Figure Drawing Basics - The Male Figure | Kyle Petchock | Skillshare

Playback Speed


  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x

Figure Drawing Basics - The Male Figure

teacher avatar Kyle Petchock, Kyle Petchock Art

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

6 Lessons (48m)
    • 1. Course Intro

      3:38
    • 2. Lesson 1: The Head

      9:56
    • 3. Lesson 2: The Torso

      8:31
    • 4. Lesson 3: Arms and Legs

      10:34
    • 5. Lesson 4: Hands and Feet

      8:35
    • 6. Lesson 5: The Full Figure

      6:49
  • --
  • Beginner level
  • Intermediate level
  • Advanced level
  • All levels
  • Beg/Int level
  • Int/Adv level

Community Generated

The level is determined by a majority opinion of students who have reviewed this class. The teacher's recommendation is shown until at least 5 student responses are collected.

1,855

Students

11

Projects

About This Class

Hey everyone!  In this drawing course I’ll be showing you how to sketch the male figure.  We’ll first break it all down into sub lessons, each focusing on a different area of the anatomy (for example, one video lesson will cover drawing the head and facial features).  The last video will then tie it all together to draw a simple pose, using all the information covered in the previous lessons.  At the end of the course, your assignment will be to take what you learned and sketch your own character.  You can be as creative as you’d like with the appearance and outfit.  It can be your favorite superhero, or a character you make up.  The choice is up to you.  Thank you so much, have fun, and Keep Persevering!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Kyle Petchock

Kyle Petchock Art

Teacher

Hello, I'm Kyle Petchock and welcome to my Skillshare channel!  I'm a freelance artist who specializes in digital illustration / comic art, and I started this freelance journey just over three years ago. However, this didn't happen overnight.  Breaking into the art world is no easy feat.  It requires years of practice, patience, and most importantly, Perseverance to push through challenges.  Always believe in yourself, because if you do, you'll take the inspired action required to move you one step closer toward your goal, even if they're baby steps (yes, those count too). 

My personal mantra is 'Keep Persevering,' which also stands for my initials (KP).  More importantly, I use this motto to let aspiring artists know that even a normal guy who spent... See full profile

Class Ratings

Expectations Met?
  • Exceeded!
    0%
  • Yes
    0%
  • Somewhat
    0%
  • Not really
    0%
Reviews Archive

In October 2018, we updated our review system to improve the way we collect feedback. Below are the reviews written before that update.

Why Join Skillshare?

Take award-winning Skillshare Original Classes

Each class has short lessons, hands-on projects

Your membership supports Skillshare teachers

Learn From Anywhere

Take classes on the go with the Skillshare app. Stream or download to watch on the plane, the subway, or wherever you learn best.

