English Speaking Patterns Mastery: It's just that... | Anthony Kelleher | Skillshare

English Speaking Patterns Mastery: It's just that...

Anthony Kelleher, BA TESOL - Founder of Sir English - English Tutor

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3 Lessons (19m)
    • 1. It's just that... (Learn)

      8:49
    • 2. It's just that... Speaking (Practice 1)

      3:26
    • 3. It's just that... Listening (Practice 2)

      6:53

About This Class

English Speaking Patterns Mastery is an English course taught by me, Anthony, a native British English speaker. You will learn English patterns at a deep level, so that you can sound more native-like when you speak English.

English patterns are groups of words (phrases) that native English speakers use again and again. If you learn one pattern, you can make hundreds of sentences. Learning these patterns will also improve your overall grammar and sentence structure.

This course includes: 

  • lectures for the target English patterns
  • speaking practicefor every single pattern
  • listening practicefor every single pattern
  • future updates- this course will continue to grow and grow
  • PDF transcripts
  • and MP3 downloadsso that you can learn anywhere, any time.

Each section focuses on one target pattern so that you can master each one and produce it accurately in your spoken English.

If you want to speak English more clearly, if you want to sound more native-like, or if you simply want to take your English to the next level, this course can help you achieve your goal of improving your English.

Transcripts

1. It's just that... (Learn): the target pattern for this lecture is it's just that so with this pattern, it's just that we can omit the word that, like many of the other patterns we've seen now let's look at the meaning off. It's just that look at this example. I'm sorry you didn't get the job. It's just that we need someone with more experience. So what does? It's just that mean It's used when you want to make a complaint, a suggestion or an excuse to soften the impact so the listener doesn't get annoyed. So did you get that? We use this pattern to make a complaint, a suggestion or an excuse in the example we just looked at. This is a kind of excuse. So a boss off a company was talking to an interviewee, and he said, I'm sorry you didn't get the job. It's just that we need someone with more experience. So he's using this excuse to say, This is the reason you didn't get the job. I'm sorry you didn't get it. This is his reason for justifying, not giving the job to this interview eat. So we use the phrase. It's just that to soften the impact to make it less severe. Okay, so when we're saying something bad, like a complaint or we giving an excuse or when we're making a suggestion, that's not very nice. It's just that softens the blow. It makes the words after less harsh and less serious. Okay, that this is how we use this particular pattern. Let's look at some examples to make everything much clearer for you. Here's the 1st 1 I'm sorry, Tina. I didn't mean to shout at you. It's just that I was so angry about what happened. So have a think about this example. Is it an excuse, a complaint or a suggestion? Well, this one is an excuse. So the parson is saying I'm really sorry for shouting at you, but this is my reason why I did it. This is my justification behind it. So when we given excuse, we use the phrase. It's just that to soften the impact to say I'm sorry. This is why I did it, okay? And also I went to notice the pronunciation. It's just that so when we use the full phrase, it's just that the T at the end of just is not pronounced fully so it sounds like just just so, the T at the end of just is omitted. So we say it's just that so notice this pronunciation feature off this pattern. Let's look at the second example, Poll says. Why are you looking at me like that? Do I look strange? Mary replies. No, not strange. It's just you need a haircut. So how about this example? Is it an excuse, a suggestion or a complaint? What do you think? Well, this one is a suggestion. So Mary suggests Paul gets a haircut. So why do we use this pattern when making a suggestion? Why do we want to soften the words that we use? Well, sometimes a suggestion is not negative. For example, I can say to my friend, Let's go to the cinema. This is a suggestion, or shall we go to watch a movie? In this case, we can't use this pattern because there's no negativity. But Mary is suggesting that Paul gets a haircut in this suggestion. There's a tiny bit of negativity, you see. So that's why she wants to soften the words. The negativity is that she's might think Paul's hair is too long to Messi. Okay, so that he needs to sort out his hair that this is why we use this pattern. When there's any negativity, you can use it to soften the wads. Now let's look at one more example. I'd like to make a complaint. It's just that the menu said it included french fries, but we didn't get any. So this example is obviously a complaint. Someone is in a restaurant and they're complaining about the food they're saying to the waiter or waitress. We didn't get any french fries with the meal, but the menu