English Pronunciation & Accent Training: Transform Your English Speech | Elizabeth Jones | Skillshare

English Pronunciation & Accent Training: Transform Your English Speech

Elizabeth Jones, Academic Director at Cambridge1English

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13 Lessons (29m)
    • 1. Creating Your Structure

      1:22
    • 2. Muscle: Using Muscles to Create Sounds

      1:45
    • 3. Power & Breathing: Do It Like an Opera Singer

      2:27
    • 4. Noise: Using Your Sinuses

      4:07
    • 5. Noise: Creating Voiced Consonants

      0:45
    • 6. Power & Noise Practice (Dont Worry! Be Happy! Exercise)

      0:06
    • 7. English as a Stress-Timed Language: Introduction

      1:13
    • 8. Timing Practice ('Cat Rat Hat Mat' Exercise)

      1:02
    • 9. Timing Practice ('I Walk to Work' Exercise)

      0:22
    • 10. Music, Pitch and Tone Change: The Basics + Tip

      4:59
    • 11. Music, Pitch and Tone Change: Giving Presentations

      2:13
    • 12. Using the Schwa ('Would You Like a Cup of Tea' Exercise)

      2:36
    • 13. Voiced and Unvoiced Consonant Sounds

      6:02
11 students are watching this class

About This Class

Discover the secrets behind native British English-sounding speech! Get concrete techniques, tips and exercises which you can implement and practice everyday. Be heard more at work and feel confident and effective in your English speech. 

