Essential English Idioms | "get your hands dirty" | Money & Business | Able Lingo ASL | Skillshare

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Essential English Idioms | "get your hands dirty" | Money & Business

teacher avatar Able Lingo ASL, American Sign Language (ASL)

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

15 Lessons (1h 19m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:25
    • 2. Conversation Introduction

      1:30
    • 3. Pronunciation Practice (3 Speeds)

      1:55
    • 4. Definition With Similar & Opposite Expressions

      13:15
    • 5. Conversation Analysis

      6:29
    • 6. Usage, Tips, & Strategies

      6:07
    • 7. Practice, The 4 Types of Sentences In English

      2:41
    • 8. Practice, Create Idiom Sentences

      14:06
    • 9. Practice, Create Idiom Conversations

      8:44
    • 10. Review, Question #1 With Explanation

      1:31
    • 11. Review, Question #2 With Explanation

      3:09
    • 12. Review, Question #3 With Explanation

      3:07
    • 13. Review, Question #4 With Explanation

      6:01
    • 14. Review, Question #5 With Explanation

      8:07
    • 15. Final Review

      0:54
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About This Class

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In this course, we use an essential English idiom as a foundation to improve your English grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, comprehension, and conversation.

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THIS LESSON IS DIVIDED INTO SIX (6) SECTIONS:

‚Äʬ†CONVERSATION¬†~ I guide you through multiple conversations using the target idiom. I'll also analyze each conversation and explain how it works using the idiom.

‚Äʬ†PRONUNCIATION¬†~ We improve your pronunciation by practicing at three (3) different speeds.

‚Äʬ†DEFINITION¬†~ I teach the meaning of the idiom using pictures and detailed explanations. Then, we explore similar and opposite expressions which boost your vocabulary and fluency.

‚Äʬ†USAGE¬†~ We explore tips and strategies for using this idiom in different situations. I'll show you how it's used in the past, present, and future tenses.

‚Äʬ†PRACTICE¬†~ We use unique pictures to create sentences and conversations using the target idiom. This helps to see the idiom in action and become more comfortable with its use.

‚Äʬ†REVIEW¬†~ I test your ability to use and understand this idiom with quiz questions that review what was covered in the course. I explain both the correct and incorrect answers.

