Essential English Idioms | "live beyond your means" | Money & Business | Able Lingo | Skillshare

Essential English Idioms | "live beyond your means" | Money & Business

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15 Lessons (1h 9m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:20
    • 2. Conversation Introduction

      1:23
    • 3. Pronunciation Practice (3 Speeds)

      1:50
    • 4. Definition With Similar & Opposite Expressions

      8:26
    • 5. Conversation Analysis

      5:49
    • 6. Usage, Tips, & Strategies

      4:49
    • 7. Practice, The 4 Types of Sentences In English

      2:50
    • 8. Practice, Create Idiom Sentences

      13:25
    • 9. Practice, Create Idiom Conversations

      8:38
    • 10. Review, Question #1 With Explanation

      1:51
    • 11. Review, Question #2 With Explanation

      3:30
    • 12. Review, Question #3 With Explanation

      3:30
    • 13. Review, Question #4 With Explanation

      4:55
    • 14. Review, Question #5 With Explanation

      5:29
    • 15. Final Review

      0:51

About This Class

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In this course, we use an essential English idiom as a foundation to improve your English grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, comprehension, and conversation.

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THIS LESSON IS DIVIDED INTO SIX (6) SECTIONS:

 CONVERSATION ~ I guide you through multiple conversations using the target idiom. I'll also analyze each conversation and explain how it works using the idiom.

 PRONUNCIATION ~ We improve your pronunciation by practicing at three (3) different speeds.

 DEFINITION ~ I teach the meaning of the idiom using pictures and detailed explanations. Then, we explore similar and opposite expressions which boost your vocabulary and fluency.

 USAGE ~ We explore tips and strategies for using this idiom in different situations. I'll show you how it's used in the past, present, and future tenses.

 PRACTICE ~ We use unique pictures to create sentences and conversations using the target idiom. This helps to see the idiom in action and become more comfortable with its use.

 REVIEW ~ I test your ability to use and understand this idiom with quiz questions that review what was covered in the course. I explain both the correct and incorrect answers.

ENJOY IMPROVING YOUR ENGLISH FLUENCY

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Below are screenshots from the class:

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello. In this idiom course, we're going to study a money and business idiom. The idiom is live beyond your means. This course will have six sections. First, we'll do conversation so you can see this stadium immediately in action. Then we'll do pronunciation. You can repeat out loud after me and improve how you say this idiom will do it in three different speeds. Then we'll do definition. What the heck does this idiom mean? We'll also do similar and opposite expressions. Wonderful. Then we'll do usage. I'm going to give you tips and strategies to best use this idiom. I'm gonna help you out. After that, Will do practice. By this time, we'll have learned quite a bit. So we're gonna put it to use. We're gonna use this idiom and make sentences and make conversations. Then we'll do review and test you. Make sure that you understand what we've been teaching and what we've been learning. We're going to work like crazy to master this idiom. 2. Conversation Introduction: Let's start with conversation. Great conversation. Number one. Who pictures, purses, bags Let's find out what's going on. Ted, you've changed. When we first got married, you never wanted us to live beyond our means. Laura. I need to have nice things. Do you really expect me to live without 50 Louis Vuitton handbags? Ted, We've been living beyond our means for too long, baby. The money's all gone. Conversation Number two. Who? A little more serious, Sue. Our company has been living beyond its means for the past five years. Donald, I know what you mean. Things are going to change around here very quickly, Sue. I hear there will be big cutbacks due to the company's choice to live beyond its means. So we did two conversations. Don't worry if he had a question or if there was a word that you didn't understand because we're gonna come back in a few minutes and explained everything all right. We just did conversation 3. Pronunciation Practice (3 Speeds): Here we are. Let's do some pronunciation. We're going to do three different speeds. Turtle speed, rabbit speed and birds. Speed. I need you to repeat out loud after me and copy my voice and how I say it. Here we go. Repeat after me with turtle speed. Live beyond your means. Once again, Live beyond your means. Here we go with rapid speed a little bit quicker. Repeat after me out loud. Live beyond your means. Once again, live beyond your means and wouldn't be complete without birds. Speed. This is regular speed. This is the speed at which should hear native English speakers See this idiom? Here we go. Repeat after me. Live beyond your means. Once again, Live beyond your means. All right. We just did pronunciation Great. 4. Definition With Similar & Opposite Expressions: it's time for definition. Let's find out what in the world does this idiom mean? And, of course, there are two definitions. There's a literal meaning, what the words mean when you see them, so we'll do that one first. If you look at the words live beyond your means, this is what it means just by the words themselves. So let's say you're this guy here. It's got the little bag over his shoulder and he's bigger than the house. But the idea is that he is beyond his means or you live beyond your means. Your means are your income, the money that's coming in that allows you to live your life style. It could be your paycheck. It could be investment, income, dividends, whatever it ISS. Your means is how you is the money that you used to live. So if you live beyond your means, beyond the word means farther away farther than so, if you're means we're here on the ground, you would live beyond your means, which is farther away down the road. That's the literal meaning. That's what the words mean by themselves is talking more about distance. If you just look at the words as what they mean. But as we know with idioms, there's always a hidden meaning, a figurative meaning. This is the meaning that's not so obvious. Here we go. Live beyond your means means to spend to march when you earn a bit of money. But all of your bills are like way more than what you earn your living beyond farther than your ability to pay for what you're doing. So you earn some money, but you're like going crazy. I'm gonna spend and by and get into debt, get all these flashy things. But I don't make much money, so it probably can't last forever. Let's do similar and opposite expressions for live beyond your means. We'll do the similar ones. First I'm going to say each one and then pause and wait so you can repeat out loud after me . Here we go. Spend more money than you can afford. Oh, more money than you can repay. Try to live the high life on a low salary. Okay, so all of these expressions are very similar to the idiom Live beyond your means. We're talking about doing things that you probably shouldn't be doing because you're gonna be in debt, you're not gonna have enough money in the future. But right now you're living beyond your means. You're spending more money than you can afford. Afford means that you have a certain amount of money, and that's what you can use to pay. Ah, smart person. And probably take that money and save some of it for future use. But a person who lives beyond their means does not. They get money and they spend it right away. So afford means what you're capable of spending, what you're capable of purchasing or what you're capable of having. So if you spend more money than you can afford, you live beyond your means. If you old more money than you can repay, you have debt, which is much higher, much, much higher than your income and your ability to pay that debt. Oh, means that you owe someone like you borrowed money from someone, and you need to pay them back, try to live the high life on a low salary. Okay, so the the high life is like an exciting life, maybe a celebrity's life, parties and discos and dancing and clubs and expensive things cars, vacations, cruises All this great stuff now. Ah, celebrity earned a ton of money so they can afford to do all those things in the high life . However, most of us don't earn that much money. So if we try to live like a celebrity and go crazy and spend our money immediately, once it comes in, you could say we're living beyond our means. We're trying to live the high life on a low salary, which may be possible for a while. But if we don't have much more income than it's gonna run out, men, she will stop. Let's do the opposite expressions. Repeat out loud after me, living within your means earn and save mawr than you spend. Be financially healthy. All of these expressions have a meaning which is opposite of live beyond your means. This 1st 1 living within your means sounds very similar To live beyond your means. However, there is