English Grammar Tenses: Learn the Different Tense Forms and When to Use Each Tense | Tom Wiztek | Skillshare

English Grammar Tenses: Learn the Different Tense Forms and When to Use Each Tense

Tom Wiztek, Marketing and Recruitment Specialist

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26 Lessons (1h 16m)
    • 1. English Grammar Course

      1:20
    • 2. Course Overview

      4:24
    • 3. Section 1: Present Simple Tense - Forms

      6:37
    • 4. Section 1: Present Simple Tense - Main Uses

      3:45
    • 5. Section 1: Past Simple Tense - Forms

      7:14
    • 6. Section 1: Past Simple Tense - Main Uses

      2:13
    • 7. Section 1: Future Simple Tense - Forms

      3:40
    • 8. Section 1: Future Simple Tense - Main Uses

      2:00
    • 9. Section 2: Present Continuous Tense - Forms

      2:25
    • 10. Section 2: Present Continuous Tense - Main Uses

      2:40
    • 11. Section 2: Past Continuous Tense - Forms

      2:06
    • 12. Section 2: Past Continuous Tense - Main Uses

      2:49
    • 13. Section 2: Future Continuous Tense - Forms

      2:45
    • 14. Section 2: Future Continuous Tense - Main Uses

      2:58
    • 15. Section 3: Present Perfect Tense - Forms

      2:11
    • 16. Section 3: Present Perfect Tense - Main Uses

      3:37
    • 17. Section 3: Past Perfect Tense - Forms

      2:22
    • 18. Section 3: Past Perfect Tense - Main Uses

      2:44
    • 19. Section 3: Future Perfect Tense - Forms

      2:37
    • 20. Section 3: Future Perfect Tense - Main Uses

      1:29
    • 21. Section 4: Present Perfect Continuous - Forms

      2:15
    • 22. Section 4: Present Perfect Continuous - Main Uses

      2:21
    • 23. Section 4: Past Perfect Continuous - Forms

      1:52
    • 24. Section 4: Past Perfect Continuous - Main Uses

      2:37
    • 25. Section 4: Future Perfect Continuous - Forms

      2:17
    • 26. Section 4: Future Perfect Continuous - Main Uses

      2:15

About This Class

Are you having difficulties learning English grammar tenses?

It can really get confusing knowing when to use which grammar tense. Unlike some other languages English has a total of 12 tenses. If you choose the wrong tense when you are writing your sentences will be unreadable and look bad. In speaking if you do not know which tense to use it will be a barrier to communication.

You need to know the 12 tenses so that you can improve your written and spoken English. Not only do you have to know which tense to use in each situation but you have to know how to form the tense correctly. This means that even if you choose the right tense, but use the wrong form, your sentences will still look wrong.

If you are interested in learning the grammar tenses then this course can help you.  

Enroll today and here’s what you’ll learn:  

  • The 12 English grammar tenses in detail  

  • How to choose the right tense for the right situation  

  • How to form each grammar tense correctly  

See you inside.

