English Idioms | ESL (English as a second languge) lessons to improve fluency | Kieran Ball | Skillshare

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English Idioms | ESL (English as a second languge) lessons to improve fluency

teacher avatar Kieran Ball, Learn a language in 3-minute chunks

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

107 Lessons (7h 47m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:41
    • 2. A bit of grammar

      13:23
    • 3. 1 Make it up as you go along

      6:56
    • 4. 2 Be onto a winner

      6:34
    • 5. 3 Throw a spanner in the works

      8:08
    • 6. 4 A one off

      6:23
    • 7. 5 Turn a blind eye

      6:55
    • 8. 6 Think on your feet

      6:25
    • 9. 7 Set your sights on

      8:04
    • 10. 8 Foot the bill

      6:21
    • 11. 9 No frills

      6:32
    • 12. 10 Be out of the woods

      6:41
    • 13. Recap Quiz Explanation

      2:17
    • 14. Recap Quiz Round 1

      1:55
    • 15. Recap Quiz Round 2

      1:46
    • 16. Recap Quiz Round 3

      1:39
    • 17. Recap Quiz Round 4

      1:31
    • 18. Recap Quiz Round 5

      1:50
    • 19. Recap Quiz Round 6

      1:53
    • 20. Recap Quiz Round 7

      1:36
    • 21. Recap Quiz Round 8

      1:41
    • 22. Recap Quiz Round 9

      1:33
    • 23. Recap Quiz Round 10

      1:44
    • 24. 11 Brush aside

      7:23
    • 25. 12 Fall on hard times

      6:42
    • 26. 13 fill your boots

      8:11
    • 27. 14 Get your wires crossed

      8:02
    • 28. 15 Pull a few strings

      6:55
    • 29. 16 Keep your eye on the ball

      7:22
    • 30. 17 Get on like a house on fire

      7:26
    • 31. 18 Dot the i's and cross the t's

      8:57
    • 32. 19 Hit the ground running

      7:57
    • 33. 20 Take sides

      7:44
    • 34. Recap Quiz Recap of 11 to 20

      1:42
    • 35. Recap Quiz Round 11

      2:01
    • 36. Recap Quiz Round 12

      1:42
    • 37. Recap Quiz Round 13

      1:44
    • 38. Recap Quiz Round 14

      1:46
    • 39. Recap Quiz Round 15

      1:45
    • 40. Recap Quiz Round 16

      1:45
    • 41. Recap Quiz Round 17

      1:46
    • 42. Recap Quiz Round 18

      4:07
    • 43. Recap Quiz Round 19

      1:53
    • 44. Recap Quiz Round 20

      1:45
    • 45. 21 Highflier

      7:23
    • 46. 22 Cut back

      6:48
    • 47. 23 Make a killing

      6:49
    • 48. 24 In line for

      6:54
    • 49. 25 Be wet behind the ears

      8:09
    • 50. 26 Hard nosed

      8:02
    • 51. 27 Get the wrong end of the stick

      7:27
    • 52. 28 Penny pinching

      8:12
    • 53. 29 Cost an arm and a leg

      7:46
    • 54. 30 Fill someone’s shoes

      7:43
    • 55. Recap Quiz Recap of 21 to 30

      1:20
    • 56. Recap Quiz Round 21

      1:47
    • 57. Recap Quiz Round 22

      1:34
    • 58. Recap Quiz Round 23

      1:36
    • 59. Recap Quiz Round 24

      1:36
    • 60. Recap Quiz Round 25

      1:36
    • 61. Recap Quiz Round 26

      1:50
    • 62. Recap Quiz Round 27

      1:34
    • 63. Recap Quiz Round 28

      1:41
    • 64. Recap Quiz Round 29

      1:42
    • 65. Recap Quiz Round 30

      1:47
    • 66. 31 Be in someone’s good books bad books

      7:27
    • 67. 32 Keep up with

      6:32
    • 68. 33 Call time on

      7:32
    • 69. 34 Play someone at their own game

      8:22
    • 70. 35 Roll up your sleeves

      7:19
    • 71. 36 Back down

      7:58
    • 72. 37 Let someone go

      7:17
    • 73. 38 Be in the running

      7:39
    • 74. 39 Sign off

      8:00
    • 75. 40 Throw money at something

      7:16
    • 76. Recap Quiz Recap of 31 to 40

      1:40
    • 77. Recap Quiz Round 31

      2:04
    • 78. Recap Quiz Round 32

      1:34
    • 79. Recap Quiz Round 33

      1:41
    • 80. Recap Quiz Round 34

      1:33
    • 81. Recap Quiz Round 35

      1:34
    • 82. Recap Quiz Round 36

      1:40
    • 83. Recap Quiz Round 37

      1:25
    • 84. Recap Quiz Round 38

      1:42
    • 85. Recap Quiz Round 39

      1:38
    • 86. Recap Quiz Round 40

      1:32
    • 87. 41 Keep a low profile

      7:29
    • 88. 42 Go cap in hand

      7:40
    • 89. 43 Be daylight robbery

      6:38
    • 90. 44 Get a word in edgeways

      7:41
    • 91. 45 See eye to eye

      7:17
    • 92. 46 Drive a hard bargain

      7:05
    • 93. 47 On a shoestring

      7:01
    • 94. 48 Hold out for

      6:26
    • 95. 49 Give someone their marching orders

      7:42
    • 96. 50 Jump ship

      7:16
    • 97. Recap Quiz Recap of 41 to 50

      1:39
    • 98. Recap Quiz Round 41

      1:38
    • 99. Recap Quiz Round 42

      1:29
    • 100. Recap Quiz Round 43

      1:40
    • 101. Recap Quiz Round 44

      1:26
    • 102. Recap Quiz Round 45

      1:46
    • 103. Recap Quiz Round 46

      1:20
    • 104. Recap Quiz Round 47

      1:34
    • 105. Recap Quiz Round 48

      1:36
    • 106. Recap Quiz Round 49

      1:23
    • 107. Recap Quiz Round 50

      1:33
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About This Class

If you’re learning English, you will have probably heard people using phrases that don’t always make sense.

You might have heard people say things like:

“He’s driving me nuts!”

“Your guess is as good as mine”

or

“I’ve had it up to here with you”

These phrases are known as idioms. Idioms exist in every language, but what are they?

An idiom is a phrase or an expression that does not make sense literally. Instead, it has a figurative meaning that is different from its literal meaning.

If somebody says, “He’s driving me nuts”, it does not mean that somebody is driving, and it has nothing to do with nuts!

In fact, “He’s driving me nuts” means “He is annoying me”.

Native speakers of English will naturally inherit idioms because they will have heard them growing up. However, if you are learning English as a second language and it is not your native language, idioms can be extremely difficult to understand.

This course is for non-native speakers of English who want to improve their comprehension skills. The course is taught entirely in English by me, a native British English speaker, and we’re going to look at the most useful idioms in English.

So, let’s crack on!

Meet Your Teacher

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Kieran Ball

Learn a language in 3-minute chunks

Teacher

Hello, I’m Kieran and I’m a language tutor based in the UK. I have created a series of online courses that you can use to learn to speak French, Spanish, German, Italian and Portuguese. (I also have some English and math courses)

Have a look below to see all the courses I currently have available. I try to add a new course at least once every other week, so check back regularly to see if the next one is ready.

I hope you enjoy :-)

Happy learning!

