English Grammar Launch: Present perfect | Anthony Kelleher | Skillshare

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
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Lessons in This Class

4 Lessons (28m)
    • 1. Present perfect (Learn)

      12:42
    • 2. Present perfect (Things to Note)

      5:40
    • 3. Present perfect speaking practice (Master)

      4:17
    • 4. Present perfect listening practice (Master)

      5:17
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About This Class

English Grammar Launch is an intermediate English grammar course taught by me, Anthony, a native British English speaker. You will learn the target grammar structures at a deep level, so that you can sound more native-like when you speak English.

This course includes: 

  • lectures for the target structures
  • listening and speaking practice for every single grammar structure
  • future updates - this course will continue to grow and grow
  • PDF transcripts
  • and MP3 downloads so that you can learn anywhere, any time.

Each section focuses on one, two or three target structures so that you can master each one and produce it accurately in your spoken English.

If you want to speak English more clearly, if you want to sound more native-like, or if you simply want to take your English to the next level, this course can help you achieve your goal of improving your English.

Meet Your Teacher

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Anthony Kelleher

BA TESOL - Founder of Sir English - English Tutor

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Hello there.

My name is Anthony, and I'm from London, England. I have thousands of students enrolled on my online courses, which focus on learning English as a foreign language.

I have a bachelor's degree in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and Linguistics, and I have taught thousands of students all over the world for the past 10 years. My teaching has brought me from London to China to South Korea. I have now returned to London where I run a successful language school.

More recently, I have developed my online presence under the Sir English brand and on various online course platforms. I also create materials in the ESL field.