Transcripts

1. English Grammar Course: Are you having difficulties learning English grammar tenses? Do you struggle with knowing when to use which grammar? Tens. It can really get confusing. Unlike some other languages, English has a total of 12 tenses. If you choose the wrong tens when you are writing, your sentences will be unreadable and look bad in speaking. If you do not know which tends to use, it will be a barrier to communication. You need to know the 12 tenses so that you can improve your written and spoken English. Not only do you have to know which tends to use in each situation, but you have to know how to form the tents correctly. This means that even if you choose the right ends, but use the wrong form, your sentences will still look wrong. If you are interested in learning the grammar tenses than discourse can help you and roll today. And here's what you learn. The 12 English grammar tenses in detail. How to choose the right things for the right situation and how to form each grammar tens correctly, so to get started, enroll today and I'll see you on the inside 2. Course Overview: Hi, this is Tom, and I want to welcome you to the inside. Here you will learn all about the 12 tenses off English grammar. I have organized the course into four main sections. The four main tens groups, simple tents, continuous, tense, perfect, tense and perfect continuous tense. In every section, you will learn the past, present and future version off the tents. Each tense has two lessons. Wondered covers the forms of the tents and the other shows you the main uses off that tense . Now it doesn't matter. What do you watch? The how to form a tense lesson first or the main uses off attends lesson Start by learning the present simple tense. First watch the how to form the present simple, tense video and then watch the main uses of the present simple, tense video. After that, choose what do you want to watch the forms first or the main uses of each tens first. But before we go into the tenses of English grammar, I want to talk to you about what you need to know about each and every tense. There are four main parts that I will cover in each lesson, so Firstly, you will have to know how to use the tents in the positive form. Sometimes this called the affirmative form, but the postive form is basically the normal sentence, such as you play football. Secondly, you need to know how to form the sentence in the negative. So an example of the negative is you do not play football. Usually this is just a matter of adding not into the sentence. Thirdly, you need to know how to ask a simple yes or no question. Now, as the name suggests, this is a question where the answer is either yes or no like Do you play football? And the fourth part is a W page question. These are questions that use the wh ward in the front. Off the sentence. The wh words are what where, when, why, who and how, as you can see how is not a double page world, but it is an exception. It still comes under this category, so you could say, Why do you play football or how do you play football now? These are more advanced questions because you cannot answer them using just a simple yes or no response. So you will learn four of these forms for every tense that I'm about to show you. Also, I will show you now how to use the tents, which each subject by subjects. I am referring to using the tents in either first person, second person and third person. So the subjects are I you he or she day we and it and every subject can be expressed in either singular form or plural form. So let's have a look at the table where you'll see this Exactly. Now you can see on the left hand side you've got either first person, second person or third person, and then in the columns you've got the teeter singular or plural. So I in 1st 1st person we have I, which is referring to me. It's singular. There's only one meat in the plural form. This would include myself with either another person or a group of people. In that case, I would say we the second person is you. So you in front off this computer screen. That's the second person you also use you. If it's a second person plural, such as, Ah class today I am setting you homework. Not that person. This is most commonly used in fictional writing, but in everyday life it's used when you're talking about another person. So you use he she or it. And in the plural form, you just say they okay, Now that you know the basics of what I will show you, let's begin our work on the present simple tense. 3. Section 1: Present Simple Tense - Forms: welcome in this lesson. You are going to learn all about the different forms off the present Simple tense. You can make the present simple tents using the to be verb. So this means you use em is our depending If you are using it in first person, second person or third person. Now I want to show you how to use the to be verb in the positive. So you can say I am from Europe. You are from London. She is from Sydney. It is from China. They are from Mexico. We are from New Zealand. Basically the only thing that changes is depending on the subject is whether we use em is or are. Now let's form the negative to form the negative is very, very easy because all you do is add not after the to be verb like I am not from Europe and is the to be verb after emu. Add not, You are not from Germany. She is not from London. It is not from China. They're not from Australia. We are not from Sydney. Now let's create some Yes, no questions. All you have to do here is reversed. The 1st 2 words and add a question mark. So using the to be verb once again Am I from Spain before you would say, like in the positive I am from Spain and now reversing the 1st 2 words. Am I from Spain or are you from London? If she from New York, is it from India? Are they from China? Are we from Europe? All we're doing is reversing the 1st 2 words the subject and the to be verb. Now let's form some wh questions and all we're doing here is adding I wh word in the front . Where am I? What is this? How are you? Why are you here? Who is Julie Wit? Notice that I have just added the question. Word in front, off the to be verb. Now let's look at verbs other than to be verbs. So with all other verbs, you're going to use the method that I'm going to show you now to form the present simple tents. Now there are two main guidelines that you have to remember. Number one. If the subject is I, you we day, then just used the verb as it is. If the subject is he she or it. Then add an s to the end. So if we take, for example, the world the verb walk, I walk, you walk, we walk, they walk you don't you just use it as it is. But if you say he walks, you add a nested end she walks or it walks. You have to, um, s now for a few words when you have to. Adam s dispelling also changes if the verb ends with S h c h s, x double that or oh, then you just add e s to the end. As you can see here, Rush Rush is teach teaches box boxes. Now, if the verb ends with y, usually you just change the white to on I and add es such as try becomes tries, cry becomes Christ. Now, the exception is if, before the why there is a vowel, then just add s. So by becomes Bice, pay becomes pays. So just keep that in mind. Now let's form the positive. And in my example, I am going to be using the verb walk. So I walk to work, you walk to work, she walks to work, it walks to work and Then they walked work and we walked to work very, very evening. Just adding an s not to create the negative. It's a little bit different of here because you have to add either do not or does not the once again here, the two rules for that years do not. When the subject is I you day or we and you use does not. When the subject is he she or it. Well, let me show you how you accuse this. So in the negative form I do not walk to work. You do not walk to work. She does not walk to work. It does not work to work And then they do not walked work. And we do not walk to work so that the only difference between the positive and the negative is we have do not or does not. Now let's create So yes, no questions. And once again, we use either do or does, depending on the subject. Do I walk? Do you walk? Does he work? Does it walking? Then do they walk to work? Do we walk to work? It's just a matter off adding do or does in front of the subject to create wh questions. You simply add the wh word in front and then followed by either do or