Everyday English for ESL | Jeffrey Hill | Skillshare
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12 Lessons (55m)
    • 1. Introduction to the Class

      1:52
    • 2. Fast Food Order

      3:53
    • 3. At the Doctor's

      4:28
    • 4. Hair Appointment

      4:47
    • 5. Airport Check-in

      4:34
    • 6. Cookie Recipe

      5:36
    • 7. Returning Goods

      4:24
    • 8. The Weekend

      5:08
    • 9. Restaurant Meal

      5:06
    • 10. Changing Money

      5:06
    • 11. The Movies

      5:10
    • 12. My Daily Routine

      5:24
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About This Class

Do you already have a basic knowledge of English, but want to improve your ability to communicate in real-life situations? And do so in a fun, enjoyable way? Then Everyday English for ESL is just the class for you!

Each lesson contains a fully-animated dialogue, which presents the language you need to know in order to communicate successfully in English in a wide range of everyday situations.

All the audio material has been recorded by professional voice actors with British or American accents, and each class comes with a ten-page PDF full of extra resources and activities.

Meet Your Teacher

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Jeffrey Hill

English Trainer, Blogger, and Course Creator

Teacher

My name is Jeffrey Hill and I teach English at the EM Normandie Business School in Le Havre, France. Although I've lived in France since 1981, I was born and grew up in Plymouth, in the South West of England.

After obtaining a BA (Hons) degree in Hispanic Studies from Liverpool University, and a PGCE from Sheffield University, I spent two years teaching Spanish. I then obtained a Trinity College Licentiate Diploma in TESOL and worked as an ESL teacher in Spain for two years.

I've been working at the EM Normandie Business School since 1991, teaching general and business English, and preparing students for the TOEIC, TOEFL and IELTS exams. In 2004 I was awarded an MBA from Liverpool University.

