Easily create Pixel Art with Blender. Beginner Friendly | Karl Müller | Skillshare

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Easily create Pixel Art with Blender. Beginner Friendly

teacher avatar Karl Müller

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

25 Lessons (3h 33m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:02
    • 2. Setting Up Blender

      2:32
    • 3. Navigating the 3D Space

      4:49
    • 4. Creating Objects

      11:06
    • 5. Editing Meshes

      11:17
    • 6. Using Modifiers

      13:06
    • 7. Working with Materials

      11:09
    • 8. Camera and Lighting Setup

      4:47
    • 9. Render Settings

      7:37
    • 10. Creating the Pixel Art Compositor

      18:59
    • 11. Modelling the Chest

      11:17
    • 12. Adding Details to the Chest

      15:27
    • 13. Adding Materials to the Chest

      8:10
    • 14. Creating an Animation for the Chest

      7:14
    • 15. Modelling a Potion Bottle

      7:55
    • 16. Creating the Potion Liquid

      7:57
    • 17. Adding Materials to the Potion

      9:28
    • 18. Modelling a Mushroom

      5:42
    • 19. Adding Materials to the Mushroom

      7:44
    • 20. Modelling a Key

      8:40
    • 21. Adding Materials to the Key

      3:17
    • 22. Creating an Animation for the Key

      4:33
    • 23. Creating Variations with a Lattice

      5:46
    • 24. Creating Sprite Sheets

      6:50
    • 25. Where to from here?

      16:21
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About This Class

Creating Pixel Art the traditional way can be a daunting task, but using Blender to render Pixel-Art from simple 3D objects, can make it a lot easier and faster.

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This technique can be a power tool in your Pixel-Art-Creating-Toolbox, and will allow you to quickly create different variations of objects, render different angles, and even create simple animations.

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Don’t worry if you are new to Blender, as I will walk you through every tool we need, and won’t overload you with unnecessary information.

I will walk you through setting up the scene, creating the Pixel Art compositor, and creating multiple objects, like a Treasure Chest, Magic Potions and more.

I will be working in Blender 2.92, so anything from version 2.92 and up should be fine to use.