does. Like he said before, depending on the subject. So it's Where do I walk? Why do you walk? When does she walk? If I had an example of he it would be Why does he walk or why does it work? How do they work and when do we walk? Okay, so you have just completed the first lecture on the different forms off the presents. Simple tents. Next, I'm going to show you when you have to use the present simple tents are See you then. 4. Section 1: Present Simple Tense - Main Uses: welcome in this lesson. You are going to learn when to use the present simple tense. Now there are four main uses for this tense. First, use the present simple when you're talking about facts, general truths or a permanent situations. So if we were to say water freezes at zero degrees, this is a fact or a general truth. I live in Australia. The moon revolves around the Earth. Two plus two is four. Some of these repairman situations, they don't change, and they are true. You're not going to be debating these things. Let's just say for general truths you use the present simple, tense. Next, if on action happens regularly, sometimes or never used the present simple. So you can use the present simple tents to describe habits or regular actions. The key being that these occur regularly sometimes or never it. Like I go to the gym every Monday. This is a habit. She only eats fish. He eats cereal for breakfast. Miss Penny takes the train to work, and we often go to the movies on Friday. All of these examples they have been either regularly or sometimes, but the key thing to remember is if it's sort of like a habit, if it happens occasionally or regularly use the present simple third, you use the present. Simple tends to talk about actions that happen right now. A good example, I can think off is a sports commentator. You see, he uses the simple tent to describe what is happening in the game. Like if we're talking about soccer or football, then you could, the commentator would say, Center passes to forward, forward player shoots. He scores all of these actions, their actions that happen now. Other examples would be I pick up the deck of cards or she throws me the ball. Now, please note we are not discussing what is happening right now, but what has happened now? Like if we were discussing what is happening now, we would use the present continuous tense. But the present simple tends on. Lee describes what happens now. It's a slight difference, but just keeping it in mind for now. I'll explain this in more detail. One. Get to the lesson on the present continuous tense and the fourth use for the present. Simple is when you talk about future plans that are related to a timetable. The key here is that your future plans they must be related to a future timetable or I should Jewel. So if you say our bus leaves at three PM, our bus leaves. That's present simple. And then at 3 p.m. So that's a future time reference. It's a fixed schedule or we fly to Europe tomorrow. Your exam starts at 9 a.m. You start school next week. Well, that you have just learned the four main uses of the present simple tents. And with that, you have concluded the module on the present. Simple. So that's tense. Number one off. 12. Done. You're off to a good start on Lee. 11 more to go. 5. Section 1: Past Simple Tense - Forms: in this lesson. I want to go over the past simple tents. Basically, it's used to talk about events that happened in the past. And in this lesson I'll show you how to make the different forms off the past. Simple tents. Let's first look at how to use to be verbs in the past. Simple tents. I hope you remember to be verbs in the present. Simple R M is or are when you use them in the past tense. They change the form to was or were. Now you use Waas for subjects I he she and it you use were for the subject. You day we let's look how you can use it in the positive. So I was here. You were tired. She was sleepy. They were hungry. We were on holiday. It was cold to make a negative statement. Just add not afterwards or war. So you can say I was not here. You were not tired. She was not sleepy. They were not hungry. We were not on holiday. It was not called to ask Yes, no questions Just add was or war in front of the subject. So the was or were is before the subject. Was I tired? Were you sleepy? Was she hungry? Were they hungry? Where we on holiday? Was it cold? And finally to ask wh questions you just asked Wh ward in front over was or were so you can use the Yes, no question for months and as the wh word in front of that. So here are some examples. Why was I hungry? When were you tired? When was it called? Why were relate When were they at school? Now let's create the past simple tents using other than to be verbs. There are a couple of rules that you must follow in changing a verb from the present. Simple to the past. Simple form. Here's there. Yeah, there are four in general. Usually the simple past tense is made by adding e D to the verb. So you land becomes London, play becomes played, walk becomes walked. Simple. However, if the verb ends with E, then you can just add a D to the end. So close becomes closed, smile becomes smiled and race becomes raced. If the verb ends with, why, then change the white Owen I and add e. D. So Carrie and would. Why we're changing the white one eye and adding e d and then becomes carried. Cry becomes cried, try becomes tried. And finally, some verbs that end with a continent. You just have to double the continent and add e d. Such as grab becomes grabbed. Tag becomes tagged, slam becomes slammed. These four guidelines are one way off, changing the verbs from present tense to past ins. But there is one more way that you change them because you see some verbs are irregular. Verbs and irregular verbs have a different present and past. For unfortunately or fortunately, it depends how you're looking at it. The best way to learn these irregular verbs is formalist off the most popular irregular verbs, and then just memorize them. He's just a short, short list. So as you can see from the Left column, we've got, like begin in the past. Simple form. It's begun. Brake is broke. Choose in the prison. Simple becomes chose in the past. Simple. So it's a different spelling. Different pronunciation, practically a different word. So I will include a list off irregular verbs. You can download it, have a look at it and best scenario would be if you actually memorize it. Okay, let's move on. So now let's use the past simple tents in the positive using other than to be verbs. So you can say I played at school. You walked to work. She visited the dentist. It rolled down the hill. They played games we visited our friends in These examples were basically just adding E g to the end. Now let's look at some positive sentences using irregular verbs. The 1st 1 being I drove to the beach drove was changed from the original form off. Dr. Then you we've got you went to work. The present version of the verb is go past. Simple went. She broke her pencil. It fell onto the ground. They lost their keys. We ate dinner on these examples. You can see the original verbs drive, go, break, fall, lose eat and how they have changed form to be presented in the past. Simple, tense when forming the negative in the past. Simple tents. There are no irregular verbs. Remember in the present simple. We use either do not or does not, to create the negative for the past simple tents. It's much easier all you do is at did not and remember no irregular verbs. So here are some examples I did not play. You did not break my pencil. She did not lose her keys. It did not rain. They did not walk together. We did not visit the museum. No changes were just adding Did not see the sentence to form? Yes. No questions. All you have to do is added. Did before the subject off the sentence Did I walk? Did you play? Did she sleep? Did it snow? Did they work? Did we talk once again? You're not changing a verb forms you're just adding did in front. And then finally to form the wh questions at the question worth before did so Let's take the above example off the Yes, no questions and convert them to wh questions. So before we had, did I walk and it could be Where did I walk? Why did that work? How long did I walk? Other examples would be. Why did you play? When did she sleep? When did its know? How did they work? Where did they talk? Sorry. Where did we talk? So for the past Simple tents When you're