Transcripts

1. Course Intro: Oh, hey there. I wasn't about to get started on a sketch, but before I do, let me ask you this. Are you a beginner looking Teoh improve in the area that you're drawing? Or perhaps you are an intermediate artist seeking of a fresh, of course from into perspective, If you answer, guess that either of these then you're in the right place. I'm Chuck and I will be your instructor. What a wonderful world of figure growing of a full time freelance artist who is trained in graphic design and hurtful part. But I mostly specialized in illustration comical garden drawing has been a huge passion of mine for my entire life and my own personal. Our journey began when I was just seven years old. I started out with your typical number, two pencil and a piece of paper, but then eventually graduated to my very first wake on drawing tablet. In place after high school, I decided to attend college, but I didn't go to impossible because I wanted to swim competitively. And typically, art schools don't have any sports teams in college. I studied the art of commercial design because at the time I thought it would be a highly marketable skill. And who doesn't want a job after college? Right. This, however, was not the case, because after I graduated with a B A, it took me nearly 13 months to get my career started. During this entire time, I face constant rejections, disappointments, emotional turmoil and even fell into depression. But despite all of this, I kept pushing and didn't give up. Then I finally got my first job to a graphic design work. What, Working this job, However, I suddenly realized that my talents were more well suited for a career in illustration. So after being at that job for just eight months, I left to pursue freelancing full time, which was initiated by a surprise opportunity with horrible and then eventually getting into coming. It'll just don't write to me. And even though that leaves afraid, terrified me. I knew that somewhere down the road, through intuition, everything would fall into place and work out perfectly. And so far it has. I tell you this because you may be facing the same or similar challenges with your own passion, but I want you to keep for securing if you follow me on either Instagram or Facebook. You'll see that it's my personal mantra, and my hope is that it's just inspiring for you guys. So with that being said, I welcome you on this dirty to becoming a better artist. You've already taken an amazing first step in my first ever. Still, Sure, of course I'm gonna walk you guys through my process on drawing the male figure. Each lesson will focus on in part of the male anatomy. And then, in the final video lesson, we're gonna bring it all together to construct a simple pose. I also have a class project for your best. Complete at the end of the course is, Well, I also wanted to get you guys to pre specs on. So the tools that I use when doing my arm so I work on a week comes in T 22 inch screen display. Along with using the program is called the Water Schedule and thes two programs can be used and which makes them the perfect pair of traditional drawing. Thank you guys so much for choosing this force. It really means a lot to be so, but further do. Let's get started 2. Lesson 1: The Head: everyone in this video lesson, I'm gonna be covering my process on drawing the head and facial futures. I'll be showing you that a sketch the mail had using simple, basic shapes the actor replacement of the eyes, nose, mouth and ears. And we'll even go with a little bit into sketching the head at different dynamic angles. We'll also do a bit of experimentation with various head shapes as well as facial hair and hairstyles. So with that being said, let's not right into the video, the first example we're going to do here is gonna be the head from the front view. So first, what we're gonna do is draw a simple circle and then draw vertical line down the center to represent the line of symmetry and then next place a horizontal line halfway down between the center of the circle and the bottom of the circle. Draw another line for where the nose is gonna be placed and begin drawing the front plane of the face by starting with the forehead up top and continuing downward with the cheekbones and then finish with the jawline. After we've done this, we're gonna throw in the ears. What should be the same with as the space between the high line and the nose line. And then we're going to draw in the neck the neck muscles, which point downward towards the collarbone and the tops of the trapezius muscles. Next schedule, line for the mouth and then construct the eye sockets as well as the nose. Think of the nose as a diamond shape and also at the crease above the eye sockets as well. Next, we're going to throw in the eyeballs. First, though, we're going to sketch a vertical line up from the nostrils as well as a slanted line from the same starting point outwards on either side Towards the end of the eye sockets, The space between these lines is where the eyes will be placed. Okay, now we're gonna go on to find the mouth a little bit more, and I'm also just gonna lightly sketch in some of the facial muscles that are responsible for a lot of different patient expressions. After we've placed these circles for the eyes were going to now draw the islands. Now you want to remember that the eyeballs are three dimensional spears, so you want to imagine the island's wrapping around them next draw and the pupils, and begin adding some details to the years in addition to refining the jaw line a little bit and the cheekbones Okay, the last few steps are going to be to step in the eyebrows and almost going to start erasing some of these rough guidelines. Because now that we've built all of the facial features, the rough guides are no longer needed, so they could just be removed all together and then draw the hairline. Also, we're going to throw in a simple hairstyle. And when I'm