Kieran

See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: If you're learning English, you will have probably heard people using phrases that don't always make sense. You might have heard people say things like, he's driving me nuts. Your guess is as good as mine. Or I've had it up to here with you. These phrases are known as Idioms. Idioms exist in every language, but what are they? An idiom is a phrase or expression that does not make sense literally. Instead, it has a figurative meaning that is different from its literal meaning. If somebody says he's driving me notes, it does not mean that somebody is driving and it has nothing to do with notes. In fact, he's driving me nuts, means he is annoying me. Native speakers of English will naturally inhabit idioms because they will have heard them growing up. However, if you are learning English as a second language and it is not your native language, idioms can be extremely difficult to understand. This course is for non native speakers of English who want to improve their communication skills, particularly their comprehension skills. The course is taught entirely in English by me and native British English speaker. And we're going to look at the most useful idioms in English. So let's crack on. 2. A bit of grammar: A bit of grammar. Throughout this course, I'll be using some grammatical terms. I'm going to go through the moon now, but you can keep coming back to this video anytime you want a grammatical term refresher so you don't get lost when I'm giving my explanations. Nouns. And noun is any word that you can put The in front of the house, the car, the phone, the game, the joke. All of these on nouns, and they're called common nouns. You also have proper nouns, which are the names for people or places. Karen, Mock, England, London, Paris. They're all proper nouns. Adjectives. An adjective is for the most part, a word that describes something. But an easier way to think about it is as a word that you can put it is in front of. It is good. It is banned. It is red. It is big, it is small. It is ready. It is important. It is broken. It is loud. These are all adjectives. Verbs. A verb is a doing word, but a simpler way to look at them are words I can put two in front of. To jump, to think, to speak, to be, to divulge, to carry, to put TCT to learn. These are all examples of verbs. Verbs come in many different forms. You can take a verb and change it. And this is called conjugation. If you conjugated verb, you can put it into different tenses. For example, the past tense, future tense, the present tense. And you can change the subject. This means the person or thing that is doing the action. Look at some different ways. We can conjugate the verb to eat. I eat, he eats, we are eating. They have eaten. She ate. You will eat. When the verb has to in front of it, we call it the infinitive. All of these are infinitives to help, to jump, to play, to clean, to listen. To make the present tense, you simply put a pronoun or a noun in front of the verb. The pronouns in English are I, you, he, she, it, we, or they. So some examples of the present tense with the verb to help our, I help, you help. We help. They help. If you want to use he, she or it. You have to put an S on the end of the verb. He helps. She helps. It helps. They're all examples of the present tense in English. To make the past tense, you tend to just put ED on the end of the verb. For example, I helped. You jumped. She played, he cleaned. We listened. To make the future tense. You just put wheel in front of the verb. I will help you. We'll jump. He will play, she will listen. We will clean the two past tenses. In English, we have a simple past tense and the present perfect tense. They are both used to talk about the past, but they are formed slightly differently. To form the simple past, you just put ED on the end of the verb, as we have seen. But to form the present perfect tense, you have to use an auxiliary verb. These are the auxiliary verbs in English. I have, you have, he has, she has, it has. We have. And they have. Then you put the past participle on the end of any of those. For example, I have helped. You have jumped. He has cleaned, she has played. We have listened. They're all examples of the present perfect tense. It's an auxiliary verb with the past participle. Most of the time, the simple past and the past participles are the same. You just add ED to the end. However, there are quite a few irregular verbs in English where the simple past and the past participles are different. Just remember, you have to use the past participle with one of the auxiliary verbs. For example, the verb to eat is very irregular. The simple past is eight. I ate, ate, ate, ate, ate, ate. And they ate. The past participle however, is eaten. I have eaten. You have eaten. He has eaten. She has eaten. It has eaten. We have eaten. And they have eaten. For a lot of irregular verbs, the past participle ends in the letters E, N. Here is a table of some irregular verbs with that to past forms, the simple past and the past participle. I have the infinitive on the left. That's the verb that has two in front of it, the simple past in the middle and the past participle on the right. To fall, fell, fallen, to eat, ate, eaten, to choose, chose, chosen. To break, broke, broken, to take, took, taken to give, gave, given to C. So C to speak, spoke, spoken, to write, wrote, written to do. Did Dune to go, went, gone to be, was or were bean. So you'll notice that most of the past participles and in the lattice EM, but done and gone down. You'll also see that the verb to be has two simple past, was and were. Well, we use was with I he she it I was he was she was it was and we use where with the other pronouns. You were. We were they were. See if you can put the correct version of the verb in the sentences. I him everything yesterday. I gave him everything yesterday. We haven't anybody today. We haven't seen anybody today. What have you what have you done? So if the sentence has, has or have, that's an auxiliary verb. And that means you have to put a past participle if have or has, isn't there, then you have to use the simple past. That's why we had I gave him everything yesterday, but then we haven't seen. And what have you done? Yesterday? We with them. But this morning they have a loan. Yesterday. We went with them. But this morning they have gone alone. Last time we came here I over twice. But luckily, I haven't over yet today. Last time we came here, I fell over twice. But luckily, I haven't fallen over yet today. I haven't anything down yet because I don't have a pen. I haven't written anything down yet because I don't have a pen down so many things. But I nothing. She wrote down so many things, but I wrote nothing. Which cake have you today? I the chocolate one. Which cake have you chosen today? I chose the chocolate one. He miss something interesting to look at. He gave me something interesting to look at. Have you to Mary about the meeting. Have you spoken to Mary about the meeting? Finally, you have what's known as continuous tenses. These tenses use the ing form of the verb. Basically you put the letters I and g on the end of the verb. In the present continuous, you put the ink verb after any form of to be in the present tense? I am, you are, he is, she is, it is we are, and they are. Is the verb to be in the present tense. So some examples of the present continuous are, I am speaking, you are singing. He is going, she is eating, it is working. We are buying. They are sending in the past continuous. You put the ink verb after any form of to be in the past tense? I was. You were Hebrew was, she was. It was we were. And they were, is the past tense of the verb to be. So some examples of past continuous verbs are, I was speaking, you were singing, he was going, she was eating, it was working. We were buying. They were sending. So as I said, you can come back to this video as often as you need in order to recap any of the grammatical terms I use throughout this course. 3. 1 Make it up as you go along: Make it hope as you go along. This phrase means to improvise as you do something without a plan. Just make it up as you go along and you'll be okay. Grammar. The verbs in this phrase, Our make and go, which you can conjugate into any tense in the past you have made and went. For example, he made it up as he went along. He made it up as he went along. In the present, you have make and go or mates and those or making and going. For example, she makes it hope as she goes along, she makes it or push it goes along. They're making it up as they go along. They're making it up as they go along. In the future. You have will make. If you use the future tense, the second verb go will be in the present tense. For example, he will make it up as he goes along. He will make it up as he goes along. Or they will make it up as they go along. They will make it up as I go along. You also change the you to any person so it matches the subject of the sentence. So that's why we had, They will make it up as they go along. Explanation. You can use this idiom to show that somebody is not sure what they're doing, but they're having a go anyway. You can use it to talk about any sort of work or when somebody is giving a speech or during the presentation, and they don't have a script. Examples. Say these example sentences to yourself. Then listen to me saying them. Number one, say it out loud. We didn't know what we were doing. So we made it hope as we went along, we didn't know what we were doing. So we made it hope as we went along. Say the second sentence out loud to yourself. Peter forgot the second half of his speech. So he made the rest up. As he went along. Peter forgot the second half of his speech, so he made the restaurant as he went along. Now say the third sentence out loud to yourself. Please don't make it up as you go along, you should make a plan. Please. Don't make it up as you go along. You should make a plan. And finally, say the fourth sentence out loud. They said they will make it up as they go along. They said they will make it up as they go along. Test yourself. See if you can replace the word improvise with the correct form of this idiom in the following sentences. When you improvise, when you make it up as you go along. When you make it up as you go along? I wasn't sure. So I just improvised. I wasn't sure. So I just made it up as I went along. I wasn't sure. So I just made it up as I went along. Or they improvising. Are they making it up as they go along? Are they making it up as they go along? It seems like she's improvising everything. It seems like she's making everything go as she goes along. It seems like she's making everything off as she goes along. Could you tell we were improvising our presentation. Could you tell we were making our presentation up as we went along? Could you tell we will making my presentation of as we went along. In context. Here are four sentences that contain the phrase to make it up as you go along. Sally was telling me that she went to a play the other day and it was as if the actors were just making it up as they went along. They didn't seem to have a script. It was more like an improve. Sally was telling me that she went to a play the other day. And it was as if the actors were just making it up as they went along. They didn't seem to have a script. It was more like an improve. Gary was nervous during the meeting and to make things worse, his PowerPoint presentation wasn't working, so he ended up having to make everything off as you went along. Gary was nervous during the meeting and to make things worse, his PowerPoint presentation wasn't working. So he ended up having to make everything or as he went along, the children hadn't done enough preparation for their presentation. So they made it up as I went along locally, they still got a good mark, and the teacher didn't seem to notice they were improvising. The children. Haven't been enough preparation for our presentation. So they made it up as I went along. Luckily, they still got a good mark and the teacher didn't seem to notice there were improvising with no proper training and no proper tools. The group had to make it up as I went along to try and fix the broken engine. With no proper training and no proper tools, the group had to make it top as I went along to try and fix the broken engine. 4. 2 Be onto a winner: B onto a winner. This phrase means to be doing something that will most likely be successful. I think you're onto a winner there. Grammar. This phrase has one verb in it. The verb is B, but you can change to suit the subject and also the tendons. In the present tense. You have r and is. For example, I think I'm on to a winner with this. I think I'm on to a winner with this. You're definitely on to a winner. You're definitely on to a winner. Or she says she's onto a winner. She said she's onto a winner. In the past, you have was and were for example, he was onto a winner. He was onto a winner. In the future. You just say will be, for example, keep doing that. And you will be onto a winner. Keep doing that, and you will be onto a winner. Explanation. You can use this idiom to say to somebody that what they're doing is likely to be successful. Or you can also use it to say that a product is going to sell. Well, you could say something like, these muffins are delicious. You're onto a winner there. If you are talking to a cage of iron, for example. Examples. These four sentences to yourself out loud and then listen to me saying them. After I say them, you could pause the video and then save them again. So say number one out loud to yourself. We've been working on this project for a year now. And I think we're onto a winner. We've been working on this project for a year now, and I think we're on to a winner. Number two. The children love the bushes writing. So I'd say she was onto a winner. The children loved the book she's writing. So I'd say she was onto a winner. Number three. I think you run to a window with these cakes that delicious. I think you run through a window with these cakes. That delicious. Number four. He seems to think he's onto a window with this new product, but it doesn't seem like anything special to me. He seems to think he's onto a winner with this new product, but it doesn't seem like anything special to me. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so that I contain the idiom b onto a winner. We all think he's going to be successful with this new business venture. We all think he's onto a winner with this new business venture. We all think he don't have a winner with this new business venture. I'm telling you safety is definitely going to succeed with this. I'm telling you Syfy is definitely onto a winner with this. I'm telling you Sophie is definitely onto a window with this. The children seem to be enjoying the cakes. So you're going to be successful with these new flavors. The children seem to be enjoying the cakes. So you want to open with these new flavors. The children seem to be enjoying the cakes. So you want to win with these new flavors. They said he was going to make a success of the new shop, but he has failed so far. They said he was onto a winner with the new shop, but he has failed so far. They said he was onto a winner with the new shop, but he has failed so far. Do you think we're going to succeed? Do you think we're onto a winner? Do you think we're onto a winner? In context? Gary doesn't look very optimistic about his latest novel. But I've read what is written so far and I think he's definitely onto a winner. Gary doesn't look very optimistic about his latest novel. But I've read while he's written so far, and I think he's definitely onto a winner. They've been working on developing a new arm of the company. And the boss seems to think that they're onto a winner. They'd been working on developing a new arm of the company. And the boss seems to think they were onto a winner. After so many failed attempts, the team is finally onto a window with this one. After so many failed attempts, the team is finally onto a winner with this one. We gave the presentation last week and everybody was very enthusiastic about it. So I think we're onto a winner with this new line of drinks. We gave the presentation last week, and everybody was very enthusiastic about it. So I think we're on to a winner with this new line of drinks. 5. 3 Throw a spanner in the works: Put a spanner in the works, or throw a spanner in the works. This phrase means that something has happened that has caused a plan not to work out as expected or hoped. Well, that rarely throw a spanner in the works. This phrase can be used either with the web PUT or throw. And that completely interchangeable. The good thing about the web port is that the past participle is also put. The past tense of the verb throw is through, or the past participle is thrown. For example, that throw a spanner in the works. That throw a spanner in the works? Or that has thrown a spanner in the works. That has thrown a spanner in the works. Both of those sentences mean that something has happened to cause an issue to a plan. In the present tense, you can say puts, or is or are putting or throw, and is off throwing. For example. This rarely ports a spanner in the works. This very ports a spanner in the works. Or you're definitely throwing a spanner in the works. You're definitely throwing a spanner in the works. Again in the future. Or you have to do is put the word will in front of the verb. So you will get something like that. We'll put a spanner in the works. That will put a spanner in the works. Explanation. If you look at this phrase, literally, it means to throw a spanner into a system of gears which will cause a jam and stop the machine from working. But just like with any idiom, you can use it figuratively to talk about any incidents that will cause problems with your plan. You can use this phrase to talk about anything that will disrupt things. For example, if you're starting a business and the bank refuses to give you a loan, that will really throw a spanner in the works. The West spanner is a British English term. And in American English, they tend to say, throw a wrench in the works, or even throw a monkey wrench in the works. Examples. Say these four sentences to yourself out loud. Then listen to me, say them. Press pause and say them again. Say the first sentence out loud to yourself. We had everything ready for the wedding. But the K2 or counseling has really throwing a spanner in the works. We had everything ready for the wedding, but the caterer a counseling has re threat a spanner in the works. Number two, if they decide not to give us the funding, it will put a spanner in the works, but I think we can still make it happen. If they decide not to give us the funding. It'll put a spanner in the works, but I think we can still make it happen. Number three, I don't want to throw a spanner in the works, but have you double check this with a solicitor? I don't want to throw a spanner in the works, but have you double-check this with a solicitor? Number four, MS. being ill has definitely put a spanner in the works, but I think we can just about get by without her. Ms. Being ill has definitely put a spanner in the works. But I think we can just about get by without her. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so that they contain the idiom, put a spanner in the works, or throw a spanner in the works. The rain is going to cause a lot of problems for the party. The rain is going to put a spanner in the works for the party. Or the rain is going to throw a spanner in the works for the potty when it creates an issue for you hadn't gone when you put a spanner in the works for you? If I don't come with it, throw a spanner in the works for you if I didn't coin. The children were both a last week and it created a lot of problems. The children were both a last week and it throw a spanner in the works or the children were both last week. And it put a spanner in the works. I need to finish this essay, but my laptop has stopped working, which has obviously cause issues. I need to finish this essay, but my laptop has stopped working, which has obviously put a spanner in the works. Or I need to finish this essay. But my laptop has stopped working, which has obviously throwing a spanner in the works. Whilst it wasn't a disaster, it certainly creates a lot of problems. Once it wasn't a disaster, it certainly put a spanner in the works. Once it wasn't a disaster, is certainly throw a spanner in the works. In context. He's just a narrow minded individual who wants to put a spanner in the works for some reason. He's just a narrow minded individual. He wants to put a spanner in the works for some reason. The fact that cctv stop working has certainly thread and spanner in the works and probably made it ten times harder to find out what truly happened. The fact the cctv stop working has certainly throwing a spanner in the works and probably made it ten times harder to find out what truly happened. This isn't the first time somebody tried to throw a spanner in the works, it didn't stop as last time and it won't stop us this time. This isn't the first time somebody tried to throw a spanner in the works, it didn't stop us last time and it won't stop at this time. They weren't expecting so many people to object to their plans at the town meeting. And it through a huge spanner in the works. They went expecting so many people to object to that plan, that the town meeting and it through a huge spanner in the works. 6. 4 A one off: A one-off. This phrase can be used to describe an event that is happening just one time. Or it can also be used to describe a product or a design that is unique. You won't find the stress in the shops. It's a one-off grammar. This idiom can be used as an adjective or a noun. If you use it as an adjective, you simply place it in front of a noun. For example, you can say, he's playing a one-off gig. He's playing a one-off gig. This is a one-off payment. This is a one-off payment. She only makes one of designs. She only makes one of designs. Alternatively, you can use it by itself as a noun and say things like this is a one-off. This is a one-off. You can also use it to talk about people who are unique or special in some way. Is usually said in a positive way. Mary really as a one-off. Mary really is a one-off explanation. You can use one off to describe events or products, but you can also use it to describe people. Our unique or special in some way. Examples, say the sentences out loud to yourself and then press play to hear me say them. And then you can pause the video and repeat them again. Say number one out loud. The actress commissioned a one-off dress from the designer for the Oscars. The actress commissioned a one-off dress from the designer for the Oscars. Number two, the band is doing a one-off gig to commemorate 30 is since that first song was released. The band is doing a one-off gig to commemorate 30 years since that first song was released. Number three, there is nobody else like Peter. He really is a one-off. There is nobody else like Peter. He really is a one-off. Number four delegate asking me for help again, this is a one-off. Don't go asking me for help again. This is a one-off. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so they contain the idiom one-off. This is a unique vase. There is no other light in the world. This is a one-off vase. There is no other like it in the world. This is a one-off vase. There's no with the light in the world. A painting is an original piece of work. A painting is a one-off piece of work. A painting is a one-off piece of work. The singer was so amazing. He was PLS. The singer was so amazing. He was a one-off. The singer was so amazing. He was a one-off. They could never recreate a shell like this. It was full of inimitable performances. They could never recreate a chair like this. It was full of one of performances. They could never recreate a shell like this. It was full of one-off performances. Serena Williams is an unequal tennis player. Serena Williams is a one-off tennis player. Serena Williams is a one-off tennis player. In context. We don't want to sign on to anything. We just want to make a one-off payment and move on. We don't want to sign on to anything. We just want to make a one-off payment and move on. If you want to do an AI company, there's a one-off training day. You have to pretend first. If you want to do an AI company, there's a one-off training they have to attend first. You need to keep a lookout for irregularities. If they're one-offs, don't worry. But if there are common occurrence, will need to restart the whole system. You need to keep a lookout for irregularities. If they're one-offs, don't worry. But if ever a common occurrence will need to restart the whole system. This was very out of character for James. I hope it's a one-off or we'll have to reconsider his employment. This was very out of character for James. I hope it's a one-off or we'd have to reconsider his employment. 7. 5 Turn a blind eye: Turn a blind eye. This phrase is normally used to say that somebody is ignoring something bad or illegal that is happening. They know it's happening, but they're pretending not to notice. I'll turn a blind eye this time, but don't do it again. This idiom contains one verb, turn. You can use it in the past, present, or future, and it's irregular verb. In the past, you have turned, they turned a blind eye. They turned a blind eye. In the present, you can use turn or turns, but you can also say turning. For example, he always turns a blind eye. He always turns a blind eye. Or I'm turning a blind eye this time. I'm turning a blind eye this time. In the future tense, you simply put will in front of the verb. For example, I think she will turn a blind eye. I think she will turn a blind eye. Or don't think we will turn a blind eye. Don't think we will turn a blind eye. Explanation. This phrase is used to say that somebody is deliberately overlooking something or ignoring something bad that is happening. If somebody says that they will turn a blind eye to something you're doing, it's usually considered that they're doing you a favor. You can put the preposition to after the phrase to say what it is that's being ignored. For example, she turned a blind eye to his bad behavior. Examples. Say these four sentences out loud yourself, and then listen to me say them. Once you've heard me say them, you can pause the video and repeat them again. Number one, a lot of people know this is going on, but they choose to turn a blind eye. A lot of people know this is going on, but they choose to turn a blind eye to the policeman, turned a blind eye to the crime going on right in front of him. The policeman turned a blind eye to the crime going on right in front of him. Number three, if you do something illegal, we're not going to turn a blind eye. If you do something illegal, we're now going to turn a blind eye number for the landlord. Turned a blind eye to the fact that two families were sharing an apartment. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so that they contain the idiom, turn a blind eye. Sharon, through her rubbish on the flow. But Steve pretended he didn't see Sharon through her rubbish in the flow. But Steve turned a blind eye. Sharon through her rubbish on the football bit. Steve turned a blind eye. Whenever John did something wrong, his mom ignored it. Whenever John did something wrong, his mom turned a blind eye. Whenever John did something wrong, his mom turn a blind eye. The authorities often pretended not to notice what was going on. The authorities often turned a blind eye to what was going on. The authority is often turned a blind eye to what was going on. The President prefer to pretend not to notice the issues around asylum seekers. The President prefer to turn a blind eye to the issues around asylum-seekers. The President prefer to turn a blind eye to the issues around asylum-seekers. The inmates soon got to know which offices will pretend not to see the rule-breaking. The inmates soon got to know which officers would turn a blind eye to the rule-breaking. The inmates soon got to know which officers would turn a blind eye to the rule-breaking. In context. We're not supposed to park here, but the authority is usually turn a blind eye. We're not supposed to hog here, but the authorities usually turn a blind eye. If you want to join our company, you need to realize that there are a lot of things going on that you might not agree with. The best thing to do though, is to turn a blind eye and get on with your day. If you want to join our company, you need to realize that there are a lot of things going on, but you might not agree with. The best thing to do though, is to turn a blind eye and get on with your day. They might turn a blind eye to this order behavior at your own school, but we're much more vigilant here. They might turn a blind eye to this sort of behavior are your own school. But we're much more vigilant here. If you see something wrong, you should never turn a blind eye. Or you're simply adding to the problem. If you see something wrong, you should never turn a blind eye. Or you're simply adding to the problem. 8. 6 Think on your feet: Think on your feet. This phrase is used to describe when somebody can work through something quickly without having to think it through first. It's usually associated with actions that need to be completed in a short period of time. So you're able to make decisions without thinking about them. First, teachers often have to think on their feet. The idiom contains one verb I think. But you also have to change the word Your to agree with the subject of the sentence. The word think can be conjugated into the past, present, and future tenses. It's irregular in the past and it becomes thought. For example, he thought on his feet. He thought on his feet. In the present tense, you can say think, thinks of thinking. For example, I'm always thinking on my feet. I'm always thinking on my feet. She thinks well on her feet. She thinks well on her feet. Or they can think on their feet. They can think on their feet. Again in the future. You just put will in front of the verb. We will think on our feet. We will think on our feet. Explanation. This phrase is used to mean that somebody can act quickly in a situation without having to think about it first. It tends to be used in high pressure situations where there isn't much time is considered a good quality to have. The phrase literally means that you can think while standing on your feet. So it's saying you don't need to sit down and work something out beforehand. You can just get on with it. Examples. Have a go at saying this, for example, sentences out loud. Then listen to me say them. Pause the video and repeat them again. Number one, we need workers who can think on their feet. We need workers who can think on their feet. Number two, he can think on his feed quicker than anyone I've ever met. He can think on his feet quicker than anyone I've ever met. Number three, stay alert and think on your feet if you need to. Stay alert and think on your feet, if you need to. Number for this industry will suit you. If you can think on your feet and react well on the stress. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so they contain the idiom, think on your feet. I've always been good at getting things done under pressure. I've always been good at thinking on my feet. I've always been good at thinking on my feet. I had to work out what to do really quickly. I had to think on my feet. I had to think on my feet. There are moments every day in which we have to act quickly without hesitation. There are moments every day in which we have to think on our feet. There are moments every day in which we have to think on our feet. In this job, you have to stay calm and act on the pressure. In this job. You have to stay calm and think on your feet. In this job, you have to stay calm and think on your feet. If you can make decisions quickly, it will help you a lot. If you can think on your feet, it will help you a lot. If you can think on your feet, it will help you a lot. In context. You must not be afraid of thinking on your feet and implementing ideas as I commend your head, You must not be afraid of thinking on your feet and implementing ideas as they come into your head. Anybody who cannot think on their feet will find it difficult to work in high pressure environments. There isn't a lot of time to sit back. Anybody who cannot think on their feet will find it difficult to work in high pressure environments where there isn't a lot of time to sit back. She thought on her feet and decided to turn this disaster into a learning opportunity. She thought on her feet and decided to turn this disaster into a learning opportunity. Your ability to think on your feet will really impress the bosses. Your ability to think on your feet will really impress the bosses. 9. 7 Set your sights on: Set your sights on. This phrase means, and you have a goal in mind and you're focusing yourself on achieving it. She set her sights on being an astronaut. Grammar. The verb in this idiom is set, which is very similar to the verb port in the past tense is the same as the present tense. For example, he set his sights on the cottage. He set his sights on the cottage. You have to remember to change the Yeoh in, set your sights on to match the subject of the sentence. In the present tense, you can say set, sets or setting. For example, we're setting our sights on going to Italy. We're setting our sights on going to SLA. Wouldn't she sets her sights on something she achieves. It wouldn't. She sets her sights on something she achieves it. Don't set your sights on the green car. Don't set your sights on the green car. In the future tense, we simply put will in front of the verb. They will probably set their sights on something ridiculous. They will probably set their sights on something ridiculous. Explanation. The phrase, set your sights on something is quite an ambitious phrase linked to goals and achievements, but it can also be used for objects. For example, he set his sights on the red car. There is another way that you can use this phrase. You can say, have your sights set on something as well, and you have to conjugate the verb, have. Instead. He set his sights on becoming a teacher. Well, you could also say he had his sights set on becoming a teacher. The phrase actually comes from the verb site in terms of a weapon. The site of a gun is a device used to line up your eye on the target. You can use the verb set to say that you're lining up the site. Finally, you can put a verb after set your sights on, but you have to put I-N-G or ink on the end of it. He satisfied on winning the competition. He set his sights on winning the competition. Examples. Say these four sentences out loud to yourself. Then listen to me say them after each sentence, pause the video and have another go repeating it. Number one, she has set her sights on an Olympic gold medal. She has set her sights on an Olympic gold medal. Number two. He set his sights on moving his company to American XJ. He set his sights on moving his company to American XJ. Number 3. Another couple has set their sights on the same house we want another couple has set their sights on the same house we want. Number 4. Once we set our sights on something, we usually achieve it. Wounds. We set our sights on something, we usually achieve it. And if you look at these four sentences, you can see that the subject determines how we change the JO. So in the first sentence, rather than saying your sites, we say she has set her sights, so she goes with her. In the second sentence it says he set his sights. So he goes with his it goes she with her. He with his eye, with my u with you. They with their and we, with our like in the last sentence, wounds, we set our sights. This is the same as with the idiom, think on your feet, in which we had to change the your feet to my feed his feed her feet, et cetera. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so that they contain the idiom, set your sights on. She really wants to become a doctor when she's older. She has set her sights on becoming a doctor. When she's older. She has set her sights on becoming a doctor when she's older. I didn't go out to intentionally sell my company. It just happened. I didn't set my sights on selling my company. It just happened. When they really want it. Will they set their sights on it? Will they set their sights on it? Wouldn't Sally decide she wanted something? She works really hard to get. It won't service. That's her sights on something. She works really hard to get it. Wouldn't Sally sets her sights on something. She works really hard to get it. They're really hoping you become the new head of marketing. They are setting their sights on new becoming the new head of marketing. They are setting their sights or new becoming the new head of marketing. In context. If you have really set your sights on becoming a manager, you will probably have to relocate to another city. If you have really set your sights on becoming a manager, you will probably have to relocate to another city. A lot of parents set their sights on goals for their children to achieve without considering what they want in life. A lot of parents set their sights on gold electrode and to achieve without considering what they want in life. Hillary Clinton set her sights on becoming the first woman president of the United States. Hillary Clinton set her sights on becoming the first woman president of the United States. That training for several hours every day because they have been assigned set on the world record. That training for several hours every day because they have their sights set on a world record. 10. 8 Foot the bill: Foot the bill. This phrase is usually used when referring to something expensive. It means that your left having to pay for something. And it tends to have a negative connotation, but not always. He ordered and left me to the bill. The verb in this ADM is fought. And it's a verb that is only really used in this specific expression. The past tense of this verb is fought. And in the present tense, you can also use food, but you can use foots or footing as well. And as well, the future tense is willful. I will put the bill. I will put the bill. Who fought the battle in the end? Who fought the bill in the end? Why are we footing the bill? Why are we footing the bill? She always felt stability. She always foots the bill. Will you for the bell this time? Will you for the bill less time? Explanation. This ADM comes from the 15 hundreds. It used to refer to the foot of the bill, which is the very bottom of the bill, where all the totals are added together. Over time, this morphed into a verb. And now we have foot the bill and footing the bill as a verb. It tends to have a negative connotation if you're referring to somebody having to foot the bill, but if you offer to foot the bill for somebody that has no negative meaning attached. Examples. See if you can say these sentences out loud to yourself. Then listen to me say each one, pause the video and repeat it again. Number one, the company has to foot the bill for medical insurance. The company has to foot the bill for medical insurance. Number 2. He will be footing the bill. Who will be footing the bill? Number 3. Rosie is learning to play the guitar, and her father is footing the bill for the lessons. Rosie is learning to play the guitar, and her father is footing the bill for the lessons. Number for taxpayers are probably going to end up footing the bill. Taxpayers are probably going to end up footing the bill. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so they contain the idiom, foot the bill. Who is going to pay for all the drinks? He's going to put the bill for the drinks. Who is going to foot the bill for the drinks? I can't believe everybody has left and I have to pay the bill. I can't believe everybody has left and I have to foot the bill. I can't believe everybody has left and I have to foot the bill. Why did you have pave everything? Why did you have to put the bill? Why did you have to put the bill? Normally, you get certain benefits and the company will pay for them. Normally, you get certain benefits and the company will put the bill. Jacob broke two computers at school and they've asked his mother for the money to replace them. Jacob broke two computers at school and they've asked his mother to foot the bill to replace them. Jacob broke two computers at school and they've asked his mother to foot the bill to replace them. In context, many energy companies are encouraging their customers to install new smart meters, but they're also asking them to foot the bill. Many energy companies are encouraging their customers to install new smart meters, but they're also asking them to foot the bill. Whenever the company takes us out for dinner, the boss folds the bill. Whenever the company taxes are for dinner, the boss foots the bill. I don't mind organizing the party, but I'm not happy about footing the bill for everything. It isn't my responsibility. I don't mind organizing the party, but I'm not happy about footing the bill for everything. It isn't my responsibility. If anything goes wrong, I will put the bill to fix it. If anything goes wrong, I will be able to fix it. 11. 9 No frills: No-frills. This idiom is an adjective used to describe a product or a service as basic, it doesn't have a negative connotation now, It's usually used to show that it's cheap without any extra luxuries or add-ons. Is a nice hotel, but it's no frills. Grammar. The phrase no-frills is simply an adjective that you can place in front of a noun or used as an adjective to describe a product or service. For example, a no-frills airline. A no-frills airline, a no-frills hotel. A no-frills hotel. The service is good, but it's no-frills. The service is good, but it's no frills. It went from being no-frills to a first-class airline. It went from being no frills to a first-class airline. I'm happy with no frills. I'm happy with no frills. Explanation. The phrase no-frills means that non essential features have been removed in order to keep the price low. It doesn't have a negative connotation as most people are happy to pay less. The word frill comes from the fashion industry, and it refers to the ruffles or strips of pleated fabric used as decoration on clothing. They are basically an extra that is only there to look nice and adds nothing to the overall usage of the item of clothing. Examples. Have a go at saying these sentences. Number 1. This no-frills airline offers very low fares. This no-frills airline offers very low fares. Number two, I prefer a no-frills hotel because I'm using it for the bed. I'd prefer a no-frills hotel because I'm only using it for the bed. And number three, we don't need anything expensive. A no-frills room is fine. We don't need anything expensive and no-frills room is fine. Number four, It's a no-frills supermarket, but it has everything you need. It's a no fill supermarket, but it has everything you need. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so they contain the idiom, no-frills is quite a basic hairline, but it's fairly low cost. It's a no-frills airline. It's a no-frills airline. This soup market doesn't have fancy packaging and the shelves are a big basic. This is a no-frills supermarket. This is a no-frills supermarket. Or you could say, the supermarket is no-frills. We know saying that the rates, we've just booked a budget hotel. We're not staying at the red's. We've just bought a no-frills hotel. We're not staying at the Ritz. We've just booked a no-frills hotel. I need to get away somewhere. I'm not bothered where just a cheap holiday is fine. I need to get away somewhere. I'm not bothered. Where does the no-frills holiday is fine. I need to get away somewhere. I'm not bothered where just a no-frills holidays fine. This Jim doesn't have classes or a swimming pool or even a reception. This is a no-frills, Jim. This is a no-frills GM. In context. There has been a growing number of no-frills, gyms that can offer lower prices because they've eliminated all non-essentials, like hot tubs and so on. As there has been a growing number of neutrophils, gyms that can offer low prices because they've eliminated all non-essentials like hot tubs and so on as if you need so much rest your head for a few hours, we can just book a no-frills hotel. If you need somewhere terrestrial head for a few hours. We can just spoken no-frills hotel. I would rather save my money for the actual holiday and travel on a no-frills airline. I would rather save my money for the actual holiday and travel on a no-frills airline. I prefer no-frills supermarkets because you get the same food just without all the fancy package when I prefer no frill supermarkets because you get the same food just without all the fancy packaging. 12. 