure out what's working and what isn't. Try and get all these strings ringing out nicely. Once that sounds good, try playing in a minor bar chord, which, as you can probably guess, is the exact same form is the G minor bar chord. Just to fret, step so convenient, consistent patterns are trying at each string. Ring out nicely and fix any mistakes you got. 81. Lecture 82: 5 STRING MAJOR CHORDS: So now you know the form of a six string major court, a six string minor chord and a five string minor chord. The G Minor and the A minor aren't in desperate Zito, but I wanted to show you the strict six string, minor chord form before moving on to the five string major chord because the five string major court is the hardest. So I wanted to give you a bit more practice before jumping into that. The loss pattern to do is a five string major. This one is not easy, and it's got some weird fingering. So expect that this one's gonna take you a while to get used to try five String D major court. Just like moving from the 16 major to the six train minor chord on Lee, One stream is different between the five stream major and the five Street minor chord. If we look at the core diagram for D Major, the only thing that's different from what would be a D minor is the second strip. The second string is one front higher on the D major court. Unfortunately, though, this makes fingering little a little tough. Are you ready to try it out. So for a five string major chord, we actually have to bar with two different fingers both the first finger and the third finger barred in this court. You're gonna take your first finger and bar the fifth stream and the first trip. Then you're gonna put the pinky on the second of seventh fret of the second. Strict. Now, here's the really challenging part. You can take your third finger on bar both the fourth and the third strings. So you gonna lay your third finger flat across both the strings, and you'll actually end up curling your finger in the reverse direction to make sure it avoids hitting the first string. Now you're probably thinking my finger doesn't bend like that. No one's ever does at the beginning minded. And I don't expect years to either. I did warn you in advance that bar chords will take quite a while to get used to. So try this for a bit of time and see if you get all the strings ringing out individually. This is a weird motion. So this court on its own might take you several days of practice, become used to Don't worry if it takes you a while to get down and take your time because we're gonna add it into our existing chord progression for Esposito in the next video. 82. Lecture 83: DESPACITO PART 4: okay. Hopefully, it took some time to get used to all these bar chord forms. They are challenging, but it's definitely worth it at the ends. Once you get comfortable with the courts and eventually they'll become second nature. So our final chord progression for Esposito is B minor, G de and a try holding each of these cords for four beats before switching to the next one . 1234 Uh, let's try this whole chord progression held for single beats in the next play Long videos. Take your time at each speed before moving up and see if you can work your way up to the full speed. Play along video as always. Don't worry if everything isn't exactly perfect as you play it because it sounds decent. That's good enough, and bar chords will take you a bit of time to get used to. So it's better to keep practicing and let your fingers develop their strength and coordination over time. Consistent progress is better than perfection and will keep you more motivated. Long term 83. Lecture 84: DESPACITO PART 4 SLOW PLAY ALONG: one to three. Four. Um uh. 84. Lecture 85: DESPACITO PART 4 MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 85. Lecture 86: DESPACITO PART 4 FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 86. Lecture 87: DESPACITO PART 5: Hopefully, you managed to get the chord progression going reasonably well. The last step is to add in our upbeat, strumming pattern we talked about earlier. We've been playing our chord progression on down beats. Now we're gonna do the exact same chord progression just on up beats instead. So this time you're gonna play on the end of every beat like we did earlier. We're going to strum up with their thumb for these courts. So this chord progression is gonna look like one and two and three and four. And then we'll switch the next chord and do the same one and two and three and four trial that play along videos next to see if you can get this up to speed. 87. Lecture 88: DESPACITO PART 5 SLOW PLAY ALONG: one to three four. 88. Lecture 89: DESPACITO PART 5 MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 89. Lecture 90: DESPACITO PART 5 FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 90. Lecture 91: DESPACITO PART 6: Okay, now that you can play the upbeat pattern we can add in our mutes or are cords held for a short period time, also known as playing staccato, the only thing you need to change here is to play the cord on. Then, on the next downbeat, you release the pressure from your court and it'll be the one issue you might come across is the sixth string ringing it on your five string bar chords. To stop this from happening, it's useful to mute the sixth string with your first finger. So what you want to do is slide the position of your first finger up just a little bit so that the six string can't play out. I do this for any chord with a string. I don't want to play because it means you could be less accurate with your right hand and still only play the strings you're trying to. If your first finger's intentionally mute in the sixties, you can struggle six strings with your right hand, but only the five you want to wring out well, actually ringing up. This is nice because it's hard to be really accurate with your strumming hand So try out this full chord progression with up beats and the music notes, and that's how you played Esposito. 