Essential English Idioms | "cash cow" | Money & Business | Able Lingo ASL | Skillshare

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Essential English Idioms | "cash cow" | Money & Business

teacher avatar Able Lingo ASL, American Sign Language (ASL)

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

15 Lessons (47m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:29
    • 2. Conversation Introduction

      1:16
    • 3. Pronunciation Practice (3 Speeds)

      1:25
    • 4. Definition With Similar & Opposite Expressions

      4:17
    • 5. Conversation Analysis

      4:13
    • 6. Usage, Tips, & Strategies

      2:36
    • 7. Practice, The 4 Types of Sentences In English

      2:29
    • 8. Practice, Create Idiom Sentences

      6:43
    • 9. Practice, Create Idiom Conversations

      7:26
    • 10. Review, Question #1 with Explanation

      1:35
    • 11. Review, Question #2 with Explanation

      2:35
    • 12. Review, Question #3 with Explanation

      3:05
    • 13. Review, Question #4 with Explanation

      2:20
    • 14. Review, Question #5 with Explanation

      4:15
    • 15. Final Review

      0:46
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About This Class

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In this course, we use an essential English idiom as a foundation to improve your English grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, comprehension, and conversation.

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THIS LESSON IS DIVIDED INTO SIX (6) SECTIONS:

• CONVERSATION ~ I guide you through multiple conversations using the target idiom. I'll also analyze each conversation and explain how it works using the idiom.

• PRONUNCIATION ~ We improve your pronunciation by practicing at three (3) different speeds.

• DEFINITION ~ I teach the meaning of the idiom using pictures and detailed explanations. Then, we explore similar and opposite expressions which boost your vocabulary and fluency.

• USAGE ~ We explore tips and strategies for using this idiom in different situations. I'll show you how it's used in the past, present, and future tenses.

• PRACTICE ~ We use unique pictures to create sentences and conversations using the target idiom. This helps to see the idiom in action and become more comfortable with its use.

• REVIEW ~ I test your ability to use and understand this idiom with quiz questions that review what was covered in the course. I explain both the correct and incorrect answers.