ENJOY IMPROVING YOUR ENGLISH FLUENCY

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello. In this idiom course, we're going to study a money and business idiom. The idiom is get your hands dirty. We'll study this idiom in six different sections. First, will do conversation. We're going to see this idiom in action. Then we'll do pronunciation. We need to make sure you're pronouncing this idiom correctly. We'll do three different speeds and you can repeat out loud after me. Then we'll do definition. What the heck does this idiom mean? Will also cover and explore similar and opposite expressions? We're really gonna boost your vocabulary. Then we'll do usage. I'll give you some tips and strategies for ways to best use this idiom. And of course, we'll do practice. We need to make sure you have lots of hands on practice making sentences and creating conversations with this idiom. Oh yes, we're going to do review. We're going to test your knowledge and make sure you understand what we've been studying. Our goal in this idiom course is to master this idiom 2. Conversation Introduction: Let's do conversation. We're going to see this idiom in action. Conversation Number one Sam. If we don't get our hands dirty, none of the employees will respect us, Amy. But I just got promoted and now have a corner office with a great view. Sam, listen to me. Your promotion is great, but we must get our hands dirty to maintain employee morale. Conversation number two. Tanya, I know you got your hands dirty. Working for the mob about five years ago, Eric. Well, you get your hands dirty every time you break into rich people's homes and steal things. Tanya. Hey, this conversation is about your illegal activity, not mine. Let's stay focused. Don't worry. If you didn't understand everything that happened or all of the words in this conversation , we're going to return in a few minutes and talk about all these conversations. Wonderful. We just did conversation 3. Pronunciation Practice (3 Speeds): Let's do some pronunciation. Great. We're going to practice seeing this idiom with three different speeds. See, the animals were going to dio turtle speed, rabbit speed and birds Speed. I need you to repeat out loud after me, I will say each one at the different speeds and then pause in a way for you to repeat. Let's boost your pronunciation. Here we go with turtle speed. Repeat after me. Get your hands dirty one more time. Get your hands dirty. Okay, let's move on to rabbit speed. A little bit quicker. Here we go. Get your hands dirty. Get your hands dirty. And of course, we got to move on to birds. Speed. This is regular speed. This is what you would hear if you're talking to someone in conversation. Here we go. Get your hands dirty. Get your hands dirty. All right. We just did some pronunciation. Fabulous 4. Definition With Similar & Opposite Expressions: let's explore the definition off this 80. Um, what the heck does get your hands dirty mean? We're about to find out. First, there is a literal meaning. This is what the words mean by themselves. So get your hands dirty means probably what you were thinking to get your hands dirty. So imagine, like in the pictures here someone has been working outside or grabbing dirt or touching something that's dirty. They got their hands dirty. So that's the literal meaning. That's what the words of the idiom mean. However, of course, there is a figurative meaning, and this idiom is a little bit unique because it has two figurative meanings. You see, down here, I put number one. This is gonna be the first definition of the idiom, and in a moment we'll go to number two. So the figurative meaning is the hidden meaning, the meaning. That's not obvious, but it's understood because native English speakers use it all the time. Okay, so the first meaning off get your hands dirty, is to help out to get involved. For example, if the boss maybe in this picture, the boss is the guy without the reflective vests, so this guy over here. He got his hands dirty by going and helping out the employees by doing the work, which not is necessarily his job. But he decided to help out Over here in this picture, we have five people in there looking at a laptop. Let's just say, for example, that the guy in the middle that's the boss. He decided to get his hands dirty and help his employees out and show them something about the presentation or about the financial statistics or something. The boss decided to get involved. He decided to me, we do some of the work that the regular employees have to do. It might not be his responsibility, but he decided to get his hands dirty. He decided to help out. So that is the first meaning off. Get your hands dirty. There is a second meaning. Ah, second hidden meaning for get your hands dirty. Perhaps you've heard of this one before. Here we go to get your hands dirty. The second meaning is to do something illegal. You're breaking the law. You're committing a crime. Like over here. This guy has a gun in his back. Park it and it's a pretty safe guest to say he's not going to do something that the police or the government would like. These guys in the middle. They look kind of dark, maybe a little bit angry and aggressive. They may have some plans to get their hands dirty and do something illegal, something that is not right. Maybe this guy on the left, he's part of the Chinese Mafia, and they're going to rob someone or extort someone, which means to take money from them by forcing them to give money. Okay, so that is the second meaning of Get your hands dirty. It's to do something illegal. Now let's explore some similar and opposite expressions to get your hands dirty. And over here you could see this picture or the hands air, all holding each other. We're going to first review the first definition, so all of these expressions in the opposite and similar expressions will have a similar or opposite meaning to get your hands dirty. The first meaning. So I will say each one, and I need you to repeat after me. Here we go, be willing to work with subordinates, do dull and regular work get involved with work or a project. All of these expressions are green and, just like above is green, so they're similar. They mean almost the same thing with different words. The word subordinates means someone who works below you or works for you. So the boss would be up here and the subordinates would be down here. The subordinates are his employees or her employees. So if the boss is willing toe work with the subordinates, he's really willing to do things that necessarily aren't what he's supposed to be doing all the time. Or they're not his job responsibilities. But he wants to help out. So year she decides to get their hands dirty and help the employees. The word dull is just another word that means boring, not exciting. So often there's work at that needs to be done that is dull. It's not exciting, and usually the boss doesn't have to do it. But if the boss sees the employees and the employees really overloaded with work, the boss might say, might think that, you know, I'll get my hands dirty. I'll help out. I'll do the dull and regular work, which is not exciting, but I want to get involved and help out get involved means to take action, to do something. So if the boss wants to get his hands dirty, or even if another employee who said maybe a different section who has different responsibilities, they want to help someone else, they want to get their hands dirty so they get involved. And they helped him out with work or maybe a project. All right, let's do the opposite. Will do some expressions with the opposite meaning to get your hands dirty. Repeat after me refused to assist lower level workers. Do specialized work. Avoid working on other tasks. So once