91. Lecture 92: ADDING PERCUSSIVE HITS: now we could leave this here if we wanted to, but there are a few other things we can do to make this even more interest. The first of this is adding in percussive hits what we can do here since our strings air muted on the downbeat. Anyways, we can strum downwards with their second and third finger, and we'll get a percussive sound. None of the strings will ring out, so this will effectively add some sort of a drum rhythm with her guitar playing. It's kind of cool, I think. See if you can try and play this along with me. One to three, four 1234 one to three four. 92. Lecture 93: ALTERNATE WAYS TO USE FINGERSTYLE: another way we can achieve a similar effect in a more traditional finger style pattern is by finger picking the cords instead and using our percussive hit technique, we learned early in the course. If you pick the lowest four strings of each chord with your thumb and your 1st 2nd and third fingers an alternate that with a percussive hit, you don't need to release the bar chords and each downbeat because you're right. Handle. Mute the strings. Try this out by playing the lowest four strings of each chord and alternating with protest of hits one, 23 four. 93. Lecture 94: ADDING IN FINGERPICKING: now the benefit to using the more traditional finger style approach to this riff is that just like in an earlier section, of course, we can add in some finger Purcell patterns to our cords to make our if more interesting. If you listen closely to the actual song Esposito, you can hear that they're actually to guitarist Plane once playing the cords, and the other is playing a finger picked rhythm. So just how, like we learned to finger pick out songs in the last section, we could do the same thing to a song like this and the songs of Perfect Candidate for that . So the next play Long videos I'm initially have finger style version of this chord progression, something that would actually fit nicely with the actual song. One thing to remember is that even though I'm showing you a specific finger style pattern, most variations of playing different strings on each chord will sound pretty decent with the song. So the pattern I've made up is by no means the only thing you can do here 94. Lecture 95: SLOW PLAY ALONG: one to three four way . 95. Lecture 96: MEDIUM SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 96. Lecture 97: FULL SPEED PLAY ALONG: 1234 way. 97. Lecture 98: USING ALL TECHNIQUES: Now let's take the finger picking pattern we did in the last videos and add in some of our techniques from throughout the course. Let's try adding in some slides, hammer ons, pull offs and even some harmonics. To make a really cool finger picking pack, you'll be able to see how you can take a simple chord progression, then turn it into a finger pick pattern and then spice it up with some other cool techniques to make something really unique and really impressive sounding Remember is your practice in this one that it's pretty much the same pattern you just learned with some interesting little accents. Place throughout it and notice how even just a few subtle little accents can take it from something fairly standard something really cool. 1234 98. Lecture 99: SLOW PLAY ALONG: one to three four. 99. Lecture 100: MEDIUM PLAY ALONG: 1234 100. Lecture 101: FAST PLAY ALONG: 1234 101. Lecture 102: LET'S BRING IT ALL TOGETHER: now as a final conclusion to this course, let's take our three different parts the finger pick drift, the combination quarter and finger pick drift and our straight strummed chords and bring them all together to make a song. The song structure will repeat each section and a manner that would be similar. What you'd see in a full song. I think you'll find this full composition. It really nice to play. It doesn't follow the same song structures. The actual song that Esposito It's my personal interpretation of a similar song made the showcase off All the things you learn throughout this course, I wanted to leave you with a pretty cool tune. You can learn place so you can show off all your friends and family. You'll probably want to fall along with the downloadable tab and try this on your own a bunch before following along with the play along videos. But by the time you can play along with a full speed video, you should be pretty proud of what you've accomplished in this course 102. Lecture 103: FULL PLAY ALONG: 1234 103. Lecture 104: CONCLUSION: And with that, it's time for me to sign off. Hopefully, you've learned a lot on this course and excited about all the cool techniques. You complaining you should be able to learn a lot of really interesting songs now and hopefully got a few ideas. How to be creative with your guitar playing. You can come up with their own interpretations of socks, help you try and play around with things and see what cool stuff you can come up with. That being said, I love to see what you've learned through this course. It would be great if you sent a video of yourself playing one of the tunes recover in this course to my email address at Hurt at Fast Fingers academy dot com. Or even better, I'd love for you to send me a video of you playing a song you love, whether it's just your own interpretation, just like we did with Esposito. If you're feeling particularly adventurous or just the song as it was written, it's always rewarding seeing what my students can come up with after they've been through the course, because in online courses you don't have a lot of interaction with your students. So it's really exciting for me to see toe actually see the real people that go for my course. If you do send in a video and are interested in being featured as a testimonial on my site or being featured in my newly launched its rampage, I'd love to give you some personal promotion. I can give you a showed out on my account so that other people have the opportunity to your seals. Is music has meant to be shared, and performing for others is one of the most fun things you can do is a musician, but that you choose to do this or not. I hope you've learned a lot on this course, and I hope you're proud of the new skills you get. You're pretty proficient finger style guitarist by this point, and that's a fun place to be. So good bye for now on Hopefully see you again soon