Meet Your Teacher

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Karl Müller

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello everyone, My name is Carl, and in this class you'll learn how to create pixel art from 3D objects using Blender. If you ever wanted to create pixel art without having to draw each frame pixel by pixel, then this class is for you. And don't worry if you're new to Blender as our walk you through a v2, we need and want overload you with unnecessary information. Creating pixel art in this way allows us to easily render our objects from multiple angles and even create simple animations, all without having to redraw the image for every frame. This technique isn't meant to completely replace the traditional method of drawing pixel art, but it's especially useful for quickly creating multiple variations of objects so that you can create more interesting scenes for your games and other pixel art projects. I will walk you through setting up the scene, creating the pixel art compositor, and also creating multiple objects like treasure chests, magic potions and more. How the geriatric easily create variations of these objects using the lattice and also how to quickly create spreadsheets from the image sequences. I really hope you'll follow along and I trust that you'll learn a few useful things along the way. 2. Setting Up Blender: Hello everyone. In this lesson I'm going to show you how to sit up blender to make our workflow a little bit easier. And firstly, you need to get blender and you can get that at blender.org. Or if you have steam installed on your PC anyway, you can get blended directly from the steam store as well free. And the cool thing about installing it from steam is it'll get updated automatically as new versions are released. Cool, and this is what blender looks like. So let's go up to Edit. Click on Preferences, and then look for key map. Let's click on K-map. And then over here you'll see extra shading pie menu items. So let's click to enable that. And that'll just add a few more options for us to use while we're working. And the next list, click on Add-ons. And in the search box type node. And then look for Node Wrangler and click to enable that as well. And this will add a lot of cool features when we're working with nodes within Blender, as you'll see in later lessons. And then miss click on System. And then at the top here you'll see Cycles render devices. And what that does is when we use these cycles renderer to render our images later on as we going to do in later lessons, we can use our graphics card to speed up that process. So if you have an NVIDIA graphics card, you can click on cuda and you'll be able to see it Dan selected day. If you have an RTX graphics card, you can click on optics and it'll speed up the process even further. And if you have an AMD graphics card, you'll see it under OpenCL and you'll be able to select it day while we're here. Just make sure that global undo is enabled as well. Cool. And then lastly, blend the users the middle mouse button, a lot for navigation when moving around the 3D workspace. And if you don't have a middle mouse button on your mouse, just make sure on a lot of devices you can actually click in your mouse wheel to use it as a middle mouse button. But if you don't have a middle mouse button, you can come to input over here. And the intellect emulate three button mouse. And what that does is if you hover over it, you'll see it emulates the middle mouse with Alt, Left mouse. So if you want to use a middle mouse function, you can hold down Alt and then use your left mouse button as you would the middle mouse button. I do have a middle mouse button, so I'm going to disable that Qu, and now we're ready to go. We can close that down. In the next lesson, we're going to look at how to navigate the 3D space within blender. 3. Navigating the 3D Space: Hello everyone. In this lesson we are going to be looking at the workspace of Blender, and we're also going to be looking at how to navigate the 3D space. I'll show you a few shortcuts that we can use to make our workflow but easier. And I'll remind you the shortcuts again as we use them in later lessons. If you're ever uncertain about what keys and mouse buttons I'm using, you'll see they get displayed in the bottom right over here as I press the buttons. So if I left-click, you'll see it says lift in vibrates a on my keyboard. You'll see it shows it down as well. Cool. So in Blender, we're going to be working in 3D. And that means we have three different axes. We have an x-axis, a y-axis, and a z-axis. And you'll be able to see them in the top right over here. So the Z axis, up and down axis, our y-axis is the green, front-to-back axis. And the x axis is red and it goes from left to right. You'll see in the scene, we've got a red and green line going across our grid as well. And that just shows us where the y and the x-axis is, and the z-axis is always going vertically up and down. Who? This is our 3D view. And this is the default scene that we get when we start Blender, you'll see we have a camera and a cube and a point light. You can lift, click on Objects, deselect them, and you'll see they get highlighted as they're all selected. In the top right over here, you have what's called the outliner. And that gives us a list of everything in our scene. And that allows us to select objects that are inside other objects or objects that are just placed very closely together. And so if you're ever uncertain about which object you are selecting, you can just check and you'll see it gets highlighted with this blue line as we select the different objects in our scene. And if we select them in the outliner, you'll see they get selected in the 3D view as well. Cool. So now it's navigate our scene a bit. And to do that, we're going to be using our middle mouse button. So if I click and hold down the middle mouse button, you can move your mouse to rotate the scene around and let go. And if you hold down shift with the middle mouse button, you can move the scene around. And then if you hold down Control and middle mouse button, you can move the mouse up and down to zoom in and out. And you can also use the mouse wheel and scroll that up and down to zoom in and out. And in. Sometimes you want to view your object straight from the front or straight from the top or straight from the side. And then instead of having to move and hope you get it exactly right, you can simply use the shortcut keys on your keyboard, which are numpad 1 to go into front view. Numpad three to go into right view. Now we're looking at it from the right and the numpad seven to go in to talk to you. If you don't have a numpad, you can click on any one of these axes. Let's say click on the SSID. You'll see we are top view. If we click on the y. Now we're looking at it from the back. So we want to look at it from the front. Just click on this other little green ball here. Now we're looking at it from the front. And then if you click on the X, we're looking at it from the right. If you want to look at it from the left, you can click on the other side. There we go. And the same way if you want to look at it from the bottom, you can click on this bottom one. And the