again, in red over here, these are all expressions, which are the opposite in meaning to get your hands dirty. So if get your hands dirty means to do something to get involved. The opposite is not wanting to get involved and not wanting to help out. So refuse, which means to basically say no or deny or not do something, refused to assist lower level workers. In other words, you're refusing to assist your subordinates. You don't want to help them out. You only want to do your job responsibilities, and that's it. so maybe the boss just stays in his office all day long, and Onley does what the boss is supposed to do and doesn't help the employees when they need it. Doing specialized work is the opposite of getting your hands dirty, because oftentimes getting your hands dirty is doing dull and regular work, which is necessary. It's important, but it's not very exciting or specialized, so specialized work is very unique. It takes a lot of skills, and it's very special. It's very specialized. Also avoid working on other tasks, so avoid means to not do to do other things, so you don't have to do that. Tasks could be project work that needs to be done or a list of things that the employees need to do. So if you avoid working on other tasks, you don't do anything that's outside your job responsibilities. Your job description. You only do what's on your list of things to do. You don't help other people out. So that was the first definition. There's a second definition as well. All right, here we go. And once again, the second definition has to dio with criminal activity doing things that are illegal repeat after me. Do something illegal or forbidden. Commit a crime engaged in unlawful behavior. So these expressions are similar to get your hands dirty and specifically when we're talking about crimes criminals, the mob, mobsters, mafia people doing things they probably shouldn't be doing. And if the police knew those people would probably be locked up, so forbidden means prohibited. It's something that you're not supposed to do or there's a law that says, Do not steal or do not do that. Illegal is the opposite of legal legal means. It's okay to do it and illegal means it's not OK, so if you get your hands dirty if you go rob a bank, you could say you did something illegal and forbidden. Commit a crime is the same meaning as break the law. Get your hands dirty, engage in unlawful behavior. Engage is committing to do something. Making a choice to carry out an action unlawful is the opposite of lawful. A lawful would be the same as legal and unlawful would be the same as illegal behavior is conduct actions, things that you're doing. So if you engage in unlawful behavior, guess what you're getting your hands dirty. You're doing something illegal and forbidden. All right, let's move on to the opposites. Repeat after me. Respect the laws and government. Be a law abiding citizen. Be open, honest and above board. So these are the opposites in this section. You're not getting your hands dirty. You're doing things which are okay, and they're not prohibited, and they're not forbidden. So if you respect the laws in government, then you probably won't have any problems with the police or the government. Respect means to honor, to follow, to not make problems be a law abiding citizen is another way to say respect the laws in government laws of the rules that the society or the government or town, whoever they have an abiding means to follow to respect, to not make problems be open, honest and above board open. In this situation means, like you're not trying to hide anything. You're not doing anything illegal, honest would be means truthful. Not trying to make problems lying or doing things that you shouldn't be doing above board just means honest, nothing to hide. And it's out in the open. The idea behind this phrase is that there is an idiom called under the table or below the table were like two criminals. One's gonna pay the other one, but they don't want anybody to know. So they take the money and they stick it under the table, and they do their business below the table under the table. And this is above board. So aboard would be like a piece of wood, maybe like the top of a table. And you do your business above the table because you don't have anything to hide. It's honest, and you're not causing problems, and it's you're not doing anything that's prohibited or forbidden. Okay, so these are similar and opposite expressions to the second meaning off. Get your hands dirty. All right, we just did the definition wonderful. 5. Conversation Analysis: it's time for conversation analysis. Let's take a look at the two conversations that we saw when we first started, and let's learn more about them. Let's explore them. Talk about them. Conversation number one. Sam. If we don't get our hands dirty, none of the employees will respect us, Amy. But I just got promoted and now have a corner office with a great view. Sam, listen to me. Your promotion is great, but we must get our hands dirty to maintain employees more round. So let's talk about this conversation. In this situation we have to employees, I would say their management management, maybe a manager, a bar, someone above the regular level of of employees. So they're talking and they're talking about getting their hands dirty. This is definition number one, where the management employees or the managers, the bosses, they decide to help out the employees. So and the first part, Sam says, if we don't get our hands dirty, none of the employees will respect us. He could have said, If we don't work with our subordinates, none of the employees will respect us. So if we don't work and help out the people that are below us that work for us. They're not going to respect us. Amy Amy is probably not the best manager, but I just got promoted and now have a corner office with a great view. It's easy to see that Amy's top priorities are probably not helping her employees. She's just fascinated and excited about her new corner office, which is probably pretty cool because if you're having corner office, you have probably windows on both sides in a fabulous view. But that doesn't really help your employees when they're pulling their hair out and so frustrated because they can't get their work done. So Sam seems to be more of a reasonable manager. He's willing to help out the employees and get things done. So Sam tries to talk to Amy and says, Listen to me, your promotion is great, but we must get her hands dirty. In other words, we must get involved at work to maintain employee morale. Employee morale. First, morale is like attitude. How are you doing? I have high morale. I got great energy, great emotion, or I have low morale. Oh, I'm so depressed. Things were horrible. The world is coming to it at a. So if your boss or you're working somewhere, do you think you would want to have the employees have high morale? Good moral or low? Morrogh. I think the answer is pretty obvious, right? You want your employees to have good morale, high moral cause, then they're much more focused and able to get their work, their work done. So Sam wants to focus on maintaining employee morale. So if the morale is already at this level, people are happy. They're getting things done, their productive. They're effective. Then Sam wants to keep that level. He wants to maintain the word maintain means to keep it where it is, or maybe even go higher improve. But you don't want a opposite of maintain would be to decrease or to lose where you're at lose momentum. So Sam was focused on maintaining employee morale. He wants to get involved. He wants to work with these with the subordinates. Amy is focused on her wonderful office. Let's move on to conversation number two. Tanya, I know