Transcripts

1. Creating Your Structure : shoulders back. Deep breath in from us. Deepest possible in your belly. Open up everything in the concert hole of your respiratory system and speech muscles. Oh, you're now when you yawn, feel for the opening off the back of your mouth, the top of your throat. Oh, you must keep that open and strongly open when you speak English. Big difference between English and a lot of other languages where it's relaxed, so it's not relaxed in English. Opening up. Feel it. Notice it. OK, start again. Shoulders back, breathing from deep down in the belly. Oh, my name's Beth. My name's Beth. My name's I'm a teacher. 2. Muscle: Using Muscles to Create Sounds : uh, my cheeks a completely relaxed my jaw. Is this openess possible? Happy can't. Here, my George is as open as possible. Just like in car park The sound before the valuable sound before the law. But my cheeks and my mouth, my lips therefore my cheeks are are as open as possible in every single direction I can think of in this big zero open shaped cat Happy cat Now one little trick I ask for people toe aim for when they say the ah which is Saimon angry. Pull the watch my eyebrows The eyebrows need to go up in out in a big diagonal We are porting its every kind of possible movement in the front of the face The lips, the cheeks, the eyebrows. There was so much muscle movement going on to create that one sound accurately in English. It's hard work. Keep practicing Happy, happy cat 3. Power & Breathing: Do It Like an Opera Singer : was a speaking opera singer. Luckily, no other musical one. The first way that I create that power we need to constantly create that noise is by taking in that deep breath, because that deep breath enables me to speak with residence for a very, very long time for an indefinite amount of time until I can possibly breathe again. And I might not know when that is. Okay. So the pattern of breathing in the English language is is different from a lot of other languages. Particularly, for example, what's called syllable timed languages such a Spanish, where all the syllables have the same length. So there is an opportunity to breathe, uh, regularly more regularly on B. There is less, maybe residence a lot of the time. So, um, we can't read that regularly in English. So we must take in that very deep breath before we start speaking before we start producing what's called a speech unit until I pause and Kenbrell again. So just to recognize that the breathing pattern of English is different from a lot of other languages, right? Let's practice together producing that opera singer type of power, and I still haven't read Okay, Right. All together, shoulders brought back. Taking that really, really deep breath us. I walk to work. Remember your constant resonance throughout engaging all of your muscles Powerful e one more time I walk Teoh, Now you can break. 4. Noise: Using Your Sinuses: noise. Goodness may. Have you ever noticed if you particularly if you live in England, use the bass, use public transport? How noisy English speakers, ah way are constantly creating noise when we speak and with when I refer to noise, I'm actually mainly referring to vibration. So the use of the voice box, the vote phone call cords. Ah, if you put two fingers here around where your voice box is around the Adam's apple, as it's called the lump, you should be able to feel vibration. When you speaking English or virtual virtually all of the time. I can feel it constantly. Right now, there is no gap, no gap whatsoever. Whereas a lot of other languages years, a lot less voice books when they're speaking my starting consul int sounds on the words in don't worry. Be happy. Are duh on don't rule, uh, on worry. Um but, uh, our bay and on happy Mm don't right with, for example on don't put your two fingers here. Four fingers, two fingers. Either side four fingers. Here you should be able to feel in your Sinuses. The vibration that you're making the vibration starts before you make that moon burnt the for don't. So we make the duh sound longer by starting it before you might imagine by starting it before the explosion. Mm. Zones worry. Be okay. Happy is not voiced. Although you will notice. I do make it as noisy as possible. So I give it some voices. It's not very pleasant, but it's just a strong. So there's no vibration there. Really happy, but it's still longer, by the way. It's probably still longer than what you naturally want to do. Just highlighting you Check. Okay. Mm. Zones worry. Oh, bay hoppy. Happy get OK, so it's a little bit of a cheat, but it's true. We do it, we do it. Um, each time we are starting a sound on the start of award, okay? 5. Noise: Creating Voiced Consonants : don't. I could if I wanted inflate my cheeks because I blocked the air when I produced the W. It's not over. It's whoa worry. Well, okay. 6. Power & Noise Practice (Dont Worry! Be Happy! Exercise) : so don't worry. Be happy. 7. English as a Stress-Timed Language: Introduction: because again English is a stress timed language. I cannot. I can't spend the same amount of time on each word or even syllable. If they're long words, I can't do that. I must make some of my words shorter to say that I can fit my unit, my speech unit, into exactly the same amount of time, no matter how many words there are. So I made. It must make the unimportant not useful words. Throwaway words. I must make him short. So it's not a cat and a rat and a hat and a mat. No, I can't do that. It's cat and rat on a mat and a hat in various orders. Um, so I reduce them in various ways, but one of the ways to make it shorter if there no important words. 