In 2004, I started The English Blog, which now has over 9,000 posts and se... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction to the Class: hello and welcome to everyday English for E S L. A course for elementary to intermediate level learners of English. My name is Jeffrey Hill, and in this course you will learn the language. You need to deal with a variety of basic situations from everyday life, such as ordering fast food. Can I have Ah, double cheeseburger with fries, please. Making an appointment at the Han dresses. What do you need to have done? Well, I'd like to have my hair cut and styled and returning goods to a shop about them for my son . But they're too big. Each video lesson has a fully animated dialogue first without subtitles. Well, Doctor, I've got a sore throat and a bad cough and then with subtitles. Well, Doctor, I've got a sore throat and a bad cough. Listen and repeat activity. What shall we do this weekend? A listening comprehension passage check in is usually the first procedure for a passenger when arriving at an airport. As airline regulations require passengers to check in by certain times prior to the departure of a flight on the final section where you will be asked some questions about the lesson topic. What is your favorite festered restaurant and why? So If you want to improve your listening and speaking skills, learn over 500 words of vocabulary and have fun while you do it. This is the course for you. 2. Fast Food Order: welcome to make Burger. What can I get you today? Can I have Ah, double cheeseburger with fries, please? Sure. Would you like anything to drink? Yes. Off a large coke. Will that be all? Yes. Thinks. How much do I owe you? That comes to $5.50. Here you are. Thank you. Have a nice day. Hi. Welcome to make Burger. What can I get you today? Can I have Ah, double cheeseburger with fries, please. Sure. Would you like anything to drink? Yes. Off a large coke. Will that be all? Yes. Thinks. How much do I owe you? That comes to $5.50. Here you are. Thank you. Have a nice day, boy. Listen and repeat. Hi. Welcome to make burger. What can I get you today? Can I have Ah, double cheeseburger with fries, please. Sure. Would you like anything to drink? Yes, I have a large coke. Will that be all? Yes. Thinks. How much do I owe? Yeah, that comes to $5.50. Here you are. Thank you. Have a nice day. Four listening comprehension. Fast food restaurants are very popular with people who are in a hurry or who don't want to spend a lot of money. The fast food industry used to be dominated by hamburgers, but these days it's possible to find fast food chain specializing in many other types of food, such as pizza, pasta, chicken or fish. Although most fast food restaurants have seats for their customers, you will usually have to wait in line to place your order at the counter. Of course, many customers take their food away with them to eat elsewhere, and some fast food restaurants also have a drive thru service for motorists. Despite having a reputation for serving unhealthy food, most fast food restaurants now offer healthy options. Such a salads are fresh fruit. In spite of their recent difficulties, it looks like fast food restaurants are here to stay four questions. Now it's your turn to speak. I'm going to ask you a series of questions relating to the topic of this lesson. Pause the recording to give yourself time to answer, and don't just answer yes or no trying to give as much information as possible. How often do you eat in fast food restaurants? What is your favorite festered restaurant and Why? Why have fast food restaurants been so successful? What are some recent trends you've noticed in the fast food sector? Would you like to work in a fast food restaurant? 3. At the Doctor's: Good morning, Mrs Jones. What seems to be the problem? Well, Doctor, I've got a sore throat and a bad cough. I've also got a headache. How long have you had these symptoms? About four days now. On my feeling. Really tired too. It sounds like you've got the flu. Take two aspirin every four hours. You should also get lots of rest and drink plenty of fluids. If you don't feel better in a couple of days, give me a call. Thank you, Doctor Four. Good morning, Mrs Jones. What seems to be the problem? Well, Doctor, I've got a sore throat and a bad cough. I've also got a headache. How long have you had these symptoms? About four days now. On my feeling. Really tired too. It sounds like you've got the flu. Take two aspirin every four hours. You should also get lots of rest and drink plenty of fluids. If you don't feel better in a couple of days, give me a call. Thank you, Doctor Boy. Listen and repeat. Good morning, Mrs Jones. What seems to be the problem? Well, Doctor, I've got a sore throat and a bad cough. I've also got a headache. How long have you had these symptoms? About four days now on my feeling. Really tired too. It sounds like you've got the flu. Take two aspirin every four hours. You should also get lots of rest and drink plenty of fluids. If you don't feel better in a couple of days, give me a cool thank you, doctor. Listening comprehension. If you were feeling ill or have a medical problem, you can make an appointment to see the doctor. In Britain, the place went. Doctors see their patients, is called a surgery in America. It's a doctor's office. When you arrive for your appointment, the secretary or receptionist will probably ask you to wait in the waiting room until the doctor is ready to see you. When