you got your hands dirty. Working for the mob about five years ago, Eric. Well, you get your hands dirty every time you break into rich people's homes and steal things. Tanya. Hey, this conversation is about your illegal activity, not mine. Let's stay focused in this conversation. Get your hands dirty, Got your hands dirty. This idiom is the definition number two of Get Your Hands dirty. So we're talking about illegal activity crimes, unlawful behavior, breaking the law. So, Tanya, she's talking to Eric and she says, I know you got your hands dirty Working for the mob. The mob is short for mobsters. It could be like the Mafia Gangsters, groups of illegal people that are going to do things that break the law, right? Probably violent things. Maybe hurt people, steal money and do stuff like that. So time you could have said, I know you did something illegal working for the Mob about five years ago. So time he is talking about Eric's past, Eric responds. Well, you get your hands dirty every time you break into rich people's homes and steal things. In other words, well, you commit a crime every time you break into rich people's homes and steal things. I think one thing we can take away from this conversation is Tania and Eric are both criminals. They both do illegal things. They break the law. They dio unlawful things. They're not law abiding citizens. And for some reason they want to compare and talk about what they've done in the past. Over here in the bottom, we see some of the stuff that Eric did something with guns, pointing stuff of people. And that doesn't always end up well now, Tanya, she's not really an angel, either. See, she's picking into a safe and taking the money of people, rich people or other people and taking stuff that's not hers. So we have a couple of criminals, All right, so we just did conversation analysis. I think that's just great. 6. Usage, Tips, & Strategies: Let's talk about usage. I'm going to give you some tips and strategies for using this idiom for putting it into practice. Here we go. Let's talk about the first definition definition number one. We see the hands again over here. And just remember that the definition number one for this idiom is getting involved helping out your employees in doing things that are not part of your job responsibilities. But you want to help out and make sure there's high morale at the work environment. So with this indium, we need to match the pronoun to fit the sentence. Here is the pronoun. It's a possessive pronoun. Get your hands dirty. This will change. So I'll give you some examples and show you how it will change depending on the subject of the sentence. If it's I, I would say I got my hands dirty. You you got your hands dirty. You're going to see a pattern here. You, your I my and so on. So let's go down the list. He got his hands dirty. She got her hands dirty. We got our hands dirty. They got their hands dirty. You could also change he and she with names. David got his hand dirty, his hands dirty Martha got her hands, dirty stuff like that. So this is for the first definition of get your hands dirty. Make sure to match the pronoun to fit the sentence. So match the pronoun in here. Your gonna have to match it with the subject of the sentence. Okay, let's go to the second definition. Second definition includes what the 1st 1 did, but it also has a second part because sometimes when crimes happen, there's someone that's making someone else do a crime. So, for example, I got your hands dirty. Maybe I sold you a bicycle. But you didn't know that I stole that bicycle from someone else. So later, somehow the police find out and they see your bicycle and they checked the computer and the numbers. Serial numbers match and they see that the bicycle you have is stolen. So they arrest you. And they think you stole the bicycle. You might be innocent, but I got your hands dirty. I got you involved in criminal activity, so they got my hands dirty. Maybe the mob, but call the mob of the Gangsters called me on the phone and said We're gonna hold your kid hostage if you don't go and rob the bank. So I did criminal activity, but it was someone else who got me involved and got my hands dirty. She got his hands dirty. He got your hands dirty. We got her hands dirty. So this time we're the criminals and we found a lady or a woman that we need. We need her to do something illegal for us. So we got her hands dirty. I got their hands dirty. You've got our hands dirty. So there are multiple conversations. The main thing is here, this pronoun will change and we need to make sure it fits the sentence. It matches a subject. This idiom can be used as its own sentence. If it's a command, Ah, Command is telling someone to do something or requesting that someone do something. So if the sentence is, get your hands dirty, do it now. The first sentence get your hands dirty is telling someone to do something. It's a command. So that's when we can use this idiom as its own sentence because it's a command. We need to make sure the verb get matches the context and the situation. So we're talking about the past, present, future, those kind of situations. So here's the verb to get, and we need to make sure that it matches the rest of the sentence. Let's take a look at this idiom being used in the past, presence and future, so you can kind of get idea how it looks in the past. Last year, we found out they had gotten their hands dirty when they bribed the police to look the other way. Mm. So here we are in the past tense and in this example, get your hands dirty is part of another sentence is part of a larger sentence, so it fits inside. But it's in the past. So the verb change to had gotten in the present. Right now, Sam is getting his hands dirty. He's working with his employees to help finish the project on time. So in the present right now is getting his hands dirty, and it's within a larger sentence for the future. Next summer, we'll get your hands dirty when I teach you everything I know about robbing banks. Here we have will get your hands dirty. We can't see the will. But the two l's wheel is We will. So Wheel is short for we will. And in this sentence we had to make it. The future will get your hands dirty. All right, We just did use it. Let's move on. 7. Practice, The 4 Types of Sentences In English: Oh, boy, it's time to do practice. We've been learning and studying and focusing on what we need to know. Now let's put it to practice. Let's put it to work first. We're going to use the idiom, get your hands dirty and we're going to use a picture and we're going to do some stuff. We're going to create the four different kinds of sentences in English, and we'll also create a conversation. Wonderful. First, let's review Of the four different kinds of sentences we have, the 1st 1 is sharing information. It's a declarative sentence. Next give a command or make a request is called an imperative sentence. Then number the third kind of sentences. Ask a question and express strong emotion. So let's use something illegal because we're this lesson is all this course is all about. Get your hands dirty. So let's see, I would share information as an example is I stole the money. So I am telling you something. I'm sharing information. I stole the money for the second kind of sentence. Give a command or make a request. I'm telling you to steal the money. I'm not asking. I'm telling you, steal the money. If I want to be respectful, if I'm a respectful criminal, I might say Please, please steal the money. But more likely than not, I would probably just say, Steal the money or I'm gonna beat you up or something like that. Asking the question is 1/3 kind of sentence in English. So we might just say who who stole the money? And we put a question