a big difference. Living within your means means you stay within inside your ability to pay for things beyond means to go outside your ability to do things, which makes it very difficult for your income to pay for those things. Once again means, means, means means the definition of means in this situation is it's your income, your paycheck, your salary, your interest, income, dividends, whatever so live beyond your means means live outside your ability to use your money to pay for things living within your means. You can probably go for a long time and not have too much debt and not have ah, lifestyle, which is very risky. Earn and save more than you spend. So earn means to do things which other people pay you for you provide them value and they give you money in exchange. So you're earning money. Money is coming in, so you earn and save. Maybe you keep, like, 20% 10% of your income and you save it. You put it in a place that you can use for investment in the future, or just to have it in case something bad happens in your life. So if you're earning and saving more than your spend spending, you have in a very responsible lifestyle the opposite is living beyond your means. All the money that comes in proof it goes out because you're lead living on extravagant lifestyle, be financially healthy. If you brought all of your paperwork to an accountant and he says, OK, let's see what's happening. How much money is coming in? How much money is going out? Your assets, liabilities, stuff like that. Assets are something that put money in your pocket. Liabilities are things that take money out of your pocket. So if the counting says to you, you are financially healthy, you would say, Hey, great, I'm being responsible. Maybe it's not super exciting, but it's very responsible. The money that's coming in you're not. It doesn't disappear immediately on things that you probably don't need. Your living very well. You're living within your means. So all of these are the opposite for live beyond your means. Okay, we just did definition. Mm. 5. Conversation Analysis: Let's do conversation Analysis. Woo. Let's go back and look at the two conversations we did a little while ago and talk about them. Conversation number one. Ted, You've changed. When we first got married, you never wanted us to live beyond our means. Laura. I need to have nice things. Do you really expect me to live without 50 Louis Vuitton handbag? Ted, We've been living beyond our means for too long, baby. The money's all gone. All right, So, Ted, he seems to be the more financially responsible person. He says. You've changed. When we first got married, you never wanted us to live beyond our means. Well, he could have said, You've changed. When we first got married, you never wanted us to spend more than we earned. Then he closes and stops the conversation when he says, we've been living beyond our means for too long, baby, he could have said, We've been trying to live the high life on a low salary for too long, Baby. The money's all gone. Now, Laura. She seems to love her handbags, and I don't think she's buying the handbags at a discount store. She wants Louis Vuitton handbags I'm not a handbag expert, but I'm pretty sure these handbags cost hundreds of dollars. Hundreds of dollars. Okay, so Laura just loves the handbags. She loves them so much that she she just ignores that, you know, they can't afford them. They don't have the money available to spend on those things, so they must have a lot of debt. I'm going to guess when she goes to buy these handbags, she whips out the credit card. Credit card is just another form of debt money that you have to pay back later. And if you don't pay it back soon or right away, they charge you interest depending on your country. Depending on the credit card company, it could be up as high as 2030 maybe even 40% depending on how risky you are to that bank. So Ted is the more financially responsible one in this conversation. And Laura, not so much. They've been married for a while. When they started out, it seems like maybe they had a clear view for the future. They were going to live financially, responsibly and do things that would make their life style more stable. But now the money's Oh God! All right, let's move to conversation number to sue. Our company has been living beyond its means for the past five years. Donald, I know what you mean. Things they're going to change around here very quickly. Sue. I hear there will be big cutbacks. Do the due to the company's choice to live beyond its means. Here we go, another situation where they're using the idiom living or live beyond your means. So, Sue said, our company has been living the honest means for the past five years. She could have said Our company has been going into debt like crazy for the past five years . Su also said, I hear there will be big cutbacks due to the company's choice to live beyond its means. She could have said, I hear there will be big cutbacks due to the company's choice to spend more money than it can afford. So let's talk about this conversation. One word that jumps out is cutbacks, and it's just not any kind of cutbacks. It's big cutbacks. Cutbacks in this situation, in this scenario with the company means more likely than not. A lot of people are going to get fired because the company is hurting financially. So if they don't have enough money to pay for things, that means they don't have enough money to pay their employees, so they're gonna have to cut back. They're gonna have to fire some employees. Sometimes they also say downsize, which just means make the company's smaller and I have to pay out so much money. So there's going to be big cutbacks in this company because the company has chosen to live beyond its means. It has decided to spend more money than it can afford. For the past five years, this company has been living beyond its means, and specifically they've been going into debt like crazy. Who knows? Maybe this company was trying to grow. Maybe they acquired a new gun company or a whole bunch of new employees or started a new section in the company, and they thought that the product was going to take off and be really successful. But turns out that all of their spending and living beyond their means didn't work out, so they didn't have enough money coming in to cover the lifestyle and how they wanted the company to be okay. We just did conversation analysis. I thought it was great 6. Usage, Tips, & Strategies: let's do usage in this section. I'm going to give you some tips and strategies on how to best use this idiom. Let's get started. All right. With this idiom, live beyond your means. We need to match the pronoun to fit the sentence. So you're in this idiom. This is the pronoun your okay, so