using other than to be verbs. And you're saying it either in negative asking, yes, no questions or wh questions. You don't change the form of the verb. 6. Section 1: Past Simple Tense - Main Uses: Welcome back in this lesson. I want to talk about the past simple tents. I want to cover the main areas when to use this tense. Primarily the past simple tense is used for finished actions, for finished habits or for finished states. These are actions that started in the past and finished in the past like I exercised at the gym last Monday. You know that I started my exercise in the gym last Monday and I finished my exercise or yesterday I went to the cinema. I was on holiday six months ago. You always use the past simple tent to say when something happened, so you usually will include some sort of time reference to the past, such as yesterday, a week ago, last night, last week, last year or six months ago. So here's some other examples off finished tasks what you did yesterday when something was done, or if you are telling a story or talking about some news, and you will always be using the past simple tents. Here are some examples I went to the movies yesterday. I broke my tennis racket last week. I drove 800 miles to get here. The News reported that a cat got stuck on a tree. The key thing to remember is that these are finished tasks from the past. Let's have a look at the second use now. The second use off the past simple tense is a little bit weird because you use the past simple tents to talk about the present or the future. It's but these are imagined events. So if I won the lottery, I would go on a holiday. If I had a $1,000,000 I would buy a new car. I wish it wasn't so called. I wish I had more time. If Sam was playing, they would win. So these are all imagined events. Okay. Thank you for watching completes this lesson. 7. Section 1: Future Simple Tense - Forms: how everybody in this lesson I want to talk about the future. Simple, tense and in particular I want to show you how to form the future. Simple tents. So to make sentences, using the simple future tense the main wards that you will use our will and show such as you will I will I show or we show. However, will is the key word that you have to know if you can use will with all the subject. So all the personal problems These are I you he she it we and they While you can only use show when the subject is I or we such as I shall be there, we shall arrive at eight tonight. Whereas once again, if you're using will you can use it with any subject. I will be there. We will arrive at eight tonight. They will arrive at eight tonight. So Will is basically the main focus for you. Let's first have a look at how to use the future. Simple tents in the positive. I will go to the concert. You will go to the concert. She will meet us later. It will be a great concert. They will go to the concert, we will go to the concert. We're talking about a future event and we're basically just adding Will will go, will meet will be in the negative. It's easy because all you have to do is add not after will. So the key wars being will not like. I will not go to the concert. You will not go to the concert. She will not meet us later. It will not be a great concert. They will not go to the concert and we will not go to the concert. However, one forming the negative, you can shorts in the form so instead off writing or saying will not all the time you can use want and this is how it looks. I want go to the concert. You won't go to the concert. She wants meters later. It won't be a great concert. They won't go to the concert. We want go to the concert. So instead of we will not go to the concert we want go to the concert to form Yes, no questions. It's just a matter of putting will be in the beginning before the subject. So will I go to the concert. Will you go? Will she meet us later? Will it be a great concert? Will they go to the concert? Will we go to the concert? And lastly to form Doug? You hate questions. We just at the wh word before will. So if we if it was a yes no question it would be. Will I go to the concert? Yes or no? Wh question When will I go to the concert? Why will I go to the concert? Or how will I go to the concert? Other examples are Where will you go? To the concert? Why will she meet us later? How will it be a great concert? Where will they meet us? At the concert. Why will we go to the concert? So as you can see the key word that you have to remember And if you see it, it sort of identifies the future. Simple tents is will. Okay, thanks for watching this lesson. I see in the next one 8. Section 1: Future Simple Tense - Main Uses: welcome in this lesson. I want to talk about the future. Simple tents and in particular, I want to show you when to use the future. Simple tense as the name implies, the future simple tense is used to say anything about the future. But here are the main categories so that it will be easier for you to understand. Firstly, if you are predicting something like election results, which sporting team will win or the weather, then you will use the future. Simple tense. Here's some common adverbs in time that may indicate that the future simple tense is being used worth, such as tomorrow, Later today, next week, next month or in the afternoon in a sentence, it would look like I think that Spain will win the World Cup. It will rain tomorrow, a beefy will wind election next month. So in these examples, I'm making a prediction about a future result. The second use is whenever you want to express a willingness to do something, or to make a promise such as I will clean the house when it stops raining or when it stops raining, we will go to the beach, and thirdly, I will carry your bugs for you. You're making a promise to do something in the future and the Thirdly you use the future simple tense when you want to express a spontaneous decision. So if you suddenly decide to do something, then you can use this tense like actually, I will have a cup of coffee. I will go to the concert book a ticket for me right now. I will get the bill. Well done. You have just learned when to use the future. Simple tents. Thank you for watching. 9. Section 2: Present Continuous Tense - Forms: welcome back in this lesson. I want to talk to you about the present continuous tense and in particularly how to form the present continuous Now, just so you know, if you have read any other textbooks this tense, it's sometimes known as the present continuous. But I have also seen it's called the present Progressive tense so it doesn't matter which name is used. It's still referring to the same tense. The reason that it's known as a continuous tense or a progressive tense is because it's an action that is happening right now. The present continuous tense is easily identifiable by its form. In particular. If you see an I n g verb, then you can sort of think that it's using some type off the continuous tense. But in more detail, you need a to be verb and a verb with an I N G ending. So to recap your memory, the to be verb in the present tense is M is our. And then on top of that, you just need a very put on I N G ending. So here's some examples of how it is used in the positive I am skiing. You are walking. She is singing. We are dancing, They're drinking. It is raining to form the negative. You just had not after the to be verb. So I am not skiing. You are not walking. She is not singing. We are not dancing. They're not drinking. It is not raining now to form. Yes, No questions. We basically switch around the 1st 2 words off the positive form. So 1st 1 we've got em. I skiing in the postive form. It's I am skiing next. Are you walking in the positive former Could be. You are walking So now it's Are you walking? If she thinking Are we dancing? Are they drinking? Is it raining? And Leslie to form wh questions? Just put the wh word in the front. Where am I? Skin. Why are you walking? How is she singing? When are we dancing? Where are they drinking? Why is it raining? And that is all you need to know about the forms off the present Continuous tense 10. Section 2: Present Continuous Tense - Main Uses: Hello. In this lesson, we will examine the main uses off the present continuous tense. It is also called the present progressive, tense. But remember, continuous or progressive, it has the same meaning Now, generally speaking, he used this tense to talk about things that are