mark at the end showing that it's a question. The fourth kind of sentence is where we express strong emotion. It's called an exclamatory sentence because we put an exclamation point at the end. Let's see. So if something is, ah, we might say, Ah, that guy stole my money, Get him! So that's a bit more exciting, right? This is not good excitement, but it's showing strong emotion. That guy stole my money. Get him 8. Practice, Create Idiom Sentences: let's create the four different kinds of sentences who this and might get interesting. Does it look like we're using the first definition of get your hands dirty? I don't think this is a boss helping out his employees. I think this is probably some criminals in doing something which is illegal, committing a crime or breaking the law. So let's make a couple sentences where we share information. Hello, Joe, Sam and Bob, I guess. First, let's describe the picture. It looks like there are two guys Joe and Bob who are going to do something not so nice to Sam. We don't know the history. We can use our imagination and think what the history might be. But it looks like Joe is getting his fist ready. He might be about to punch Sam. We'll see. So here's my first sentence, and this is what you would call a declared of sentence where I share information. I have a black belt in karate, and there's no way I'm going to get my hands dirty, going to make the idiom bold. So jump cell. It's easy to see, so that's the first sentence. Repeat after me. I have a black belt in karate, and there's no way I'm going to get my hands dirty. So for this sentence, I would say it's probably Sam who's saying it, and we can make it obvious that he's saying it by adding some quotation marks. So it's Sam's in the middle and he's seeing this sentence. I have a black belt in karate, and there's no way I'm going to get my hands dirty. This would make me think that Joe and Bob are asking or trying to force Sam to do something he doesn't want to do. They're trying to get Sam's hands dirty. They want him to do something illegal, something that's breaking the law. So Sam could say, There's no way I'm going to break the law. There's no way I'm going to commit a crime for the second sentence. Let's have Joel respond. Joe says I'm going to punch you in the face if you ask us to get our hands dirty one more time. So maybe this situation is now what we thought get her hands dirty will make a bold. So maybe Sam is the one that was asking Joe and Bob to get their hands dirty. Who? The situation is getting so full of drama. Repeat this sentence out loud after me. I'm going to punch you in the face if you ask us to get our hands dirty one more time. So Sam is likely asking Joe and Bob to do something illegal and maybe Joe and Bob Kat Sam And there they want to make it very clear We don't want to get our hands dirty. We don't like having trouble with the police. We don't want to break the law. Mm. So here we are. We did two sentences that share information. In other words there declared of sentences. Let's make two sentences that are commands or requests and we're gonna use the same picture . Good old Joe, Bob and Sam. First sentence. Get your hands dirty. There's the command. If you don't, we'll find someone else who will war. This would probably be Jill Joe talking. Let's fix up the sentence. Make the idiom bald. Right at the beginning is the command. Get your hands dirty so he's not asking nicely. He's commanding. He's telling Sam to do it. Repeat after me. Get your hands dirty. If you don't, we'll find someone else who will. All right, so we don't know the history, but we kind of have an idea that Joe and Bob are probably not the most honorable, honorable people. They're probably criminals. And they're involved with Sam. Somehow. We don't know, but they want him to do something illegal. All right, let's do another another command or request. Please get your hands dirty. My son is being held hostage and they need you to rob the bank right now. Things change. Things change. Here is idiom. Get your hands dirty before we move on and talk about the sentence. Let's repeat it out loud. Repeat after me, please get your hands dirty. My son is being held hostage and they need you to rob the bank right now. So the the request. It's more of a request this time because we put the word please in front of it. So it's like a mini command. It's like a week. Command is more of a request. Please get your hands dirty. So in this situation's a little bit stranger. The person's son, maybe Sam son was held hostage, and the criminals that are holding them hostage said You've got to go rob this bank or were not, or else we're gonna hurt your son. So Sam went up to Joe and Bob and said, Come on, you gotta robbed the bank and you kept pushing and pushing. Maybe they got pissed off because they don't want to do anything illegal, and they're like, holding them down. Good. Sam was so emotional and just unpredictable. What? See, what? What's he gonna do? Because he's scared about his son. So Sam needs something done so he can save his son. And he wants Joe and Bob to help out because they need the money to pay the hostage free the hostage. Okay. Either way, these air two sentences that use ah, command or a request. Let's move on. Now let's make two sentences where we ask a question. Same thing. Hello, Joe. Salmon Bob. Why do you guys want me to get my hands dirty? I tell the police anyway. All right. Get my hands dirty. Make it bold. Repeat after me. Why do you guys want me to get my hands dirty? I tell the police anyway. So the first sentence is where we ask a question. Why do you guys want me to get my hands dirty. So this is probably Sam talking and we'll put the quotations. So it's easy to see that Sam is talking and he's talking to Joe and Bob like always and saying, You know why? I don't want to get my hands dirty. I just tell the police anyway. So who knows? Maybe Joe and Bob wants Sam to hold on to some stolen material or some stolen diamonds or something. Because the police were chasing them, Who knows? And Sam's just being honest and you say, Well, I'd tell the police anyway, which is probably not a good idea for Sam, because if you tell Joe involved that I would tell the police Anyway, let's just say Sam is probably not going to be doing so well after this situation. Let's make another question. Oh, wrong answer, buddy. Do you know what we're going to do if you don't get your hands dirty? Whoa. So this is probably Joe talking Wrong answer buddy saying you know, Sam, you're saying the wrong things at the wrong time. Repeat after me. Wrong answer, buddy. Do you know what we're going to do if you don't get your hands dirty. Okay, So Sam just told them that, you know, I would tell the police anyway, and just, like, wrong answer. But we don't want the police to catch us. Do you know what we're going to do if you get your hands dirty? Well, we can imagine what will happen. Sam's probably going to get beat up, and he probably knows already what Joe and Bob did that was illegal. So that make Sam a witness. So if the police cart Sam, they could ask Sam. Hey, what did Joe and Bob do? So this situation is probably not very good for Sam. Something bad is going to happen for sure. Let's make the fourth kind of sentence an exclamatory sentence where we need to express strong emotion. All right, Same situation. We're getting to learn so much about Sam, Joe and Bob. I don't want to get my hands dirty exclamation. I can't lose my job. Mm. Get my hands dirty. Make it bold. Repeat after me. I don't want to get my hands dirty. I can't lose my job. So this is probably Sam talking. And once again, Joe and Bob, they want him to do something illegal just by what Sam said. I would think that maybe Sam works