we need to match that pronoun to fit the sentence. Here are some examples when we're talking about making it match and fit the sentence it needs to match the subject of the sentence. So in this sentence, I live beyond my means. The subject is I We're talking about my situation. So we need to have I in my if it's you live beyond your means. We need to match up your and you the subject and the pronoun in the idiom need to match. Let's go down the list. He lives beyond his means. She lives beyond her means. We live beyond our means. They live beyond their means. The organization lives beyond its means. Mm. This idiom can be used as its own sentence. If it's a command, if your telling someone to do something So for example, let's say you're an evil credit card company, and you're giving out credit cards to everyone, and you say to them, Live beyond your means and you're just evil. But you're not very smart. So you're just telling people what you think they should do. Live beyond your means. Don't be financially responsible. So this is Onley scenario, in which this idiom could be a sentence all by itself. If it's a command, we need to make sure the verb live matches the context and situation. We're talking about the past, present and future. Let's see this idiom being used in the past, present and future. Let's start with the past. We used to live beyond our means. An almost went bankrupt. We sure learned our lesson. Bankrupt means when you don't have any more money, you can't pay your bills. You can't pay your debt. So they almost went bankrupt. They were in a situation where they almost didn't have the ability to pay their debt and pay and keep their lifestyle. So I guess it freaked him out because we sure learned our lesson. I imagine they're living in a way that's much more responsible and more fiscally sound. Fiscally sound mint means financially responsible and stable present. Right now, Henry is living beyond his means. He must be worried about what will happen in a few weeks. Maybe Henry is going crazy. He's using his credit card to pay for everything. Trips, cruises, expensive dinners, who knows? But he has a certain a certain level of income from his job or whatever his income is, But his expenses are much, much higher. So he's living beyond his means. And we think he must be worried about what will happen in a few weeks when the credit card company calls and says, Hey, you're not making your payments. Credit card declined future. Next month, I plan to live beyond my means and go crazy partying, drinking and gambling. Hopefully, a lot of people don't say this, but this is an example of how the idiom can be used in the future. So this person plans to go nuts, go crazy and suddenly become very irresponsible and live beyond their means. So they're gonna have a crazy lifestyle, very expensive lifestyle that costs much more than they're able to afford. Once again, the word afford means the ability to pay for things you have a certain amount of income and you use that income to pay for things or a portion or a part of that income. You don't go overboard and trying to buy things which are way outside your ability to pay for them. We just did usage, all right. 7. Practice, The 4 Types of Sentences In English: it's time for practice. We're going to practice using this idiom. Wonderful. We're going to use the idiom and some pictures. We're going to create the four different kinds of sentences and create conversations. Wonderful. First, let's review the four different kinds of sentences in English. One kind of sentences for sharing information. Another one is for giving a command or making a request. The third kind is asking a question, and the fourth kind is expressing strong emotion. Now, the fancy words for these kinds of sentences sharing information is a declarative sentence . Given a command is an imperative sentence. Asking a question is an interrogative sentence. Expressing strong emotion is an exclamatory sentence. If I was you, I wouldn't worry about these big words. Just remember what they mean The simpler words. Okay, so we're gonna share some information and an example of a declarative sentence which shares information is Henry is a weird guy. So I just shared information with you. I told you something. Now let's do a command. Don't let Henry in the house. I'm telling you, I'm commanding you. Don't let Henry in the house. If I wanted to be more respectful or nice, I would put a police in front of it. Please don't let Henry in the in the house. Then it's more like a request, but it's the same kind of sentence I want to ask a question. I might say. Why is Henry licking our windows? So we have a question ends with the question work. We want to know why the last kind of sentence is an exclamatory sentence where we express strong emotion. Holy cow Henry. Just eight are male and their two sentences in here and both of them and with an exclamation part mark Holy cow Henry. Just eight are male. So this situation is a little bit strange. Were probably at the window looking outside, watching Henry as he does all these crazy things. But this These are examples of the four different kinds of sentences in English. 8. Practice, Create Idiom Sentences: Let's create the four different kinds of sentences using this idiom and a picture. Here we go. Oh, I see a picture and it's Bill. Hello, Bill. Okay, when we're describing this picture, I see a guy. He's looking at us. He has glasses on and the glasses have a black frame. He he has a beard, and he has kind of longer hair that's a little bit messy. He's sitting outside in a chair, looks like a very comfortable chair, and the chair looks almost too new to be where it is. Well, he's wearing boots, shorts and shirt around him. I see a bottle of some sort of probably juice. I don't know well, bottle of booze. The bottle of alcohol, Probably beer behind him. Looks like this is maybe a shopping cart, some sort of cart and there's a tree or a branch tree doesn't look like it's alive, but there's a can hanging from the tree, and there's a bottle hanging from the tree behind. Bill looks like there are two tunnels. Looks to me like it would be part of a bridge. And maybe there is a road that goes overhead. I don't know. I would say bills. Expression is not happy for sure. He's probably looking at a scene, thinking, Why are you taking this picture? So looks like Bill is homeless. Homeless means the person doesn't have a home. They don't have a house, they don't have an apartment. They don't have a place where someone's letting them stay. So maybe Bill lives under the bridge. Who knows? Let's make a couple sentences where we share information about this picture and we're going to use the idiom as well. Bill lived beyond his means for five