continuing to happen. And now I want to show you in more details when to use the present continuous tense. Firstly, we can use the present continuous tense for actions that are happening in the now these air actions there are likely to still be happening. When we finish talking like I am working now I am walking. At this moment, I am talking over the phone after the sentence, the action is still happening. Next, we use the present continuous tense to describe temporary situations. These are actions that are taking place on Lee for a period of time. I am working on the factory until I find a different job. So it's a temporary situation. Working in the factory, Thomas resting in bed until he recovers, they are spending the week in Australia. Thirdly, we can use this tense to describe annoyances. It's mainly when you are talking about irritating habits. Bad habits or shocking news. For this, you will use either always or constantly, such as you are constantly losing your keys. They are always running late. My son is always getting in trouble at school. Fuel prices are always rising, so all of these are examples off annoying situations or irritating habits. And finally, you can use the stents when talking about the future. But you can only use the stents for talking about the future when you're describing. I planned action in the near future, so there has to be a plan involved when you have planned actions in the future. You will describe these using certain words such as tomorrow, next week, later tonight, Monday. So at this can be any day of the week after here. Some examples. I am going to the job interview on Friday. We are flying to Dubai next week. I am shopping for shoes tomorrow. I am meeting with friends after work, so you have just learned the four main uses off the present continuous tense 11. Section 2: Past Continuous Tense - Forms: in this lesson. I want to talk to you about the past continuous tense, also known as the past. Progressive, tense and in particular, I want to focus on the different forms off the past. Continuous tense. Now this is actually very similar to the present continuous tense. And here's what you do. We take the past simple version off the to be verb. So this is either Waas or work. Then we add the I N G ending to the verb and that's older is to it. You will use Waas when the subject is I he she or it. And you will use where, when the subject is you day we So let's have a look at some examples. This is how you will use the past continuous tense in the positive. I was walking. You were running, She was hiking. It was snowing. They were sailing. We were traveling to form the negative. We just add not before the verb. So I was not walking. You were not running. She was not hiking. It was not snowing. They were not sailing. We were not traveling to form. Yes, no questions. Just reverse the 1st 2 words. Now remember the past version of the to be verb should be before the subject. So here the examples. Was I walking? Were you running? Was she hiking? Was it snowing? Where they sailing? Where we traveling? And then finally to form that behaved questions just at the w hate world to the beginning. So you can say, Where was I walking or how was I walking or why was I walking? Other examples are Why were you running? When was she hiking? How was it snowing? When were they sailing And where were we traveling? 12. Section 2: Past Continuous Tense - Main Uses: Hi again. Let's talk about the past continuous tense, also known as the past progressive tense. In this lesson, I will show you the different users off the past continuous tense. So number one, when a person is in the middle of doing something in the past, so you use the past continuous tense when you won't describe what a person was doing at a particular time in the past, we're describing an action that a person is in the middle of doing in the past. So here's some examples. I was busy gardening in the morning, So in the morning, the morning is the past. I was busy gardening, so it was something that I was doing in the process of doing. Yesterday I was working. I was still driving in the evening. In May, she was working as a waitress. So all of these examples the person was doing something or in the middle of doing something in the past. Second for interrupted actions so you can use the past continuous tense when an action in the past was interrupted by a non direction. Here's an example. You were walking and stopped to talk to your friend, your main action is walking. You use the past continuous tense for dissection. Your second reaction is you stopped and the secondary action is always stated, using the past simple tents. Here's some more examples. Jeremy was waiting for us when we got off the plane, or I was watching TV when the phone ring. So watching TV is the main action, using the past continuous tense and then when the phone rang that is, using the past simpletons. You can use the past continuous tense to describe bad habits. However, if you do this, you always have to use either always or constantly or forever here. Some examples. She was always coming to work late. He was always losing his keys. They were constantly making excuses. And lastly, you can use the past continuous tense to describe the story background. So when you're telling a story, you use this tense to set this setting or the background. Like the sun was shining, the office workers were typing or the plane was landing. In other words, you are setting the scene with the past continuous tense. Okay, these are the four main uses for the past continuous tense Thanks for watching 13. Section 2: Future Continuous Tense - Forms: welcome in this lesson. Let's cover the future Continuous tense. This is sometimes referred to as the future progressive, tense and Indus Linz and I want to focus on the different forms. The future continuous tense is actually quite easy to make. All you need is the future version off the to be verb which is will be and you use the verb with an i N g ending and that's basically it. Here's how you can create positives using the future continuous tense. I will be going to the concert. You will be walking to the party. He will be driving to the party. It will be staying at home. They will be playing at the party. We will be drinking at the party Notice that will be is used for every subject. Now let's have a look How you conform negatives using the future continuous tense And what you have to do is you just add not after will and that grease the negative So in the positive we had will be so this time around to form the negative it will you will use will not be. Here are some examples off this I will not be going to the concert. You will not be walking to the party. He will not be driving to the party. It will not be staying at home. They will not be playing at the party. We will not be drinking at the party. Will not, can be used in a shortened form and that will create Want. It would just make sentence sound a little bit smoother, A little bit nicer. So here are the exact same sentences that we used before except using the contracted form. So before we had, I will not be going to the concert. Now it's I won't be going to the concert. Then we've got you won't be walking to the party. He won't be driving to the party. It won't be staying at home. They won't be playing at the party. And we won't be drinking at the party to form. Yes, no questions. Just add will in the front before the subject. So will I be studying? Will you be running? Will she be dancing? Will it be fetching? Will they be climbing? Will we be watching? And finally to form the w hate questions Just at the wh Word in front of the will. So where will I be studying? When will you be running? What will she be dancing? What will it be fetching? How will they be climbing? What will we be watching? And there you have it. As you can see, it is very, very easy to form the future continuous tense. 