in a place where he has access to something valuable. Maybe money, cash, electron, ICS or something that Joe and Bob want. And they want Sam to probably steal it for them. But Sam's thinking, man, if I do this illegal stuff, I'm probably going to get fired. I can't lose my job. So Sam could have said something like, I don't want to do anything illegal. I don't want to break the law. I can't lose my job. All right. So, Joe, good old Joe is going to say if you don't steal the money and get your hands dirty will feed you to the fish. All right, get your hands dirty. We'll make it easy to see in this sentence. Repeat after me. Add some emotion to your voice and make it exclamatory because we're expressing strong emotion. So remember, Joe was kind of pissed off. He wants to get something done. If you repeat after me, If you don't steal the money and get your hands dirty, we'll feed you to the fish. So in this sentence, feed you to the fish. What do you think that means? Dump him in the water. So if Joe threatens to feed Sam to the fish, that means kill him and dump him in the river. Dump him in the ocean, and then, you know, after a while, the fish will eat him. So this is a very strong threat. If you don't steal the money and get your hands dirty and do the illegal activity will feed you to the fish Will kill you if you don't do it. We're asking if you don't get your hands dirty. So this is another situation where Sam bad things were happening in Sam's life. Okay, so we just made the four different kinds of sentences using Get your hands dirty. 9. Practice, Create Idiom Conversations: it's time to create a conversation using the idiom. Here we go, who looks like issue, and Peter is sitting down in a cafe, and Peter has, I think, a cup of tea or cup of coffee. There's a lady at a different table talking on a cell phone, and Aisha doesn't look very happy. We can't tell Peter's expression, but who knows? So they're probably having a conversation. They are having a conversation, and we're gonna see what that conversation is because we're going to make a conversation using Get your hands dirty. So first, Aisha says, I just we used the quotations. I just found out you got your hands dirty on our last deal. Mm, You got your hands dirty on our last deal. We'll see which definition they're talking about, Peter replies. I'm not sure what you mean. So Peter is pretending What I don't understand. I Easter says a gangster called me this morning asking for money. Well, Peter said, Oh, that was Rico. He wants me to get my hands dirty again and steal more of your money to make this one bold . So Peter does know what they're talk. What I used to talking about. So here's the complete conversation. The intro maybe I use just said, Hey, Peter, we need to go out and have a meeting. I need to talk about some things that have been happening. Network. Something I found out Peter's like. All right, boss. Let's go. I use a says. I just found out you got your hands dirty on our last deal. Peter. I'm not sure what you mean. Aisha Ah. Gangster called me this morning asking for money. Peter. Oh, that was Rico. He wants me to get my hands dirty again and steal more of your money. It's safe to say that in this conversation. Get your hands dirty. We're talking about the second definition. We're talking about illegal activity, breaking the law, doing something that's illegal, unlawful and prohibited. Forbidden. Okay. I should could have said I just found out you did something illegal on our last deal and exactly what it waas. It looks like Peter stole money from I used to. Somehow maybe I should have given him money and said, you need to buy this product or you need to invest in this fund or do something specific with the money in Peter's like and then gave it to Rico. Rico called, and he wants to do it again because he probably made money off the deal and maybe was a little bit awkward when Rico talked with Aisha on the phone. I was probably like, What? I don't know any Gangsters, but Peter does. Peter knows Rico and Rico wants Peter to get his hands dirty again and steal more of Aisha's money. Peter could have said he wants me to do something forbidden again and steal more of your money. He wants me to break the law again and steal more of your money. So we don't know how this conversation goes from here. But if I was to guess I used, you would probably look even more pissed off. Peter, you're stealing from me. Our companies already have in trouble and you're stealing money and working with Gangsters . Um, all right, let's move on and make what? Yes, another conversation or Rick? Jerry, they're looking at me. They're looking at us. It seems like they want to talk to us about something. Both have sunglasses on. They look kind of aggressive and intimidating, like they want to do something bad to us, Rick. We got a complaint from an employee that you're not getting your hands dirty. Who Not getting your hands dirty or we're going to be using definition number one or number two. We're gonna find out shortly. Jerry says, Yeah. Mary says you don't help clean the toilets anymore. Mm. So I guess we don't help out. Jerry's telling us about it. Rick says they asked us to put on sunglasses. So we look tough when we talk to you. Mm. Jerry. Yeah. You'd better get your hands dirty or will put you in in the toilet. Get your hands dirty. Make it bold. Let's review the conversation. This is not what I was expecting. Rick. We got a complaint from an employee that you're not getting your hands dirty. Jerry. Yeah. Mary says you don't help clean the toilets anymore, Rick. They asked us to put on sunglasses. So we look tough when we talk to you. Jerry, you're You'd better get your hands dirty. We'll put you in the toilet. So what do you think in this conversation? Get your hands dirty. Are we using the first definition where it's get involved and help out Or are we using the second definition? Where is doing something illegal? The picture makes us think that it would be something illegal, but it's not quite. I guess you could say if if they put put us in the toilet, that would probably be illegal. But when they're using getting your hands dirty, get your hands dirty. They're talking about doing your work, helping out, helping the other employees, getting involved in doing what needs to get done. So when Rick says we got a complaint from employees that you're not getting your hands dirty, he could have said we got in a complaint from an employee that you're not getting involved . You're not helping out with work, and it turns out that the work is cleaning toilets. So they're talking to us. And I guess in this situation, our job is, or maybe our job isn't only cleaning the toilets, but we should be cleaning the toilets and they think we should be cleaning the toilets. So they came to talk to us and Rick and Jerry, you're probably employees there. And the boss maybe ask them, you know, pay, put on sunglasses. You look a little bit tougher because we need this guy to clean the toilets. So Jerry says, Yeah, you'd better get your hands dirty. We'll put you in the toilet. He could have said, Yeah, you better help out. Better get involved and help the employees or we'll put you in the toilet. So this situation, this conversation wasn't exactly what it appeared to be at the beginning, when u T C two guys like this two thugs, You think that something illegal is gonna happen, However, in the conversation for get your hands dirty were using definition number one where an employee or a manager is not helping out, and they want him to help out by cleaning the toilets. All right, so we just did practice. Wow. 10. Review, Question #1 With Explanation: That's right. It's time for review. You know what? I'd better put on my nerd glasses to make sure I can focus. Okay. Are you ready? Here we go. Question number one Which of the following statements is true about the idiom? Get your hands dirty. The pronoun your will Maybe change the pronoun Your will never change. Take a moment. Pause the video. I'm going to show you the answer in 54321 All right. The answer is the pronoun your will maybe change. It's not all the time that is going to change, but it's very likely it will change Once again. We're talking about the your and get your hands dirty. So remember, we're talking about I got my hands dirty. He gets his hands dirty Tom gets their hands dirty We get your hands dirty. So depending on the subject of the sentence, we're likely going to change this pronoun your alright if anybody says to you Hey, the word your the pronoun, it's never going to change. You say, uh, that's not right. 