years before his mom kicked him out of the house. All right, let's make the idiom bold. So it's easy to see. And then I'm gonna have you repeat the sentence after me. Here we go. Bill lived beyond his means for five years before his mom kicked him out of the house. So it looks like things are not going very well for Bill, but he's probably responsible for what happened. He was living beyond his means for five years before his mom kicked him out. Maybe he was living in the basement, were in the same room that he grew up in, grew up in when he was a kid who knows? But his mom, she finally had enough bill. You have been spending too much money, my money buying crazy, expensive things, using my credit card when I wasn't looking. I've had enough. So if she kicked Bill out now Bill is homeless. However, it looks like Bill was able to take his nice, comfy chair with him. Who? And Bill moved down to the bridge and lives under the bridge. So let's do another sentence. No Bill lives under a bridge, fights to keep his beloved. So for chair and regrets living beyond his means. Make the idiom bold once again. Okay, now repeat the sentence after me. Now Bill lives under a bridge, fights to keep his beloved sofa chair and regrets living beyond his means. Okay, first off, the word beloved means something that you really value. You love something a lot, so Bill loves his sofa chair, and this isn't a regular chair. It's more like a sofa, right? Ah, so far couches long. But this is a sofa chair, because when you sit in it, it's like a section of a couch, a section of a sofa. It looks like a pretty nice chair. Oh, I'll give Bill that. Okay, But now Bill lives under the bridge, and I imagine he's not alone. There's probably other homeless people that live there as well, and he has to fight to keep his beloved sofa chair. I went there a lot of people out there that would love to sit in his chair, have his chair and maybe steal his chair. So Bill's got a big challenge watching his chair and making sure someone else doesn't take it from him. Hmm. But Bill, like he looks over here, he doesn't look so happy, right? He probably regrets living beyond his means. And why does he regret living beyond his means? Because his behavior made a situation where his mom finally decided, Get out of the house. You can't live here anymore. Let's make a couple sentences that are a command or a request. Same situation with Bill. Homeless bill in his wonderful chair. Live beyond your means, Bill. You can do much better than this. Maybe someone walks up to Bill and says, Wow, things look like they're really suck for. You live beyond your means, which kind of doesn't make sense because he doesn't have the ability to live beyond this means. I bet his mom took away all those credit cards that we make this bald in this sentence. It's a command. So someone is telling him to do something. Repeat out loud after me. Here we go. Live beyond your means, Bill. You can do much better than this. Sentence Number two, please live beyond your means. You still owe me a lot of money. Make that bold. Um, So maybe someone was walking something one day and they saw Bill down there like, Hey, that guy owes me, like, $50,000. So they went down, talked with Bill, and wow, things are looking so great. So they would warrant built to live beyond his means. Go, go get money from your mom or something because you owe me a lot of money. I need you to pay me back. Repeat after me, please. Live beyond your means. You still owe me a lot of money. These are two sentences with a command or every quest. Let's make a couple sentences, which ask a question and we're gonna ask Bill a couple questions first. Why did you live beyond your means for such a long time. It's make it bold. Repeat after me out loud. Improve your pronunciation. Why did you live beyond your means for such a long time? So maybe we know Bill, and we happen to be walking by and we're chatting with him and we're like, Oh, you know, why did you bring your chair outside? He's like I live here. I live back there under the bridge. He will I ho. And then we find out more of the details. He tells us why his mom kicked him out of the house for his crazy spending habits. So we asked him, Why did you live beyond your means for such a long time? Maybe if we stay around and we talked him for a little bit longer, we might also ask how has living beyond your means worked out for you? I make the idiom bold. We'll talk about this in a second. Repeat after me. How has living beyond your means worked out for you? So we know what the idiom living beyond your means? What it means if someone says worked out for you Mm, It means how have things been going. Has it been a success or has been a failure? What are the results? So if the sentence is how has living beyond your means worked out for you? How has spending like Crazy worked out for you? What kind of results have happened because you've been living your living beyond your means ? So these are two different questions that we could ask Bill. When you sit in his comfortable chair and probably has a lot of time on his hands to talk, let's make two sentences that expressed strong emotion. We're still in the same situation with Bill, and he's still looking at us is getting creepy. Okay, first sentence. I can't believe you lived beyond your means. I love your chair, though. Make the idiom bold. Repeat after me. I can't believe you live beyond your means. I love your chair, though. Maybe we were talking with Bill and we started talking about how he owes us a lot of money and we get a little bit upset. So he said, I can't believe you live beyond your means, because I'm not going to get paid. But then we noticed something else. We noticed that lovely comfortable sofa chair, and we just say, you know, that's a great chair. I love your chair, though. Second sentence. If you keep living beyond your means, I won't visit you anymore. It doesn't matter that you have the best spot under the bridge. Let me fix this. The we're gonna make the idiom bowls or jumps out. All right. This is two sentences and they're both exclamatory. Repeat after me. Put some emotion in your voice. If you keep living beyond your means, I won't visit you anymore. It doesn't matter that you have the best spot under the bridge. All right, so at this point in the conversation, we're fed up, which means we don't want to take any more from Bill. We're just upset. So we tell him, You know, I'm not going to visit you anymore. If you keep living beyond your means. I don't care that you have the best spot under the bridge. So Bill probably has neighbors that live under the bridge to, and he has been there long enough that he has the best spot under the bridge, which may be the best spot, but he's