ENJOY IMPROVING YOUR ENGLISH FLUENCY

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: in this idiom course, we're going to study a money and business idiom. The idiom is cash cow. We're going to use this idiom as a foundation to improve your grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, comprehension and conversation. This course will have six different parts. The first part is conversation where you can see the idiom in action. Next will move on to pronunciation and practice saying this idiom at three different speeds . You can repeat after me, then we'll do the definition. It's important to figure out what this idiom means will also give you similar and opposite expressions so we can boost your vocabulary. Then we'll do usage. I'll give you tips on how to best to use this idiom. Then we'll do practice. Who will make sure you have lots of practice making sentences and making conversations using this idiom. Then we'll do review and test you and make sure you understand what we've learned in this course. We're going to master this idiom 2. Conversation Introduction: Let's see this idiom in conversation. Conversation number one, Fred. We had no idea your business would be such a cash cow, Tom. Yeah, I know. Sardine flavored ice cream is the way to go. Fred. If this cash cow keeps producing, you can retire early and live on a tropical island. Conversation number two, Henry, that company is a potential cash cow. Sarah, I know. We must bring them in as a new client. Martha, I'm worried someone will get to them first. George, keep focused. We need this cash cow. These are conversations number one and number two. Don't worry. If you don't understand everything that happened, we'll get to them and we'll explain everything. We just did conversation, all right? 3. Pronunciation Practice (3 Speeds): let's practice our pronunciation of this idiom. We're going to do it in three different speeds. We have turtle speed, rabbit speed and birds speed. So I will say the idiom. And I need you to repeat after me out loud and improve your pronunciation. Okay, here we go with turtle speed. Cash cow. One more time. Cash cow. Here we go with rabbit speed. A little bit faster. Repeat after me. Cash, cow, Cash, cow! All right, it's time to move on to birds, Speed. This is the speed that native English speakers would use when saying this stadium. Here we go. Repeat after me. Cash, cow, Cash, cow! All right, we just did pronunciation. 4. Definition With Similar & Opposite Expressions: Let's talk about the definition for cash cow. What the heck does this idiom mean? First, let's talk about the literal meaning. What is the dictionary? Meaning of the words. So we have cash and we have a cow move. When we look at this idiom, we might think, OK, we need to pay some cash to buy the cow or the cow is worth a certain amount of money. So that's not quite what the idiom means. So we move on to the figurative meaning. Like all idioms, there's a hidden meaning. There's a secondary meaning, so cash cow is a great source of income. This could be a huge amount of money all at once, like winning the lottery, a cash cow. Or it could be a reliable source of income that comes infrequently or a bit by bit. Over time, we can see a calendar. Here it's January, and every few days there's a new bag of money. So whatever this investment is, it's a great cash cow because it keeps producing income. It could be dividends from a stock. It could be rental income or some sort of investment that keeps producing income. Let's talk about similar and opposite expressions to cash Cow. I'll do the similar ones first, and I'm going to pause after I say each one so you can repeat after me and improve your pronunciation. Here we go. Reliable source of income. Huge profit source. Consistent option for making money. So these are all similar expressions to cash cow. Other ways to describe what a cash cow is. Let's do the opposite. Repeat after me. Money pit, Unwise investment drain on finances, Waste of money. So in the red, we have opposite expressions things which are not similar to cash Cow. Actually, they are the opposite of cash cow. The 1st 1 money pit is actually another idiom. Wonderful. And a money pit is a place where you keep putting money. You invest more and more and more in your money. Poof disappears. Your money doesn't come back. Ah, pit is a big hole like a well or a big hole in the ground and think that you're taking money and you're throwing money into the pit. So a money pit is a really bad investment or a place where you put your money and it just doesn't grow or come back a drain on finances is something that sucks your money away when we say the word drain we're talking about. It's kind of like a hole where things go down, but they don't come back up. It's just like on your sink in your kitchen and your bathroom, where the water goes down. But unless there's a problem, the water never comes back up. So a drain on finances is similar to a water drain in that it goes down and disappears and doesn't come back. So it's very similar to a money pit. Okay, so these air all similar and opposite expressions for cash Cow, we just did the definition for cash cow, all right. 