14. Section 2: Future Continuous Tense - Main Uses: Welcome back. In this lesson, we will review one to use the future continuous tense. The future continues. Tense is mostly used to discuss future events, but let's get into some more details as to when to use it. The most common use for the future continues tents is foreign activity that will occur in the future and continue for a period of time. Common phrases that you use our next week next month, tonight in the evening. Tomorrow, later here. Some examples I will be exercising in the gym tomorrow. I will be flying to Prague next week. I am going to the interview at 12. This time tomorrow I will be sunbathing on a beach. So all of these examples they're continuing actions that will take place in the near future . Secondly, you can use the future continuous tense to talk about an action in the future that will be interrupted by another action. So the primary action will be using the future continuous tense and the secondary action, the one that interrupts your primary action will be made using the present simple tense. Here are a couple of examples. I will be making dinner when she arrives home. So making dinner, that is the primary action, and she arrives home that will interrupt your primary action. Next, she will be studying upstairs when her parents go out, or they will be playing football when he arrives at the airport. Thirdly, you can use the future continuous tense to predict what will happen in the future or make guesses what might happen in the future. Like you will be missing the sunshine when you go to England. Or if it's late, she will be sleeping. So these air guesses as to what might be in the future and the fourth to use is for actions that have started right now and will continue onwards into the future. So when you use the word still, you can use the future continuous tense for actions that are happening now and are expected to continue into the future. Just remember the keyword. Still, here's how it will be used in one hour. I will still be studying. So the implication is I'm studying now, and in one hour I will still be studying next week. I will still be living in that apartment, or the tide will still be going out in one hour. So these air actions that have started right now in the present and are continuing into the future Okay. Thank you for watching. You have just learned the four main uses off the future continuous tense. 15. Section 3: Present Perfect Tense - Forms: welcome. In this lesson you will learn how to form the present perfect tense. Whenever you have to make a present perfect, tense sentence you need to use, have or has together would I past participle to form a past participle. You usually add e g to the end off a regular mom herb so play becomes played. Walk becomes walked now. Some words, however, are irregular verbs. In these cases, you do not add ET to the end. But you have to use their past participle form so Dr would become, has driven, chose has chosen drink has drunk. So first I'll show you how to create the present perfect tense in the positive form. So you can say I have worked. You have traveled. She has walked. It has rained. They have observed we have played. So I'm always using either have or has and then the verb. I'm adding e d to the verb. These are for regular verbs to form the negative just at not after has or have. So you could say I have not worked. You have not traveled. She has not walked. It has not rained. They have not observed. We have not played to form? Yes, no questions. Remember that They always start with Have or has Have I traveled to Europe? Have given us the Germany. Has she swam in? The pool hasn't been raining. Have they been drinking? Have we rented the room? And finally to form wh questions Just out of the wh Word in the front followed by either have or health. When have I traveled to Europe? Why heavy visit to Germany. When has she swam in the pool? Where has it been raining? What have you been drinking? Sorry, What have they been drinking? How have we rented the room? And that's basically how you form the present perfect tense use either have or has an ad a past participle off the verb. 16. Section 3: Present Perfect Tense - Main Uses: Hello. In this lesson, we will be discussing the present perfect tense. The present perfect tense is used to link the past to the present. The time of the action is before now. Usually the time is not specified, but we know that it took place sometime in the past. And unlike the continuous tense, with the present perfect tense, the emphasis is on the result rather than the action. So here's an example. I have painted the wall. The key focus here is on the wall that was painted So the result. Now let's have a look at an overview off the main uses off the present perfect tense use number one, the present perfect tense is used to talk about an action that started in the past and continues to the present. Like I have lived in London since 2010. She has had the same car for 10 years. We have worked here for four years For this use, we usually mention how long on action has been done, so we use either since or four we used since for a fixed time in the past, I have lived here since 2015 or I have known Bob since last month. We use four when specifying a period in time. This could be hours, days, months or years. So I have known Bob for three years. I have been hungry for hours. Use number two actions that occurred sometime in the past. Exact time is unknown and it's not important for this use. So the focus is on the finished result. Each sentence using the present perfect tense gives you the idea off completion. So you know, some action was completed. So I have painted the wall. I have hiked on the trail. I have finished the magazine you lent me. She has lost her keys. A good example of this is when talking about life experience. So actions that happened sometime during a person's life. Some examples are I have been to Tokyo. She has visited that town three times. So if you're talking about life experience, then you will want to use the present perfect tense. And this also includes actions that occurred in the past and remain through and relevant to the present. Here are some examples I have lost my keys so I can get in. I have not gone toe work because I am sick. Use number three repeated actions that have happened in the past. These are actions that have been done many times in the past. I have taken many exams since I moved to London. I have been to Asia many times. I have gone to the gym every Monday for the past year, and the final use is basically for recent events or news. These are actions that have happened recently, so you will use words like just yet. Already or recently. Here are some examples Just now the new president has given his victory speech recently. We have had some severe rainy winter already. The tickets have sold out. Emma has just washed her hair. We have just finished our dinner. This concludes. The lesson went to use the present perfect tense. 17. Section 3: Past Perfect Tense - Forms: Hello. In this lesson, I want to focus on the past Perfect tense in particular how to form the past. Perfect for the present. Perfect tense. I hope you can recall we used, have or has together would I past participle now for the past Perfect tense The only thing that changes is that we use the past version off have so we use head So the formula looks like this head plus the past participle. Usually we just add e d to the verb to make the past participle. So move becomes moved, climb becomes climbed. But when you use on irregular verb, you have to change the form to get the past participle. So Dr becomes driven. Speak becomes spoken. So let's have a look at some forms off the past. Perfect tense. So this is the positive form off the past perfect tense. I had played the game head instead Off have or has and played which is the past participle . I had played the game you had worked. She had shopped all day. It had snowed, they had driven all night. We had traveled to New Zealand to form the negative just at not after head This is very simple and it's actually almost identical to forming the negative in the present perfect ends. So in distance we can say I had not played the game. You had not worked. She had not shopped all day. It had not snowed. They had not driven all night. We had not traveled to New Zealand to create Yes, no questions. We just start the question with head. Always had I traveled Have you driven toe work head? She shopped for shoes, headed snowed all day Had they danced all night head, we meant and finally to form wh questions. Just insert the wh word before head. When had I traveled? Why had you driven toe work? Where had she shopped for shoes? Where had it rained all day? Why had they left when had we met? Thanks for watching. That's just how easy it is to form the past perfect tense 18. Section 