Send me a message if there are any particular topics you would like me to focus on for future courses in the ... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Present perfect (Learn): the target structure for this lecture is the present perfect. So the present perfect. This is an English tents, and it's one of the most challenging tenses in English. It causes the most problems for students off English. But in this lecture we're going to clarify the meaning and the structure so that you can understand it much, much better. Let's go to the first meaning off the present. Perfect. It has different meanings. Let's focus on number one first. So look at this example. Situation, William asks. Have you traveled much? Tina? Tina replies. Yes, I've visited over 10 countries in Europe, but I haven't visited the USA yet. That is next on my list. So the words in bold indicate the present perfect. This meaning shows that Tina has visited all these countries in her life. Up to now, the present day, she will visit more countries in the future. But up to today, she has visited over 10 in Europe. Think of this meaning as in my life up to now, so that's meaning one. It's important to clarify the meaning. Think of it as in your life up to now. So imagine your life from when you were born this year up to now the present day. So everything that happens in between Aled the events in your life When you describe all these events, you can use the present Perfect. I'll give you one example. I have visited Japan three times in my life. So in my life since I was born up to today I have visited Japan three times 123 to the present. Perfect is the perfect tense to use. I can say I have visited Japan three times. This means in my whole life. Let's look at meaning to now. Look at this example. Robert has eaten so much food today he has had two burgers, half a pizza and a huge slice of cake. So the words in bold indicate the present perfect. This meaning shows that you have done something over a period off time. In this example today, up until now, Robert has eaten all this food so far. Today he will eat more, but so far he has eaten this much, so that's meaning to it's very similar to meaning one, remember? Meaning one is from when you were born up to today, but meaning to is talking about a shorter time period, for example, one day today or one week, So I can say so far this week. It's a very short time period. I have eaten three hamburgers, you see, So I'm talking about a much shorter period. I could also talk about my whole life in my life. I have eaten hundreds of hamburgers, but this week I've eaten three hamburgers, you see, so we can change the period of time. Now there's one more meaning that we need to look at. Meaning three. Look at this example. This is really scary. I've never driven before. This is the first time I've ever driven a car. So the words in bold indicate the present perfect. This meaning shows that it's the first time you have done something in your life. This person is driving a car for the first time ever and notice the words never means not in my life. It means I've never done something in my whole life and ever is the positive form it means in my life. Those are the three meanings off the present perfect that we're going to focus on in this lecture on the following lectures. Now the structure is also very, very important for the present. Perfect. Let's have a look at how we form the present perfect. So we use I we, you or they plus have plus a past participle verb, for example, Eaten, gone, driven, lost, etcetera. When we use he she or it we use has plus a past participle verb. So he, she and it remember, can include a person's name. For example, Jane or Antony. If we use a name, we also use has plus past participle verb. So look at these two examples. I have eaten many kinds off food. She has won lots of awards, so that's the positive structure. Just a note on the past. Participle verbs. The's verbs are usually found in the third column off a textbook verbal list. So, for example, the verb to eat has the basic form eat. It has the past form eight, and it has the past participle form eaten. We need this form for the present perfect. I have eaten many kinds of food in my life, so we need to use the past participle with the present perfect. Let's look at the next structure with negative structure. This is formed in a similar way. So I we you they this time we use haven't have not plus a past participle verb for he she and it we use hasn't plus a past participle verb. For example, I haven't been to a football match this year. He hasn't eaten any food today. Now there is another negative structure that we're going to look at using never. So we use I we you they plus have plus never plus past participle. It sounds very confusing and long, but when we get to the example sentences, you'll know how to use them. He, she and it uses has plus never plus a past participle verb. For example, you have never bean to a football match. He has never eaten meat, Remember, never means not in my life. It's always talking about your whole life. So if someone says to you, I've never eaten meat, they're talking about their whole life from when they were born. Up to now, that means in their life they haven't eaten any meat. If I say I've never bean to Australia, that means I've never visited Australia in my life. Always remember that never means in my life, not in my life. Here is the question structure we formed. The questions like this have plus I we you they plus the past participle verb. Another form is has Plus he she it plus a past participle over, for example, Have they spoken to John Spoken? Is the past participle off the verb to speak? And the second example says, Has she broken a bone broken? Is the past participle off the verb to break said, that is the question structure. That was a lot of information to take in. I know there were three different meanings and lots of different structures. But just remember, the present perfect is to talk about a time period in my life or a shorter time period, for example, today, this week, this month, and always remember the time period is continuing. So in my life, I have done this this and this, But my life is continuing, so maybe I will do even more the same as the short time periods this week is continuing. It hasn't finished, so just keep that in mind. The present perfect always means that the time is continuing. Something else could happen soon as well. So if I say I've eaten three hamburgers this week, it means I might it more tomorrow or the next day? I might not, but I may. That's the key off this tense. Let's move on to the things we have to note for the present. Perfect. See you in the next lecture. 