5. Conversation Analysis: Let's do conversation analysis. Remember those two conversations that we showed you at the beginning? Well, let's see him again and talk about them. Conversation number one Fred. We had no idea your business would be such a cash cow. Tom. Yeah, I know. Sardine flavored ice cream is the way to go, Fred. If this cash cow keeps producing, you can retire early and live on a tropical island. So Fred said we had no idea your business would be such a cash cow. He could have said we had no idea your business would be such a great source of income. Fred also said if this cash cow keeps producing, you can retire early and live on a tropical island. He could have said if this huge profit source keeps producing, you could retire early and live on a tropical island. So they used cash cow twice in this conversation. But both times they're talking about their wonderful business. They're wonderful business of sardine flavored ice cream, huh? For whatever reason, in this situation, in this scenario, people love sardine flavored ice cream, and how do we know? Because it's a cash cow. It's a great investment. It's a wonderful source of income. Fred is so surprised about this cash cow of sardine flavored ice cream that he says Tom could maybe retire early and live on a tropical island. So Tom is making a ton of money and maybe he can stop working early and not have to keep working until he's old and maybe live in paradise. Who knows? So once again, the other ways to say cash cow in this conversation, a great source of income and ah, huge profit source conversation number two Henry, that company is a potential cash cow. Sarah, I know we must bring them in as a new client. Martha, I'm worried someone will get to them first. George, keep focused. We need this cash cow. Henry could have said that company is a potential reliable source of income. George said Cash cow on the first part, but he could have said, keep focused. We need this profit source so we don't know exactly what kind of company this is, but we know it's a cash cow. In other words, investing in this company having them as a client, why would create money for us? A swell as them it would be a great deal. Martha. She's a little bit worried that some other company might get them as a client, and maybe she should be worried, especially if this company is a cash cow. Everyone's probably going to be chasing it, wanting to work with it and create deals with it. It's a possibility that this company is a cash cow. Sarah. She's focused that she wants to bring them in as a new client. We're not quite sure what business they do. Maybe they do advertising. Or maybe they help companies sort out their investments or manage their books. I don't know, but Sarah, she's focused. We need to bring this company in as a new client because, you know, there are a cash cow. They're going to create a lot of money, probably for everyone and the other ways to say, cash cow in this conversation, Reliable source of income and profit source. We just did conversation analysis, All right, 6. Usage, Tips, & Strategies: Let's do you said in this section. I'm going to give you some tips on how to best use this idiom. Cash cow is a fixed phrase. This means you're not gonna put any words in between. This is great because we know will be one unit. Wherever it shows up, it will be together as one cash cow cash cow will be used as part of a larger sentence will go back to the conversations in a minute. But you can see that cash cow is not by itself. It can't be used as a sentence alone. It has to be part of a larger sentence. Cash cow will be the same in the past, present and future because it's a fixed phrase. This is wonderful. It makes it much easier to use. So here's conversation number one, and in the first sentence we see the idiom cash cow. It's part of a larger sentence here. It's at the end of the sentence on this one. It's at the beginning of the sentence, but either way, cash cow is one unit. Nothing goes in between. This is wonderful because it makes it very predictable when we want to use this idiom. We're always going to say it as a cash cow. Here is the second conversation. Same thing. Cash cow. Part of a larger sentence and also down here, part of a larger sentence. Let's see. Cash cow used in the past, present and future. Last year I found a company which turned out to be a reliable cash cow. Right now I'm trying to make a deal with the potential cash cow. In a few years, if you work really hard, you might have asthma. Any cash cows as I do so we can see we used it in the past. Present in the future in cash. Cow didn't change in the past president of future. It was the same in each one. We just did. Tips on usage for cash cow. Wonderful. 7. Practice, The 4 Types of Sentences In English: We've been studying the idiom cash cow. I think it's time to start practice and use this idiom, All right, so what we're going to do is we're going to use this idiom and a picture. First. We're going to create the four different kinds of sentences. Then we'll create a conversation. Wonderful. Let's review the four different kinds of sentences in English. First, we have a declared of sentence. This is where we share information. Then we have an imperative sentence where we give a command or make a request. We're asking for something or telling someone to do something. An inter Iraq. A tive sentence is where we ask a question and exclamatory sentences where we express strong emotion. So let's give an example of each one. Let's say we're talking about pizza. Pizza's delicious. An example of a declared of sentence would be the pizza is delicious. So I shared information with you. The information that I shared is at the peace. Pizza is delicious. An imperative sentence. So I'm gonna give a command. Oh, I'm gonna tell you to do something so I could say eat the pizza. So I'm telling you to do something. If I wanted to do it in a nicer way, but still have it be a nice commander request. I would say please. Please eat the pizza for an inter rocketed sentence. I'm gonna ask you a question. Mm. Do you like the pizza for an exclamatory sentence? We could say something like the pizza made me vomit. We need to put an exclamation mark at the end to show emotion. Okay, so these are the four different kinds of sentences I wouldn't worry about. The big words declare a tive imperative. Interrogative and exclamatory. That's more for teachers. I need you just to remember what these kind of sentences are. What they mean. 8. Practice, Create Idiom Sentences: Now we're going to use cash cow and create the four different kinds of sentences. On the left side, we have a picture, and when I see this picture, I see two guys. It looks like two males