still homeless. Has to live outside in the cold and wet and all that stuff. So these are two sentences which expressed strong emotion in the sentence. Best spot means best location. Okay, let's move on. 9. Practice, Create Idiom Conversations: Let's create conversations using this idiom and some pictures. Here's our first picture. Oh, how nice Chuck and Susan are on a romantic date. They're eating dinner. Chuck is holding a glass of wine. Susan looks like she still has a little bit of food left on her plate. She's smiling, showing some teeth. He's smiling, too. He has. It looks like casual business clothing on with a suit coat. She has a nice dress on in the background. You can see some flowers, things hanging on the wall there. Probably in a nice restaurant. Let's see what they're talking about. Chuck. Stick with me, baby. I never live beyond my means. I'm Susan. I'm smiling because you're lying. You're in debt up to your ears, Chuck. Oh, yeah. By the way, can you pay for dinner tonight, baby? Susan, we're never dating again. You never learned to not live beyond you're means Woo. Then they go through a quick and make the idiom bold. All right, Well, here's a conversation, Chuck. Stick with me, baby. I never live beyond my means. Susan, I'm smiling because you're lying. You're in debt up to your ears, Chuck or yeah, by the way. Can you pay for dinner tonight, baby? Susan were never dating again. You never learn to not live beyond your means. Mm. So this situation is not quite what it seemed. It looks like they're having a nice romantic dinner, but actually, there have been quite a serious conversation. Shark wants to have an even stronger relationship with Susan, and she's like, 00 no, You are in debt up to your years Up to your years means a huge amount. Think about if you're in a big pool of water and the water is up to your ears and a little bit longer is gonna be over your head. So Chuck has so much debt that the debt is up to his ears. That's another idiom. It's just another way to explain a massive amount of debt, which is probably too much to pay off for a very long time. And it makes Chuck not very responsible in a financial way. So Susan were never dating again. You never learn to not live beyond your means. So in other words, she could have said you never learned to live within your means or you never learn. Teoh save more than you spend. So I would say this relationship is over. And who's going to pay for the dinner tonight? I would say Susan's gonna get stuck with the bill. I don't think she is going to be smiling much longer when she really finds out that Chuck's not joking. He can't pay and why she's smiling because he's lying. I'm not quite sure. I suppose smiling is better than crying. Yes, he's a terrible boyfriend. He can't pay for things. Okay, let's move on and do another conversation. Wonderful. So we have Max and we have John. Max is a cat. John is a guy who was almost naked. My thinking He's got some short time and all. He's got a hat. He can't be naked. If he's wearing a hat, they're sitting in front of the house. Looks like there's a window in the house. Is either white or light blue? I'm not sure. Max, the cat and John the Human are looking at each other, and they're having a conversation. Should we find out what they're saying? All right, so Mac says, I see you sold your clothes. I guess you're still living beyond your means, John. It happens. I still have my hat, though. Max, you've been living beyond your means for about 35 years. No. How is that work? You know, for you, John. Am I really talking to a cat? Hey, cat rhymes with hat. Okay, let's make idioms bold living beyond your means. Another one living beyond your means. Okay, but here's the conversation, Max. I see your soldier close. I guess you're still living beyond your means, John. It happens. I still have my hat, though. Max, you've been living beyond your means for 35 years now. How is that working out for you, John? And I'm really talking to a cat. Hey, cat rhymes with hat. Okay, so this is a silly conversation, but we can see how the idiom live beyond your means is used. And in both examples were using living, living beyond your means. Because it's a current condition that is still happening. It's still going on, and he's been living beyond his means for 35 years now, so that means a couple of things. First, this cats very old. Also, Max is the cat. John's the human John can't see his face, but I'm not going to guess. He's super old either, but for the majority are almost all of his life. He's been living beyond his means. He's been spending more money than he's been earning. His income is much, much lower than what he owes or what how many bills he has. So I would say John is going to keep living beyond his means. I don't think he's going to change his lifestyle if someone is so desperate to get money that they're willing to sell the clothes, not any clothes, not clothes in the closet, but clothes that they're wearing right now. That's very, very desperate, unstable and not very responsible. However, John is very happy that he still has his hat. It looks like he has his shoes too wonderful. However, John's lifestyle must be really unpredictable and unstable and unattractive. So Max is the cat and he's talking to John. I would say maybe there's something with something wrong with John upstairs. Maybe he is mentally challenged as well. At the end, he's like Well, um, I really talking to a cat, but then he goes back to being kind of stupid. Hey, cat rhymes with hat so the two words cat and hat sound like each other. And he thinks that's more important than actually finding a way to live in a better way, which is not so financially irresponsible. So I don't think John is going to stop living beyond his means. He's going to stay as he is. Okay, we just finished practice. Fabulous. 