drawing dark hair characters, I like to just fill in thes space of the hair with light shade of gray. Okay, the next example is gonna show the head from the side view. So first, much like we did in the previous example, sketch a circle. And then, instead of drawing the vertical line of symmetry down the center, we're going to sketch a vertical line not in the exact center of the head, a little bit to the left, and this is gonna be where the ear is gonna go next. Rough out the year itself and draw two lines to show where the eye and nose there gonna be placed. Similar to how we did in the first example. After we've done that, we're then going to sketch in the jaw line along with that front plane for the face, the cheekbone area, and then we're gonna draw in the neck and the neck muscles. Next, begin constructing eye socket and the nose along with the mouth upper and lower lips, the chin and the nostril. Place a circle for the I, which should sink back into the skull a bit and then draw the islands from the side view the I will appear like a triangle pointing to the left and then next add details to the ear . Okay? And now the last few things that were going to do here are sketch in the high brown and the hairline, like we did in the first example. Refined the jaw area and the neck a bit more. And I'm also gonna erase a lot of those guidelines that we laid down initially because now that all the facial features are set in, there's no need for them anymore. Okay? And now the third example, we're gonna sketch here is going to show the head from the back view. So first, we're gonna start with the top of the torso and the neck. I like to do this because it just allows me to know how to place the skull accurately. And speaking of which, we're gonna draw a circle for the head once again, like we've done in the previous two examples. Okay, after we've done this, we're gonna draw in the ears and any visible parts of the jaw that are showing, and then next, we're gonna draw in the hair, and I'm gonna fill it in with, like, shade of gray. Because, as I said, when I'm drawing dark haired characters in the sketch form, I like to just fill it in. So that way, I know later on what color the hair is gonna be. Okay, Next. What we're going to do is explore three different dynamic angles, showing the head in different positions. So the 1st 1 we're gonna do here is going to show the head looking up and being viewed from a lower angle. I'm just going to speed up this part of the process of it just to save some time But basically when the head is viewed from a low angle, the placement of the years will shift to below the eyes. Also, since the I sink back into the skull, you'll see the top part of the inner eye socket more clearly from this angle, and you'll also see the jaw line change shape and you'll see underneath the nose as well. Drawing heads from different angles like this definitely takes practice, and it may not happen as quickly as you want, but persistence and practices key for improvement. OK, so this next example that I'm going to demonstrate is gonna show the head looking down into the side. In examples like this, it actually helps me to start with a three dimensional box rather than a circle, because from really dynamic angles such as this, it helps for me to sketch the box. So that way I know exactly where that front plane for the face is going to go and where exactly the ears are gonna be placed, as well as the neck muscles. From this angle, the placement of the year will actually ship to above the eye line, since the entire head is pointing down because the eyes sink back into the eye sockets. They'll also be covered partially by the eyebrows. You'll only see a little bit of the eyes, but you won't get the full view as if you were looking at the head from a low angle, like in the first example or from straight on. Also, pay attention to how the neck muscles interact when the head is being positioned this way. And then in this third example, I'm going to be sketching the head from the back view, and it's gonna be slightly looking over the shoulder. So, as I stated earlier in the back view example, we're going to start with the top of the torso and built up from there. And then we're going to start building the skull from the top of the neck in addition to placing the year and then following all the previous steps that we covered in the beginning of the video. Okay, And now, before we close out this lesson, I'm also gonna cover exploring different head shapes. So I've gone and sketched out three heads here, each using a different overall shape for the skull. What I'm gonna do here is I'm going to take this layer and lower the opacity, and then I'm going to just draw in the overall shapes above this layer. So this first example on the left, the head shape is gonna be more square. But again, we're following the same steps that we covered in that very first example showing the face from the front view. We're now just exaggerating some of the features and changing the overall shape. The next example is going to show had being more of an oval shape. And again, you can also experiment with different hairstyles, some facial hair. I included a little mustache on this guy. And then the third example, I decided to sketch a younger child, and the head shape is gonna be a lot more round. And now when you're drawing a young kid or a teenager, the facial features are gonna be a lot softer. So you're not going to see those defined cheekbones or that sharp bridge of the nose like we did in the 1st 2 examples. Everything is gonna be very rounded and soft to show the young age of the child You did it . Congratulations on completing the first lesson of this course. By now, you should have a much better understanding up drawing the head and facial features before we move on. Just a quick recap. So when you're starting your sketch, always keep in mind to begin using simple and basic shapes. Remember the accurate