shaking hands. There's a computer, There's paper, there's a pen. There's looks like another lady sitting there. She has some notes, some documents with graphs and lots of information on it. I would say this situation is somewhere in business where they're making a deal. Maybe they just negotiated, and now they're congratulating each other on the wonderful deal they made. Looks like there are three people. We can't see other places in the room. But I would say there are two men and one woman sitting there. So let's make a couple sentences. The clarity of sentences using the idiom cash cow. We could say this deal will be the biggest cash cow in history. So we shared information. Repeat after me. This deal will be the biggest cash cow in history. All right, so let's make this bull So it stands out. Another sentence could be this cash cow is a wonderful deal for both of us. I'm going to make this board repeat after me. This cash cow is a wonderful deal for both of us. Okay, so we just made two declared of sentences where we shared information and we used in each sentence the idiom cash cow. Let's make an imperative sentence. So we're going to give a command or make a request, and we're going to use this situation, this picture for inspiration. So maybe the guys there shaking hands, we can't see the expressions on their face, So maybe one is intense. Maybe he's seen make this deal a cash cow. So he is telling the other guy what to do. Make this deal a cash cow. You know, the words make this deal successful, make it into a deal, which makes a lot of money. One person could also say, except this cash cow. So he's telling the other person what to do. Except this cash cow. Except this investment except this wonderful deal, because we're going to make a lot of money. So repeat after me, make this deal a cash cow except this cash cow. So these are two imperative sentences using the idiom cash cow. Let's make two questions using this idiom and the picture. So they're probably talking. Maybe someone has a question. And they say, Do you think this deal will really be a cash cow? So there. Maybe they're not sure. So they're gonna ask, Will this deal really be a cash cow? Really? Really Be a reliable source of income. Maybe the person responds with another question. Why don't you think this deal will be a cash cow? So one person is showing a little bit of doubt Because they say, Do you think this deal will really be a cash cow? And the other person is maybe a little surprising thinking. Do you know something? I don't know. Why don't you think this deal will be a cash cow? Repeat after me. Do you think this deal will really be a cash cow and the second sentence? Repeat after me. Why don't you think this deal will be a cash cow? So we just created two questions with the picture and the idiom. Cash cow. Now let's create to exclamatory sentences. Once again, we use the picture and the idiom, so we need to express strong emotion. Thes sentences will end with exclamation marks. Let's see This is the best cash cow ever. So someone's really excited about this deal. They know they're going to make a lot of money, and the money is gonna be coming on coming in consistently in a reliable way. So they say this is the best cash. However, Maybe the lady, she jumps up and she screams. I'm so excited about this cash cow. So she just can't contain her emotions anymore. And she says, I'm so excited about this cash cow. Repeat after me. Put some emotion in your voice. This is the best cash. However, I'm so excited about this cash cow. All right, so we did our two sentences that are exclamatory. 9. Practice, Create Idiom Conversations: Let's create a conversation using the idiom cash, cow and a picture. I wonder what the picture will be. First, let's talk about the picture. It looks like we have two people, Mark and Amy, and it looks like they're outside. I would say is probably looks like evening because his shadows so far back we have a man and a woman there dressed, I would say, for business. Maybe they're coming home after a long day of work. Who knows? The lady has a funky gold necklace with some big round thing on it. She's smiling. She must be in a good mood. He's got a nice beard with the with the mustache. Who, what? A mustache in a red tie and simple business dress. All right, so they're gonna be talking about something, and they're going to use the idiom. Cash cow looks like Amy is going to start the conversation first. So Amy says, What do you think? A vote? Our latest deal? Mark replies. I think it's a really cash cow, Amy replies. I'm kind of worried. You said that last time in last time, it wasn't a cash cow, Mark says. Don't worry, baby. I'm sure it will be a cash cow. This time. We're going Teoh to be rich and we're off the page. The oil, We will fix it. All right, So let's repeat the conversation and we're gonna make the cash cows bold so they will pop out as we're going along. Cash cow. One more. Okay, so Amy and Marker talking, they just left work. And maybe they're walking to their cars in the parking lot and they happen to bump into each other. Amy says, What do you think about her latest deal? Mark answers. I think it's a really cash cow, Amy. I'm kind of worried. You said that last time and last time it wasn't the cash cow Mark. Don't worry, baby. I'm sure it will be a cash cow this time. We're going to be rich. He would probably combine this into gonna, because when the native speakers speak, we don't usually say going to unless is very formal. This is probably more informal off a situation because there after work, they're walking to their cars where they're going to go home. So his last sentence would probably be We're gonna be rich. All right. So, Mark and Amy had their conversation talking and using the idiom cash cow, What we get to make another conversation. Fabulous. This time we had Fred and Tom. Looks like they're also standing outside. I'm not quite sure where they are just by looking at