says it includes French fries. So then making a complaint. Now when we make a complaint, it's usually a negative thing, right? In fact, it's always a negative thing. So we use the phrase. It's just that to soften the blow, to soften the words that we're using towards the waiter or waitress or whoever were complaining, too. So we use it when we're complaining, but we don't want to sound very bad. We don't want to sound like we're a really negative person, so this softens. The blow, softens the impact off the words now have a look at the structure off this pattern. It's very simple. We use the pattern. It's just that plus a subject verb and an object. So basically a grammatical sentence, for example, it's just that you need a haircut. So that's the basic structure. Now there's one more thing we have to look at in terms of structure and that's context. Have a look at this. So we usually give context before this pattern. Not after before. So we give context. We use the pattern. It's just that, plus the subject verb object. For example, I didn't mean to shout at you. This is the context and then the pattern. It's just that I was so angry. So there we have it, the English pattern. It's just that now move on to the speaking and listening practice exercises. Download the MP three and listen to it as much as you can see you in the next lecture. 2. It's just that... Speaking (Practice 1): speaking practice full. It's just that Listen to what I say. Then pause the video on. Repeat after me. Think about the pattern we studied. Train your brain to master this English pattern. Let's get started. I really like the new house. It's beautiful. It's just that it's really far from my family. We bought a new dog recently, but I'm not sure if we can keep it. It's just that it proves and peas all over the floor. I don't think you should join the Army. It's just that it could be dangerous. What if you go to war? I'm really sorry for being late. It's just my car broke down and I had to take a taxi. I don't want to get married. Jane, I like you. It's just that getting married now is too quick. What's wrong? You're looking at me in a strange way. It's just You look a little tired. Are you okay? Hi. Excuse me. I saw you from over there and have to say hello. It's just that you look so familiar. Do I know you? Are you thinking about leaving the company? Please don't. It's just that I don't enjoy working here. anymore. Highly long time no see. You look a little different. It's just you've grown a bit around the waist. Where are you, John? It's just that you said you would be here at 1 p.m. And it's 2:30 p.m. now. 3. It's just that... Listening (Practice 2): listening practice for. It's just that. Listen to what I say. Then pause the video and write down what you hear. Press play to see the text on the screen and check your answer. Train your brain to master this English pattern. Let's begin. Yes, of course I want to take the job. It's just that I thought you might offer me a higher salary. Yes, of course I want to take the job. It's just that I thought you might offer me a higher salary. Peter, you're working really hard. It's just that you never spend time with the kids. Peter, you're working really hard. It's just that you never spend time with the kids. Please let me borrow the car. I need to go somewhere later. It's really important. I can't. It's just I need it to pick up my new girlfriend soon. We're going on a date. Please let me borrow the car. I need to go somewhere later. It's really important. I can't. It's just I need it to pick up my new girlfriend soon. We're going on a date. I apologize for breaking your phone. It's just that it slipped out of my hand and fell into the toilet. I apologize for breaking your phone. It's just that it slipped out of my hand and fell into the toilet. I don't mind if you borrow my clothes. It's just that you should ask before you borrow them. I don't mind if you borrow my clothes. It's just that you should ask before you borrow them. Why do you want me to give you £100? It's just that there's a really big music festival this weekend and I want to go. Why do you want me to give you £100? It's just that there's a really big music festival this weekend and I want to go. I'm really sorry for not doing my homework, sir. It's just that I had lots of other homework to finish. I'm really sorry for not doing my homework, sir. It's just that I had lots of other homework to finish. Come on. Are you ready to go out exercising? No. Sorry. It's just that I'm feeling a little tired and lazy. You go alone. Come on. Are you ready to go out exercising? No. Sorry. It's just that I'm feeling a little tired and lazy. You go alone. Mike. When are you going to tidy your bedroom? It's just You keep saying you'll do it, but you never do. Mike, when are you going to tiny your bedroom? It's just You keep saying you'll do it, but you never do. You want me to buy you that $1000 bag? Do I look like a rich man? Please, Ben, It's just You said you would buy me a nice present for my birthday. You want me to buy you that $1000 bag? Do I look like a rich man? Please, Ben, It's just You said you would buy me a nice present for my birthday.