you finally get to see the doctor, he will usually begin by asking you to describe your symptoms. He may then give you an examination or take your blood pressure. For example, If the doctor knows what's wrong with you, he will give you some advice and perhaps prescribe some medicine. You will have to take the prescription to the chemists to get the medicine. Hopefully, you will get well soon questions. Now it's your turn to speak. I'm going to ask you a series of questions relating to the topic of this lesson. Pause the recording to give yourself time to answer. And don't just answer yes or no trying to give as much information as possible. How often do you go to the doctors? When and why did you last go to see the doctor? How are you feeling at the moment? Once the health service, like in your country, would you like to be a doctor? 4. Hair Appointment: Hello, citizens. Hair salon. Truly speaking. How may I help you? I'd like to make an appointment. Please. What do you need to have done? Well, I'd like to have my hair cut and styled. When can you come in? Do you have anything available for Saturday morning? Let me just look. Yes, we do. How about 10 45? That would be fine. Can you give me your name, please? Yes, it's Jolie. That's J O l I e. Thank you, Miss Jolie. We look forward to seeing you on Saturday. Hello, Citizens. Hair salon. Truly speaking. How may I help you? I'd like to make an appointment. Please. What do you need to have done? Well, I'd like to have my hair cut and styled. When can you come in? Do you have anything available for Saturday morning? Let me just look. Yes, we do. How about 10 45? That would be fine. Can you give me your name? Place? Yes, it's Jolie. That's J O l I e. Thank you, Miss Jolie. We look forward to seeing you on Saturday. Listen and repeat. Hello, citizens. Hair salon. Trudy speaking. How may I help you? I'd like to make an appointment, Please. What do you need to have done? Well, I'd like to have my hair cut and styled. When can you come in? Do you have anything available for Saturday morning? Let me just look. Yes, we do. How about 10 45? That would be fine. Can you give me your name, please? Yes, it's Jolie. That's J O L I E. Thank you, Miss Jolie. We look forward to seeing you on Saturday. Listening comprehension. Every woman knows how important it is to look after your hair. There's nothing worse than a bad hair day, especially if you have something special planned. How often you visit the hairdressers depends on the length and style of your hair. But the average British woman spends over a month of her life in the hairdresser's chair, according to a new study. The survey asked women how often they visit their hair dresses and how long they spend having their hair done. Over a year, an average woman spends just under 14 hours at the hair dresses, which works out of 36 days, or just over a month during the course of a lifetime. Visits include trips for cotton blow dry, which takes around minutes, and a full color, which takes 2.5 hours. Most will visit the Salam fur trim every six weeks, with hair being colored every three months. Questions. Now it's your turn to speak. I'm going to ask you a series of questions relating to the topic of this lesson. Pause the recording to give yourself time to answer. And don't just answer yes or no trying to give as much information as possible. How often do you go to the headdresses? When did you last visit the hair dresses? What did you have done? Describe your hair. What other words do you know for describing people's hair? 5. Airport Check-in: Good morning, sir. Where you flying to today? I'm booked on the 10. 30 flight to Rome. May I have your passport and ticket, please? Certainly. Here you are. That's fine. And are you checking any luggage? No, I just have this carrier. Okay. And would you prefer an aisle seat or a window seat? Window seat, please. All right, here's your boarding. Pass your flight boards at gate number 10. Thank you very much. You're welcome. Have a good flight. Good morning, sir. Where you flying to today? I'm booked on the 10. 30 flight to Rome. May I have your passport and ticket, please? Certainly. Here you are. That's fine. And are you checking any luggage? No, I just have this carry on. Okay. And would you prefer an aisle seat or a window seat window? See, Clues. All right, Here's your boarding. Pass your flight boards at gate number 10. Thank you very much. You're welcome. Have a good flight. Listen and repeat. Good morning, sir. Where you flying to today? I'm booked on the 10. 30 flight to Rome. May I have your passport and ticket, please? Certainly. Here you are. That's fine. And are you checking any luggage? No, I just have this carry on. Okay. And would you prefer an aisle seat or a window seat? A window seat, please. All right, here's your boarding. Pass your flight boards at gate number 10. Thank you very much. You're welcome. Have a good flight listening. Comprehension. Check in is usually the first procedure for a passenger when arriving at an airport. As airline regulations require passengers to check in by certain times prior to the departure of a flight for international flights, you are obliged to present a passport. But for domestic flights, a photo I D. Is usually sufficient. The airline agent will ask you if you want to check any luggage or if you just have carry on luggage, large or heavy. Suitcases and bags will have to be checked and go in the aircraft's cargo hold. But you can take smaller bags or cases