placements and proportions of very special features and do a little experimentation with different dynamic angles. Well, thank you guys. So much for watching. I hope you learned a thing or two and I will see you in the next lesson. Take care. 3. Lesson 2: The Torso: Hey, there, guys, in this Listen, I'm gonna be covering my process on sketching email, torso and hips. We'll be showing you three different examples of the torso, one being from the front view, another from the side view, and then 1/3 example from the back. Also be demonstrating a few different examples of the torso in a side twisting motion while also breaking down the forms into simple and basic shapes. I'm really excited for this one, and I hope you guys are too. So with that being said, let's get right to it. Okay, guys, let's get started. This first example is gonna be showing the torso from the front. You. So first sketch a vertical line. This is gonna be the line of action or the spine followed by horizontal line up top to show where the shoulders are gonna go next, sketching oval for the rib cage and then sketch an upside down triangle to show the lat muscles in the back. All right, so next we're going to throw in two circles to represent the shoulders, create the midsection and dropbox for the hips. Next, you want to form the abdominal section and the pectoral muscles along with the traps up top and the neck as well as the collarbone. Next steps are to divine the rib cage. You also want to start to define the oblique muscles on the sides as well. And at the small muscles beneath the pecs called the psoriasis interior. These are not part of the rib cage itself, but they simply rest on the exterior of it. Okay, Next, What I'm gonna do is quickly throw in the upper arms on the upper parts of the legs so you guys can see how they will connect to the torso itself. And then I'm gonna start defining the shoulders here, which are also known as the deltoids. Now the shoulders are split into three sections of muscle, but from the front view, you really only see that front section and a little bit of the middle section. The last thing we're going to do with this example is measure to make sure everything is proportioned out correctly. So I'm gonna quickly throw in the head. And now, eh? Fully grown male adults is gonna have a torso that's going to be about three headlines tall . So I'm just gonna measure out here and sketch a couple of heads next to it to make sure everything lines up properly. And it looks like we're good here. Okay. Example Number two. We're going to show the torso from assigned you. So Step one is start with the spine. But it's not going to be pointing straight up and down when the torso is standing upright. Naturally, the spine is going to be curbing a little bit. So you want to draw curve blind, followed by an oval for the rib cage once again and then a circle to show where the shoulder is gonna go. After we've done this, we're going to sketch the midsection and draw a box for the hips, much like we did in example One. Okay, next we're going Teoh sketch the pec muscle to the abdominal section, traps and the neck, as well as defining the lattes and the shoulder blade for the back. I'm also gonna throw in the head as well, so you guys can see how it connects to the torso itself. Now we're going to start defining the rib cage at the small sore actus interior muscles just beneath the pectoral and then we're gonna start defining the oblique muscles in the midsection. Okay, The last thing we're going to do with this example is begin defining the deltoid muscles. As I said before the Delta, what is split into three main sections which you can really get a good view of from the side. And then I'm also gonna throw in the upper part of the leg so you guys can see how it connects to the hip. I'll be going into the leg muscles in more detail in another video coming up. Okay. For example, Number three, we're going to sketch the torso from the back view. So we're going to repeat the first few steps that we went over in the 1st 2 examples and also be sure to include those two circles for the shoulders, the midsection and the box for the hip area. After I've done that here, I'm going to just quickly throw in the upper arms, upper parts of the leg and the neck and head. So that way you guys can see how they all connect to the torso from the back view. Okay? And now we're gonna get into some of the main back muscle groups. So first, we're going to sketch the trapezius muscles, the shoulder blades as well as the shoulders. Okay, Now that I've gone and done that, I'm gonna start to define the lat muscles a little bit more as well as the oblique muscles that are on the signs. Now, the last few things that were going to do here in this example our sketch in the lower back area, the tailbone and the bulk of the move muscles, you can picture the group muscles as looking like butterfly wings. It's just an easy thing to do to simplify the structures even more. Okay, now that we've sketched the torso from three different points of view, we're gonna move into some dynamic angles, specifically focusing on the torso twisting. So we're going to start by drawing a three dimensional rectangle here, and we want to imagine the entire torso like rectangle. I'm also just gonna throw in the center line. Now, what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna take that same rectangle, and we're going to imagine and twisting so you really can get an idea off. The dynamics are going to be like when we actually go to sketch the torso itself in a twisting motion. All right, so now we're going to sketch the torso twisting, and we're gonna basically follow all the steps that we covered in those 1st 3 examples. Except this time you want to keep in the back of your mind that three dimensional rectangle twisting. And you also want to remember all the basic shapes and forms that we discussed in the first examples. But now you want to