3: Past Perfect Tense - Main Uses: hype. In this lesson, you will learn when to use the past perfect tense. This tense is used to indicate that something was completed in the past before something else happened. This is one of the least popular tenses, and nonetheless, we're still need to be aware of it and know how to form it. So let's examine the main uses off this tense. So, firstly, you will use the past perfect tense to describe an action or event that happens before another action and both of these actions they took place in the past. When we arrived, the film had started. It had rained in the night, so we drove to work. I had saved my document before the computer crushed. So if we take the 1st 1 when we arrived, the film had started both of these events, your arrival and the film starting. They took place in the past. It had rained in the night, so we drove toe work. It had rained in the night. That's is using the past perfect tense, and then the other event is so we drove. Both of these events happened in the past. Let's move on. So just like the first use, which refers to an action that occurred in the past and finished in the past. Use number two. The only difference is that we can include a time reference. So you know, for how long the action or event took place. Like here are some examples. When he finished university, he had been in Sydney for two years, or I had lived in England for two years before I bought an apartment. I had played tennis for eight months before I go to professional coaching. So the only difference between us number one and use number two is that there is a time reference. So if we take the third sentence, I had played tennis for eight months before I got professional coaching. I had played tennis. That's the past perfect tense. Then we've got before I got professional coaching. That's the second event, and we know that eight months. That's the time reference and use number three. Use the past perfect tense if you wish to talk about something that you wish you had done in the past, So these are unreal things that could have happened in the past but didn't So you could say if I had done the work last week, I would have been done on time. If I had known that they were ill, I would have stayed at home. If I had won a $1,000,000 I would have retired by nine. So there you have it. Those are the three main uses off the past. Perfect. Tense. Thank you for watching. 19. Section 3: Future Perfect Tense - Forms: the future perfect tense is made just like the other perfect tense forms, which is a good sign because it's really easy to make this time. You use the future simple form off, have so that will become, will have and then you add a past participle to the main verb. Remember that ad e g. To the end of the verb rule, we have coverage it already in the previous two lessons on forming the present perfect tense and forming the past. Perfect tense. So here, let's have a look at how to form the future. Tense in the positive. So you add will have. And then the past participle off the verb. So I will have passed the test. You will have traveled to China. She will have cooked dinner. It will have slept. They will have worked. We will have eaten dinner Now The negative is always formed by adding a not so, he adds. Not in between will have so that becomes will not have. So here's some examples. I will not have passed the test. You will not have traveled to China. She will not have cooked dinner. It will not have slept. They will not have worked. We will not have eaten dinner. Remember that Will not can be contracted to form Want So not a way of writing. The negative is like this. I want have passed the test you want have traveled to China. She won't have cooked dinner. It won't have slept. They won't have worked. We want have eaten dinner. Here's how you form the Yes, no questions. Just put well before the subject. So will I have passed the test? Will you have traveled to China? Will she have cooked dinner? Will it have slept? Will they have worked? Will we have eaten dinner and to form the wh questions at the wh word in the beginning before will. So when will I have passed the test? When will you have traveled to China? When will she have cooked dinner? How will it have slept? How will they have worked? Where will we have eaten dinner? This is a little bit more complicated, but that's because distance is not used very often. But as long as you know the formula which is will have plus the past participle off the verb. Then you will know how to recognize this tents and how to form sentences using the future. Perfect tense. Thanks for watching 20. Section 3: Future Perfect Tense - Main Uses: in this lesson. I want to talk about the future. Perfect tense, not distance. It's not a common one, but you have to be aware of it. And there really is only one main use for this tense. It deals with actions that will be finished at a particular point in the future. This action will be completed in the future. Usually this will be before another action, another event or another time. Here are some examples he will have written his report by tomorrow morning. So what this means is that come tomorrow morning, the report will be ready or by 12 oclock. I will have finished my interview. What this means is that come 12 o'clock in the day, the interview, it will already have Bean finished because it's unfinished. Event. Emma will have washed the dishes by 7 p.m. By May. I will have lived here for eight months. Here is not a way of understanding the future. Perfect tense. You are essentially projecting yourself into the future and from the future point, looking back at the actions that will be completed at that point. That's why this tense is used most often with a future time world, so it can be two weeks by Monday by tomorrow at six o'clock any time reference that points towards a future time. 21. Section 4: Present Perfect Continuous - Forms: Welcome back In this lesson you will learn how to form the present perfect, continuous tense. So here is the formula you have to use, have or has depending on the subject plus the past participle off B which is beam plus I verb with r i N g ending. So to form the present perfect continuous tense, you either use have bean or Hezb e in, followed by a verb would I n g. Here's how it looks in positive form. I have been swimming. You have been walking. She has been dancing. It has been raining. They have been studying. We have bean working. So remember you use Heze. If the subject is he she or it and use have If the subject is I you, they or we Here's how it looks in the negative. All you do is add not in between the have being or has been so I have not bean swimming. You have not been walking. She has not been dancing. It has not been raining. They have not been studying. We have not bean working to form. Yes, no questions. Just remember that it always starts with either have or has followed by the subject. So here are a couple of examples. Have I bean swimming? Have you been walking? Has she been dancing? Has it been raining? Have they been studying? Have weeping, working and lastly to form wh questions while basically like always Just at the wh Ward in the front followed by either have or has so it can be Where have I been swimming. Why have you been walking? How has she mean dancing? When has it been raining? How have they been studying or when have we bean working Basically whenever you see have bean or has bean followed but by an i n g ending off a verb You know that it's the present perfect continuous tense Thank you for watching. 