with you on the plane as long as they will fit in the overhead bin above your seat in the plane's cabin. If you exceed the size and weight limits specified by your airline, you may have to pay an excess baggage charge after the agent gives you your boarding pass, you can go through security and make your way to the gate that corresponds to your flight. Eventually, your flight will be called and you can board the plane four questions. Now it's your turn to speak. I'm going to ask you a series of questions relating to the topic of this lesson. Pause the recording to give yourself time to answer. And don't just answer yes or no trying to give as much information as possible. When was the last time you flew in a plane? How do you feel about flying? What do you usually take with you when you travel by plane? How do you spend your time during long flights? What's your opinion of low cost or budget airlines? 6. Cookie Recipe: Hello and welcome to Kim's kitchen today. I'm going to show you a simple recipe for cookies. Let's start with the ingredients you will need. Three cups of flour, 1.5 teaspoons of baking powder, eight ounces of butter, 1.5 cups of sugar and one egg. First mix the flour and baking powder in a bowl. Then, in another bowl, mix the sugar and butter. Next, add the A and blend in the mixture from the first poll. Finally, use a wooden spoon to put balls of the cookie dough onto a baking tray and bake in the oven for 10 minutes. Allow the cookies too cool for a few minutes, but don't eat them all at once. Hello and welcome to Kim's kitchen today. I'm going to show you a simple recipe for cookies. Let's start with the ingredients you will need. Three cups of flour, 1.5 teaspoons of baking powder, eight ounces of butter, 1.5 cups of sugar and one egg. First mix the flour and baking powder in a bowl. Then, in another bowl, mix the sugar and butter. Next, add the A and blend in the mixture from the first bowl. Finally, use a wooden spoon to put balls of the cookie dough onto a baking tray and bake in the oven for 10 minutes. Allow the cookies too cool for a few minutes, but don't eat them all at once. Listen and repeat Hello and welcome to Kim's kitchen Today. I'm going to show you a simple recipe for cookies. Let's start with the ingredients you will need. Three cups of flour, 1.5 teaspoons of baking powder, eight ounces of butter, 1.5 cups of sugar and one egg. First mix the flour and baking powder in a bowl. Then, in another bowl, mix the sugar and butter. Next, add the egg and blend in the mixture from the first bowl. Finally, use a wooden spoon to put balls of the cookie dough onto a baking tray and bake in the oven for 10 minutes. Allow the cookies too cool for a few minutes, but don't eat them all at once. Listening comprehension It has been said that England and America are two countries divided by a common language, and much has been written about words that are chiefly used in one country or the other, for instance, eggplant in the U. S. And over sheen in the UK, However, there are also words that exist in both countries but have a different meaning depending on which side of the Atlantic. Iran. The word cookie is a good example. In the UK, a cookie is a soft, moist biscuit. British cookies tend to be bigger and more substantial than a British biscuit in the U. S. However, the word cookie covers both with the British would call a biscuit and a cookie. The word cookie comes from the Dutschke uchiha, meaning little cake, and could have been popularized in the US due to early Dutch colonization. Though we don't know for sure. Cookies are made in a wide variety of styles using a range of ingredients, including sugars, spices, chocolate, butter, peanut butter, nuts or dried fruits. Some cookies are soft and others hard. The softness of the cookie depends on how long it is baked. Now, what sort of cookie would you like with your tea questions? Now it's your turn to speak. I'm going to ask you a series of questions relating to the topic of this lesson. Pause the recording to give yourself time to answer. And don't just answer yes or no trying to give as much information as possible. How well can you cook? What things can you cook? Where do you find your recipes? What's your favorite recipe? What's your opinion of TV cookery programmes? 7. Returning Goods: Hi. How can I help you? Hi. I'd like to get a refund on this pair of shoes. May I ask why? You're returning them? About them for my son. But they're too big. Did you keep the receipt? Mm. No. I must have lost it. I'm afraid I can't give you a refund. If you don't have the receipt, you can exchange them for a smaller size. Or I can give you a credit note. How long is it good for? Six months. Okay. I'll take the credit note or Hi. How can I help you? Hi. I'd like to get a refund on this pair of shoes. May I ask why? You're returning them? About them for my son. But they're too big. Did you keep the receipt? No. I must have lost it. I'm afraid I can't give you a refund. If you don't have the receipt, you can exchange them for a smaller size. Or I can give you a credit note. How long is it good for? Six months. Okay. I'll take the credit note or listen and repeat. Hi. How can I help you? Hi. I'd like to get a refund on this pair of shoes. May I ask why you're returning them? About them? For my son. But they're too big. Did you keep the receipt? Um, no. I must have lost it. I'm afraid I can't give you a refund. If you don't have the receipt, you can exchange them for a