shortcuts again. Or numpad 1 for front view Number 3, 4, right view and numpad 74, top view. And if you want the opposite of those. So let's say numpad 1 is front view. If you hold down Control and press number 1, we'll get into back view. And number three is right view, hold down control and numpad 3. And that gives into left view. And but seven is top view, hold down Control and press numpad seven. And that'll take you into bottom view. And at a time you can just use your middle mouse button to click and drag. And that'll go back into 3D view again. Now you'll see we have our camera here. And with this camera is for, is when we render our images, it will always render the view of the camera. And to go into camera view, we can press 0 and our numpad. And that's the image that we see when we render. So to render an image, we can press F2 on our keyboard. And as you can see, that renders the camera view for us. So even if we are looking at the objects from the side or working on different parts of it. Anytime increase if 12, it'll still render from that camera view. And instead of using the numpad, we can also just press on this little camera icon. And you'll see it says Toggle camera view. Cool, and that's it for this lesson. In the next lesson, we're going to be looking at how to create new objects and how to rotate scale and move them around as well. 4. Creating Objects: Hi everyone. In this lesson we are going to be looking at how to create and manipulate objects in 3D. So to start with, we have our default scene over here. And it's left-click to select our cube. And it gets highlighted with these yellow lines. And then with it selected, we can press X on our keyboard and then click Delete. So now we've deleted that cube. And you'll see that little written white circle with that crosses in the middle. That is our 3D cursor. And that 3D cursor can be placed anywhere in our 3D space. And anytime we create new objects that will be created with the 3D cursor is placed. Now to create a new object, we can either go to add at the top, yeah, any of these object classes. And then within them will find the different objects. Or we can press Shift a and that same menu will pop up wherever our mouse is. And that just makes it a bit quicker and makes it so that you can keep your focus in a certain spot. So let's press Shift a to add. And our 3D objects will find under the Mesh hitting. And you'll see you've got a plane, a cube, a circle, a UV sphere, and Ico sphere, cylinder, cone, tourists, grid and monkey. So let's create a new UV sphere. And you see it gets created with our 3D cursor is placed. Now to move our 3D cursor, we can simply hold down shift and then right-click anywhere in our scene. And you'll see our 3D cursor jumps to that spot. So now if our three cases every day and we press Shift a to add a mesh and it's linked queue. But this time, you'll see a Q gets created with the 3D cursor was placed. You can also give the 3D cursor exact x, y, and z coordinates. And to do that, we need to open the menu with a little arrow over here. We can click on that and you see we get this little menu over here. At the moment it's set to Item. And depending on the add-ons you have installed, you'll see different little tabs over here, but you always have Item, Tool and view. So let's go to View. And you see under view we've got a 3D cursor. And then we can set the location and the rotation of our 3D cursor. Such a receipt, the location of the 3D cursor to the center of our scene. We can press Shift C, and that makes jump back to the origin of our scene. And as you can see now, the location is now zeros 0000 on the x, y, and z, and the rotation is 0 as well, and all the axes. So let's say we wanted to move that up on the z-axis. Again, if you need to remind yourself what axes these are in, just look at this little image over there and that shows you z is up. Why is the green one going from front to back and x is the red one going from left to right. So let's move that up axis. Let's make that two and press Enter. And I can see it moved exactly two meters up on the z-axis, but it's still at 0 on the x and y-axis. So now let's create another object. Let's press Shift a and create another UV sphere. And you can see that place it exactly where our cursor is as well. Sometimes if we move our scene around with shift and middle mouse button, this are working on something over here. And we rotate around and want to see our spheres again. But it's difficult to see the back of a sphere because our view cameras not focused on the sphere anymore. To focus the camera on any object, you can simply select the object and then press the period key on your numpad. And that'll focus the camera on that object. Now we can zoom out a bit with the middle mouse wheel. And if you rotate around now, you'll see it rotates perfectly around that object. So let's do that with this sphere as well. Click on it to select it. The period key on your numpad. Now we can zoom out and you'll see it rotates perfectly around that object. Now, cool, and I will look at how to scale and move and rotate the different objects. I always use the shortcut keys because that makes it a lot faster. And so I'll show you those as well. But you see in our tools panel on the left here, we've got the move tool, the rotate tool, and the scale too as well. And you can always click on one of these and you'll be able to move your objects like this. Let's undo that. I prefer to stay in the select box mode and allows me to easily select different objects to can drag to select multiple objects. And then I use shortcuts to rotate, Move, and scale the objects around. So let's go through that quickly. So with an object selected, let's make this one a little bit smaller. So to scale an object, we want to press S on our keyboard. So let's press s1's. And as we move our mouse, you see gets bigger and smaller. So let's make that a little bit smaller. And then left-click to apply the scale. And Alice move that down a bit. Now to move an object, the shortcut key is G. And I remember that by saying, I want to grab the object. So I'm going to press G to grab and move. And then if I move my mouse around, you'll see we can move the object and then left-click to place that any way we want. Press Undo. And sometimes you only want to move the object in one specific axis. So let's say we wanted to move that down a bit to create a snowman looking object of the day. We can click on the tops via deselected and increase G to grab and move. And then we want to constrain it to the z axis. So we can simply press Z on our keyboard. And I can see it can only move up and down on the z-axis. So let's move that down until it's barely touching the bottom one, and then left-click to apply. And in the same way, we can move an object on the x or the y axis as well. So let's press G to grab and move, and then press X, which is the red axis. And now as we move our mouse, you'll see it moves on that axis. If you accidentally made an adjustment and you want to cancel that without having to click and then undo while still moving the object, you can right-click and goes back to where it was before you started moving or rotating or scaling that object. So let's say we