22. Section 4: Present Perfect Continuous - Main Uses: welcome in this lesson. I want to talk about the present perfect, continuous tense. The present perfect continuous focuses on unfinished activities. Mainly, we use this tense for unfinished actions that start in the past and continue in the present . So here are the three main uses off this tents. Firstly, we use the present perfect continuous tense to describe actions that started in the past and are continuing into the present. We informed for how long something has been happening. Usually we do this by using either four or since followed by a time period. Here are some examples I have been studying in London for six months. She has been working in Australia since 2010. We have been waiting at the airport for three hours. Next, we can use distance to discuss actions that are in progress these air general actions or habits that started in the past and continue into the present except with issues. We do not specify a time. Instead, we just say recently, I have been drinking a lot off coffee. Recently, I have been studying very little. Recently or recently, I have been exercising in the gym and the third use We can also use the present perfect continuous tense to talk about actions that have begun in the past and were stopped recently. Here are some examples I am tired. I have been working all day, so working all day that something that you began in the past and was stopped recently and that's why you're tired or I have bean swimming. So I am really hungry. It has been raining. I have been walking, so I need some water. So in this year's, we're talking about actions that start in the past and finished really recently and given a reason why it is relevant. So I need some water because I've been walking or I am really hungry because I have been swimming. Okay, that concludes. The three main uses off the present perfect continuous tense. 23. Section 4: Past Perfect Continuous - Forms: Now let's talk about how to form the past perfect, continuous tense So the past perfect, continuous tense can be easily identifiable by the words had bean. Here's the full formula Head plus the past participle off B, which is being plus a verb with an i N G ending. So here's how it looks in the positive form. I had bean sleeping. You had bean walking. She had been cleaning. It had been barking. They had been drinking. We had been traveling. So it's easier to form the past perfect, continuous tense because it's always had bean irrelevant off which subject you use. Here's the negative. Just are not in between head mean. I had not bean sweet leaping You had not been walking. She had not bean cleaning. It had not been barking. They had not bean drinking. We had not been traveling to form. Yes, no questions like always reversed the subject and head So before like the poster for most I had bean sleeping so we're reversing the head and the subject and it had I been sleeping or had you been walking had she been cleaning, headed, been barking had they been drinking had we been traveling and finally to form wh questions . Just add the wh word in front, off head. When had I been sleeping? Why had you been walking? What had she been cleaning? Why had it been barking When had they been drinking? And how had we bean traveling? Okay. And that's older is to forming the past perfect, continuous tense. 24. Section 4: Past Perfect Continuous - Main Uses: in this lesson. I want to talk about the past. Perfect, continuous tense. As a general rule, you will use this tense one of activity started in the past and also finished in the past. But there are two main uses for this tense. Firstly, on ongoing activity that started in the past and had finished in the past before another event which also took place in the past. This is an action that finishes before another action from the past. The key difference between the present perfect, continuous and the past perfect, continuous is that here the action finishes before another action, and both of the actions are in the past. So let me give you an example to make this easier. The workers had been renovating, and that's why it looked new or I had been working all day. That's why I was tired when we met. Jerry had been playing cards all night. That's why he was tired in the morning. So Jerry had been playing cards all night. That's activity that started in the past and finished in the past. Before the other activity, which is were in the morning, he was tired, and the second use is use the past perfect, continuous tense for an activity that started in the past and finished in the past and was ongoing for a certain time period. In diffuse. We know that the action starting in the past and finished in the past, but the key difference from use number two and use number one is that we'd learn how long activity was done for. So usually we use four plus a given time period. So he had been working as a cashier for six months before his promotion, so we know that he's been working as a cashier for six months. That's the time period. Or they had Bean playing voluble for two years before the injury, so we know that they had been playing voluble. That's the past activity. And we know the second activity that happened in the past is the injury, and we know that they had been playing for two years. So those are the three elements off the past perfect, continuous tense. The next example is they had been watching TV for three hours before Cindy came, or she had been sunbathing for 30 minutes before it started to rain, and those were the two main uses for the past perfect, continuous tense 25. Section 4: Future Perfect Continuous - Forms: Welcome back in this lesson. I want to show you how to form the future. Perfect, continuous tense to identify the future. Perfect, Continuous tense. Remember, the words will have bean. Those three words are the key to understanding distance. The formula is will have plus the past participle off B which is being plus a verb with an i N G ending. Here are some examples of it being used to form positive sentences. I will have bean studying. You will have been working. She will have bean swimming. It will have been raining. They will have been drinking and we will have bean hiking to form the negative. Just add not after will so I will not have been studying. You will not have been working. She will not have been swimming. It will not have been raining. They will not have been drinking. We will not have bean hiking now remember, you can shorten these wars. So instead of using, will not you can use want so then it would become I want have been studying. You want have been working. She won't have been swimming. It won't have been raining. They won't have been drinking and we want have bean hiking to form? Yes, no questions put Will in front of the subject So will I have bean studying? Will you have bean working? Will she have been swimming? Will it have been raining? Will they have been drinking? And will we have bean hiking to form wh questions just at the wh Word in front Off will So just like for every other tense. So that would become What will I have been studying? Where will you have been working? How will she have been swimming? Where will it have been raining? Why will they have been drinking? Where will we have bean hiking? So the secret to all of these forms are the words will have bean, once you see will have bean you know its future Perfect continuous tense 26. Section 4: Future Perfect Continuous - Main Uses: Now it's time you learn when to use the future. Perfect, continuous tense. Now this is a nisi tends to learn, and it's very similar to the past. Perfect, continuous except off. Obviously, this time the actions happen in the future. So there are two main uses for distance use. Number one. We can use the future perfect, continuous tense to state how long we will have been doing something at a particular time in the future. So here, two examples to make it easier by Monday so Monday is in the future. They will have been traveling for three days, so that's how long they have been doing something. So in this case, it's traveling next example. At five, I will have been working for eight hours, so we're projecting ourselves into the future and then saying how long at that point we would have been doing something So the second use is we can use the future perfect continuous to talk about something ongoing that finishes in the future before another action or a specific time before we return to work. We will have been studying for two weeks, so we know that studying is ongoing. It's an activity that is ongoing and it will be and it will finish before another event which in this case is to return to work. Next example. When I come at 3 p.m. You will have been practicing for many hours. So we know that you will have been practicing for many hours. And that's before another event which in this case is before I come. And the last example is when I arrived at your house, I will have been driving for three hours. So driving that is the ongoing activity and I will have been driving for three hours before the other activity. The other action, which is when I arrive at your house. Either case, the future perfect continuous tense is used with a time reference.