smaller size. Or I can give you a credit note. How long is it good for? Six months. Okay, I'll take the credit note, boy. Listening comprehension. If you buy something in a shop and it turns out to be damaged, broken or faulty in some way, you have a legal right to return the goods and get your money back as long as they are still under guarantee. If you bought something in a shop and then just changed your mind about it, you do not have any legal right to return the goods. However, many shops have a returns policy which lets you take your items back to the shop for any reason and get a refund. Sometimes shops will only let you exchange the goods for something else in the store rather than giving you a refund. Or they may give you a credit note or voucher to use in their store. This is often the case. If you're returning something you bought in a sale, you'll usually need to show where and when you bought your goods. You can prove this with your receipt if you have one. If you don't have a receipt and you bought the items using a debit or credit card, you could ask if they will accept a card. Statement is proof of purchase questions. Now it's your turn to speak. I'm going to ask you a series of questions relating to the topic of this lesson. Pause the recording to give yourself time to answer, and don't just answer yes or no trying to give as much information as possible. When was the last time you returned goods to a shop? What happened? What do you usually do with your receipts? Why do shops sometimes give credit notes rather than refunds? What would you do if a shop refused to change a faulty article? What's your opinion about extended guarantees? 8. The Weekend: Hi, Sue. Hi, Dave. How was your weekend? It was great, actually. Oh, what did you do on Saturday? We had a barbecue, and yesterday we went to the beach. Yes. The weather was fantastic, wasn't it? How about you? Well, I spent most of the weekend working in the garden. You must be really tired, then. Yes. I must have dug about 20 holes. To be honest, I'm glad to be back at work. It's a lot more relaxing. Four. Hi, Sue. Hi, Dave. How was your weekend? It was great, actually. Oh, what did you do on Saturday? We had a barbecue, and yesterday we went to the beach. Yes. The weather was fantastic, wasn't it? How about you? Well, I spent most of the weekend working in the garden. You must be really tired, then. Yes. I must have dug about 20 holes. To be honest, I'm glad to be back at work. It's a lot more relaxing. Boy. Listen and repeat. Hi, Sue. Hi, Dave. How was your weekend? It was great, actually. Oh, What did you do on Saturday? We had a barbecue and yesterday we went to the beach. Yes, the weather was fantastic. wasn't it? How about you? Well, I spent most of the weekend working in the garden. You must be really tired then. Yes, I must have dug about 20 holes. To be honest, I'm glad to be back at work. It's a lot more relaxing. Four listening comprehension. The week used to consist off six weeks days and Sunday, but it's now made up of five weekdays on the weekend. The innovation occurred in Britain in the third quarter of the 19th century. Before then, the working week would end on Saturday evening, and Sunday was the weekly day off. Once a day of rest, Sunday has now become a day for shopping sports on doing chores around the house. For most of us, life takes on a different rhythm. At the weekend, we sleep in, cut the grass or wash the car. We also go to the movies who we travel. And, of course, we exercise and do sports. Some sports like tennis haven't old history. Others, like windsurfing and hand gliding, are more recent. If you ask most people to name the first day of the week, they will answer Monday. 50 years ago, the answer would have been Sunday. Most Wall calendars still show Sunday as the first day of the week, and Children are taught the days of the week starting with Sunday. But how long will this convention last? Four questions. Now it's your turn to speak. I'm going to ask you a series of questions relating to the topic of this lesson. Pause the recording to give yourself time to answer, and don't just answer yes or no trying to give as much information as possible. What did you do last weekend? How do you usually spend your weekends? Which day do you prefer, Saturday or Sunday? And why? What are your plans for next weekend? Once your opinion about shops opening on a Sunday. 9. Restaurant Meal: Good evening, madam. Are you ready to order? Yes, I think so. Would you like a starter? No, I think we'll just have a main course and a dessert. What do you have in here? I'm going to have the fish and I'll have the steak. Well done, please. Certainly, sir. And what would you like to drink? Two glasses of red wine and a bottle of mineral water, please. And for dessert? Fruit salad for me. And the same for me too. Boy. Good evening, sir. Madam, are you ready to order? Yes, I think so. Would you like a starter? No, I think we'll just have a main course and a dessert. What do you having? I'm going to have the fish and I'll have the steak. Well done, please. Certainly, sir. And what would you like to drink? Two glasses of red wine and a bottle of mineral water, please. And for dessert? Fruit salad for me. And the same for me too. Listen and repeat. Good evening, sir. Madam, are you ready to order? Yes, I think so. Would you like a starter? No, I think we'll just have a main course and a dessert. What do you having, dear? I'm going to have the fish and I'll have the