it would make me think some sort of public area, probably in the middle of the day. And they both have hats on. They're both older fellows as well. I think Fred is a bit older than Tom. Fred has glasses, he's got a belt and he looks like his pants. Er pulled really hard, really high up, up over his stomach. And Tom has a beard and looks like he's smoking a cigarette. He's about halfway through his cigarette. He's holding it in his right hand, and he has a blue and white shirt, and they both kind of have suit coats on, but without ties. So it's a little bit relaxed, but not so informal either. So they're gonna have a conversation, and Fred says, I heard about this great cash cow. Tom says, Hmm, Give me some details and Fred replies, All you need to Dio is loan me $50,000 and I will make you rich. So Tom says, Hmm, there's really no way I'm going to give you $50,000. Just fix this. So there's really no way I'm going to give you $50,000. But please tell me about this cash cow Anyone anyway, I won't change that, But please tell me about this cash cow opportunity. Okay? So Fred and Tom, they met in the middle of Ah, open public place, and they're going to start chatting. And Fred says, Hey, hey, I heard about this great cash cow. Tom says, Give me some details, Fred. All you need to do is loan me $50,000 I will make you rich, Tom, whom There's really no way I'm going to give you $50,000. But please tell me about this cash cow opportunity. Once again, I'm gonna change this from going to to gonna just sounds more natural. So he says, there's really no way I'm going to give you $50,000 But please tell me about this cash cow opportunity. So it seems one could say Tom doesn't trust Fred friends. Makes it sound like he's got this great investment opportunity on a reliable source of income. Ah, cash, cow. And let's make these bold again So you can see where they are and they jump out at you. All right, so Tom doesn't really trust Fred, but he's still curious. What does Fred have to say? So we made a conversation between Fred and Tom, and they used the idiom cash cow. We just didn't practice using the idiom cash cow. Fantastic. 10. Review, Question #1 with Explanation: Now we're on our last section. We're going to do a review. Who were going to test you and make sure that you understand what we've been studying. Are you ready? Here we go. Question Number one. Just for you. Which of the following statements is true about the idiom? Cash cow. It's a sentence all by itself. It's not a sentence all by itself. Hmm. What do you think? This would be a good place to pause the video If you need more time to think, I'm going to give you the answer in 54321 Thinking the answer is it is not a sentence all by itself. Do you remember before when we talked to boat tips on the best usage for this idiom? I mentioned that cash cow is one unit. It always stays together. And I also mentioned it's going to be part of a larger sentence. So the answer here is cash. Cow is not a sentence all by itself. If someone says to you cash cow, you don't understand cause it's not a sentence. So if someone says cash cow is a sentence, you say no cash. Cow is not a sentence all by itself. 11. Review, Question #2 with Explanation: question number two. Ah, it's a conversation. Fabulous! Bella says. Oh my goodness, We've worked so hard. Our business has finally become a cash cow. Oscar. Congratulations. I have to admit, I'm kind of jealous. By the way, can I borrow some money? Which expression below is similar to the green words above a greasy tomato? Be a waste of time. See unwise investment. De huge profit source. All right, if you need more time, I would pause the video. Look at the answers, look at the conversation and see which is the most similar to the green words above. I'm going to give you the answer in 54321 The the answer is huge profit source. So we're looking for an expression which is similar has almost the same meaning as cash cow . And before we talked about this cash cow means a reliable source of income. Ah, huge profit source. So we're going to be making some money. So the answer is huge. Profit source. We could stick it in the sentence, and Bella could have said, Oh my goodness, we've worked so hard. Our business has finally become a huge profit source. So it's the same thing as cash cow. The same meaning the wrong answers will talk about those two. A. A greasy tomato just doesn't make any sense. A greasy tomato. I don't think it would be very delicious, but that's irrelevant. The answer being a waste of time. It doesn't have much to do with the idiom cash cow and this answer looking force an expression with a similar meaning and waste of times. Way off. An unwise investment is the opposite of what we're looking for, so C is wrong as well. Once again, the answer is the huge profit source. 12. Review, Question #3 with Explanation: question Number three. Ah, another conversation. Fabulous. David, I'm planning to travel to Africa and start a new business. I'm hoping it will become a cash cow. Rebecca, that's great. I wish you the best of luck. Here's my business card. Call me if things work out. If not, there's no need to call. Which answer below is the opposite of the green words above a great investment. Be a money pit seen scary adventure. The fantastic opportunity. Pause the video and take your time Before you choose your answer, make sure we're looking for an answer, which is the opposite. I'm going to show you the answer in 54321 The answer is B money pit, and once again it's very important to read the question right. We're looking for the opposite. So an expression which has the opposite meaning of cash cow and the only one down here, which is the opposite is money pit. If you remember when we were studying the meaning of cash cow, we did similar and opposite expressions. Money pit is an idiom, and it was one of the opposite expressions to cash cow. Think of once again. I think I mentioned a big hole in the ground, and