selected the top sphere, the press S to scale. And then we decide, no, you don't want to scale this anymore. We can just right-click and it goes back to where it was not to rotate an object. Let's lick this cube. For instance. You could press R on the keyboard to rotate. And then it'll rotate around. And we can also constrain that to a specific axis. So let's say we only wanted to rotate it around the z-axis. We can just press Z once. And I would only rotates around the z-axis. We can always change your minds. Press X. Now it can only rotate around the x axis or press Y. And I will only rotate around the y-axis. And now we can lift click to apply our rotation. And as you can see, it rotated around the y direction. Cu is press Shift C to reset our 3D cursor to 0 shifts. See, the beaker and Alice add in a plane. Shift a go to Mesh and select playing. And I'll just scale that up a bit. So we'll press S and scale. And while scaling an object like this, Let's say we wanted to make it 10 times bigger. We can simply type in tin on our keyboard and then press Enter. So now let's move that down a bit. We'll press G on our keyboard to grab and move. And then z to constrain it to the up and down z axis. And then just move that down until it only barely touches the bottom sphere day and left-click to apply glue. With an object selected. You can also hold down Shift and click on another object, and they'll both get selected. Now if we press G to grab, you'll see that both move around. Let's right-click to cancel that. So let's say we wanted to move this object along this flow now, but not up and down at all. That would mean we wanted to move it in the x and the y axis, but not in the z-axis. And we can also do that by pressing G to grab and move. And then instead of pressing Z or X or Y, we can tell blender, okay, I want to move it in all directions except for the z-axis. So we can press Shift Z. And now we can move it anyway. And it will stay on that plane. But it will never go up and down. So let's put it over there and left-click to apply. In the same way we can move our camera around. So you can click on our camera, press G to grab, and we can move that around. But that makes it a bit difficult sometimes. So let's right-click to cancel that. And if you go into camera view with numpad 0, you'll see what the camera view is seeing. And that's this little frame that we see over there. So let's say we wanted to move this camera alphabet. Now, if we scroll with our mouse wheel, you'll see it doesn't change the actual frame size of our camera. And if you try to rotate around with the middle mouse button, you'll see it goes out of camera view again. So there's pre 0 and an unpaid again to get into camera view. Now another little side menu over here. Remember you can bring that up by pressing N on your keyboard. Will see in the View tab this eye view Locke section. And under that there's a camera to view checkbox. If we enable that now. And we scroll with our mouse wheel to see the camera actually moves in and out. And if you hold down the middle mouse button, we can move the view of the camera so that we can frame our camera. So we want to do something like that. And we can also move by holding Shift and clicking with the middle mouse button. And then we can drag and move and then just let go. And if we're happy with the placement of a camera, we can just unselect that little box and we don't accidentally change our camera view again. Now we can go around and work on different parts of our scene. And if you want to go back into camera view, you just press 0 on your numpad. And again, if you want to change the actual view of the camera, we can just select camera to view. And now you'll see it changes the actual view of our camera again. We can also hold down control to move in and out smoothly like this. And now we can perfectly frame your objects in your scene. There we go. So this is able, this so that we don't accidentally move that around and have a press F2 to render. You see we get the exact same framing that we had in our camera. Cool, and that's it for this lesson. In the next lesson, we're going to be looking at how to manipulate the basic shapes like our cube and sphere that we have here. And turn them into more complex shapes that we can use to create our objects. 5. Editing Meshes: Hello everyone. In this lesson we're going to be looking at how to manipulate the actual 3D geometry of our objects. And in that way we can turn a simple cube into something much more interesting. To do that they select our cube. And then we need to go into edit mode. And at the top left here you'll see that it says object mode. And if you click the drop-down, we can select Edit mode is also a keyboard shortcut for that, you can simply press Tab on your keyboard. And that'll switch between object and edit mode very quickly. So let's go into edit mode by pressing tab. And there you see, we've got these little points on the corners of our cube. These are called vertices and they're the most basic element, a 3D object. You'll see we have a vertex on each corner. And in between the vertices, we've got edges. And then if we have three or more agents, in this case we have four. We can have a face. And the side of the cube is that face that we see that is created between these four vertices. And we can manipulate these vertices in the same way that we manipulated our 3D objects in object mode. So we can select any of them by clicking on them. We can click and drag to box, select and select multiple vertices at once. And then with these vertices selected, we can press G to grab and move to press G ones, and then move our mouse around. And you can see we can start editing the shape of object. So let's look at backward texts. Press G to grab and move. Move that up a bit. And I can start rotating around, press G. And we start creating the shape that you want. Select this one, press G. And sometimes we want to select the entire top part of an object. But as you can see now, that back vertex was not selected because it was hidden behind the faces of the object. To enable us to select vertices, even if there'll behind the object, we can hold down Z on our keyboard. And then move down and select toggle x-ray. If you're not seeing toggle x-ray, just make sure that you have the extra pie menu options enabled, like I showed you in the first video. Cool. And I can see, we can actually see through the object. So if we want to select the bottom vertices, we can just drag and select like that. And I can see all those bottom ones are selected. And if you want to go out of x-ray mode, we can just hold down z again, move down and let cozy. Easy as that. Now in edit mode, we have different selection modes as well. At the moment it's set to vertex select. So we can select these vertices. And if you look up here, there are three icons and you'll see it says vertex select. So if you click on the second one, you see the vertices have disappeared. And now we can only select the edges. We can hold down shift to select multiple edges. And as you can see, if we select all the edges that make up a face, that face will turn orange as well to show that it's selected now, the same with the vertex select mode. Let's go