10 Be out of the woods: Be out of the woods. This phrase is used to say that you're not in a dangerous place anymore. Or sometimes is used in the negative to say that you're still in an uncertain place. And you would say that you're not out of the woods. We're not out of the woods yet. The phrase, be out of the woods uses the verb B, which we can conjugate in the past, present, or future tenses. In the past, you have was and where? For example, we went out of the woods yet. We went out to the woods yet. Or he was finally out of the woods. He was finally out of the woods. In the present tense, you have is, and I think we are out of the woods now. I think we are out of the woods now. You're not out of the woods yet. You're not out of the woods yet. And then in the future tense, you just say will be, you will soon be out of the woods. You will soon be out of the woods. Explanation. This idiom has been in use since the 17 hundreds. And in its literal sense, it simply means that being out of the woods is to be out of a dangerous place. Since woods are places where animals or other people that might attack, you can easily hide. Nowadays is very often used to talk about somebody's health, but is not limited to that. It's also usually used in the negative to say that you're not out of the woods yet means that things are still uncertain. Examples. Say these example sentences out loud. Number one, we won't know if he's out to the woods for another week or so. We won't know if he's out in the woods for another week. Number two, Toby, things he might finally be out of the woods type of things. He might finally be out of the woods. Number 3. The business is doing well, but it's not entirely out of the woods yet. The business is doing well, but it's not entirely out of the woods yet. Number four, we won't be out of the woods until the money starts coming in. We won't be out of the woods until the money starts coming in. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences that they contain the idiom out of the woods. I think Western in danger. I don't think we're out of the woods. I don't think Miranda, the wounds, everything went as well as we could have hoped, but she's not completely safe yet. Everything went as well as we could have hoped, but she's not completely out of the woods yet. Everything went as well as we could have hoped, but she's not completely out of the woods yet. If I say I'll say strong, we should be out of trouble by the next quarter. If our sale stay strong, we should be out of the woods by the next quarter. If our sales stay strong, we should be out of the woods by the next quarter. As soon as his temperature drops, he won't be at risk anymore. As soon as its temperature drops, he'll be out of the woods. As soon as its temperature drops, he'll be out of the woods. I wouldn't say we're completely safe yet. I wouldn't say we're completely out of the woods yet. I wouldn't say we're completely out of the woods yet. In context, the patient has just come out of surgery and she's feeling a little better now, but she's not as the woods yet. The patient has just come out of surgery and she's feeling a little better now, but she's not out of the woods yet. Our sales are 25 percent higher than they were a month ago. So things are going well. But I wouldn't say we're completely out of the woods yet. Sales are 25 percent higher than they were a month ago. So things are going well. But I wouldn't say we're completely out of the woods yet. Now we've paid everything off. We're officially out of the woods. Now. We've paid everything off. We're officially out of the woods. The economy seems to be gradually getting better. But it wouldn't be wise to say we're out of the woods yet. The economy seems to be gradually getting better. But it wouldn't be wise to say we're out of the woods yet. 13. Recap Quiz Explanation: Recap quiz. Let's do a quick quiz to recap the first 10 idioms that we've been learning. Let's just quickly familiarize ourselves with them first. Make it up as you go along. This means to improvise beyond to a winner. This means to do something that will likely succeed. Throw a spanner in the works. This means to cause something not to go to plan. A one-off. This is an original design or a single occurrence of an event. Turn a blind eye. This means to know something is happening, but to pretend, not to notice. Think on your feet. This means to be able to make decisions without thinking about them first. Set your sights on. This means to focus on something as you'll go foot the bill. This means to pay for something. No frills. This adjective can be used to describe something as basic without extra luxuries or add-ons. The out of the woods. This means to be out of danger. To test our knowledge of these idioms. Now, what we're going to do is take four sentences that don't contain an idiom, then take four idioms and try and fit one in each sentence. For example, if you've got the sentence, things were looking good, but we weren't out of danger yet. And one of the idioms was be out of the woods. Then we could rewrite the sentence as things weren't looking good. But we weren't out of the woods yet. We'll have 10 rounds altogether with four idioms tested in each round. 14. Recap Quiz Round 1: Round one. Here are four sentences and for idioms, try and rewrite each sentence so it contains one of the idioms. Instead, each ADM will be used only wounds. The idioms are. Make it up as you go along. Throw a spanner in the works, turn a blind eye beyond to a winner. The sentences are, He's just a narrow minded individual who wants to mess things up for some reason. They might pretend not to notice this sort of behavior your own school. But we're much more vigilant here with no proper training and no proper tools. The group had to improvise to try and fix the broken engine. They've been working on developing a new arm of the company. And the boss seems to think they're going to be successful with it. So pause the video, see if you can rewrite those four sentences with idioms instead. And then press play CT. Got them right. Number one, He's just a narrow minded individual who wants to throw a spanner in the works for some reason. Number two, they might turn a blind eye to this soldier behavior at your own school. But we're much more vigilant here. Number three, with no proper training and no proper tools, the group had to make it up as they went along to try and fix the broken engine. Number 4. They've been working on developing a new arm of the company. And the boss seems to think they run TO winner. 15. Recap Quiz Round 2: Round to the idioms are, turn a blind eye. Make it up as you go along. Set your sights on. Throw a spanner in the works. The sentences are, if you are really hoping to become a manager, you will probably have to relocate to another city. We're not supposed to park here. What the authority is, usually ignore it. The fact the cctv stop working has certainly cause an issue and probably made it ten times harder to find out what truly happened. Sally was telling me that she went to a play the other day. And it was as if the actors would just improvising. Pause the video, see if you can rewrite those four sentences using the idioms. And then press play to see if you got them right. Number one, if you have really set your sights on becoming a manager, you will probably have to relocate to another city. Number 2, we're not supposed to park here. The authority is usually turn a blind eye. Number 3. The fact the cctv stop working has certainly throw a spanner in the works and probably made it ten times harder to find out what truly happened. Number four, psi was telling me that she went to a play the other day and it was as if the actors were just making it up as they went along. 16. Recap Quiz Round 3: Round three. The idioms, our foot, the bill. A one-off. Think on your feet. Make it hope as you go along. The sentences are we don't want to sign up to anything. We just want to make a single payment and move on. Gary's PowerPoint presentation wasn't working, so he had to improvise. Many energy companies are encouraging their customers to install new smart meters, but they're also asking them to pay for it. You must not be afraid of making decisions quickly and implementing ideas as they come into your head. Pause the video, see if you can insert those idioms into their sentences. And then press play and see if you got them right. Number one, we don't want to sign up 20 Anything. We just want to make a one-off payment and move on. Number 2, carries PowerPoint presentation wasn't working, so we had to make everything as he went along. Number 3, many energy companies are encouraging their customers to install new smart meters, but they're also asking them to foot the bill. Number four. You must not be afraid of thinking on your feet and implementing ideas as they come into your head. 17. Recap Quiz Round 4: Round for. The idioms are a one-off foot, the bill. Set your sights on. Turn a blind eye. The sentences are, a lot of parents focus their energy on goals for their children to achieve without considering what they want in life. Whenever the company takes out for dinner, the boss pays for it all. If you want to join our company, there's a training day. You have to pretend first, but you only have to go. One's. The best thing to do is to pretend it isn't happening and get on with your day. So pause the video, see if you can put the idioms into those sentences, and then press play to see if you got them right. Number one, a lot of parents set their sights on goals lateral and to achieve without considering what they want in life. Number two, whenever the company takes out for dinner, the boss foots the bill. Number three. If you want to join our company, there's a one-off training day you have to attend first. Number four, the best thing to do is to turn a blind eye and get on with your day. 18. Recap Quiz Round 5: Round five. The idioms are, set your sights on. B onto a winner. A one-off foot, the bill. The sentences are, Gary doesn't look very optimistic about his latest novel. But I've read what he's written so far. And I think he's definitely going to have success with it. You need to keep a lookout for irregularities. If there are anomalies, don't worry. But if there are common occurrence, will need to restart the whole system. I don't mind organising the party. I'm not happy about paying for everything. It isn't my responsibility. Hillary Clinton dreams of becoming the first woman president of the United States. So pause the video, see if you can rewrite the sentences using the idioms and then press place if you got them right. Number 1. Gary doesn't look very optimistic about his latest novel. But I've read what is written so far. And I think he's definitely onto a winner. Number two. You need to keep a lookout for irregularities. If they're one-offs, don't worry. But if there are common occurrence, will need to restart the whole system. Number three, I don't mind organizing the party, but I'm not happy about footing the bill. It isn't my responsibility. Number for Hillary Clinton set her sights on becoming the first woman president of the United States. 19. Recap Quiz Round 6: Round 6. The idioms are, thinking on your feet. No-frills, be out of the woods. A one-off. The sentences are, the patient has just come out of surgery and she's feeling a little better now. But she's not being given the all clear yet. There has been a growing number of basic gyms that can offer low prices because they've eliminated all non-essentials like hot tubs and its owners. This was very out of character for James. I hope it's a single occurrence or we'll have to reconsider his employment. Anybody who cannot make decisions quickly will find it difficult to work in high pressure environments where there isn't a lot of time to sit back. So pause the video, see if you can rewrite all these sentences using the idioms. And then press play and see if you got the mind. Number 1. The patient has just come out of surgery and she's feeling a little better now, but she's not out of the woods yet. Number two, there has been a growing number of no-frills. Gyms can offer low prices because they've eliminated all non-essentials, like hot tubs and zone is number three. This was very out of character for James. I hope it's a one-off or we'll have to reconsider his employment number for anybody who cannot think on their feet will find it difficult to work in high pressure environments where there isn't a lot of time to sit back. 20. Recap Quiz Round 7: Round 7. The idioms are, be out of the wounds. Think on your feet, foot, the bill, no-frills. The sentences are, if you need some way to rest your head for a few hours, we can just book a cheap and basic hotel. She thought quickly and decided to tear the disaster into a learning opportunity. If anything goes wrong, I will cover the costs to fix it. Our sales are 25 percent higher than they were a month ago. So things are going well, but I wouldn't say we're completely safe yet. So pause the video, see if you can rewrite those four sentences using the idioms. And then press play to see if you got them right. Number one, if you need some whites, rest your head for a few hours, we can just book a no-frills hotel. Number two. She thought on her feet and decided to turn this disaster into a learning opportunity. Number 3, if anything goes wrong, I will put the bill to fix it. Number 4, our sales are 25 percent higher than they were a month ago. So things are going well. But I wouldn't say we're completely out of the woods yet. 21. Recap Quiz Round 8: Round 8. The idioms are beyond to a winner. Turn a blind eye, throw a spanner in the works. Set your sights on. The sentences are, this isn't the first time somebody tried to remain things. It didn't suppose last time and it worked. This time. They're training for several hours every day because they really want to get the world record. After so many failed attempts, the team is finally going to be successful with this one. If you see something wrong, you should never ignore it, or you're simply adding to the problem. Pause the video, see if you can rewrite the sentence is using mediums, and then press play to see if you got them right. Number one, this isn't the first time somebody tried to throw a spanner in the works, it didn't stop as last time and it won't stop. Was this time. Number 2? My training for several hours every day because they have set their sights on the world record. Number three. After so many failed attempts, the team is finally onto a winner with this one. Number 4, if you see something wrong, you should never turn a blind eye. Or you're simply adding to the problem. 22. Recap Quiz Round 9: Round nine. The idioms are, no-frills. Be out of the woods. Beyond to a winner. Think on your feet. The sentences are, we gave the presentation last week and everybody was very enthusiastic about it. So I think we're going to be successful with this new line of drinks. Now we've paid everything off, we're officially out of trouble. I would rather save my money for the actual holiday and travel on a cheap airline. Your ability to make decisions quickly, we'll really impress the bosses. So pause the video, rewrite the sentence is using the idioms and then press Play so you can check your answers. Number one, we gave the presentation last week and everybody was very enthusiastic about it. So I think we're onto a winner with this new line of drinks. Number 2. Now we've paid everything off. We're officially out of the woods. Number three, I would rather save my money for the actual holiday and travel on a no-frills airline. Number for your ability to think on your feet, will really impress the bosses. 23. Recap Quiz Round 10: Round ten. The idioms are, throw a spanner in the works, make it top as you go along. No-frills. Be out of the woods. The sentences are, the children hadn't done enough preparation for that presentation, survey improvised. The economy seems to be gradually getting better. But it wouldn't be wise to say, we're safe yet. They weren't expecting so many people to object to that plans are the town meeting and it made things difficult. I prefer basic supermarkets because you get the same food just without all the fancy packaging. So pause the video, have a go at rewriting the sentences using the idioms, and then press play to see if you got them right. Number one, the children haven't done enough preparation for that presentation, so they made it up as they went along. Number 2, the economy seems to be gradually getting better. But it wouldn't be wise to say we're out of the woods yet. Number three, they weren't expecting so many people to object to their plans at the town meeting and it through a spanner in the works. Number 4. I prefer no frill supermarkets because you get the same food just without all the fancy packaging. 24. 11 Brush aside: Brush aside. This phrase is used to say that you don't think something is important, so you're just going to ignore it and move on to something else. It usually refers to things like criticisms, complaints, or suggestions that people have made. He always pushes aside any negative feedback. The phrase brush aside, uses the verb to brush, which you can conjugate into different tenses. In the past, you have brushed she brushed me aside. She brushed me aside. They brushed all her suggestions aside. They brushed all her suggestions aside. In the present tense, you have brush brushes and brushing. He's always pushing things aside. He's always pushing things aside. If they brush it aside, ask them again. If they wish you aside, ask them again. And in the future, you have Willowbrook. We will push aside any fears we have. We will push aside any fears we have. Explanation. This idiom literally means to brush something away with a broom. It means you're considering the suggestion or the criticism as unimportant as a piece of dust that needs to be brushed away. If you were to see a piece of dust on your clothing, you would quickly brush it off to get rid of it. Likewise, if you brush something aside, you are pushing it away from you so you can ignore it and focus on things you consider more important again, this ADM has a largely negative connotation and it's used in a sense that they're brushing something aside is a bad thing to do. People may feel resentment if they are brushed aside. On the other hand, you can brush things aside in a positive manner. For example, you can brush aside worries and fears, leaving you more confident. Examples. Avogardo's saying these example sentences out loud and listen to me say them, and then pause the video and repeat the sentence again. Number one, It's not helpful to merely Bruce people's opinions aside. If they're valid. It's not helpful to merely brush people's opinions aside if they're valid. Number two, I try not to push people aside, but sometimes I'm too busy to get distracted. I've tried not to Bush people aside, but sometimes I'm too busy to get distracted. Number three, they brushed aside everything I said without consideration. They brushed aside everything I said without consideration. Number four. Why do you just push everything aside? Like it doesn't matter to you. Why do you just brush everything aside? Like it doesn't matter to you. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences. They contain the idiom. Brush aside. You shouldn't just ignore what people have to say. You shouldn't just brushed aside what people have to say. You shouldn't just brushed aside where people have to say, tell me your worries. And I promise I will listen to them. Tell me your worries and I promise I won't push them aside. Tell me your worries. And I promise I won't push them aside. She didn't listen to anything. So he had to say she brushed aside anything save you had to say she brushed aside anything. So he had to say, I wish you wouldn't just ignore me when I'm reaching out to you. I wish you wouldn't just brush me aside when I'm reaching out to you. I wish you wouldn't just brush MY assignment. I'm reaching out to you. She doesn't take notice of any doubts in her mind and just goes for it. She brushes aside any doubts in her mind and just goes for it. She pushes aside any doubts in her mind and just goes for it. In context. The family brushed aside her final wishes and chose to spend the money. She left them on a new car. The family brushed aside her final wishes and chose to spend the money she left them on a new car. The president merely brushed aside any questions about his actions during the election. The president merely brushed aside any questions about his actions during the election. During the meeting, the CEO will probably pushed aside any accusations that he lied. So we need to have our evidence ready. During the meeting, the CEO will probably brush aside any accusations that he lied. So we need to have our evidence ready. Perhaps you shouldn't brush the idea aside to hastily. It's always important to listen and consider suggestions from loyal customers. Perhaps you shouldn't push the ideas are too hastily. It's always important to listen and consider suggestions from loyal customers. 25. 12 Fall on hard times: Fall on hard times. This phrase is used to say that you or somebody is currently going through a difficult period in your life. It often refers to financial hardship or difficulties in your personal situation. He's recently fallen on hard times. Grammar. This phrase uses the verb fall, which it can conjugate into the past, present, and future tenses. In the past, we have the simple past fell and the past participle fallen. Last year. He fell on hard times. Last year he fell on hard times. I think may fallen on hard times. I think they've fallen on hard times. In the present tense, you can use for falls or falling. It seems like we're always fallen on hard times. It seems like we're always falling on hard times. You can call me if you ever fall on hard times. You can call me if you ever fall on hard times. And then in the future tense, you simply say will fall. Hopefully, we will not fall on hard times again. Hopefully we will not fall on hard times again. Explanation. This phrase uses hard times to talk about a difficult period in your life full of challenging circumstances. And it's usually referring to some sort of financial hardship or a difficult personal situation. The verb is used to suggest that it wasn't anybody's fault, but just bad luck. Examples. Read these example sentences out loud. Then listen to me say them, pause the video and repeat them again. Number one, it's not easy when you fall on hard times. It's not easy when you fall on hard times. Number two, I haven't heard from Marie and I think she's fallen on hard times. I haven't heard from marine and I think she's fallen on hard times. Number three, you would tell me if you'd fall on hard times, Wouldn't you? You would tell me if you'd fallen on hard times, Wouldn't you? Number four, I fell on hard times a few years ago. I fell on hard times a few years ago. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so they contain the idiom, fall on hard times. He's really having a lot of financial difficulty element it He's ready. Fallen on hard times at the minute. He's really fallen on hard times at the minute. If you're struggling financially, you can always apply for financial assistance. If you've fallen on hard times, you can always apply for financial assistance. If you've fallen on hard times, you can always apply for financial assistance. Hopefully, we won't experience any challenging circumstances, but you can never know for sure. Hopefully we won't fall on hard times. But you can never know for sure. Hopefully, we won't fall on hard times. But you can never know for sure. I didn't go through challenging circumstances. I simply spend more than I earned. It was my own fault. I didn't fall on hard times. I simply spent more than I end. It was my own fault. I didn't fall on hard times. I simply spent more than I and it was my own fault. Gary is going through a difficult period with his family. Gary has fallen on hard times for this family. Gary has fallen on hard times with his family. In context. We fell on hard times after my wife's restaurant closed down. So I had to take on a second job to pay the bills. We fell on hard times after my wife's restaurant closed down. So I had to take on a second job to pay the bills. The government paints a picture of this rosy economic recovery. But there are still countless families falling on hard times. The government paints a picture of this rosy economic recovery. But there are still countless families fallen on hard times. Since the war. Had family had fallen on hard times and they hardly had enough money to live on. Since the war. Her family had fallen on hard times and they hardly had enough money to live on. It's not easy when you fall on hard times, but it's important to reach out for help because you don't have to go through it alone. It's not easy when you fall on hard times, but it's important to reach out for help because you don't have to go through it alone. 26. 13 fill your boots: Fill your boots. This phrase is used primarily in the UK and is usually used to say that somebody is allowed to have or take as much of something as they want. But you'll also hear it used to say somebody is allowed to do as much of something as they want. There's plenty available. So fill your boots. Grammar. This phrase uses the verb to fill and the possessive adjective, your. You can conjugate the verb to fill into the past, present, or future tenses. And you have to change your to agree with whoever is doing the filling. You can say my boots, your boots, his boots, her boots, one's boots. Boots or their boots. The past tense of fail is filled. Everybody fill that boots. Everybody filled their boots. In the present tense, you have fill, fills or filling. John is really fitting his boots. John is rarely filling his boots. Please fill your boots. Please fill your boots. And then in the future tense, you just say, we'll fill. He will fill it beats. He will fill his boots. I will fill my boots. I will fill my boots. Explanation. Just like with a lot of idioms. This phrases, origins are not certain. And there are various stories. My favorite is to do with coal miners. The story goes that English coal miners wore boots that didn't have good grip for the cobblestone streets on their way home from the mines. So they used to take off their boots to walk home. But instead they fill that with coal. They filled that boots with enough coal for their family for one day. Nowadays, it's used to mean that you can take as much of something as you need. Examples. Say these example sentences out loud. Then listen to me say them. Pause the video and repeat. Sentence one. Most bars will be saving free food. Say you can fill your boots. Most bars will be saving free food, so you can fill your boots. Sentence to the buffet was unlimited. So he filled his boots at lunchtime. The buffet was unlimited. So he filled his boots at lunchtime. Number three, every episode of their favorite show was available to stream. So they fill their boots. Every episode of their favorite show was available to stream. So they fill their boots. Number four, there's a closing down sale. So Mary will fill her boots tomorrow. That the closing down sale. So Mary will fill her boobs tomorrow. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so they contain the idiom, fill your boots. The Olympics has attracted a lot of people. So local traders are selling a lot of products. The Olympics has attracted a lot of people. So local traders are filling their boots. The Olympics has attracted a lot of people. Say local traders are filling diabetes. The shop used to be expensive, but now it's closing down. The prices have dropped and everybody is taking full advantage. The shops used to be expensive, but now it's closing down. The prices have dropped and everybody is fitting that boots. The shop used to be expensive, but now it's closing down. The prices have dropped and everybody is fitting that buttes. The library has a lot of leaflets available with vouches for local attractions. So go and get as many as you can. The library has a lot of leaflets available with vouches for local attractions. Sat down valley boots. The library has a lot of leaflets available with vouches for local attractions. So going to fill your boots. All six series of the TV show are now available. So we're going to watch them all, all six series of the TV show and now available. So we're going to fill out boots. All six areas of the TV show are now available, so we're going to fit. Everybody has gone higher. But there is some which fields that are available. So please eat as much as you like. Everybody has gone home, but there is so much fewer still available. So please forgive abuse. Everybody has gone home, but there is so much Phil still available. So please fill your boots. In context. The invitation said that food and drink was included. So Jake took full advantage and rarely felt his boots. The invitation said that food and drink was included. So Jake took full advantage and very detailed his boots. That closing down next week. And they need to get rid of all their own stock. So you might as well fill your beats by closing down next week and they need to get rid of all their old stock. So you might as well fill your boots. Don't feel your obliques just yet. Wait and see if anybody else wants anything first. Don't fill your boots just yet. Wait and see if anybody else wants anything first. I'm a bit tight for money at the minute, but I heard there's plenty of every time available. So I'm going to fill my boots and take as much as I can. I'm a bit tight for money at them in it, but I heard that plenty of overtime available. So I'm going to fill my boots and take as much as I can. 27. 14 Get your wires crossed: Get your wires crossed. When people get their wires crossed, they have a different understanding of the same situation or they have misunderstood what somebody else has said. I think we got our wires crossed. Grammar. This phrase uses the verb get and the possessive adjective yo. You can conjugate the verb to get into the past, present, or future tenses. And you have to change your to agree with whoever is getting their wires crossed. You can say my wires. Your wires. His wife has her wires, ones. Why is our wires or their wires? The past tense and the past participle of get are both got. Put in the USA, you will also hear gotten as an alternative past participle. Everybody got there, why is crossed? Everybody got their wires crossed. You and Mary have got your wires crossed, or you and Mary have gotten your wires crossed. In the present tense, you have get, gets or getting. I think you're both getting your wires crossed. I think you're both getting your wires crossed. Don't get your wires crossed. That will get your wires crossed. And then in the future tense, you just say will get, we will inevitably get our wires crossed at some point. We will inevitably get our wires crossed at some point. Explanation. This ADM dates back to the time when telephones and telegraph wires had to be plugged in manually by an operator. If two peoples telephone wires got crossed accidentally, then it would cause all sorts of problems. Today, you can use this phrase to mean that you have misunderstood what somebody has said, or that you understood something differently to how somebody else understood it. Meaning you both end up with contrasting information. Examples. Say these example sentences out loud to yourself. Then listen to me say them. Pause the video and repeat them. Number 1. We just need to make sure we don't get our wires crossed. We just need to make sure we don't get our wires crossed. Number 2, I realized I got my wires crossed shortly after hitting send. I realize I got my wires crossed shortly after hitting send. Number 3. Y is cross last week. Last week. Number 4. I'm pretty sure I didn't say that. You've got your wires cross somewhere. I'm pretty sure I didn't say that. You've got your y is crossed somewhere. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences. Say they contain the idiom, get your wires crossed. If you don't listen to each other, you're going to end up misunderstanding something. If you don't listen to each other, you're going to end up getting your wires crossed. If you don't listen to each other, you're going to end up getting your wires crossed. The teacher for the school was closed on Tuesday, whereas the children thought it was closed on Wednesday. The information must have gotten mixed up. The teacher thought the school was closed on Tuesday, whereas the children thought it was closed on Wednesday. They must have got their wires crossed. The teacher thought the school was closed on Tuesday, whereas the children thought it was closed on Wednesday. They must have got our wires crossed. Now, this is my office. Yours is over there. You've misunderstood something. Now. This is my office. Uses over there. You've got your y is crossed. Now this is my office is over there. You've got your y is crossed. I thought she was cooking dinner and she thought I was cooking dinner. Say we must have been very clear. I thought she was cooking dinner and she thought I was cooking dinner. So we must have got our wires crossed. I thought she was cooking dinner and she thought I was cooking dinner. So we must have got our wires crossed. It's easier to get over text messages than on the phone. Is easier to get your wires crossed, David text messages than on the phone is easier to get your wires crossed over text messages than on the phone. In context. Somehow, we got our wires crossed because I thought we were going to meet at a coffee shop and Sarah thought we were meeting in the bar. Somehow we got our wires crossed because I thought we were going to meet at the coffee shop and Sarah thought we were meeting in the bar. Jenny got her wires crossed. I told her to e-mail John, but she email James. Jenny got her wires crossed. I told her to e-mail John, but she email James. I thought John said the exam was yesterday, but it's not until this evening, so we must have got our wires crossed. I thought John said the exam was yesterday, but it's not until this evening. Seven Muslim got our wires crossed. Gary said gene told him it was a fancy dress party, but they most probably got their wires crossed. Gary said gene told him it was a fancy dress party, but they most probably got their wires crossed. 28. 15 Pull a few strings: Pulled a few strings. This phrase is often used to say that you will use the power or influence that you have three friends or connections in order to get something you want or to help somebody else get what they want. I think I can pull a few strings and get your table. Grammar. This phrase uses the web pull, which is an irregular verb. In the past tense, you have pulled. He pulled a few strings. He pulled a few strings. I've pulled a few strings. I've pulled a few strings. In the present tense. You have pull, pulls or pulling. He's pulling a few strings for you. He's pulling a few strings for you. And in the future, you have Whirlpool. I will pull a few strings. I will pull a few strings. When you pull a few strings for me, will you pull a few strings for me? Explanation. This idiom comes from puppetry. A refers to the strings attached to the puppet, the property or can make the puppet move in any way by pulling the strings. Nowadays, a refers to having some sort of power or influence, usually in terms of friends or acquaintances. And you can call them to help you get things you want or to help somebody else. You can use the term if you're doing somebody a favor by asking your connections to help them out. As well as the phrase, pull a few strings. You'll also hear pull some strings. Examples. Say these four sentences out loud to yourself. Then listen to how I say them. Pause and repeat. Sentence one. She pulled a few strings to get him out of trouble. She pulled a few strings to get him out of trouble. To he pulled a few strings to get his daughter a job in Michelle's office. He pulled a few strings to get his daughter a job in Michelle's Office. Three. A young lady at the desk was able to pull a few strings and get me an upgrade. A young lady at the desk was able to pull a few strings and get me an upgrade for Will could probably pull some strings and help us out a bit. We could probably pull some strings and tuples alphabet. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so they contain the idiom, a few strings. I'm sure I could call a few people and get the ball rolling. I'm sure I could pull a few strings and get the ball rolling. I'm sure I could pull a few strings and get the ball rolling. His mom made some calls and managed to get him a place on the course at Cambridge University. His mom pulled a few strings and managed to get him a place on the course at Cambridge University. His mom pulling the strings and managed to get him a place on the course at Cambridge University. I was just wondering if you would be able to help me out and get me a better deal. I was just wondering if you would be able to pull a few strings and get me a better deal. I was just wondering if you would be able to pull a few strings and get me a better deal. I'll contact some of my old colleagues and try and get your place on the next trip. I'll pull a few strings and try and get you a place on the next trip. I'll pull a few strings and try and get you a place on the next trip. She can usually use her contacts to get tickets to any show in London. She ones. She can usually pull a few strings and get tickets to any shell in London she wants. She can usually pull a few strings and get tickets to any show in London she wants. In context. I hear that the only reason I got into college was because his dad pulled some strings with the president of the university. I hear that the only reason I got into college was because his dad pulled some strings with the president of the university. I actually know a few people who work at the restaurant. So I'll see if I can pull a few strings and get you a table. I actually know a few people who work at a restaurant. So I'll see if I can pull a few strings and get you a table. Is it possible to get anything done around here without pulling some strings? Is it possible to get anything done around here without pulling some strings? You agency is going to start pulling strings to get this police investigation quashed. You Agency. He's going to start pulling strings to get this police investigation quashed. 29. 16 Keep your eye on the ball: Keep your eye on the ball. This phrase is used to tell somebody to pay attention and stay focused. It's normally related to accomplishing a goal. Just keep your eye on the ball. Grammar. This idiom uses the verb keep, as well as the possessive adjective. You're just like with the other idioms that had your, you can change it to my his, her one hour or they're the verb can also be conjugated to talk about different tenses. In the past tense, you have kept. He always kept his eye on the ball. He always kept his eye on the ball. If you had kept your eye on the ball, you would have one. If you had kept your eye on the ball, you would have won. In the present tense, you can say keep, keeps or keeping. You, keeping your eye on the ball. Are you keeping your eye on the ball? A winner keeps their eye on the ball. A winner keeps their eye on the ball. In the future tense, as always, you simply say will keep, I will keep my eye on the ball. I will keep my eye on the ball. Explanation. This idiom comes from baseball, where it implies that players need to watch where the ball is at all times in order to succeed when the game. It is used commonly in business as a way to emphasize that you should be attentive and careful and remain focused on your goal. Examples. Say these four sentences out loud. Then listen to me say them. Pause the video and repeat them. Number one, bell would do better in his classes. If he just kept his eye on the ball. Bill would do better in his classes if he just kept his eye on the ball. Number two, we've got to keep our eye on the ball. If we want to remain successful. We've got to keep our eye on the ball. If we want to remain successful. Number 3, keep your eye on the ball and don't try to plan too far ahead. Keep your eye on the ball, and don't try to plan too far ahead. Number 4, if they'd kept their eyes on the ball, this wouldn't have happened. If they'd kept their eyes on the ball. This wouldn't have happened. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so that they contain the idiom, keep your eye on the ball. They really need to focus if they want to win the tournament. They really need to keep their eye on the board. If they want to win the tournament. They rarely need to keep their eye on the ball if they want to win the tournament. It's important to stay alert and vigilant this week. Our biggest client will be visiting the factory for random inspections. Is important to keep your eye on the ball this week, our biggest client will be visiting the factory for random inspections. It's important to keep your eye on the ball this week, our biggest client will be visiting the factory for random inspections. I graduated in just three years because I was able to remain focused and prioritize my study is above all else. I graduated in just three years because I was able to keep my eye on the ball and prioritize my studies above all else. I graduated in just three years because I was able to keep my eye on the ball and prioritize my studies above all else. She really needs to push aside any distractions. If she wants to win this election. She really needs to keep our eye on the ball. If she wants to win this election, she really needs to keep our eye on the ball. If she wants to win this election. Tried to stop getting distracted and you will achieve much more. Try to keep your eye on the ball, and you will achieve much more. In context. It takes a lot of nerve and controlled. Keep your eye on the ball in those sorts of conditions. It takes a lot of nerve and control to keep your eye on the ball in those sorts of conditions. We didn't keep our eye on the ball, and our main competitor made some major improvements to their product and pushed us out of the market. We didn't keep our eye on the ball, and our main competitor made some major improvements to their product and push those out to the market. She won widespread praise for her TOEFL negotiating skills and her ability to keep our eye on the ball. She wouldn't widespread praise for her tough negotiating skills and her ability to keep our eye on the ball. It's fine to have some fun. But when you have a task that needs to be completed, it's vital that you keep your eye on the ball. It's fine to have some fun. But when you have a task that needs to be completed is vital that you keep your eye on the ball. 30. 17 Get on like a house on fire: Get on like a house on fire. This phrase is used to say that you're getting along very well with somebody new and you'll quickly becoming friends. We both get home like a house on fire. Grammar. This idiom uses the verb GET, which we've had with other idioms. In the past tense, you have got for both the simple past and the past participle. But don't forget that in American English, you can also use gotten as the past participle. We've always got an unlock, a house on fire. We've always got none like a house on fire. They go to unlock a house on fire. As soon as they met. They goes on like a house on fire. As soon as I met. In the present tense, you can say Get, gets or getting. Are you getting on like a house on fire? Are you getting on like a house on fire? Pole gets on with John Locke, a house on fire. Paul gets on with John Locke, a house on fire. In the future tense, you say, we'll get I'm sure you will get on like a house on fire. I'm sure you will get on like a house on fire. Explanation. The idiom gets on like a house on fire comes from the fact that a house that has caught fire burns very quickly and vigorously. If you get on with somebody the way a house catches fire, then it means your friendship is growing quickly and you're developing a great relationship. A comes from American history when houses were built of wood. So if it ever did catch fire, the wood would burn very fast. Examples. Say these sentences out loud to yourself. Then listen to me say them. Then pause the video and have a go at saying them again. Number one, I went over and struck up a conversation and we got on like a house on fire. I went over and struck up a conversation and we got on like a house on fire. Number two, we have nothing in common. You can't expect us to get on like a house on fire. If we have nothing in common, you can't expect us to get on like a house on fire. Number three, when I introduced Nikki to my old school friend Alex, the pair of them got on like a house on fire. When I introduced Nikki to my old school friend Alex, the pair of them got on like a house on fire. Number four, I was worried about introducing my boyfriend to my parents, but they got on like a house on fire. I was worried about introducing my boyfriend, my parents, but I got on like a house on fire. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so they contain the idiom, get on like a house on fire. I can't wait for you to meet Mark. I just know the two of you will get along really well. I can't wait for you to meet Mark. I just know the two of you will get on like a house on fire. I can't wait for you to meet Mark. I just know the two of you will get on like a house on fire. Jane and Sean from the friendship very quickly because they had so much in common. Jane and John got on like a house on fire because they had so much in common. Jane and Sean gotten like a house on fire because they had so much in common. When they're on the pitch, their enemies, but off the pitch they get along great. When they're on the pitch, their enemies. But off the page, they get on like a house on fire. When they're on the page, they are enemies, but off the pitch, they get on like a house on fire. As soon as we met, we started forming a friendship and basically ignored everybody else. As soon as we met, we got on like a house on fire and basically ignored everybody else. As soon as we met, we got on like a house on fire and basically ignored everybody else. You both share similar interests. So I'm hoping you all get along fine. You both share similar interests. So I'm hoping you'll get on like a house on fire. You both share similar interests. So I'm hoping you'll get on like a house on fire. In context. When we were younger, we always used to get on like a house on fire, but he annoys me now. When we were younger, we always used to get on like a house on fire, but he annoys me now. They met up last year for the first time in a long time. But they still got on like a house on fire. They met talk last year for the first time in a long time, but they still put on like a house on fire. We went a lot to play together very often. But when we did, We really got on like a house on fire. We waste lots play together very often. But when we did, We really got on like a house on fire. I didn't think hurry and Kylie would get along. But after a couple of drinks, everybody was getting on like a house on fire. I didn't think heroin Kyla would get along. But after a couple of drinks, everybody was getting on like a house on fire. 31. 