2. Present perfect (Things to Note): Let's look at the things that we have to note for the present. Perfect tense. As I said, it's one of the most challenging tenses in English, so there are a few things we have to look out for and keep in mind. Let's look at the first thing we can use many time words with the present. Perfect. For example, today, this week, this year, this morning, etcetera. When we use them, we always mean that the time period is continuing now and will continue in the future. You can think of it like the phrase so far or up to now. So, as I mentioned in the previous lecture, this is one of the key things you have to remember for the present. Perfect. The time period we're talking about hasn't finished. It's continuing, but the present perfect describes the time period so far up to now, things might change in the future, but so far I've done this. That's the difference between the present perfect on the past. Simple. The past Simple is talking about a time period that's finished in the past, but the present Perfect is talking about a time period that's continuing started in the past. It's continuing now and will continue in the future. So think of it as like so far up to now. Okay, let's look at the second thing in the present. Perfect we can contract has and have with the subject, for example, he's is he has, she's, she has five. I have you've you have etcetera. This is another small thing that you can note the contraction off the subject Andi has or have. So if I say I have visited Japan three times, I can contract I and have to become I've I've visited Japan three times. This is much more common in spoken English. We contract I and have to become I've. Similarly, if I say he has visited Australia twice, I can contract he and has to become he's. He's visited Australia twice. Look out for these contractions when you use the present Perfect. Let's look at the next thing that we have to note as I mentioned in the previous lecture we use ever to mean in your life. For example, have you ever met a famous person? This means in your life? Have you ever met a famous person? Whoever is always talking about in your life. Similarly, never is the negative version we use never to mean not in your life. For example, I have never seen the movie Toy Story. This means in my life. I have never seen Toy Story, so never means not in your life. Finally, we use bean to mean visited or went in the present. Perfect. For example, I have bean to Mexico three times or we've bean to three weddings this week. Bean is the past Participle off. Go! There you have it. Those are the things you need to note for the present. Perfect tense. Move on to the practice exercises that speaking on the listening for this tense This will take your understanding to the next level. Don't forget also, to download the MP threes on and the pdf which has all the transcripts off the MP threes. Download all that. Listen as much as you can Andi, train your brain to master the present Perfect 3. Present perfect speaking practice (Master): speaking practice for the present. Perfect. Listen to the sentence. Then pause the video and repeat after me. Think about the structure we studied. Train your brain to master the present. Perfect. Let's get started. Have you ever bean to Greece? I highly recommend you go. I haven't eaten any fruit today. Experts recommend we eat five pieces a day. I've never tried caviar, but I really want to. Where is the most interesting place you have ever? Bean? My car is broken down. It's the third time it has broken down this year. Has William worked hard this term? Has he done all his homework? Well, Brian is incredibly fit. He has run in 20 marathons, and he plans to do another one next month. This is the most peaceful place I have ever visited. It's like paradise. I've never seen that woman before. Is she the new employees? Is this the first time you visited London? No, I have bean him many times before. Warren Buffett and Bill Gates have donated billions of dollars to charitable causes. Edward made a New Year's resolution to read more. He has read 20 novels so far this year. Who is the most famous person you have ever seen or met. Is this new Marvel movie good? I don't know. I haven't seen it. Shall we go and watch it? Sorry I am really bad at tennis. This is the first time I have ever played. Let's plan something special for Mike's birthday. Has he ever bean to Paris? Can you play poker? Yes, but I haven't played for over a year. I have never won any money on the lottery, but I have spent so much on it over the years. 4. Present perfect listening practice (Master): listening practice for the present. Perfect. Listen to me. Say the sentence. Then pause the video and write down what you hear. Press play to see the text on the screen and check your answer. Train your brain to master the present. Perfect. Let's get started. Can you believe it? Andrew has never traveled by plane. He is terrified of flying. Can you believe it? Andrew has never traveled by plane. He is terrified of flying. I haven't eaten any chocolate this year. I'm on a diet. I haven't eaten any chocolate this year. I'm on a diet. Recently, I have studied hard for the test. I haven't slept much recently. I have studied hard for the test. I haven't slept much. Pamela has worked so hard this year that I think she deserves a bonus. Pamela has worked so hard this year that I think she deserves a bonus. Chris has won a writing award for the second time this year. Chris has won a writing award for the second time this year. Wow, This is the first time I've eaten Korean food and I am impressed. Wow, This is the first time I've eaten Korean food and I am impressed. Over the last few days, we have bean to three parties. We are completely exhausted. Now. Over the last few days, we have bean to three parties. We are completely exhausted now. Have you heard anything from James recently? I haven't seen him for a long time. Have you heard anything from James recently? I haven't seen him for a long time. Sorry, sir. I didn't do my homework. That's the second time this week. You haven't done it. Sorry, sir. I didn't do my homework. That's the second time this week you haven't done it. We can go horse riding when we visit Germany. Have you ever ridden a horse? We can go horse riding when we visit Germany. Have you ever ridden a horse? I've drunk five cups of coffee so far today. I'm trying to stay awake after the late night. I've drunk five cups of coffee so far today. I'm trying to stay awake after the late night. I cannot believe Natasha missed the flight. That's the second time she has done that. I cannot believe Natasha missed the flight. That's the second time she has done that.