back to vertex select mode. Select that vertex, hold down shift, click on that one, that one, and that one. I can see these edges have turned orange and the face has turned orange as well. That just shows us, we have selected all the vertices that make up these edges. Cool. Now we can also go into face select mode. And that allows us to simply click on any of these phases. And with a face selected, we can press G to grab. Move that around. Let's right-click to cancel. We can press S to scale, make that entire face smaller or larger. Let's left-click to apply. And we can also press R to rotate and allows us to rotate our face to make interesting objects. And in the same way, we could constrain operations in object mode. We can also constrain these operations to the axes in edit mode. So for instance, if you wanted to move this face up and down, but not in the x or y axis. We can press G to grab. And then without clicking, we can press Z. And I can see we can only move that up and down on the z-axis. So we can move that up, maybe left-click to apply. And let's rotate that face as well. Let's press R to rotate. And the moment it's rotating around the camera view. So let's press Z to constrain that to be z axis as well. And I can see it's only rotating on the z axis. And if you want to make finer adjustments, you can simply hold down Shift. And you'll see, you'll make very small adjustments to your rotations. Cancel that. Let's press S to scale. And as you can see, it's scaling in all directions. And we can also tell blender to only scale that in the z direction by pressing Z. And I can see it's scaling up and down. Let's right-click to cancel that. Press S again to scale. Analogies scale it in the x and y directions, but not in the z direction. So to tell blender just scattered in all directions except for the z, we're going to press Shift Z. And I can see it shows us it's only going to scale in the x and the y directions. Let's go back into object mode with tab and with our cube selected x and delete this cube. Now let's add a new cube with Shift a and intellect cube. And let's go back into edit mode with tab on our keyboard. You can also quickly switch between these selection modes like vertex and agent phase, with the normal number keys on your keyboard, not the numpad, just the normal number keys. So if you press one, it goes to vertex select mode. If you press too, it goes to edge select mode. And if you press three occurs to face select mode. And now we can select faces. We press two, we can select edges. And if you press 1, we can select the vertices. Now if we start with a cube, we only have these eight vertices to work with. And sometimes you want to add more to create a more complex shape. And an easy way to do that is simply to add a loop cut around the object. Now add a loop cut does, is it divides the faces and the edges around the object in a loop. So to make a loop cut, we can press Control R. And as we move our mouse around, it shows us where it will create that loop cut. So let's say we wanted to make one straight down the middle way. It's left-click once. And now we can decide where we want to place this loop. If we want to place it exactly in the middle, we can simply right-click and it'll snap back to the center. Let's create another loop, cut. Our again to look at. And then let's place whenever they left-click once. And let's move that one to the side and then left-click to place a day. And sometimes you want to select that entire loop again. And, but that would mean you have to go around and shift click to select all of the different vertices or edges. But there's an easier way to do that and you can do that in vertex or edge select mode. So to do that, let's hold down Alt on our keyboard and then click on that loop cut that we created. And as you can see, we selected the entire loop. And if you wanted to select this loop that we created second, we can hold down Alt and left-click, and then we select the entire loop. Cool. So let's select this middle one again. Hold down Alt and click and its scale that up a bit so we can press S to scale and then just move that out Tibet and left-click to apply. Now starting to get something a little bit more interesting. Analogies like the other edge loop that we created by holding Alt and clicking on the HE loop. And as you can see, it's selected all the vertices and edges, even the ones that are behind the object at the moment. And Alex press S again, scale it down and left-click. And that way you can see we can easily make interesting shapes to work with. And if you ever want to see what your object looks like without the grid and all the selection boxes and everything, you can hold down z as well and then move up to toggle overlays. And as you can see now, Blender will then only show the physical objects. And we can enable our overlays again by either clicking on this icon up top here show overlays. But we can hold down z, move our mouse up, and let go of z. And the cool thing about using these pi minis is you don't actually have to stop on the button that you want to select. You can simply move in that direction and let go. Move in that direction, let go, Let's go into X-Ray mode. Disable x-ray mode. There we go. So if you get used to weigh these objects are you can actually select them without even looking just by moving a mouse in that direction. And that makes it a lot faster when you start working with complicated objects. Coo. And the last operation I want to show you is the extrude operation. And by extruding, we can also add new geometry to our object. So let me show you how that works. Let's go into face select mode by either clicking this icon at the top here, or by pressing 3 on our keyboard and then select a face we want to extrude. And into extrude, we're going to press E to extrude. So if you press E, you'll see it creates a new piece of geometry that comes out of that face that we had selected. And it'll move it out the direction that that face was facing. So we can move that and left-click to apply. We can also press S to scale that up a bit and left-click to apply. Press E to extrude again. And move that out. Left-click to apply. Press S to scale again and make that smaller left-click to apply. And that's another really nice way to create more geometry to work with. So let's press E to extrude again, left-click to apply it to extrude, left-click to apply. And then if you press D to extrude without clicking, if you then press S to scale, it will keep that extrusion, but it will scale it in place them. So if you want to create a step over there, we can scale that up. And then left-click and in press E again to extrude, and then extrude that out and left-click to apply. And they were starting to get some interesting shapes. One of these operations that I showed you now also have corresponding icons on the toolbar over here. You'll see these extrude region and they are a few more, but I find it a lot quicker and easier to rather use the shortcuts for those operations. And again, I'll keep reminding you of the shortcuts as we use them in later lessons as well. So don't worry if you have trouble remembering all of them. Cool, and that's it for this lesson. In the next lesson, we're