imagine them in more of a 3/4 view. Just always go back to that center line of action and rotate everything. Okay, so I've also gone and thrown in the upper arms upper leg and the neck and head so that what you guys can see, what happens to the shoulders, neck muscles and pecks when these limbs are in motion? And in some cases, the torso twisting is a direct result of the arms or legs moving forward or backward, as well as the neck turning to the side. The second twisting example here will show the torso from the back view again. We want to break down the entire Corso as a simple three D rectangle, which I'm gonna show here real quick and then twist it around that center line of action. As with the first twisting sketch we explored previously, we're going to follow all the steps that we covered in examples one through three of the video, if you need to, you can rewind and rewatch my steps for those examples. If you're still having some trouble constructing some of the muscles in this example, I'm also going to include the upper arms, legs and neck and head to further illustrate the motion, as I did with the previous twisting example. Another thing to keep in mind is that when the upper like is moving back as shown here, the glute muscle is going to flex similar to the way the bicep muscle bulges out when flexing fantastic work. Congratulations for completing Lesson two of this course. By now, you should have a much clearer understanding of drawing the male torso and tips from a variety of different angles before we move for without what do we do with recap will be covered here, So when you're drawing the torso and tips, you want to always visualize the main forms and muscle groups with simple shapes you want Some? Also, make sure you have a clearly defined line of action before started to build the forms. Otherwise, notice the spine and you want also work the practice, drawing the torso, hips from a variety of different angles. Thank you guys so much for watching. I really appreciate it, and I hope you learned a thing or two. I will see you on the next video and take care. 4. Lesson 3: Arms and Legs: everyone in this next video. Listen, I'm gonna be discussing my process or drawing the arms and legs. I'll cover both of them separately while talking about gesture, breaking the forms down into simple and basic shapes. And it will even explorer of you examples showing each in various positions that will show the muscles in action. So that being said it, why don't we get started first, I'm going to sketch the arm from the front view, so we're going to start with a circle to represent the shoulder placement or the deltoid. And then we're gonna sketch a smooth line and draw a circle halfway down where the elbow joint will go, Then draw another rough circle at the end of the forearm to represent the hand policemen. You won't always make sure that you nail down the gesture of the armed first before going in with details or muscle structures because, as they say, forms fellow gesture. And if you don't know the gesture down and you go in with details too fast, then your sketches gonna look very static and stiff. But if you begin with the gesture and then at the details, the forms are gonna look a lot more fluid and natural. Okay, now that we have the overall gesture of the arms sketched out, we can now begin to go in when building some of the muscle structures. So first about the bicep and then draw the super nature muscle directly. Blow it on the left side of your arm, followed by the flex er Carpi radio Alice muscle on the right side of the forearm. And then you're gonna sketch in the small for nater terrorist muscle just above that, OK? And the next you're going to sketch the extent, sir Carpi Radio Alice, longest muscle on the left side of the forearm along with the tricep, And you're going to define the Dell Point muscles. Remember, the deltoid is split into three sections of muscle, but from the front view, you're only gonna see that front section and a little bit of the metal work. And we're also just gonna rough in the hand real quick so you guys can get a general idea of the placement and positioning, but we're gonna cover hands in more detail in the hands and feet. Video coming up. Okay, Moving on. Example Number two is gonna show the arm from the side view. So just like we did in the first example, I'm going to start with that circle to show the shoulder placement, and then I'm gonna sketch of fluid line. And since reviewing arm from the side, the light is gonna be a little bit curved because the arm, naturally falling, is never gonna appear straight up and down. It's gonna have a little bit of a curve to it. So, like we did with the front view, we're going to establish that fluid gesture before we move on to adding any details. Now that we've established the fluid gesture, let's start building some of the muscles again. Start with roughing off the bicep and then next steps the super Nader muscle directly below it. Followed by the extent, sir Carpi, Radio Alice, longest muscle and the extent, sir Digit or, um, next, we're gonna throw in the tricep muscle in the back and then the elbow joint. Next. What I'm gonna do is define the deltoid muscles by splitting up the main form into those three sections of muscle. Now that we're viewing the arm from the side, you'll be able to see all three sections clearly and like we did in the last example. I'm just gonna throw in the hand, bro. Quick so you guys can get a sense off the positioning. Okay, now, example number three. We're going to sketch the arm from the back of you. So like we did in the 1st 2 examples, we want to start with that fluid gesture. I'm also gonna rough in a part of the back of the torso. So you guys, we'll see how it connects. Overall, Now that we have the gesture down, let's start building the muscle structures. So first, we're going to start by defining those deltoid muscles up top. And I'm also just going to start