8. Timing Practice ('Cat Rat Hat Mat' Exercise): cat hat Rat Matt! Cat hat Rat! Matt after me. Cat hat rat! Matt. Now I'm going to add one word hand. Cat, rat hat. Matt, repeat after me. Cat and hat and rats and Matt. Now I'm going to add another word. Oh, so it's and, uh, cat on the right and a hat on the mat. Cats and the rats and a hat and Matt. 9. Timing Practice ('I Walk to Work' Exercise): I walk to whack. How do you get to work? Do you walk to work? Do you drive to work? Do you ride your bike or cycle toe work? 10. Music, Pitch and Tone Change: The Basics + Tip: another way. English speakers are so musical musical in inverted commas because it's not necessarily nice sounding. But English speakers have a stretched pitch range, so they will go from very high pitch to very low pitch, possibly from higher to lower, but also from higher to lower over a very short space off time, for example, over just one syllable. They will go from very high to very low on back up again. Possibly, um, so that happens all of the time or all of the time. A lot of the time when an English speaker speak speaking. So your job to try and sound as a native English as you want to or two. Maybe not if you don't want to, but to get listen to and to get hurt at meetings or on conference calls, for example, really try and we'll try to be reassured. It's OK to stretch your pitch and go from high to low quite dramatically. It's a bit like a caricature. It's a bit like a cartoon. So actually students with me who make fun, who have a laugh at an English bigger, doing that over dramatically suddenly, to me and to any other native English speakers hear sound incredibly natural. But I understand that for most people, if it's not their personality to want toe act and to sound over dramatic or it's not to do that kind of level off pitch stretch automatically, I have one tip for you. Your test for yourself if and this is only if you're not completely comfortable doing the dramatic. Oh, I walk to work. Sometimes I cycle to work. Sometimes I drive to work. If you personally are not completely comfortable doing the dramatic stretched at both ends , high to low pitch change immediately. That's okay. I suggest you do, uh, one thing either find within your comfort zone your personal comfort zone, whether you are most comfortable starting very slightly higher. Oh, ending slightly lower. For example, let's try the high range I walk to work. Sometimes I cycle to work. Sometimes I drive to work each of those sections, like a speech unit, one of my speech units, so that may be stretching your pitch light a higher than you normally start higher for some of you met you it it may be more comfortable starting lower and finishing lower, so let's try that one. I walk to work, so drop lower than it's natural. Sometimes I cycle to work. Sometimes I drive toe. Okay, so that's not entirely comfortable for me personally. But you can hear for some of you, so you don't immediately have to do that. I walked toe work. Sometimes I cycle to work. Sometimes I drive to work. You don't have to do the high to very low immediately choose one, practice it, do it tomorrow at work in a meeting or on a conference call and go with that. 11. Music, Pitch and Tone Change: Giving Presentations : when it comes to pitch, range, change, range on change. One rule I always like to be broken, but really handy. Raw for gaining confidence in practice without feeling too extreme is that when we are doing prepared speech, what we call prepared speech. So it's in sort of more formal situations. It could be while you're talking about a particular subject in a meeting. Or it could be when you're doing a presentation. If you notice. Mostly, I'm doing it right now. So we over one speech unit. Whatever that speech unit end is, it's not necessarily a whole sentence. It's whatever feels natural for you over one speech unit, we start high, go down low, start high and low. Remember to pause for a longer time than maybe feels natural in between each speech unit. Start high, go down, start high, go down, start high, go down low. Now let's do that. All together will put everything structurally together. Us. Well, it's useful. Shoulders back, breathe in from deep down in the belly, I walk to work. Sometimes I cycle to work. Sometimes I drive to work. So your speech units, while you're presenting maybe longer than that of course, but ultimately on English speakers, music is pretty much that it prepared speech. Start high, go down low. 12. Using the Schwa ('Would You Like a Cup of Tea' Exercise): Would you like a capital T? Oh, yes. I love a couple and chats. Yeah, cup. Uh, se uh, Cap. Uh, see, now it's meant to be quick sort that individual sound the Schwab on so is meant to be really quick. A cup of tea, a company t come pity One cup of tea. A cup of tea. Would you like a cap ity? Would you like a cuppa tea? Would you like come petit? Would you like a camp A t? Would you like a capital T? Oh, I love I love I'd love I love a cup. I love a cap. I love a couple. I love a capper. I love a capper. Chat chats in a chat chat chat in a chat. Copper capper cap Kappa Yeah, copper and chat copper and a chat cap. Parana Chat. Capper on a chat I'd love a camper and a chat Chide lover, camper in a chatter, Cupper and a chatter Capper on a jack. Copper and chatter. Copper and chat. I love a company in a chat. I love a couple. I love a couple in a chat. I'd love a cup er in a chat. Yes, yes, I love a capper on a chat. I love a capper chat. Yes, I'd love a capper on a chat. I'd love a cuppa and a chat tied love a cup. Earn a jacked I love a cuppa and a chat. I love a cupper in a check I love a cuppa and a chat. 13. Voiced and Unvoiced Consonant Sounds: Unvoiced consonant sounds from the breath, from deep down in your belly, up. Block the air before producing. Always block. Otherwise this just no explosion. I don't hear anything. Cote SIP, ssh, show book. And then ssh, che, tongue out. We must see that tongue out, a voiced consonant. So here, for the starting consonant sound, ignore the rest of the words. Different thing, where just doing that starting consonant sound. Add Loy's Resonance, vibration from your voice box. Continuously, like, like bagpipe. Never stops with English speakers. Start here. We must, like the unvoiced consonants. Add power, more power. From here, from your belly. We must block the Arab. But before, sorry, before exploding, with the voiced consonants, we are starting the noise before we exploit to make it longer. Bach, oops. Wow. Okay. Teeth for the unknown over and pushed down really hard onto your bottom lip. Not nice. I know. Measure like in dog. And then judge, zeus, orange juice. Not ssh. Like its partner. I can feel vibration on the back of my neck. It's so continuous. Trash. Tongue out again. Just add voice. That.