18 Dot the i's and cross the t's: Dot the I's and cross the T's. This idiom means that you are carefully going over the final details when you're finishing a task. We just need to dot the I's and cross the T's. Grammar. This ADM uses the verbs dot and cross, which we can conjugate into different tenses. In the past tense, we get a double t for dot, and it becomes dotted, and then cross, just becomes crossed. Have you dotting the i's and cross the T's? Have you dotted the I's and cross the T's. I've just doesn't the I's and cross the T's. I've just dotting the i's and cross the T's. In the present tense, we have dot, dots and dotting, and then cross, crosses and crossing. She's dotting the i's and crossing the t's right now. She's dotting the i's and crossing the t's right now. They always dot the I's and cross the T's. They always dot the I's and cross the T's. And in the future tense we say, we'll adopt and we'll cross. But if you say will in front of the web dot, you don't need to repeat the word will in front of cross. When you dot the I's and cross the T's, will you dot the I's and cross the T's? Explanation. This idiom comes from times before ballpoint pens, when people wrote using quills or pens that were dipped into a pot of ink. It was easy for the ink to create a blob or a spot on the paper if the writer start writing. So they wrote in cursive with each letter in a word connected to the previous letter. Therefore, they did not put a dot on their letter eyes or put the little line through their letter T's until they've completed writing a word. So nowadays, the idiom is used to save that you're completing your work and making sure all the details are taken care of. You might have noticed that there is an apostrophe in eyes. And one and T's. This is just to show that it's not the word is, but rather the plural of I. The apostrophe is usually not used in the plural, except when you're saying the plural of a letter. Finally, instead of saying the eyes and VTS, you can change to my yo hour or any other possessive adjective. Dot the I's and cross the T's. Could be dot your i's and cross your t's. Examples. Say these example sentences out loud to yourself. Then listen to me say them. Pause the video and repeat them again. Number one, the negotiations are nearly finished, but we still have to dot the I's and cross the T's. The negotiations are nearly finished, but we still have to dot the I's and cross the T's. Number two, I had dotted all the I's and cross the T's. So I wondered why my application was rejected. I had dotted all the I's and cross the T's. So I wondered why my application was rejected. Number three, before taking the project to the CEO, let's make sure we dot the I's and cross the T's. Before taking the project to the CEO, let's make sure we dot the I's and cross the T's. Number four. Your teacher is a tough grader. Be sure to dot your i's and cross your t's on the exam. Your teacher is a tough grader. Be sure to dot your i's and cross your t's on the exam. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences. So that may contain the ADM dot your i's and cross your t's. She writes a highly accurate reports. She always double-check everything. She writes highly accurate reports. She always doubts arise and crosses her tease. She writes highly accurate reports. She always surprise and causes her T's. I made sure to triple check all my work when installing the circuit breaker. You can never be too careful with schoolwork. I made sure to drop my I's and cross my teeth when installing the circuit breaker. You can never be too careful with electrical work. I may show to my I's and cross my tea is when installing the circuit breaker, you can never be too careful with electrical work. Wildcard and Jerry go through everything a second time. I always find mistakes in his work. Why can't Jerry dot the I's and cross the t's? I always find mistakes in his work. Why can't Jerry dot the I's and cross the T's. I always find mistakes in his work. Jan didn't pay enough attention in her exam. She hadn't double-check that all her answers were correct. And I only got a B minus. Jan didn't pay enough attention inherit exam. She hadn't dotted the I's and cross the T's and only got a B minus. Jan didn't pay enough attention in her exam. She hadn't dotted the I's and cross the T's and only got a B minus. Please make sure to double-check everything when signing this contract. Please make sure to dot your i's and cross your t's when signing this contract. Please make sure to dot your i's and cross your t's when signing this contract. In context, the negotiations on nearly finished, but we still have to dot the I's and cross the T's. The negotiations on nearly finished, but we still have to dot the I's and cross the T's. We reached a broad agreement and decided to dot the I's and cross the T's. Later. We reached a broad agreement and decided to dot the I's and cross the T's. Later. Laura had dotted all the I's and cross the T's. So she wanted what she had done wrong. Laura had dotted all the I's and cross the T's. So she wondered what she'd done wrong. They'll go through this form with a fine tooth comb. So make sure you dot the I's and cross the T's. They'll go through this form with a fine-toothed comb. So make sure you dot the I's and cross the T's. 32. 19 Hit the ground running: Hit the ground running. This phrase means that you start a new job or a new task with success and great enthusiasm. She and he started yesterday, but she hit the ground running. Grammar. This idiom uses the verb hit, which is an interesting verb, since the past tense is also hit. I hit the ground running. I hit the ground running. They have hit the ground running. They have hit the ground running. The present tense is hit. Hits or hitting. Hitting the ground running. As she hitting the ground running. I hope he hits the ground running. I hope he hits the ground running. And then in the future tense, you say we'll hit. I'm sure you will hit the ground running. I'm sure you will hit the ground running. Explanation. This phrase used to be attributed to the Second World War as a reference to the soldiers who parachuted in and then run as soon as I hit the ground. But actually, there are various sources of people using this idiom much earlier than World War 2. There are a lot of examples of hit the ground running used in its literal sense to describe criminals jumping from freight trains. But it didn't start to be used in a figurative or idiomatic sense until 1941 of the first examples of the phrase being used as an idiom was in the Hayward daily review in October 1940. It sometimes seems to me that the young idea nowadays wants to hit the ground running and to tell the old editor is how to run things. Examples. Say these four sentences to yourself out loud. Then listen to me say them. Pause the video and repeat. Number one. The company hit the ground running and hasn't slowed down since the company hit the ground running and hasn't slowed down since. Number two. She studied the reports over the weekend so she could hit the ground running when the meeting began. She studied the reports, have the weekend so she could hit the ground running when the meeting began. Number 3, Jacob hit the ground running with a winner the first round. Jacob hit the ground running with a win at the first round. Number four, I plan to hit the ground running with a full business plan. I plan to hit the ground running with a full business plan. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so they contain the idiom, hit the ground running. I am confident that our new CEO will just get on with things straight away when she's here. I'm confident that our new CEO will just hit the ground running when she's here. I'm confident that our new CEO will just hit the ground running when she's here. He is in excellent shape and in good spirits. So we'll hopefully get straight to work when he gets back. He is in excellent shape and in good spirits. So he'll hopefully hit the ground running when he gets back. He is in excellent shape and in good spirits. So he'll hopefully hit the ground running when he gets back. You will need to get to work immediately. If you want to be ahead of the pack, you will need to hit the ground running. If you want to be ahead of the pack. You will need to hit the ground running if you want to be ahead of the pack. Jacob was very successful in his new job. He had made good progress as soon as he started and never looked back. Jacob was very successful in his new job. He had hit the ground running and never looked back. Jacob was very successful in his new job. He had hit the ground running and never looked back. We're trying to plan as much as possible so that once we begin, we can make great headway straight away. We're trying to plan as much as possible so that once we begin, we can hit the ground running. We are trying to plan as much as possible so that once we begin, we can hit the ground running. In context. A decade ago, I had a lot more energy. I would wake up, hit the ground running, and never stop until I went to bed again. A decade ago, I had a lot more energy. I would wake up, hit the ground running, and never stop until I went to bed again. The new manager says his team, we'll have to hit the ground running if they are to achieve their objective or staying in the Premier League. The new manager says his team will have to hit the ground running if they are to achieve the objective of staying in the Premier League. This season, they expect to hit the ground running rather than faces livestock. And the consequent focus on just trying to catch up. This season, they expect to hit the ground running rather than face a slow start. And the consequent focus on just trying to catch up. In the movie, five highly competitive friends hit the ground running every May in a game of tag. They've been playing since the first grade. In the movie. Five highly competitive friends hit the ground running every May in a game of tag they've been playing since the first grade. 33. 20 Take sides: Take sides. This phrase means that you agree with or support one person, group, or cause, and not another. She refuses to take sides on the issue. Grammar. This idiom uses the verb take, which you can conjugate into different tenses. In the past, there is the past simple took, and then the past participle is taken. He took sides in the argument. He took sides in the argument. I've never taken size with either of you, U2. I've never taken sides with either of you two. In the present tense, you have take, takes and taking. Why are you taking sides with him? Why are you taking sides with him? Marry always take sides with that team. Mary, always take sides with that team. In the future tense, you say, we'll take. Whom will you take science with? Whom will you take sides with? Explanation? This phrase can be used by itself, or you can use it with the preposition with to show whom you are taking sides with. Taking sides is usually seen as a negative thing unless it's in reference to a big issue. Otherwise, taking size can be seen as something that causes unnecessary upset. Examples. Say these sentences out loud to yourself, then listen to me say them. Pause the video and repeat. Number 1. He doesn't like confrontation, so he never take sides in an argument. He doesn't like confrontation. So he never take sides in an argument. Number to everyone in the company was quick to take sides when the new policy was introduced. Everyone in the company was quick to take sides when the new policy was introduced. Number three, they were arguing, but I didn't want to take sides. So I left. They were arguing, but I didn't want to take sides. So I left. Number four. She doesn't mind taking sides on important issues, but she always looks carefully at all the arguments. First. She doesn't mind taking size on important issues, but she always looks carefully at all the arguments. First, test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so that they contain the ADM take sides. I refuse to choose one side over the other in this argument because it's nothing to do with me. I refused to take sides in this argument because it's nothing to do with me. I refuse to take sides in this argument because it's nothing to do with me. Whenever we quarrel, you always agree with everything Carol says. Whenever we quarrel, you always take sides with Carol. Whenever we quarrelled, you always take sides with Carol. Is usually best to never agree with one person over another in political debates that we didn't table. It's usually best to never take sides in political debates are the dinner table. It's usually best to never take sides in political debates at the dinner table. When your children argue, it's important not to agree with one of them over the other. When your children argue, it's important not to take sides. When you were children argue, it's important not to take sides. My mom always agrees with my brother over me and it really makes me angry. My mom always takes my brothers side over mine and it really makes me angry. My mom always takes my brothers side, either mine, and it really makes me angry. And so you'll see in this example, I've changed it slightly and said takes my brothers side instead of saying take sides with my brother. But you could say, My mom always take sides with my brother over me and it really makes me angry. My mom always take sides with my brother over me. And it really makes me angry. So you can use either or you can say to take sides with somebody or to take somebody's side. In context. I bet he will take the company side in this situation and not the union side. I bet he will take the company side in this situation and not the union side. Don't take sides in an argument between friends because you'll only upset the other person. Don't take sides in an argument between friends because you will only upset the other person. I can't take sides in this football match because both myosins are playing on opposing teams. I can't take sides in this football match because both myosins are playing on opposing teams. My sister and I used to argue all the time when we were younger, but my mom never took sides with either one of those. And I think that's why we still got on so well now, my sister and I used to argue over time when were younger, but my mother never took sides with either one of us. And I think that's why we still get on so well now. 34. Recap Quiz Recap of 11 to 20: Let's do another quick quiz to recap the next 10 idioms that we've been learning. Let's start by quickly familiarizing ourselves with them first. Brush aside. This means to refuse to listen to criticisms, complaints, or suggestions. Fall on hard times. This means to experience a difficult period of time. Failure beeps. This means to have or to do as much of something as you want. Get your wires crossed. This means to fail to understand each other. Pull a few strings. This means to use influential contacts in order to obtain an advantage. Keep your eye on the ball. This idiom means to stay focused on the objective. Get on like a house on fire. This means to get along very well with somebody. New. Dot the I's and cross the T's. This ADM means to deal with the final details when completing a task. Hit the ground running. This means to start a new job fully prepared without needing any help. Take sides. This means to support one side against the other in an argument. 35. Recap Quiz Round 11: Round 11. Just like with the last quiz, we're going to get four ATMs and four sentences. And I want you to try and rewrite the sentences using the idioms. Idioms, our brush aside. Get your y is crossed, fall on hard times. Dot the I's and cross the T's. The sentences are we went through a difficult period after my wife's restaurant clays down. So I had to take on a second job to pay the bills. The family completely ignored her final wishes and chose to spend the money. She left them on a new car. The negotiations on nearly finished. But we still have to go through the final details. Somehow. We misunderstood each other because I thought we were going to meet at the coffee shop. And Sarah thought we were meeting in the bar. So pause the video, see if you can rewrite the sentence is using the four idioms and then press played, see if you got them right. Number one, we fell on hard times after my wife's restaurant plays down. So I had to take on a second job to pay the bills. Number 2, the family brushed aside her final wishes and chose to spend the money. She left them on a new car. Number 3. The negotiations on nearly finished, but we still have to dot the I's and cross the T's. Number 4. Somehow we got our wires crossed because I thought we were going to meet at the coffee shop. And Sarah, though we were meeting in the bar. 36. Recap Quiz Round 12: Round 12. The idioms are polar. Few strings. Gets on like a house on fire. Keep your eye on the ball. Take sides. The sentences are, when we're younger, we always used to get along really well. But he annoys me now. I hear the only reason I got into college was because his dad made a call to the president of the university. I bet he will agree with a company in this situation and not with the union. It takes a lot of nerve and control to stay focused and vigilant in those sorts of conditions. Pause the video, see if you can rewrite the sentence is using the idioms. And then press Play, see if you got them right. Number one, when we're younger, we always used to get on like a house on fire, but he annoys me now. Number two, I hear that the only reason under gotten to college was because his dad pulled some strings with the President of the University. Number three, I bet he will take sides with the company in this situation and not with the union. Number 4. It takes a lot of nerve and control to keep your eye on the ball in those sorts of conditions. 37. Recap Quiz Round 13: Round 13. The idioms are, hit the ground running, fill your boots, get your y is crossed. Brush aside. The sentences are, the precedent. Mainly took no notice of any questions about his actions during the election. Jenny misunderstood. I told her to e-mail John per she email James. A decade ago. I had a lot more energy. I would wake hope I get to work immediately and never stop until I went to bed again. The invitation said that food and drink was included. So Jake took full advantage and ate and drank as much as he could. So pause the video, see if you can rewrite the sentences, and then press play to see if you got them right. Number one, the president may be brushed aside any questions about his actions during the election? Number 2, Jenny got her wires crossed. I told her the e-mail John, but she email James. Number 3. A decade ago, I had a lot more energy. I would wake up, hit the ground running, and never stop until I went to bed again. Number for the invitation is that that food and drink was included. So Jake took full advantage and filled his boots. 38. Recap Quiz Round 14: Round 14. The idioms are, get your y is crossed. Dot the I's and cross the T's. Take sides. Pull a few strings. The sentences are, I actually know a few people who work at the restaurant. So I'll see if I can make a few calls and get your table. Don't agree with one person over another in an argument between friends because you're only upset the other person. We reached a broad agreement, decided to finalize the details later. I thought John said the exam was yesterday, but it's not until this evening. So we must have got confused. Pause the video, have a go at inserting there is idioms into their sentences, and then press play to see if you got them right. Number one, I actually know a few people who work at the restaurant. So I'll see if I can pull a few strings and get your table. Number two. Don't take sides in an argument between friends because you will only upset the other person. Number three, we reached a broad agreement and decided to dot the I's and cross the T's later. Number four. I thought John said the exam was yesterday, but it's not until this evening. So we must have got our wires is crossed. 39. Recap Quiz Round 15: Round 15. The idioms are, take sides, brush aside, pull a few strings, fall on hard times. The sentences are, during the meeting, the CEO will probably not answer any accusations that he lied. So we need to have evidence ready. The government paints a picture of this rosy economic recovery. But there are still countless families going through difficult periods. Is it possible to get anything done around here without having to call useful contacts? I can't support one side over the other in this football match because both my sons are playing on opposing teams. Pause the video, have a go at rewriting the sentences using those four idioms. And then press play to see if you got the mind. Number one. During the meeting, the CEO will probably brush aside any accusations that he lied. So we need to have our evidence ready. Number two, the government paints a picture of this rosy economic recovery, but there are still countless families falling on hard times. Number 3, is it possible to get anything done around here without pulling a few strings? Number four, I can't take sides in this war will match because both my sons are playing on opposing teams. 