defining the shoulder blade a little bit, followed by the tricep muscles we're gonna add in the elbow joint. And then we're going to sketch in the super Nature muscle and the flexor carpi, Grady Alice. But we're only going to see the back views of these muscles because they wrap around to the front of the arm. And then the last thing I'm going to do is sketch in the extent, sir, digital or muscles and throw in a rough sketch of the hand. Okay, Now we're gonna explore the arm and a few different dynamic poses showing the muscles in action. But basically the key things to keep in mind Our When the arm flexes forward, as shown in this first example, the bicep will contract and bolt out while the tricep expands. Same thing goes, for example, number two here. But this time the arm is gonna be flexing in a different direction. But the same thing applies. The bicep is gonna bulge and contract while the tricep expands. And then, in this third example here, we're going to use a little bit of four shortening to show the arm reaching out. And you want to remember that the super nater and flex er carpet radio Alice muscles point downward towards the center of the palm. So when the arm is rotating, as shown here with the pum opening those muscles, they're going to rotate as well. All right, now that we're done with the arms, we're gonna move on to drawing the legs. We're gonna begin by sketching the light from the front view. So start by sketching a box for the hips along with the lower portion of the oblique muscles and the growing area. Next, rough out the upper and lower legs with smooth, gestural wines similar to what we did in the arms portion of this lesson. Because, remember, forms followed jester. Next, begin shaping the upper and lower leg. After this, you want to define the kneecap and sketch the the fastest X Turness and fastest internist muscles on the upper leg. Directors for Morris will then be placed in the middle above the knee. Following that, you're gonna draw the muscle that flows from the hips down to the lower leg cult, the sartorius and the tensor Fassi a latte on the outermost region of the upper leg and lastly, sketched the calf muscles on the lower leg along with the Tibby Alice interior. Now the left side of the calf muscle will actually appear to be a bit higher than the calf muscle on the right side. Okay, An example. Number two here, we're gonna draw the length from the side view. So first sketch that box for the hips, just like we did in example, one. But from this angle, keep in mind that this box is going to be tilting downwards slightly and also sketched the circle for the hip joint. After this, proceed withdrawing the upper leg and the lower leg from the side view. The front of the upper leg and back of the lower leg will be curved, while inversely the back of the upper leg and front of the lower leg will be straight. Next, you want to rough in the foot and sketch the fastest external ist. Draw in the kneecap, the tensor Bessie A. Let A and directors for Morris muscles on the upper leg. Then you want to sketch the side of the glute muscle over the hip joint and drawing the calf muscle on the lower leg. Also, be sure to include part of the biceps femoris that will be visible behind the upper leg. All right, moving on. The third example is going to show the length from the back view so again to begin drawing that box to represent the hips. And next you want to form the glute muscles, as we discussed in the torso slash hips lesson. Imagine the glute muscles as butterfly wings. After this sketch, the upper and lower legs with those same fluid, gestural lines that we covered in the previous two examples. And also you want to rough out the back of the foot as well. And lastly, you want to draw the Sema tendon, Asus and bicep femoris muscles on the upper part of the leg along with the calf muscles on the lower leg. All right, now we're gonna go ahead and sketch the legs in a few different dynamic action poses. So when you're sketching the legs in different positions, you want to keep in mind all of the step that we covered in those 1st 3 examples. But this time we're gonna be focusing more on the gesture of the post. So, like I stated earlier in the video, you want to really focus first on those smooth, blowing, gestural lines before going in and adding any detail. This way, the Post will look a lot more fluid and natural, and it won't look a stiff as withdrawing any part of the human figure in different positions. It definitely takes a lot of practice and patients. It's something that you may not get a grasp of immediately, but with enough time in practice, you will, in fact, get the concepts down and you'll be able to eventually then draw them for memory. Awesome job. Congratulations for completing less than three of this course by now. You should definitely have a much better understanding of how to construct the arms and legs before we move forward. Let's just do a quick little recap. So when you're beginning to sketch the arms of the legs, you want to remember that forms follow gesture, Meaning you want to start with those those smooth, fluid, gestural lines before adding detail. Because if you start with the detail first, your forms are gonna look very rigid and stiff, so always begin with gesture. Next, you want to remember, as always, to break everything down into simple and basic shapes and then gradually build detail upon them. And lastly, you know, just explore different positions and angles for both, as this will increase your knowledge and ability to draw the arms and legs more accurately . So thank you guys so much for watching. I really appreciate it, and I hope you learn something from this. I will see you in the next lesson. Take care 5. Lesson 4: Hands and Feet: Hey, guys, in this video lesson, I'm gonna be talking about my process for sketching the hands and feet. That was without a doubt that the hands and feet are challenging to draw. But when