10. Review, Question #1 With Explanation: Let's do review. Wonderful. We're going to test you and see if you remember what we've been studying. Here we go quick. Oh, wait. I almost forgot. I'm putting on my nerd glasses. Let's get serious. Okay. Question number one Which answer fits best in the following sentence? The company is living beyond means. Here are the choices her your It's the OK. Feel free to pause the video. Take a moment and look at the answers and the question. Which answer fits best in the sentence. I'm going to give you the answer in 54321 It's okay. We learned before in the usage section where I gave you tips and strategies that the pro known in this idiom must match the subject of the sentence. So in this sentence sentence, who are we talking about? We're talking about the company. So when we use this idiom, the pronoun needs to match the company. The company is not a person, it's a group of people. It's an organization. But we would look at it as a thing. A single thing. So we can't use We can't use her. We can't use your because her and you're referred to people toe actual living, breathing people. But the company is more of a thing, and the doesn't work because those not a pro known it's an article. So the best answer is it. The company is living beyond its means, okay? 11. Review, Question #2 With Explanation: question number two. Who? Patricia. I'm planning to buy the biggest flat screen TV and awesome sports car in a huge house on the ocean. Keith, you're joking, right? You're a dishwasher. Don't you think that would be really living beyond your means? Which expression below is similar to the green words above? A An awesome way to live. Be a horrible financial choice. See a way to live your dreams. Take a moment. But through the answers, look through the conversation and choose which one you think is the most similar to the green words above. Here comes the answer. In 54321 Be a horrible financial choice. The situation is that Patricia wants to go crazy buying all this incredibly expensive stuff . Keith is trying to bring her back to reality. Remind her how things really are. Patricia is a dishwasher. Unfortunately, dishwashers don't make a lot of money because what they do is not very specialized. Dishwasher is a person who washes dishes. They they wash the pans, the forks, the knives, the plates, the bulls, all that stuff, probably in a restaurant. And the work they do is very important to the business but it's not very specialized. It's not difficult, so dishwashers don't make a lot of money. But Patricia wants to live the high life. She wants to have a big TV, a sports car in a huge house on the ocean. So back to the question we're looking for something similar to really living beyond your means. So beyond your means is like we're living in a way that your income, the money you're getting in does not cover your expenses or can only cover them for a short amount of time. And there's no way you can keep living that way. So the most similar answer is a horrible financial choice. It would just be a bad choice on Patricia's part to try to buy all this stuff. Her money would be gone poof, just like that. If we put it in the conversation, Keith could have said, You're joking, right? You're a dishwasher. Don't you think that would be a horrible financial choice, right? It would be. Let's take a look at the wrong answers. A an awesome way to live. Well, if Patricia got all this stuff, she might feel office, um, for a very, very short period of time, but eventually she doesn't have the income to keep paying for these things. And the bank's gonna probably take back to sports car, take back the house and take all the stuff that she is unable to pay for. So a doesn't work, cause it's not similar to really living beyond your means. See a way to live your dreams. It's not similar either, so it's obviously wrong. And it might end up being more of a nightmare because Patricia would be like, Wow, this creates stuff and then eyes gone, I can't pay for it and she's gonna have to go back to her dishwasher job, okay? 12. Review, Question #3 With Explanation: question number three. Darrell. When you sold your house and stop drinking, I thought you had decided to stop living beyond your means, Laura. Then I bought a Ferrari, started gambling and began attending wild parties every night. Oh, yeah. Which answer below is the opposite of the green words above a. Begin A life of good deeds. Be start living within your means. See, make more financial mistakes. Take a moment, pause the video, look through the answers, review the conversation and answer the question. Which answer below is the opposite of the green words above. Okay, here comes the answer. In 54321 See, make more financial mistakes. Um, first off, we need to make sure we're focusing on the opposite. The opposite meaning of the green words above. Stop living beyond your means. This is actually a good thing because it means you're stopping living in a way that you can't afford that you can't pay for. So we're looking for the opposite of that Since stop living beyond your means would be a good thing. We need to look for an answer, which would be a bad thing. And the only answer which is a bad thing would be make more financial mistakes. That's the opposite of stopping living beyond your means. So in this situation, Darryl thought that Laura was going to improve her decision making. She sold their house. She stopped drinking. She stopped doing things that probably made her financial situation not so good. However, Laura has other ideas. Buy a Ferrari, start gambling and goto wild parties Every night doesn't seem like a great decision. So the opposite of Stop living beyond your means is to make more financial mistakes. Let's take a look at the wrong answers. A begin a life of good deeds. Deeds are another word for actions, behavior. So if you do good deeds, you do things that help people create value for people. Could be donating money, building some house for someone helping someone with their school loans. Who knows? So a life of good deeds is to do good things. However, this isn't the opposite of what we're looking for, and it doesn't make a lot of sense with conversation. So it is wrong. Be start living within your means. Who that's actually a good thing to start living within inside your ability to pay for things within your means. So living with in your means is the opposite of living beyond your means. And appear says to stop living beyond your means, which is a good thing. And this one says, Start living within your means, which is also a good thing. So that's why be can't be right, because we're looking for the opposite. So the best answer is C. Make more financial mistakes. 