40. Recap Quiz Round 16: Round 16. The idioms are, keep your eye on the ball, fall on hard times, hit the ground, running, get on like a house on fire. The sentences are, since the war, her family had experienced very difficult times and they hardly had enough money to live on. The new manager says his team will have to start working hard straight away if they are to achieve their objective of staying in the Premier League. We didn't stay vigilant and our main competitor made some major improvements to their product and pushed us out of the market. They met up last year for the first time in a long time. But they still got along really well. Pause the video, have a go at rewriting the sentences, and then press play and see if you got them right. Number one, since the wall, her family had fallen on hard times and they hardly had enough money to live. On. Number 2, the new manager says his team will have to hit the ground running if they are to achieve their objective of staying in the Premier League. Number three, we didn't keep our eye on the ball, and our main competitor made some major improvements to their product and pushed us out of the market. Number for the metal blast year for the first time in a long time. But they still go to unlock a house on fire. 41. Recap Quiz Round 17: Round 17. The idioms are, fall on hard times. Keep your eye on the ball. Get on like a house on fire. Fill your boots. The sentences, are they closing down next week and they need to get rid of all the rootstock. So you might as well buy as much as you like. It's not easy when you experienced financial difficulties. But it's important to reach out for help because you don't have to go through it alone. We went allowed to play together very often. But when we did, We really had a great friendship. She won widespread praise for her tough negotiating skills and their ability to stay focused. So pause the video, rewrite the sentences using the idioms, and then press play and see if you got it right. Number one, by closing down next week, and they need to get rid of all their own stock. So you might as well fill your boots. Number 2 is not easy when you fall on hard times. But it's important to reach out for help because you don't have to go through it alone. Number three, we went flat plate together very often, but when we did, We really got on like a house on fire. Number four, she won widespread praise for her TOEFL negotiating skills and heritability to keep her eye on the ball. 42. Recap Quiz Round 18: Round 18. The idioms are dot the I's and cross the T's. Hit the ground running. Brush aside. Get your wires crossed. The sentences are, perhaps you shouldn't dismiss the idea too hastily. It's always important to listen to and consider suggestions from loyal customers. This season. They expect to get to work immediately rather than face a slow start. And the consequent focus on trying to catch up. Laura had gone over all the details carefully. So she wondered what she'd done wrong. Gary said gene told him it was a fancy dress party, but they most probably got mixed up. So pause the video, rewrite sentences using the idioms, and then press play to see if you got them right. Number one, perhaps you shouldn't push the idea aside to hastily. It's always important to listen to and consider suggestions from loyal customers. Number 2, this season, they expect to hit the ground running rather than face a slow start. And the consequent, I'm just trying to catch. Number 3. Laura had dotted the eyes and said she wanted Gary is that gene told me with a fancy dress party. But they probably got that y is the cost. 43. Recap Quiz Round 19: Round 19. The idioms are, get on like a house on fire. Take sides, fill your boots, hit the ground, running. The sentences are, in the movie. Five highly competitive friends got to work every May in a game of tag. They've been playing since first grade. I didn't think hurry and Kylie will get along. But after a couple of drinks, everybody was acting like the best of friends. Don't take too much just yet. Wait and see if anybody else want anything first. My sister and I used to argue all the time when we're younger, but my mother never agreed with either one of us. And I think that's why we still get on say Well now. So pause the video, rewrite the sentences, and then press play to see if you got them right. Number one, in the movie, 50, highly competitive friends hit the ground running every May in a game of tag. They've been playing since first grade. Number two, I didn't think Harry and Kylie would get along. But after a couple of drinks, everybody was getting on like a house on fire. Number three, don't fill your boots just yet. Wait and see if anybody else wants anything. First number for my sister and I used to argue all the time when we're younger, but my mother never took sides with either one of us. And I think that's why we still get an answer. Well, now. 44. Recap Quiz Round 20: Round 20. The idioms are, fill your boots, pull a few strings, dot the I's and cross the T's. Keep your eye on the ball. The sentences are, it's fine to have some fun. But when you have a task that needs to be completed is vital, that you stay focused. You agency is guaranteed start getting in touch with some contacts to get this police investigation quashed. They'll go through this form with a fine-toothed comb. So make sure you fill in all the details carefully. I'm a bit tight for money at the minute, but I heard there's plenty of every time available. So I'm going to be greedy and take as much as I can. Say, Pause the video, rewrite the sentences using the idioms, and then press play to see if you got them right. Number one, it's fine to have some fun. But when you have a task that needs to be completed, it's vital that you keep your eye on the ball. Number two, you wait-and-see, is going to start pulling strings to get this police investigation quashed. Number 3. They'll go through this form with a fine-toothed comb. So make sure you dot the I's and cross the T's. Know mofo. I'm a bit tight for money at them in it, but I heard there's plenty of every 100 available. So I'm going to fill my boots and take as much as I can. 45. 21 Highflier: Hi flyer. This is a noun, but is referring to somebody who has a lot of ability and a strong wish to be successful and is therefore expected to achieve a lot. It can also be referring to somebody who has already been successful. This firm has always attracted high flyers looking for a big Korea grammar. This idiom is simply a noun which is used by itself to talk about some really successful or who has the potential to be successful. He is a high flyer. He is a high flyer. I've been quite successful, but I'm far from being a high flyer. I've been quite successful, but I'm far from being high flyer. There is an adjective that you can form from this noun, high-flying, which you can place in front of nouns. She is a high-flying investment banker. She is a high-flying investment banker. High-flying employees tend to and 25 percent more, high-flying employees tend to n 25 percent more. I feel like I'm surrounded by high-flying business people. I feel like I'm surrounded by high-flying business people. Explanation. You can use the word high flyer to describe somebody who has achieved or has the potential to achieve great success. It's generally considered a positive word that's associated with working hard and achieving success. Examples. Say these examples sentences out loud to yourself. Then listen to me say them. Pause the video and repeat them again. Number one, team was such a high flyer in college that it's no surprise he's achieved such great success in his career. Tim was such a high flyer in college that it's no surprise he's achieved such great success in his career. Number two, for investors, there is always the risk that today's high flyers, maybe tomorrow's flops. For investors, there is always the risk that today's high flyers, maybe tomorrow is flops. Number 3. Thomas was recognized as one of the top high flyers in his college. Thomas was recognized as one of the top high flyers and it's college. Number four. At the age of 30, he became a high flyer in his field. At the age of 30, he became a high flyer in his field. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so they contain the EDM high flyer. The people who are destined for success can cope with that kinda stressful life. But the less able students find it very tough indeed. The high flyers can cope with that kind of stressful life. But the less able students find it very tough indeed, the high flyers can cope with that kind of stressful life. But the less able students find it very tough. Indeed. You need to provide more resources to attract those who are heading for success into teaching, particularly in the core and foundations objects. You need to provide more resources to attract high flyers into teaching, particularly in the core and foundations objects. You need to provide more resources to attract high flyers into teaching, particularly in the core and foundations objects. She works very hard and has remarkable talent. She really is heading for success. She works very hard and has remarkable talent. She really is a high flyer. She works very hard and has remarkable talent. She really is a high flyer. He has been destined for success since he was young and its first meeting went straight to number one. He has been a high flyers since he was young and his first movie went straight to number one. He has been a high flyer since he was young and his first movie went straight to number 1. I'm a hard worker and I have more talent than most, but I don't think I'm going to be that successful. I'm a hard worker and I have more talent than most, but I don't think I'm a high flyer. I'm a hard worker and I have more talent than most. But I don't think I'm a high flyer in context. Even though it looked like a huge deal for most people. For a onetime high flyer, it represented quiet, calm down. Even though it looked like a huge deal for most people. For a onetime high flyer, it represented quiet, calm down. I've had quite a bit of success in this industry, but I'm far from being a high flyer. I've had quite a bit of success in this industry, but I'm far from being a high flyer. The high-flying executive traveled everywhere by private plane and had assistance to carry out all her mundane tasks. The high-flying executive traveled everywhere by private plane and had assistance to carry out all her mundane tasks. They always got top grades in school. So it's no surprise that both high flyers now, they always got top grades in school. So it's no surprise that both high flyers now. 46. 22 Cut back: Coat back. The phrase back means to do less of something. And it's usually in reference to spending money. We need to cut back on spending. Grammar. This ADM uses the verb quote, which is another verb whose past participle is the same as the infinitive. So in the past, we just say quote, he cut back on costs. He could back on costs. They've cut back on how much they spend. They've cut back on how much I spend. In the present tense, we have coat. Coats and coating. Are they cutting back on costs? Are they cutting back on costs? They normally coat back a bit at Christmas. They normally called backup attack Christmas. In the future, we say, we'll quote, We will put back a bit next week. We will go back a bit next week. Explanation. The phrase back tends to be used with the preposition on. You can then put a verb ending in I-N-G after it. Oh, put a nanometer and they cut back on drinking. She called back on costs. You can use it by itself. And the thing is referring to will be clear from earlier on in the sentence. We use a lot of water last month, so we need to go back a bit this month. Examples. Say these, for example, sentences out loud to yourself. Then listen to me say them. Pause the video and repeat. Number one. We have been cutting back a bit. We did have 13 horses, but now we only have nine. We have been cutting back a bit. We did have 13 horses, but now we only have nine. Number two, the government has cut back on spending on the arts. The government has cut back on spending on the odds. Number three. My doctor told me that I need to cut back on eating fried foods in order to improve my cholesterol. My doctor told me that I need to cut back on eating fried foods in order to improve my cholesterol. Number for Pete smokes but he's trying to go back. Pete smokes, but he's trying to cut back. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so they contain the idiom, coat back. I will stop eating so many baskets, but I'll start next week. I will quote back on biscuits, but I'll start next week. I will put back on base-case, but I'll start next week. You should reduce the number of sugary drinks you have. That just not good for your health. You should reduce the number of sugary drinks you have. They just not good for your health. You should cut back on sugary drinks. They just not good for your health. You should cut back on sugary drinks. They're just not good for your health. It's time we stop spending side MOOC. We need to reduce our bills by a quarter each month. It's time we coat back. We need to reduce our bills by a quarter each month. It's time we look back. We need to reduce our bills by a quarter each month. And now we're going to save a huge amount of money. But if we stop buying so many office supplies, we could reduce our outgoings. I never went to save a huge amount of money, but if we coat back on office supplies, we could reduce our outgoings. I know it won't save a huge amount of money, but if we put back on office supplies, we could reduce our outgoings. If the company doesn't less than the amount of money they're spending, then they wonder, if the company doesn't go back on spending, then the wonder, if the company doesn't cut back on spending. That. I wonder. In context. Several major hospitals are quoting back-end stuff at the moment. Several major hospitals are cutting back on staff at amendment. Richer countries must do more to coat back carbon emissions. Richer countries must do more to coat back carbon emissions. Try to go back on foods containing wheat and dairy products. Try to go back home foods containing wheat and dairy products. If a school board coats back on funding the arts, then what will become a theater program? If the school board cuts back on funding the arts, then what will become of the theater program? 47. 23 Make a killing: Make a killing. This phrase is used to mean that you make a lot of money in a short amount of time. They made a killing with the sale of their house. Grammar. This idiom uses the verb to make. In the past tense. You say made for both the past participle and the simple past. She made a killing. She made a killing. We've made a killing. We've made a killing. In the present tense, you can say make, makes, or making. They make a killing every year. They make a killing every year. You're making a killing here. You're making a killing here. In the future tense, you say will make. I think we will make a killing. I think we will make a killing. Explanation. The origins of this idiom are in the 1800s. And it was used in a literal sense. It was used by American bison hunters to describe the act of shooting a large number of Buffalo in a short period of time. The term then became more idiomatic and is used today to refer to making a large amount of money in a short amount of time. Examples. Say these four sentences out loud to yourself. Then listen to me say them. Pause the video and repeat them. Number 1, you could make a killing selling your artwork at the fair. You could make a killing selling your artwork at the fair. Number two, people who invested in Bitcoin early on have now made a killing. People who invested in Bitcoin early on have now made a killing. Number three. The chances of making a killing on lottery are extremely slim. The chances of making a killing on the lottery are extremely slim. Number four, my system makes a killing from tips as a bartender, but I hate that kind of work. My system makes a killing from tips as a bartender, but I hate that kind of work. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so they contain the idiom, make a killing. If you want to earn a lot of money, become a surgeon, law firm, partner, or stockbroker. But it's far from an easy life. If you want to make a killing, become a surgeon, law firm, partner, or stockbroker. But it's far from an easy life. If you want to make a killing, become a surgeon, law firm, partner, or stockbroker. But it's far from an easy life. You can make a huge amount of money really quickly through babysitting. If you don't declare that income on your taxes, you can make a killing through babysitting. If you don't declare that income on your taxes, you can make a killing through babysitting. If you don't declare that income on your taxes. Jasmine and a small fortune this year. She made some great investment choices. Jasmine made a killing this year. She made some great investment choices. Jasmine made a killing this year. She made some great investment choices. My mom thinks I learn plenty of money selling door-to-door, but nobody does that anymore. My mom things I'll make a killing selling door-to-door. But nobody does that anymore. My more things I'll make a killing same door to door. But nobody does that anymore. I should make a lot of money on the market this week. I managed to buy some amazing stock for next to nothing. I should make a killing on the market this week. I managed to buy some amazing stock for next to nothing. I should make a killing on the market this week. I managed to buy some amazing stock for next to nothing. In context. He invested in some risky shares, but things went very well and he made a killing. He invested in some risky shares, but things went very well and he made a killing. The company made a killing this year. So our bonuses should be huge. The company made a killing this year. So our bonuses should be huge. She only has a small shop, but isn't a great location. So I reckon she's making a killing. She only has a small shop, but isn't a great location. So my rack and she's making a killing. It's hard to get established. But once you do, you could make a killing selling to the locals. It's hard to get established. But once you do, you could make a killing selling to the locals. 48. 24 In line for: In line for this phrase is used to mean that you're likely to get something, especially something good. If anybody's in line for promotion, it's you. Grammar. This idiom uses the verb be, which you can conjugate into any tense. In the past tense, you have, was and were in the simple past, or the past participle is bin. Rachel was enlightened for the job. Rachel was in line for the job. He's been in line for the throne since his birth. He's been in line for the throne since his birth. In the present tense, you say is or are. I think you're in line for the promotion? I think you're in line for the promotion. We are all in line for a pay rise. We are all in line for a pay rise. In the future tense, you say will be. He will be first in line for the editor's job. He will be first in line for the editor's job. Explanation. This phrase is used to mean that you're very likely to get something. If you think about the word line, meaning somebody lining or queuing up for something, then if you're in line for something, you're waiting to receive, it is usually used to refer to something positive. You can put any noun after inline form in line for a promotion, in line for a pay rise. But you can also use the phrase inline to, with a verb in line to get the promotion in line to be Manager. Examples. Say these four sentences out loud to yourself. Then listen to me say them. Pause the video and repeat them. Number one, they were at least five people in line for the promotion. There were at least five people in line for the promotion. Number two, he must be in line for a place in the Guinness Book of Records. He must be in line for a place in the Guinness Book of Records. Number three. Public sector pay is also inline to be hit hard. Public sector pay is also in line to be hit hard. Number four, they are all in line for a pay rise. They are all in line for a pay rise. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences. Cell they contain the ADM be in line. Jade made no mistakes on her test and was expecting to get an a. Jade made no mistakes on her test and was in line to get an a. Jade made no mistakes on her test and was in line to get an a. If anybody is likely to get a promotion, I should think it's Helen. If anybody is in line for a promotion, I should think it's Helen. If anybody is in line for a promotion, I should think it's Helen. Mr. Robinson made it very clear that his daughter is likely to get the job should he retired or pass away. Mr. Robinson made it very clear that his daughter is in line for the job should he retired or pass away. Mr. Robinson made it very clear that his daughter is in line for the job. Should he retired or pass away? I should be getting a payout. If everything goes to plan. I should be in line for a payout. If everything goes to plan, I should be in line for a payout. If everything goes to plan. Trump thought he was sure to win the election easily, but he was wrong. Trump thought he was in line to win the election easily, but he was wrong. He was in line to win the election easily. But he was wrong. In context. I'm pretty sure I'm in line for County's position when she retires. I'm pretty sure I'm in line for County's position when she retires. My daughter is a great student, so she's in line for many academic awards at graduation. My daughter is a great student, so she's in line for many academic awards like graduation. He had been at the paper for long enough to be in line for a lifetime achievement award. He had been at the paper for long enough to be in line for a lifetime achievement award. Who you think is in line to win the elections. Who do you think is in line to win the elections? 49. 25 Be wet behind the ears: The wet behind the ears. If you say that somebody is still wet behind the ears, you mean that they have only recently arrived in a new place or job and are therefore still not experienced. He's still a bit wet behind the ears. Grammar. This idiom uses the verb be, which you can conjugate into any tense. In the past tense, you have was and were. Rachel was wet behind the ears? Rachel was wet behind the ears. He was a little wet behind the ears. He was a little wet behind the ears. In the present tense, you say is or are. They are wet behind the ears? They are wet behind the ears. You're still wet behind the ears. You're still wet behind the ears. In the future tense, you say will be he will be wet behind the ears. He will be wet behind the ears. Explanation. The phrase wet behind the ears is drawing parallels between an inexperienced person and the baby. When a baby is first born, they are wet. So if you're saying somebody is wet behind the ears, you're saying there like a newborn baby. But this is only in the sense of experience. It doesn't mean they have baby. She characteristics. People very often use the word still with this phrase. He is still wet behind the ears. There's another MOOC less used phrase that means the same thing. Not dry behind the ears yet. He's not dry behind the ears yet. But it is used far less than wet behind the ears. Examples. Say these next four sentences out loud to yourself. And after each one, listen to me say the sentence. Pause the video and repeat. Number one. He's a promising tennis player, but his outbursts unquote show he's still wet behind the ears. He's a promising tennis player, but his outbursts on CT show he's still wet behind the ears. Number two, She's so wet behind the ears. She doesn't know anything about the job. She's so wet behind the ears. She doesn't know anything about the job. Number three, they think I'm wet behind the ears, but I bet I can run rings around them. They think I'm wet behind the ears, but I bet I can run rings around them. Number four, john's too young to take on a job like this. He's still wet behind the ears. John's too young to take on a job like this. He's still wet behind the ears. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so they contain the idiom, wet behind the ears. I can't believe they decided to promote Kelly. If you ask me, I think she's too inexperienced. I can't believe they decided to promote Kelly. If you ask me, I think she's too wet behind the ears. I can't believe they decided to permanent Kelly. If you ask me, I think she's too wet behind the ears. I will ask the new intern to try to write the report, but he hasn't been on the job for long, so I didn't know if he can do it. I will ask the new intern to try to write the report, but he's still wet behind the ears. So I don't know if you can do it. I will ask the new intern to try to write the report, but he's still wet behind the ears. So I don't know if you can do it. I feel like I'm so far behind everybody else at my new job. But I'm working late every day to try to learn as fast as I can. I feel so wet behind the ears at my new job because I'm working late every day to try to learn as fast as I can. I feel so wet behind the ears are my new job. But I'm working late every day to try to learn as fast as I can. You'll never win the case with him as your lawyer. He's just out of law school and has virtually no experience. You will never win the case with hemorrhage or lawyer. He's just out of law school and still wet behind the ears. You'll never win the case with him as your lawyer. He's just out of law school and still wet behind the ears. The song is all about how he felt as a kid from a small town and being very immature or coming to LA for the first time. The song is all about how he felt as a kid from a small town and being very wet behind the ears coming to LA for the first time. The song is all about how he felt as a kid from a small town and being very wet behind the ears coming to LA for the first time. In context, this group of interns seems especially wet behind the ears. I barely trust them to get my coffee. This group of interns seems especially wet behind the ears. I barely trust them to get my coffee. She was too wet behind the ears to bear such responsibilities. She was too wet behind the ears to bear such responsibilities. Terry was just out of university with a shape. Lehigh could have medium length that fail to hide the fact that he was wet behind the ears. Terry was just out of university with a shapely hair could have medium length that fail to hide the fact that he was wet behind the ears. I'm sure you understand that we can't have a mere inspector still wet behind the ears running. A case of this importance. I'm sure you want to send that. We can't have a mirror inspect to still wet behind the ears running. A case of this importance. 50. 26 Hard nosed: Hard-nosed. This phrase is used to describe somebody who is tough, stubborn, and uncompromising. And it's very often used in reference to people working in a business. If somebody has hard-nosed, they tend not to think about emotional factors when making decisions. He is so hard, no, sometimes grammar. And this ADM is an adjective. And you can use it by itself or in front of nouns. By itself. You can say things like, she is very hard nosed. She is very hard nosed. I don't think I'm hard-nosed. I don't think I'm hard-nosed. And you can place it in front of nouns. We have a hard-nosed approach to business. We have a hard-nosed approach to business. Is a hard-nosed man. He's a hard-nosed man. I wish they didn't have such a hard nose attitude. I wish they didn't have such a hard nose attitude. Explanation. The term hard-nosed used to be used only to talk about bullets. They were hard-nosed bullets and soft notes bullets. You can imagine somebody who is hard-nosed is like a bullet that will go through anything without thinking about emotional factors of any decision. It can have two meanings that differ slightly. In business, it could be seen as a good-quality to be hard-nosed, since you will act in a more practical way without taking into consideration feelings and emotions. Although this could also be seen as a negative trait in everyday life though, being hard nosed can be seen as a bad thing, and it can sometimes be used as an insult. To call somebody hard-nosed means you consider them stubborn and unwilling to move despite arguments or persuasion. It can also be used to talk about somebody who is generally quite unpleasant and who isn't a nice person to be around. Examples. Say these four sentences out loud to yourself. And after each one, listen to me say the sentence, pause the video, and then repeat. Number one. Those who will be most interested or hard-nosed speculators and investors. Those who will be most interested are hard-nosed speculators and investors. Number two. From then on, I knew that nothing was impossible in the very hard-nosed world of fashion. From then on, I knew that nothing was impossible in the very hard-nosed world of fashion. Number three, she has a reputation as a hard-nosed negotiator. She has reputation as a hard-nosed negotiator. Number for my boss is so hard nosed that I'm afraid to say hi to him. My boss is so hard knows that I'm afraid to say hi to him. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so they contain the idiom, hard nosed. Mr. How was known to be very TOEFL stubborn, but he could really be friendly if you've got to know him. Mr. Howe was known to be very hard-nosed, but he could really be friendly if you've got to know him. Mr. Howe was known to be very hard-nosed, but he could really be friendly if you've got to know him. I really need to be tough in this business. If I'm not, then I doubt our succeed. I really need to be hard-nosed in this business. If I'm not, then I doubt I'll succeed. I really need to be hard-nosed in this business. If I'm not, then I doubt I'll succeed. Everyone thinks I'm stupid then, but only in business, I'm really a big softy at home. Edwin things. I'm hard-nosed, but only in business. I'm really a big softy at home. Everyone thinks I'm hard-nosed, but early in business, I'm really a big soft dad home. The teams uncompromising coach doesn't make exceptions for anybody. The teams hard-nosed coach doesn't make exceptions for anybody. The teams hard-nosed coach doesn't make exceptions for anybody. You must already have a reputation of being stupid and toast for this to work. You must already have a reputation of being hard nosed for this to work. You must already have a reputation of being hard nose for this to work. In context. His hard-nosed business approach is combined with a very real concern for the less fortunate in society. His hard-nosed business approach is combined with a very real concern for the less fortunate in society. Hard-nosed criminals can only be tackled successfully by a concerted, equally hard-nosed approach by the authorities. Hard-nosed criminals can only be tackled successfully by a concerted, equally hard-nosed approach by the authorities. Industry sources say that it was made clear that more hard-nosed approach this time round would be welcome. Especially so close to general election. Industry sources say that it was made clear that a more hard-nosed approach this time round would be welcome. Especially so close to a general election. Being a hard-nosed journalist or businessman does not require you to suspend basic humanity. Being a hardness journalist or businessman does not require you to suspend basic humanity. 51. 27 Get the wrong end of the stick: Get the wrong end of the stick. This phrase is used a lot more in the UK than it is in America. And it means that somebody has misunderstood something. I think you've got the wrong end of the stick. Grammar. This idiom uses the verb GET, which we've had with other idioms. In the past tense. You have God for both the simple past and the past participle, but don't forget that in American English, you can also use gotten as the past participle. We've gotten the wrong end of the stick. We've gotten the wrong end of the stick. They got the wrong end of the stick. They got the wrong end of the stick. In the present tense, you can say Get, gets and getting. She's getting the wrong end of the stick. She's getting the wrong end of the stick. Paul usually gets the wrong end of the stick. Paul usually gets the wrong end of the stick. In the future tells US I will get if you don't listen, you will get the wrong end of the steak. If you don't listen, you'll get the wrong end of the stick. Explanation. There were lots of stories that explain where this idiom comes from, though none of them can be accurately verified. The most common theory is that it used to refer to a walking stick. If somebody grabbed the wrong end of the walking stick, it wouldn't be much use in helping them to walk. It can be used in any sense of misunderstanding something and even misinterpreting a situation. For example, if somebody sees something happening without having all the details, they could misinterpret an event and therefore get the wrong end of the stick. Examples. Say these four sentences out loud to yourself. Then listen to me say them. Pause the video and repeat. Number 1. Her friend source arrive at the party together and got the wrong end of the stick. Her friend source arrive at the party together and got the wrong end of the stick. Number two, people who think the song is about drugs have got the wrong end of the stick. People who think the song is about drugs have got the wrong end of the stick. Number 3. Jeff had got the wrong end of the stick and thought I was angry with him. Jeff had got the wrong end of the stick and thought, I was angry with him. Number 4, you got the wrong end of the stick. I never meant that. You got the wrong end of the stick. I never met that. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so they contain the idiom. Get the wrong end of the stick. I think I misread the situation. Maybe she was pointing at someone else and not me. I think I got the wrong end of the stick. Maybe she was pointing at someone else and not me. I think I got the wrong end of the stick. Maybe she was pointing out someone else and not me. You misunderstood. I invited him to be kind, not because I fancied him. You got the wrong end of the stick. I invited him to be kind, not because I fancied him. You've got the wrong end of the stick. I invited him to be kind, not because I fund seed him. I don't think you've understood properly. He doesn't owe me money. I owe him. I think you've got the wrong end of the stick. He doesn't owe me money. I owe him. I think you've got the wrong end of the stick. He doesn't owe me money. I owe him. Why does he always misunderstand me? I'm pretty sure I'm always clear when I talk to him. Why does he always get the wrong end of the stick? I'm pretty sure I'm always clear when I talk to him. Why does he always get the wrong end of the stick? I'm pretty sure I'm always clear when I talk to him. They completely misunderstood. It's not my fault though. My boss gave me the wrong information. They got the wrong end of the stick is not my fault though. My boss gave me the wrong information. They got the wrong end of the stick. It's not my fault though. My boss gave me the wrong information. In context. He must have gotten the wrong end of the stick about something when I was talking to him last week because he has started acting really odd whenever I see him now. He must have gotten the wrong end of the stick about something when I was talking to him last week because he has started acting really odd whenever I see him now. When Jack and Taylor arrived at the award function together, everyone got the wrong end of the stick. When Jack and Taylor arrived at the award function together, everyone got the wrong end of the stick. Maybe I got the wrong end of the stick, but I definitely put 02:00 PM in my diary. Maybe I got the wrong end of the stick, but I definitely put 02:00 PM in my diary. It could just be that he's got the wrong end of the stick and you weren't clearing off when you were telling him. It could just be that he's got the wrong end of the stick. And you weren't clear enough when you were telling him. 52. 28 Penny pinching: Penny pinching. This phrase is used to describe the action of trying to spend as little money as possible so as to save small amounts here in there. I've been penny pinching a lot recently. Grammar. The phrase penny pinching can be used as a verb. After any form of be. He has penny pinching. He is penny pinching. They were penny pinching the whole holiday. They were penny pinching the whole holiday. Or you can use it as an adjective. I have a lot of penny pinching friends. I have a lot of penny pinching friends. Or finally, you can use it as a noun. So it's a very versatile phrase. She's been accused of penny pinching. She's been accused of penny pinching. I'm sick of your penny pinching. I'm sick of your penny pinching explanation. The term penny pinching has the image of somebody pinching a penny between their thumb and finger as they pull it out of their pocket, pinching so tightly that they don't want to let it go. And that's why the term is used to describe somebody who is reluctant to spend and we'll try to save small amounts of money in any way they can. You can change the phrase slightly and turn it into a noun that describes a person who is known for penny pinching. You can call them a penny pinching. Mark is such a penny picture. There are quite a few synonyms for penny pinching that might help you to understand this usage bit more. Money-grubbing, close visited, crimping, tight visited, greedy, stingy. Examples. Say these four sentences out loud to yourself. Then listen to me say them. Pause the video and repeat. Number one. Government penny pinching is blamed for the decline in Food Standards. Government penny pinching is blamed for the decline in fuel standards. Number 2. His grandparents were humorless and penny pinching. His grandparents were humorless. And penny pinching. Number 3. This is penny pinching at the expense of those who can least afford it. This is penny pinching at the expense of those who can least afford it. Before. This penny pinching has enabled the airline to slash ticket prices and still turn a profit. This penny pinching has enabled the airline to slash ticket prices and still turn a profit. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so they contain the idiom, penny pinching. I hope that he was not here to carry out a scoping exercise. I hope that he was not here to carry out a penny pinching exercise. I hope that he was not here to carry out a penny pinching exercise. I will never go about scooping money, I don't believe is the right strategy. I will never go about penny pinching. I don't believe it's the right strategy. I will never go about penny pinching. I don't believe is the right strategy. All they see is his stingy attitude rather than the savings he's making. All they see is his penny pinching attitude. Rather than a savings he's making. All they see is his penny pinching attitude. Rather than the savings he's making. She says she's trying to save money, but her type listed lifestyle is mainly down to the fact that she's greeting. She says that she's trying to save money, but her penny pinching lifestyle is mainly down to the fact that she's greedy. She says that she's trying to save money, but her penny pinching lifestyle is mainly down to the fact that she is greedy. They're just small minded, greedy administrators who want to hold all the money. They're just small minded, penny pinching administrators who want to hold all the money. They're just small minded, penny pinching administrators who want to hold all the money. In context. The moment the courts began, the generosity disappeared. Penny pinching raised its ugly head. The moment the courts began, the generosity disappeared. And penny pinching raised its ugly head. It would be the greatest possible shame if penny pinching quotes in research budgets were to cause us to lose this lab. It would be the greatest possible shame if penny pinching courts in research budgets were to cause us to lose this lab. Everyone likes a bargain, but some people take penny pinching to the extreme and plan their whole lives around saving money everywhere they can. Everyone likes the bargain. But some people take penny pinching to the extreme and plan their whole lives around saving money everywhere they can. The penny pinching attitude of her parents made her take a completely opposite approach to life. And now she has huge amounts of debt. The penny pinching attitude of her parents made her take a completely opposite approach to life. And now she has huge amounts of debt. 53. 29 Cost an arm and a leg: Cost an arm and leg. This phrase is used to describe something that you paid for that cost a lot of money. This trip cost me an arm and a leg. Grammar. This phrase uses the verb cost, which you can conjugate into the past, present, and future tenses. In the past, the verb cost is just cost. So it's similar to verbs like set and quote, that don't change when you put them into the past tense. It cost an arm and a leg. It cost an arm and leg. That car cost a normal EKG. That car cost an arm and a leg. In the present tense, you say cost. Costs or costing? A cost, an arm and a leg every month. A costs normal leg every month. They're costing an arm and a leg. May costing an arm and a leg. In the future tense, you say will cost. This will cost an arm and a leg. This will cost an arm and a leg. Explanation. There's a story about the origins of the phrase costs phenomenal leg that says it came from the time when people would have portraits painted. Artists would charge less if you just had your head and shoulders in the portrait and a lot more if you wanted your whole body. So having an arm and a leg and the picture would cost a lot more money. However, there is no evidence to support that this is where the idiom comes from. Unfortunately, arm and leg are used as examples of items that no one would consider selling other than us an enormous price. It's more likely that this phrase came from two earlier expressions. I would give my right arm full. And even if it takes a leg, both mean something costs a lot of money. So it's likely that they mold it into cost, an arm and a leg. The verb cost can be used with object pronouns to show whom it's costing money. It cost me an arm and a leg. It costs you a nominal leg. You can say me, you him, her OS. And then examples. Say these example sentences out loud to yourself. Then listen to me say them. Pause the video and repeat. Number one. I'd like to have a new farmhouse. They may cost me an arm and leg. I'd like to have a new farm house, but it may cost me an arm and a leg. Number two, we should visit that restaurant. The food is really good and it doesn't cost you a nominal egg. We should visit that restaurant. The food is really good and it doesn't cost you a nominal egg. Number 3. This dress is lovely, but it cost me an arm and a leg. This dress is lovely, but it cost me an arm and a leg. Number 4. It cost me an arm and a leg. Let's hope it was worth it. It cost me an arm and leg. Let's hope it was worth it. Test yourself. See if you can rewrite the following sentences so they contain the idiom, cost an arm and a leg. Buying a brand new car is so expensive. It is guaranteed cost. An absolute fortune. Buying a brand new car is so expensive. It is guaranteed cost. An arm and a leg. Buying a brand new car is so expensive. It is guaranteed cost us an arm and a leg. I want to go on holiday, but I can't find a hotel that isn't really expensive. I wanted to go on holiday, but I can't find a hotel that doesn't cost a nominal Nick. I want to go on holiday, but I can't find a hotel that doesn't cost an arm and a leg. Having children is so expensive, but it's definitely worth it. Having children costs an arm and a leg. But it's definitely worth it. Having children costs phenomenal leg, but it's definitely worth it. If it costs too much money, don't worry about it. I can probably find it online somewhere. If it costs nominal leg, don't worry about it. I can probably find it online somewhere. If it costs phenomenal leg, don't worry about it. I can probably find it online somewhere. The meal was absolutely delicious, but it costs a small fortune. The meal was absolutely delicious, but it cost an arm and a leg. The meal was absolutely delicious, but it cost an arm and a leg. In context. Sometimes we go away as a family. But when you have seven children, short trips can cost an arm and a leg. Sometimes we go as a family, but when you have seven children, short trips can cost an arm and a leg, is causing you an arm and leg to get all these TV channels and you, anybody watched two of them is costing you an arm and a leg to get all these TV channels and you only really watch two of them. I only need a phone for calls, so I don't want something that's going to cost me an arm and leg. I only need a phone for calls, so I don't want something that's going to cost me an arm and a leg. You can stay here if you like. But the rooms are very expensive. And last time I came here, it cost me an arm and a leg. You can say here if you like, but the rooms are very expensive. And last time I came here, it cost me an arm and a leg. 54. 30 Fill someone’s shoes: Phil, someone's shoes. This phrase is used to say that you're going to do someone's job or accept their responsibilities. He's going to feel kate shoes when she's gone. Grammar. The phrase, fill someone shoes uses the verb fill, which you can conjugate into the past, present, and future tenses. In the past, the web Fill is regular. So we say filled. She felt his shoes. She felt his shoes. In the present tense, you say fill? Fills or filling? He's filling our shoes. He's spending our shoes. In the future tense, you say, will fill your fill our shoes. Your philos use the word someone's can be replaced with any name with an apostrophe S. On the end. He will fill Jake shoes. He will feel Jake's shoes. Or you can replace it with any possessive adjective, which are my, your, his, her, our, or there. Who can fill my shoes? Who can fill my shoes? Explanation. This ADM is used to mean that you're filling or taking over somebody's position. Usually in reference to a job, is used quite a lot in phrases like nobody can feel your shoes, which has the implication that nobody else will be