you keep throwing money and it's a pit and you keep throwing money and the money disappears. It sucks away your money. Nothing comes back. So a money pit is the opposite of a good or wonderful investment. A cash cow is a very reliable source of income. Ah, wonderful investment. So money pit is opposite. So the opposite is what we're looking for. Let's explain the wrong answers as well. A great investment is that's what a cash cow means. But we're looking for the opposite. So is going to be incorrect in this question. See Scary adventure? Well, starting a new business could be a scary adventure, but it's not an expression with the opposite meaning to cash cow. So C is incorrect. Fantastic opportunity, A wonderful opportunity. A great opportunity is what a cash cow is, and we're looking for the opposite, so that can't work either. It's once again the answer is B money pit because it's the opposite in meaning to cash cow 13. Review, Question #4 with Explanation: question number four. I need you to use this idiom cash cow in this picture. When I see the picture I see I think it's a girl by the hands and the hair. I would say it's a woman. She has a laptop on top of the table next to her laptop. She has a cell phone, and I would say she drinking a cup of tea because there's a little string with that's probably attached the tea bag on the inside of the cup. And what time of day? It's daytime and kind of can see some light for shine in from the window and she probably working on the laptop. Who knows for this question, I need you to use the idiom cash, cow and the picture and create an interrogative sentence using the idiom. And the picture in derogative just means question. So use the idiom cash cow in this picture To create a question, I need you to pause the video and think of a question that uses the idiom in the picture. I'm going to show you what I came up with in 54321 Okay, so this girl, she might be talking to someone on the phone by speakerphone, who knows? And she says, Do you really think all of our hard work will generate and create the biggest cash cow in history? I think it's a little bit bigger. All right, so we have a question, and all you had to do is create a question using the idiom cash cow. And the question that I came up with is, Do you really think all of our hard work will generate and create the biggest cash cow in history? So how did you do? Did you create a question using the image in the idiom? You can leave a comment and show me your sentence. That would be great. 14. Review, Question #5 with Explanation: question number five. Once again, we have the idiom cash, cow and a picture. When I see this picture, I see a lot of black and white. Looks like everybody is wearing something that's black and white. Except for this lady in the middle car. Looks like she has a light blue picture. I see two males on two and four females. Two of the females are standing up, which makes me think they're finishing their meeting. Maybe they're ready to go. She's shaking hands and they're smiling. Everybody seems happy. Wonderful things have been happening. Okay, Probably a business negotiation. Something or deal. Who knows? All right, so here is what we're going to dio finish the conversation using the idiom and the picture . Oh, interesting. So here's our conversation. There are two people, three different parts. The conversation starts with. This may be the best business deal we've ever made. Thanks for all of your hard work. All right. I need you to pause the video and take some time and figure out what these two people are going to say to complete the conversation. It can pretty much be anything you want, as long as it uses the idiom cash, cow and make sense with the picture. Okay, I'm going to finish this conversation my way in 54321 So there are many options thousands of options to continue this conversation right there. So many different situations. So I would say, Let's see, she starts by saying this may be the best business deal we've ever made. Thanks for all of your hard work. And the second person could say No, thank you. You were such a treat to deal with. I'm really confident that this will become a cash cow. Make the idiom bold so we can see it The other person responds with. All right, we have to be leaving now. Thanks so much for your time. Have a wonderful day. And the complete conversation would be This may be the best business deal we've ever made. Thanks for all of your hard work. No, thank you. You were such a treat to deal with. I'm really confident that this will become a cash cow. All right, We have to be leaving now. Thanks so much for your time. Have a wonderful day. Let me explain something here. The sentences you are such a treat to deal with. So let's say this person in the middle is the person sitting down because the other person has to be leaving. So the person sitting down says, You were such a treat to deal with. If someone or some group is a treat to deal with, that means they were really nice to deal with. Things went really well. They were probably very organized, very respectful, very professional, so they were a treat to deal with. You would really like to work with them again. A treat is like a candy or something sweet that you eat. If a person is a treat to deal with, it's really nice to do business with this person. So we did the conversation. Feel free to leave a comment with your conversation. We just finished our review of cash cow. How did you do 15. Final Review: in this idiom course we studied a money and business idiom, redid the idiom cash cow. We learned that a cash cow is a great source of income, a reliable source of income. We're gonna have money coming and repeatedly, consistently or just a huge amount. At one time, we learned similar and opposite expressions for this idiom, and we studied the idiom in six parts. We did conversation, pronunciation, definition, usage, practice and review. We work like crazy to master this idiom.