13. Review, Question #4 With Explanation: question number four. We have medium and we have a picture in the picture. I see three young ladies. They're dressed very nice. Their hair is very prepared and very looks very nice. They have, ah, makeup, lipstick and all that stuff like they're ready to have a night out on the town and have a party. They all have a drink in their hand. It looks like the same kind of drink. It's some sort of orange liquid. How many guests? It's in a bar, so it's probably an alcoholic beverage, and it looks like they have a mix of emotion. Sees she seems to be maybe the happiest. She's like, Hey, who's looking at me over there? I don't know. OK, here we go. Make a comment, using the idiom and the picture. Anything you want, just make sure you use the idiom and use the picture for inspiration. Okay, pause the video. I'm going to give you my response in 54321 Okay, here is my comment. These ladies don't have to worry about living beyond their means because their parents are freaking rich. Let's make the idiom bold. What do you say? Let's practice our pronunciation. Repeat out loud after me. These ladies don't have to worry about living beyond their means because their parents are freakin rich. So this is one option for making a comment, using the idiom and the picture. Freaking here is an adjective, and it means like, really like incredibly rich. So these three young ladies, who knows if they have their own income but they don't have to worry because their parents are freakin rich. Their parents air really rich and can pay for their lifestyle. These girls, they don't even think about leaving if they should or shouldn't live beyond their means because they're not worried. We can see in this sentence the pronoun is there. So it's referring to the ladies. And there there's more than one lady. So the pronoun needs to be plural. They're living beyond their means. And in this situation, they don't worry about it. I'm going to give you another way to answer is well, remember, there are millions of ways to make a comment about this picture using this idiom. So here's another one. These women, I have learned to not live beyond their means. Now that they're wealthy they can afford to have an ostentatious lifestyle. First thing, we're gonna make the idiom full beyond their means, and I imagine the first word that jumps out at you and this sentence is ostentatious. First off lifestyle is your style. Your way of living ostentatious is an adjective, which means extravagant, luxurious. You want to attract attention. You want people to look at you. You do it in a flashy way. So just by how they're dressed in the location, the rad drinking, this stuff like that, maybe it's possible that they want to be ostentatious is they want to attract attention. They want to show off what they have and, you know, as long as they can pay for why not? That's their choice. And we learned the first sentence. These women have learned to not live beyond their means. Now they're wealthy, and they can afford. They have the money to pay for such an ostentatious lifestyle. Repeat after me, and that's practice of pronunciation. These women have learned to not live beyond their means. Now that they're wealthy, they can afford to have an ostentatious lifestyle. All right, and one last time. Let's say this big word Repeat after me ostentatious 14. Review, Question #5 With Explanation: question number five. Okay, we have the idiom, and we have a picture. I see two older people dancing. You could say old people, and it looks like the guy is maybe whistling or he's surprised. It's almost taking a picture. The lady, she has your eyes closed and looked like she's having a great time. Looks like they're dancing and, yeah, I think they're having a really nice time. Finished the conversation using the idiom and the picture. The conversation starts. You're the love of my life, baby. I wish we could dance all night long and enjoy this moment forever. All right? Whatever you'd like. Take some time, pause the video, think about it, finished the conversation and use the idiom at least once and use the picture for inspiration. Okay, I'm gonna give you our answer in 54321 All right, So it starts. You're the love of my life, baby. I wish we could dance all night long and enjoy this moment forever. So let's see. The lady was seeing that. And now the guy's gonna talk. We've lived beyond our means for a long time. I was hoping we wouldn't have to work when we were old and she responds. The boss is watching us read. Better get back to work. We need to make some money to pay our bills. Let's make the idiom bold so it jumps out and here is the conversation. Mr One away. We could do it. So she says, You're the love of my life, baby. I wish we could dance all night long and enjoy this moment forever, he says. We've lived beyond our means for a long time. I was hoping we wouldn't have to work when we were old, she says. The boss is watching us. We better get back to work. We need to make some money to pay our bills. So this situation might not be exactly what you were expecting. It looks like it's older. Couple on vacation are relaxing, having a nice stance, but actually their employees, they work there and they took a break or they snuck away to have a dance in. The bosses want she they need to get back to work. And unfortunately for their life, for a long time they've been living beyond their means. They've been spending more money than they earn or they live in a way that they have high expenses and low income. Okay, let's do another great. I'm gonna give you another way that you could finish this conversation. So let's have him talking first, he says. You're the love of my life, baby. I wish we could dance all night long and enjoy this moment forever, she says. I'm so glad we didn't live beyond our means. During our lifetime, we've been able to do incredible things. And then he says, I have an idea next month. Let's go bungee jumping sky diving and play chess on top of Mount Everest. Whoa! All right. First, let's make the idiom bold so you can see it very easily. And the conversation is You're the love of my life, baby, I wish we could dance all night long and enjoy this moment forever. I'm so glad we didn't live beyond our means. Dear, in our lifetime, we've been able to do incredible things. I have an idea. Next month, let's go bungee jumping skydiving and play chess on top of Mount Everest. So this situation, this conversation ends march better than the 1st 1 It looks like this couple is traveling, having a great time, and they don't have to work anymore if they don't want to. They do incredible things, and they're planning to go bungee jumping, skydiving and played chess on top of Mount Everest. So this conversation ends much happier than the last one. These people are not living beyond their means. They're living within their means. Once again, it means they're able to afford their lifestyle. They can pay for their lifestyle, their income or the amount of money that they have can pay for the things they do. We just finished review. How did you do? 15. Final Review: in this idiom course, we studied a money in business idiom. The idiom waas live beyond your means. We learned that the hidden meaning of this idiom is to have a lifestyle that you cannot afford. You have to pay for things and your income. The money that's coming in is not enough to pay for them over the long period. So you use credit cards and this lifestyle can't go forever. We also did similar and opposite expressions to this idiom. We covered six sections conversation, pronunciation, definition, usage, practice and review. We worked like crazy toe master this idiom.