you go and break them down into basic shapes and forms in order to simplify complex structures, they could actually become a lot easier and, quite frankly, a lot of fun. Two. Draw as well, so I'll be showing you each from you basic positions. And then I'm gonna draw some examples, showing both in more dynamic angles. Okay, let's get started here. Example. Number one is going to show the hand from the front view Palm facing forward. So first we're going to sketch a square and then divide it into four sections. Next sketch a triangle protruding from the lower left quadrant and a curved line in the same quadrant near the center of the bum. Wait another inversely lying in the JC hundreds and then directing thing, Then draw on. I saw Seles triangle above the top two quadrants and then create that same angle in the middle of the pump. Next, draw four circles up top to show the placement for the base of the fingers also sketch another circle on that lower left triangle to show the placement of the thumb as well. Okay, next, we're going to sketch some lines of action for the fingers and the thumb, and then we're gonna draw the fingertips and a circle on each finger and the thumb to show the joints, then connect the lines to form the fingers themselves. And remember, the pointer and ring fingers will be approximately the same life, with the middle finger being the longest and the piggy being the shortest. All right, now an example. Number two. We're going to sketch the hand from the opposite side. So, like we did with example one. Start with that box for the Palm and then sketch that triangle on the side of the lower right corner and the I saw Silly trying to up top. Draw the wrist and forearm and then draw small circles for the knuckles. Next, draw lines for the fingers and form the fingertips, along with circles with lower finger joints. And then, after that, connect the lines to form the fingers. Lastly, we're going to draw the tendons court. You're gonna connect from the knuckles and point downward toward the center of the wrist. Okay, now we're gonna sketch the hand from the side view. So first thing is to begin with a rectangle and then below it, we're going to sketch a triangle for the placement of the thumb. Next, we're going to draw a circle at the end of the rectangle and on the triangle to represent the base of the finger and the thumb. Next, we're going to draw the wrist, followed by lines of action for both the thumb and the pointer finger. Following that, we're gonna sketch a circle for the joint and then the finger tip and tip of the thumb. Next, we're going to then connect the fingers much like we did in the 1st 2 examples and following. We're gonna just do a little bit of refinement around the area of the thumb and the top of the hand. I'm gonna isolate the finger and break it down into simple shapes so you can think of the finger as a whole as a cylinder, and then when the finger is bending in any position except backwards because that would hurt, um, you want to start with that line first and then create the fair tip and that lower joints and then simply connect the lines as we did with those 1st 2 examples. All right, now, the last thing we're going to do here is Explorer the hand in a variety of different positions. So when you're sketching the hand and i n a dynamic pose, imagine that box from examples one and two, which is the palm. But picture it in three D forms, so it's gonna be a three dimensional box. Then draw those four circles for the finger placement and then the triangle on the side where the thumb will be placed in some examples here, the palm is gonna be folding, so there's gonna be a crease down the center. And when this happens, all of the fingers and even the thumb joint are going to shift and move as well. So if you can perfect the steps from examples one and two where we explore the hand from the front and back, you you you should have no problem trains lighting all of the forms into three dimensional terms. Now that we've completed the hand portion of this lesson, we're gonna move on to the foot. First, we're going to draw the foot from the front view, so start by sketching the lower leg and then a circle for the ankle bone. The inner ankle bone is always gonna be placed higher than the outer ankle bone. Next, sketch the upper part of the foot and two circles for the foremost balls of the foot. The outer circle will always be smaller than the inner circle. After that, we're going to sketch the toes. The big toe is always placed on in the inner part of the foot and then the rest of the toes descendant length as we move to the outer foot. Lastly, we're gonna draw the tendons by connecting them from the toes upward toward the ankle bone . All right, now we're going to sketch the foot from the side view. So again, like an example, Number one. Start withdrawing the lower leg and that circle for the ankle bone. Then you're going to sketch a circle for the back ball of the foot and sketch a downward facing rectangle for the top part of the foot. Next, draw that smaller circle for the front ball of the foot and then sketch the big toe. Since reviewing the foot from the inner side, the other toes will be hidden behind the big toe and won't be visible. Now we're going to sketch the foot from the back view, so begin by again drawing the lower leg and a ball to the ankle. Remember, as we discussed an example, Number one, the inner ankle bone is always gonna be higher than the outer ankle bone. Lastly, you're gonna draw the ball of the heel and then sketch the visible part of the front of the foot. Since the foot is being viewed from the back, we don't have to worry about sketching any of the toes. Now that we've discussed the general basics of the foot, we're gonna explore some dynamic poses. When drawing the foot in various positions, think of the ankle bone as a hinge that rotates forward and backwards. When the toes are pointing all the way forward, the top