going to be looking at how to apply modifiers to our object. And that'll allow us to have blended, do a lot of the work for us. 6. Using Modifiers: Hello everyone. In this lesson we are going to be looking at how to use modifiers, and that'll allow us to make our work a lot faster and also do some of the more tedious things for us. So to start with, let's delete our object that we created in the previous lesson. So we click on it and then press X to delete and click Delete. Now let's press Shift a to add a new object and select the cube. And to focus our camera on the object, let's press the period key on our numpad and then just zoom out a bit the rigor. So now let's press Tab to go into edit mode. And the first modifier I want to show you is the mirror modifier. And let me show you how useful that can be. They say wanted to create an object and that's symmetrical to both sides. And one way we could do that is let's make sure we are on face select mode, or by pressing 3 on our keyboard. And then select the side face and increase E to extrude. Move it out Tibet. Left-click to apply S to scale, scale that down. Press G to grab and move x0 to constrain it to the z-axis, and then move that up. And now we need to do that to the other side as well. So let's click on that face to select it. It's going to front view to make it a bit easier. This one on your numpad and then E to extrude. And now it becomes difficult because we need to try and estimate how far we extruded the other one, left-click, click to apply. Press S to scale, G to grab Z, to zoom into the z-axis. Move that up. Something like that. And it's going to decide view. And as you can see, it's not lining up exactly. Plus we had to do that two times. So let's undo all of that by pressing Control Z, control Z, control Z. And now let's slice this cube in half so that we can apply our mirror modifier and have blended do the other side for us automatically. So to do that, let's go into front view with numpad 1 and then press Control R to add a loop cut. And you can see it shows us that yellow preview. And you want to cut it straight down the middle like that. So let's left-click and then right-click to make it snap back to the center. Now I've got a nice dividing line going straight down the middle. Let's switch to vertex select mode by pressing 1 on our keyboard or by clicking that icon at the top there. And now we want to select the entire left side. And remember if you try to do it like this, we would miss that bottom vertex. Or even if you were in front view. And we did that, it will only select the front vertices because those are hidden behind the object. And to avoid that, we can go into X-Ray mode by holding down Z on our keyboard, moving my mouse down and letting go of z. Now, if we go back to front view with numpad 1, we can select. The entire left side. And you see that entire left side is lifted now. And I want to delete those vertices. So press X to delete and select vertices. And if you delete the vertices, all the edges and faces that are connected to them will get deleted as well until it gets to another vertex to navigate to a front view by pressing numpad 1, you'll see our left side is gone. Now to add modifiers, you'll see a little wrench icon on the right here. And if you hover over that, it says modifier properties. So let's click on that. Add a modifier by clicking on Add Modifier. And you see all these different modifiers. And let's go to the generate section and then look for the mirror modifier. And you'll see it over there. Let's click on the mirror modifier. And it was automatically set to the x-axis. As you can see, it adds back a mirrored version of our image on the x-axis. So now whatever we do on this one side, it will do automatically on the other side as well. So if we selected this vertex, press G to grab and move it. You'll see it does it automatically for the other side as well. It's right-click to cancel. And I'll select the center vertex. And you can see if I grab that now, we start breaking our object apart. And if you move it to the other side, we get this weird intersecting geometry that we don't want. So let's press Control Z to undo that. To help avoid that, we can activate clipping in our modifier. So it's activated clipping. And what that does is it will snap these two parts together. So we won't be able to move any of the geometry across the marriage section. So now we can easily move that without having to worry about splitting our object or creating overlapping geometry. And everything else still works the same. Let's turn off x-ray mode quickly. Old NZ go down with the mouse and the curves. So let's undo this Control Z until we have our key back. And just make sure tipping is still enabled everyday. Cooks and Alice go into face select mode with three on your keyboard, or by pressing that icon at the top, select the side face every day, and then press numpad 1 to go into front view. Now let's extrude that by pressing E to extrude. Moving that to the side and left-click to apply the press S to scale. Scale that down, left-click to apply g to grab Z, to constrain it to the z-axis. And it's moved that up and left-click to apply. And are we have a perfectly symmetrical object. Cool. So now let's say we want to smooth out this object. We don't necessarily want it to be all blocky like this. There are a few ways we can do that, but the easiest way to do that is add a another modifier called the subdivision surface modifier. We can click this little icon to minimize our mirror modifier. And we can click Add Modifier and under Generate, you'll see the subdivision surface modifier. Click on that. Now you can see it's start smoothing out our object like that and blend it applies. These modifies from the top-down, suffers. It'll do the mirror modifier and create our mirrored geometry. And then it will apply the subdivision modifier. And that'll smooth it out and start rounding out the corners. And we have a few settings over here as well. We can turn up the subdivision levels. And the more we tend that up, the smoother our object will be this 10. Both of these up to four. The difference between these two is levels viewport or the levels that we actually see within our working area of a year. And then render is the levels it will use when we press F2 to render our image. So to see that this press F2 quickly and renders our image and we can see those subdivisions. Let's close that down. Let's turn the levels for the viewport down to one. See it looks a lot more blocky. But if you press F2, we still have the much smoother surface. And that comes in handy when we have very complicated geometry that can start slowing down our view port performance, we can then simply turn down the levels in the viewport. And that'll give us nice smooth performance. But when we render, it will still have the proper smoothing applied to it. This isn't that complicated to. We can turn that up to four, so we can actually see what the final product will look like as well. And to get rid of these little steps that we still see, we can simply go to object mode by selecting it at the top left, or we can just press tab to switch between object and edit mode. So while in object mode, Let's right-click