steak. Well done, please. Certainly, sir. And what would you like to drink? Two glasses of red wine and a bottle of mineral water, please. And for dessert, fruit salad for me. And the same for me, too. Four listening comprehension. If you're going for a meal in a restaurant, it's always a good idea to book in advance. When you arrive, the waiter or waitress will show you to your table. He will then hand you the menu and give you some time to choose what you want to eat. When you are ready to warder, the waiter will take your order and ask you what you want to drink. A typical restaurant meal consists of three courses. A starter, a main course and a dessert. However, people sometimes choose, not toe have the starter or the desert. Some restaurants offer fixed menus at a set price, which is usually cheaper than ordering ala carte. When your food is ready, the waiter will bring it to your table and serve it during your meal. The waiter may come to ask you if everything is OK Hopefully it will be. But if you have a dirty glass or cutlery or your food is cold or the service to slow or the music too loud, then you may have to complain. Be sure to do so politely. At the end of the meal. The waiter will bring you the bill. If you enjoy your meal and we're satisfied with the service, you may decide to leave a tip. About 10% of the total is customary. Four questions. Now it's your turn to speak. I'm going to ask you a series of questions relating to the topic of this lesson. Pause the recording to give yourself time to answer, and don't just answer yes or no trying to give as much information as possible. How often do you eat in a restaurant? Describe your favorite restaurants. Describe a meal you had recently in a restaurant. What are the ingredients of a good restaurant for you? I want your opinion of fast food restaurants 10. Changing Money: What can I do for you? I'd like to change some euros into dollars, please. Certainly. How much would you like to change? Could you tell me what the current exchange rate is? $1.12 to the euro. And do you charge a commission? No, we don't. In that case, I'll change 500 euros. That makes $560. Would you prefer your currency in large or small bills? ID like a mix of both. And could have some change too. Of course. Please sign here. What can I do for you? I'd like to change some euros into dollars, please. Certainly. How much would you like to change? Could you tell me what the current exchange rate is? $1.12 to the euro. And do you charge a commission? No, we don't. In that case, I'll change 500 euros. That makes $560. Would you prefer your currency in large or small bills? I'd like a mix of both And couldn't have some change too. Of course. Please sign here. Listen and repeat. What can I do for you? I'd like to change some euros into dollars, please. Certainly. How much would you like to change? Could you tell me what the current exchange rate is? $1.12 to the euro. And do you charge a commission? No, we don't. In that case, I'll change 500 euros. That makes $560. Would you prefer your currency in large or small bills? ID like a mix of both. And could I have some change, too? Of course. Please sign here, boy Listening comprehension. If you are planning a business trip or a holiday abroad, it is always a good idea to obtain some foreign currency, either before you leave or when you arrive in the country. You can do this and a bank or a bureau de change a bureau dish on is a business which makes a profit by selling currency at a higher exchange rate than the rate at which it buys the same currency. For example, a UK bureau may sell mu pounds at a rate off one euro 40 cents, but only offer you one euro 20 cents if they are buying pounds from you. Both rates will generally be displayed on a sign somewhere. Commission is usually charged as a percentage off the amount to be converted or as a fixed fee. A bureau de change rarely buys or sells coins, but will sometimes do so at a higher profit margin. Justifying this by the higher cost of storing and shipping coins. Compared with banknotes in recent years, currency exchange services have gradually gone online. This new model allows for more competitive exchange rates and threatens traditional brick and mortar bureau Do Sean. Four questions. Now it's your turn to speak. I'm going to ask you a series of questions relating to the topic of this lesson. Pause the recording to give yourself time to answer, and don't just answer yes or no trying to give as much information as possible. Where do you get your foreign currency when you travel abroad? What do you do with your foreign currency when you return home? Which foreign countries have you? Bean, too? What currencies do you know? Apart from the euro and the dollar, what would you do if you lost all your money on a trip abroad? 