11. Review, Question #2 With Explanation: question number two. Ah, conversation. Wonderful, Henry. I'm very pleased with how things went. It was a great team effort, and Tom was a great leader. Patty, are you kidding? Tom sat in your office the whole time and watch TV. He didn't get his hands dirty at all. Which expression below is similar to the green words above. A Eat the pizza. Be get involved, See? Break the law de smell the roses. Take a moment. Pause. The video, which answer A, B, C or D, is similar to the green words in the conversation. I'm going to show you the answer in 54321 ha Answer is b get involved. This is similar to what get his hands dirty. Means get your hands dirty means to jump in and do the work. And maybe do things that are not part of your job description. But you want to help out and get involved. So the answer is B. If you put it in the sentence, Patty could have said, Are you kidding? Tom sat in your office the whole time and watch TV. He didn't get involved at all, so we could have said get his hands dirty or get involved. Looks like they're talking about Tom and Henry things. Tom is great. Patty things. Tom just doesn't want to get his hands dirty at all. Let's talk about the wrong answers. A. Eat the pizza. Well, that one's probably easiest to tell. It has nothing to do with getting your hands dirty or getting involved. So is incorrect. See, break the law. Who? That sounds interesting. But this is not the right definition, and it's, Ah, now we're talking about We're not talking about doing something illegal. We're just talking about getting involved. So break the law is a definition of get his hands dirty. But it's not in this situation. We would have to be talking about, like robbing a bank or stealing money or doing something like that in this conversation. They're just talking about things that work and how the boss should help out be a better leader by helping his employees. So C is incorrect. These incorrect smell the roses because it also it's like a doesn't have anything to do with the situation. Smell the roses is I kind of take everything in and appreciate things, but it doesn't fit. It's not we're talking about we're talking about get get your hands dirty and something similar 12. Review, Question #3 With Explanation: question number three. Another conversation. Olivia. Last year my partner and I got her hands dirty. When we stole 10 cars, my partner was caught, but I wasn't. Oh, yeah, Jack, It's interesting how happy you are. I thought you and your partner were best friends. Which answer below is the opposite of the green Words above a Were law abiding, be invested our time, see, Committed a few crimes De broke many laws. Mm Pause the video. Take a look at the conversation and the answers. We were looking for the opposite. This time, Which answer is the opposite? Off the green words in the conversation. I'm going to give you the answer in 54321 A. The answer is, were law abiding important thing. We got a look at the question. Which answer is the opposite? So we want something that does not mean actually means the opposite off. Got our hands dirty or the idiom. Get your hands dirty Reliever the opposite. So in this situation they're talking about stealing 10 cars, so this would be definition number two up. Get your hands dirty. We're not talking about definition number one where you help your employees at work? No, this one is the illegal definition of get your hands dirty. Were stealing things were breaking the law or committing crimes. Okay, so they got their hands dirty. So we're looking for something that is the opposite. The only one down here that's the opposite is were law abiding letter eight. Because law abiding, like we talked to boat, means that you follow the laws. You respect the laws, you don't break the law. So a stop as it is the answer. Let's talk about the wrong answers, be invested our time. It's not right because we're looking for the opposite investigator. Time means we spent our time on that activity. But we're looking for something that, you know, is opposite of doing something illegal. Investor time doesn't work, see, committed a few crimes. Well, that's exactly what we did. But however, the question is asking for the opposite of God. Our hands dirty, so committed a few crimes is if we were looking for something similar. But we're looking for opposite. So letter c doesn't work. De broke many laws, just like see, that is exactly what we did. We got our hands dirty and broke many laws. But once again we're looking for the opposite so that similar. So it's wrong, so d doesn't work, either. 13. Review, Question #4 With Explanation: question number four. I see a picture and I see the idiom Get your hands dirty in the picture. I see six people and it looks like a lady in the middle has your hands up and she's talking and looks like the other people are listening to her. Make a comment using the idiom and the picture Whatever you want. The only thing is that you need to use the idiom and the picture. So take some time, write it down or come come up with it in your head. And then in just a moment, I will show you my answer. Okay. Last chance to positive video. I'm going to talk about my answer in 54321 OK, so we make a comment. Could be a couple of sentence talked a couple of sentences talking about the picture and the idiom. All right, here we go. So let's see, we're inside this lady's head. So she's thinking, and this is what she's thinking. Mary is kind of a jerk. She tells everyone what to do and how to do it, but we all know she'll never get her hands dirty. She sucks. Okay, So, Mary would be this lady here. We'll assume she's the boss or the manager of someone that's in charge. OK, and this lady over here is thinking she's listening. Bush's thinking, other thoughts. So Mary is kind of a jerk. You know what? Repeat out loud. Great. Time to practice our pronunciation. Repeat after me. Mary is kind of a jerk. She tells everyone what to do and how to do it. But we all know what? She never gets her hands dirty. She sucks. Okay, so that is one way that we could make it comment using the medium and the picture. I'm going to give you another way. I'm sure you guys came up with one and leave a comment down below so I can see what your answer. Waas. I'm gonna give you another possibility because there are lots of possibilities and ways to answer this question. So making a comment, using the idiom in the picture, we could also do. Oh, this time. This time Mary is talking So her now she is. This is what she's seen. Everyone. I've decided to get my hands dirty. I will no longer be an unknown in involved manager. Let's get our hands dirty. Wait, let me get Sone gloves first. Okay, So maybe Mary realized that, you know, she's not the greatest boss. And she says, I've decided to get my hands dirty. I will no longer be an uninvolved manager. Let's get her hands