and hit Shade Smooth. So I just shade over those little corners that we had left and makes the object smooth. But now this may not be exactly what we want. So to control how the subdivision surface smooth our object, we can simply start adding loop cuts to our object to tell blender way we still want sharp corners and we wanted more rounded over. So let's go back into edit mode with tab. And it's going to edge select mode by pressing too and our keyboard. And let's say we wanted to sharpen this corner. We still wanted a nice sharp corner on the frontier. And easy way to do that. It's simply add a loop cut and then move that very close to our corner, as you'll see now. So let's move so we can see the top of the object. Press Control R to add a loop cut. And then add one down the middle. Left-click once, and then move that to the front. And now we can control how sharp we want that corner. We can hold down Shift to make that a bit easier. Let's move it fairly close, but not all the way and left-click to apply. Now we can see we have a definite corner there, but it's still a nice, smooth, rounded over corner. And if you want to sharpen that even more from the other side as well, we can press Control R, add a loop, cut to the middle of the object, start moving that up. Now you can see we're getting a nice sharp corner over there. And if everyone to move these loop cuts again, if you would simply press G to move that loop cut this way, wanted to move it down on the z-axis. So we press Z on our keyboard and we started moving it down. You see that quickly move out of our geometry in the top right day and that'll start causing some weird artifacts. So let's right-click to cancel. And instead of simply moving our HE loop, we can do what's called an H slide. And it'll move that age loop along our object. Constant ratio in all the different parts. Let me show you that quickly. And to do that, we can simply press G twice. So you press G to grab and G again. And now we are in slide mode. Now I can see it goes from the top to the bottom in our larger potty. And at the top right, it'll stay within our geometry as well. So that we can move it all the way up to sharpen and upheaval more, or move it down. And it gets a bit more rounded over the place that one day left click to apply. And let's hold Alt and click on this edge loop that we placed day. And then press G twice g, g. And now we can slide that along the other edge. And let's move that back a little bit as well. Let's go into front view quickly with numpad one. And the same with 12. Have this corner be a little bit sharper as well. We can simply add another loop cut down day by pressing Control art. And remember you want to place the loop cut in such a way that you can move that parallel to the age that you want to shop. And so we want to sharpen that age of a day. So we're going to place a loop cut over there and then left-click once, and then move that to the side. And left-click again. Let's add another one from the other direction as well and see what that looks like. So we press Control Alt, left-click everyday, and then move that down and left-click again. Cu is going to object mode with tab. And you can see we're starting to get some interesting shapes. And the cool thing about this is even though we have a lot of geometry now to smooth out these edges and everything. And it's still very easy to work with because if you go into edit mode, you can see we still have a very basic base geometry that we are actually working with. Go, Let's do one last thing. Click on face mode again, and then select this top face. Press E to extrude. Move that out and left-click to apply. And press S to scale. And scale that down. All the way. Qu. And I just sharpen up those corners. We can add a loop cut down the middle day. So let's look at it from the side and then press Control R. Add a loop cut, and then move that down. And sometimes it's easier to look at the married portion of our mesh to see what that is actually doing. So you can see if we move that up, we have a smooth transition and move that down. We have a very definite h over there. Just press Tab to go back into object mode. And let's turn off the overlays by holding down z, moving a mouse up, and letting go of z. Now we can see what the object actually looks like. Coup, and these are the tools that we'll be using the most when creating all of our objects. And I'll remind you of all the shortcuts and everything as we use them in future lessons. And that is it for this lesson. 7. Working with Materials: Hello everyone. In this lesson we are going to be looking at how to create and apply materials to our objects. Now by using materials, we can change the appearance of our object drastically. For instance, we can make it look like metal or wood or glass, or even add an image texture to the object. So to begin with, let's select our object we created in the previous lesson. And then to apply material to this object, we need to go to the material properties. And to do that, you'll see this little chicken ball icon at the bottom here. So let's click on that. And now we are viewing the material properties for this object. So to create a new material, we can simply click on New and it'll add a new material for us. Let's call this taste and press Enter. And here we have a few basic settings that we can adjust. For instance, we can change the base color. Let's make that red. As you can see, it's not changing the look of our object yet. And that is because we are in solid view, which is good for modelling. But when we need to see our materials, we have to switch to rendered view or material preview mode. And do that, we can hold down Z on our keyboard. And then you see we are currently in solid mode. And then we can go to rendered mode and material preview mode. So let's go to material preview mode for now. So just move your mouse in that direction and then let go of z. And I can see the red material applied to the object. So let's look at a few of these settings. We have metallic and pretend that up. As we turn that up, it makes our object look more like metal. If we turn that down again, it looks more like a plastic object again. And we can have a look at roughness as well. If we turn down the roughness, the lower we go, the smoother the object gets. As you can see now it's very smooth and very shiny. And if you turn up the roughness, it gets very rough. And now we have a very matte look to it. Let's turn up the metallic value again. Turn down the roughness. Now we have a very shiny metallic object. And in that way we can quickly create simple materials for our objects. Now let's create another cube quickly with Shift a, go to Mesh and then select cube. Then press G to grab and move, and just move that over to the side. And let's go to the material properties. And we can either create a new unique material for this object, or we can even apply the same material that we've created before to any of the objects in our scene. So let's select this cube. And then instead of clicking new, we can click on this little drop-down. And you'll see there's our taste material. Select that. Now they both have the same material applied to them. And if you make any changes to this