of the foot will be approximately in line with leg. When only the front balls of the foot are making contact with the ground. There will be a bend as the heel lifts off the ground. I've gone ahead and speed up this footage a little bit to save some time. But if you can master the concepts that we discussed in the 1st 3 examples, you'll be able to easily sketch the foot from any position possible. Fantastic work. Congratulations for completing Lesson four of this course. By now, you should be able to draw the hands and feet with more ease and not get so overwhelmed with how complex they both are. Let's do a little recap before we move forward to the next lesson. So when you're drawing the hands and feet, always, always, always remember to break structures down into simple shapes because this is going to make your life a whole lot easier, and it's gonna make drawing into a lot more enjoyable. And then you also want to practice exploring both of them from different angles and positions. And once you have the basic process down kind of break everything into simple shapes, you will be able to draw them in a variety of positions. Thank you guys, so so much for watching hope you learned a thing or two from this one, and I will see you in the next video lesson. Take care 6. Lesson 5: The Full Figure: everyone in this final video lesson. We're going to take everything that we discussed in the previous videos, and we're gonna title together. So I'll be drawing a full male character while talking about the gesture of the pose as well as basic proportions. I'm also going to detail the schedule, the end by tightening up the lighter. It also stay tuned for the end of the video when I'll be discussing the class project. All right, thank you guys so much. And let's do this. Okay, guys, let's get started here before we move on, though, if you're still having any trouble with any of the concepts covered in previous video lessons, I would advise to go back and watch them again and continue practicing until you've got the concepts nailed down before moving on to constructing the full pose. We're going to make this pose a bit dynamic rather than just a static standing pose. And we're also gonna tilt the hips a little bit to put more of the weight on that right leg . Next, we're gonna likely rough out the overall gesture before we start building the forms and muscles. One thing to keep in mind when you're sketching the pose. If you jump into details too quickly, the overall poses gonna look very stiff and static. But if you focus on the gesture first, you can then build the details on top of it, and the overall poses gonna look a lot more smooth and fluid. Okay, after the rough guidelines are placed in and the gesture is looking good, start by constructing the torso with the rib cage, pectorals, shoulders, abdominals, obliques muscles and the hips. After we built up the torso here, we're gonna then move up to the head and build the trap muscles in the neck and then the head itself, using everything that we covered in the head and facial features lesson. And I'm also going to give this character here a little bit of an expression, but I'm gonna cover expressions and a lot more detail in the future video lesson, then move down to drawing the arm muscles along with hands again, like we did with the overall figure. Make sure that the gesture and the arms is smooth and fluid before adding any details. The last thing that we're going to do here, this gets the leg muscles and also construct the feet. And remember, forms follow gesture. So be sure the gesture is fluid and smooth before moving on to building any of the forms. Now that we've completed the entire pose, we're then gonna measure to make sure everything is proportional. So when you're sketching a fully grown male figure, it's gonna be about eight head lengths toll. So I'm just gonna measure on the side here, and I'm going to sketch in red, ahead of top, and then I'm just gonna duplicate that circle eight times. And we're just going to check our work to make sure that everything is proportioned out correctly. And then now what I'm gonna do here is simply turn the sketch layer on a lighter rapacity and create a new layer over it, where I'm gonna then refine and detail the liner and I'm gonna speed this up a bit to save some time. But I just wanted to show you guys what my process is after the sketching stage. - Amazing job. Congratulations on completing this course. Thank you guys. So much for watching. And I hope you learn a lot from these video lessons on drawing the male figure well, putting these concepts into action yourselves. Just keep in mind that when you're practicing, you may not get it down the first time for the 10th time for the 30th time, or maybe even the 50th time. But that's the point. Artistic progress is supposed to be a marathon, not a sprint, and change and progress will not happen immediately. It's a long process that requires you to be patient and always continue trying consistently . But if you can learn from your mistakes, persevere and be in it for the long haul and you will see improvement eventually. So stick with it. Always try one more time and never quit. Now that being said, I have a little assignment for you. I want you guys to take everything that you've learned in this course and create your own character. You can be as creative as you like. With the appearance and outfit. You can draw your own superhero or maybe character from your favorite TV show, or you can draw character that's completely made up. After you've completed your work, please upload your files to the class project galleries so that way myself and other people can lead constructive feedback. Upload your file as a J peg, whether it's additional file or whether it's a photo of your work. If you choose to complete the project traditionally again, Thank you guys so, so much for watching it really means a lot to me and until next time, keep persevering.