11. The Movies: way do this weekend? I don't know. What would you like to do? Why don't we go to the pictures? That's a good idea. We haven't been to the cinema for ages. What's on? Well, we could go and see the latest Star Wars movie. You know, I hate Saifi. Thank you. I'd rather go and see that new romcom with Hugh Grant. I can't stand. Hugh Grant is a terrible actor. Well, it's either that or three hour French drama with subtitles. Let's just stay home and watch a DVD instead. We can order a pizza or what shall we do this weekend? I don't know. What would you like to do? Why don't we go to the pictures? That's a good idea. We haven't been to the cinema for ages. What's on? Well, we could go and see the latest Star Wars movie. You know I hate Saifi. Thank you. I'd rather go and see that new romcom with Hugh Grant. I can't stand. Hugh Grant is a terrible actor. Well, it's either that or three hour French drama with subtitles. Let's just stay home and watch a DVD instead. We can order a pizza or listen and repeat. What shall we do this weekend? I don't know. What would you like to do? Why don't we go to the pictures? That's a good idea. We haven't been to the cinema for ages. What's on? Well, we could go and see the latest stonewalls movie. You know, I hate Saifi. I'd rather go and see that new romcom with Hugh Grant. I can't stand Hugh Grant. He's a terrible actor. Well, it's either that or three hour French drama with subtitles. Let's just stay home and watch a DVD. Instead, we can order a pizza boy listening comprehension. I really enjoy going to the pictures and go to see a movie. Most weekends. I always check the film listings in the newspaper or online to see what showing. I also read the film reviews because I don't want to see a bad film, especially as it's so expensive nowadays. I prefer to arrive early at the cinema so I don't have to queue too long to buy a ticket. Sometimes the film I want to see a sold out so I might buy a ticket for a later showing. I usually sit in an aisle seat somewhere in the middle of the cinema. I think you can see the film better. You risk straining your eyes if you sit in the front few rows. One thing I don't like is when people in the audience talk during the movie or check their mobile phones. That really annoys me. Everyone should be able to enjoy the film in peace. My favorite films are Hollywood blockbusters. I Love the Avengers, Siri's and I Can't Wait to See the new Star Wars movie. However, I never go to see old black and White Forum films with subtitles. They can be so boring questions. Now it's your turn to speak. I'm going to ask you a series of questions relating to the topic of this lesson. Pause the recording to give yourself time to answer. And don't just answer yes or no trying to give as much information as possible. When did you last go to the cinema and what did you see? Who did you go with once sort of movies? Do you like best? Want your favorite movie? And why want to you think about three D movies 12. My Daily Routine: On weekdays, I always get up at a quarter to seven where my alarm goes off. The first thing I do is feed the cat. After that, I have a shower and shape. Then I get dressed. Next. I have breakfast. I usually have serial and a cup of coffee for breakfast, but I occasionally have toaster marmalade. At half past seven, I leave home and walk to the bus stop where I catch the bus to work. Nearly always like if the traffic's not too bad, I generally arrive at the office at around ten past date on a web designer. So I spent most of the day working at the computer. At ten o'clock. I have a coffee break and chat with my colleagues about work or what we've watched on TV last night. We have a staff canteen, so I sometimes have lunch there. But more often than not, I just have a sandwich at my desk. I usually leave work at 530 now. And again, I have to work late to finish an urgent project. Most days I visit the gym before going home. It helps me keep fit and takes my mind off work. In the evening. I enjoy relaxing with a glass of wine and frequently watch something on Netflix. I normally have dinner at around eight and go to better 10.5. I rarely stay up late and then that hardly ever go out during the week. I'm too tired. My weekend routine is a little bit different. I tend to get up later for a start. I regularly do my shopping on Saturday morning, but I rarely go to the big supermarkets. Queues are too long. I prefer the local shops near where I live. I making cyclist. So if the weather isn't too bad, I'll go for a long bike ride on Saturday afternoon. Saturday evening. I often go to the pub and have a drink with some friends, or might go and see a movie if there's something good on, on Sundays, unlikely. Take these easy by seldom go out. I'd rather stay in and read the papers, do a bit of housework, awesome, DIY. One thing I never do is make Sunday lunch. I hate cooking. Listen and repeat. You will go to here some key phrases from the dialogue. Say the phrases out loud, and try to copy the rhythm and intonation of the speaker. He is the first phrase. On weekdays, I always get up at quarter to seven. The first thing I do is have a shower. I usually have serial and a cup of coffee for breakfast. Most days, I just have a sandwich at my desk. In the evening. I enjoy relaxing with a glass of wine. I hardly ever go out during the week. I regularly do my shopping on Saturday morning. I rarely go to the big supermarkets. Saturday evening. I often go to the pub. One thing I never do is make Sunday lunch. Questions. Now it's your turn to speak. I'm going to ask you a series of questions relating to the topic of this lesson. Pause the recording to give yourself time to answer. And don't just don't say yes or no, trying to give as much information as possible. Question one, what is your favorite day of the week and y, to describe your daily routine. Question three. Where and when do you generally do your shopping? Question 4, how do you usually spend your evenings? Question 5, what are some things that you hate doing? That's the end of the video for this lesson. But make sure you check out all the other resources. And don't forget to do the final quiz.