dirty. Wait, Let me get some gloves first. Let's make the idioms bold so we can see them and they jump out. Okay. Who? Okay, so repeat after me. I've decided to get my hands dirty. I will no longer be an uninvolved manager. Let's get her hands dirty. Wait, Let me get some gloves first. So how is your pronunciation? Did you repeat after me? I hope so. Okay, so let's talk about the sentence a little bit. Get your hands dirty. Means to get involved, do things and help out. So uninvolved is the opposite of involved, so on. Uninvolved manager. It's someone who probably sits in their office, doesn't interact with the employees. It may do their job duties, but they don't have a great relationship with the employees because they're not willing to help out. So Mary's thinking I'm going to be an involved manager because I'm going to get my hands dirty. However, Mary's a little bit strange, and the employees might be kind of puzzled or confused about what she's really going to do because she's like, Let's get her hands dirty. But then she's like, Wait, let me get some gloves first So if I was an employee, But I was one of these people around here listening to marry, I would be like, Oh, well, she's talking about doing something. But then she's like she wants to use gloves first, so maybe she doesn't really want to help out that much. She wants to make it look like she's gonna help out and get us toe like her more. But when she pauses toe want to use gloves than maybe she's not really gonna help up very much. 14. Review, Question #5 With Explanation: question number five. I see a picture in the idiom. In the picture. I see a dark woods or forest. There's a light shining, and there's a guy with his arms out, and he's looks like he's coming towards us. This should be interesting. Finished the conversation, using the idiom and the picture. So here's the incomplete conversation. The first person says. We looked up and saw the evil murderer running toward us in the dark. The police were chasing after him. So we have a great opportunity here to have a little conversation about this picture and using the medium. So your job is to finish the conversation using the idiom and the picture. Take your time, pause the video and think what would be a great way to continue this conversation? There are lots of possibilities, and in a moment I will show you what I came up with. So positive video takes some time. Think about it and finish this conversation and make sure you use the idiom at least once. All right, I'm going to show you my answer in 54321 All right. So the first part of the conversation well, this is just interesting situation, right? This creepy guys coming towards us in the woods. We look up and saw the evil murderer running towards toward us in the dark. The police were chasing after him. So this guy's a murderer. He's just killed someone, right? So the second person says, Wow, that's incredible. I would be so scared. What did you do next? Oh, we're continuing the conversation and the person responds. We got our hands dirty and helped the police. We grabbed some branches and smacked the guy over the head. All right. And this make this obvious that it's a conversation that they're talking about out loud. So we're gonna add quotations all around quotations or just a simple way to indicate whoever's reading it. It's a conversation that spoken out loud, Okay? And let's find the idiom. We got our hands dirty. Who? Okay, so let's see the conversation. We looked up and saw the evil murderer running toward us in the dark. The police were chasing after him. Don't burn, Fung. Wow, that's incredible. I would be so scared. What did you do next? We got her hands dirty and helped the police. We grab some branches and smacked the guy over the head. We can see that this conversation is happening after what happened in the picture. So the two people are talking and one was there. What happened in the picture and there, explaining to someone else what happened and how it ended. So when they say we got her hands dirty and helped the police. So we're using definition number one of get your hands dirty where you get involved and you help out. And in this situation, it's not our responsibility to do the work for the police, but we decided to help them out. By golly, we grab some branches like the sticks that fall from trees and smacked the guy over the head. And then he was probably knocked out, passed out, or he was delayed long enough for the police to get there and grab him and put him in handcuffs. So when we said we got her hand stirred and helped the police, we could have said we helped out or we got involved and helped the police. All right, so that's the conversation. I'm also going to show you another way that we could finish this conversation All right, so it starts again. We looked up inside the evil murderer, running toward us in the dark. The police were chasing after him. I heard about that chase through the woods. There were some people, uh, in the woods who helped the murderer escape. No, it's getting a little bit juicy. That was us. We got our hands dirty and helped him escape. The guy paid off each one million dollars. We're rich, all right? When we add in my quotations and make the idiom fold this conversation and a little bit different than the other one. So it looks like the guy got away and he was helped. Hmm. Okay, so here's the full conversation. We looked up and saw the evil murderer running toward us in the dark. The police were chasing after him. I heard about that chase through the woods. There were some people in the woods who helped the murderer escape. That was us. We got her hands dirty and helped him escape. The guy paid us each $1 million. We're rich. This is an interesting situation because God, our hands dirty can mean both meanings. Number one and number two off this idiom because the first definition, which is to help out to get involved. Well, we helped. We helped the murder escape, but we also got her hands dirty by committing by breaking the law by committing a crime. So I imagine the police for probably not too happy that we help this guy out. So the guy decided to pay us each a $1,000,000. Uh, if we wanted to change the idiom to other words, similar words we could have said we broke the law and helped him escape. Or you could say we got involved and helped him escape. This is a unique situation. So this idiom here can mean both Help me not get involved and also to do something illegal . Okay, so murderer is just a person who commits murder, please, for chasing after him. And for some reason, there were some people in the woods and they're like, huh? The guy comes running up, says, Hey, I'll give you each a $1,000,000 if you help me escape. And the people are like, Ah, lovely right this way. Come in our car and we'll drive you across town and drop you off and you'll be free. So they're rich. And who knows? The police have probably lock them all up later. And they probably won't even be able to use the $1,000,000. We just finished review off the idiom. Get your hands dirty. How did you do? 15. Final Review: in this idiom course, we studied a money in business idiom. We studied the idiom. Get your hands dirty. This idiom has two meanings. First, it's to get involved to do things and help out your employees. That was definition number one, and we reviewed similar and opposite expressions to the first definition. There was also a second definition, which means to do something illegal to commit a crime to break the law. We also covered similar and opposite expressions for the second definition, where you're doing something illegal in this course, we covered six sections. Conversation, pronunciation, definition, usage, practice and review. We master this idiom.