material, you'll see changes on all the objects where it's applied. And another cool thing to know is you can apply different materials to different parts of the same object. So to do that, It's select our cube again. And to make it a little bit easier to see, Let's turn up the roughness just a little bit. There we go. Now to create another material for this object. We can click on this little plus icon at the top right here. Now we can create a new material for that slot. Let's click on New School. This. Taste too. And let's make that red. And its turn up the roughness all the way. But as you can see, it's not applied to any of the parts of this cube. Now to apply to certain parts of your object, we simply need to go into edit mode. So press Tab on your keyboard to go into edit mode and then go into face select mode by clicking this icon or pressing three on your keyboard and a weaker. Now let's select only one of these phases, which like the top phase. And then in the material properties, Let's scroll up all the way. Select our second material, and then click Assign. And as you can see, it got assigned to that face now. So let's go back into object mode, that tab. And now we have that material assigned to the top of the cube. And if you make changes to that now, let's make the color but darker and make it metallic. And turn the roughness all the way down. And there we can see we have different materials applied to the same object. So let's click on the cube X to delete and delete v cube. And let's click on an object over here, press numpad period to focus on that object. There we go. Now the side panel is good for creating quick simple materials. But if you want to make more advanced materials, we can go into our shading section of Blender and you'll find that at the top here, you'll see a shading tab. So let's click on that. So you can still see our object with the material applied. And at the bottom here, you'll see our shading section. And you'll see we have the same settings that we have in our material properties. We can see them in this node as well. So you have these different pens that now apply the specific values to our shader. And what's cool about this now is, instead of only choosing a simple color, we can create some more interesting shapes and patterns over here. And then plug that into our base color node, and I'll show you how to do that now. Cool. Let's move it off to the side. And we have a lot of useful notes that can help us create interesting materials very easily inside of Linda. And to add nodes, we're also going to press Shift a add. And then we can search at the top here. So you can either go through these and look for the node you want, or we can simply click on Search. And let's type noise and intellect noise texture. And then we can just click to apply. Now because we enabled Node Wrangler in the first lesson, we can easily preview what this node is doing. And to do that, we can simply hold down Control and Shift and then click on this node. And I can see what this node is doing is generating this random noise for us. And we can use this noise to create some interesting materials. Now to allow us to move this noise around, we need to create some mapping nodes before this. And again with Node Wrangler enabled, it's very easy to do. We can simply select our node and then press Control T. And that adds these mapping note to the noise texture. And the first thing I like to do is changes from generated two object. So we'll click and drag from the object pen and plug that into the vector pin of our mapping node. And that'll take the actual scale of an object into account. Now let's look at this dictionary quickly. See we have scale that we can turn up and down to make the noise big O, smaller in with detail. And that'll add fine details to our noise or make it look a bit more blurred. And then we have the roughness also adds some micro details to our noise as well. And the distortion starts warping the noise. As you can see. It's put that back to 0. The roughness back to 0.5. And this leave it like that for now. So let's say we wanted to create a wood grain type of texture. We can easily do that by playing around with these location, rotation, and scale properties in the mapping mode. So let's see if we change the scale on these x, y, and z coordinates. You see it stretches out the texture. Let's put that back to one. And if you hold down shift, you can move that in very small increments. So let's move it up like that texture, but on the z-axis, Let's make that 0.1. Now let's hold down shift and turn up the distortion a little bit. And they'll start warping the texture a little bit and give us that wood fiber. Look. Cool. Let's play with the detail. We can leave the detail at about to type that in as well. And I will then shift and click on the scale. Value of around eight. Looks good for the specific object foo. But now you're saying, Well it's not black and white like that. And I agree. So let's add some color to this. And to do that, we're going to add a color ramp after this noise texture. So let's press Shift a to add a node. Click on Search and type ramp. And intellect colorRamp. If you drop a node onto a line, it will connect it up automatically. So now what this is doing is it's taking the black and white input of this factor. And then if it's black, it's going to give it that color. And as it goes up to white, it's going to give it that color. And currently, this is only city black and white. So it's making no difference at all. If you click on this black arrow inhibit, then we can see we've got this black section down here. We can click on that and then change the color so we can turn it up a bit. Let's make that a dark brown. Down a bit. Maybe something like that. Click on the white arrow to select the white point on our gradient. And then click on this block and make that a lighter type of Brown goo. And now we can do is click and drag to increase the dark parts. And click and drag to increase the bright parts. And it changes bright color a bit more. It a bit darker. Turn down the saturation a little bit bigger. And this is the basic principle we're going to use to create our materials for objects in the later lessons. So one last thing we need to do, this is any previewing that color. We need to plug that color into our base color node. So let's do that. And then let's view the actual shader by holding Control and Shift and clicking on the shader. We can also just plug that in manually. But holding controlling shift makes it a bit easier. And I can see we've got a metallic word because our metallic and roughness is still set to the previous values. So it's turned down metallic value. And now it looks like a polished type of wood. As you can see. We could turn up the roughness of it, maybe. Eureka. I think Let's make this a little bit darker. So it's jagged the dark caliber to the right and drag this proud calorie but to the right. And there we go. I quite like that. Cool, and that is it for this lesson. 8. Camera and Lighting Setup: Hello everyone. In this lesson we are going to be sitting up our lights and our camera for a scene says begin with, let's switch to rendered view so that we can actually see what our lighting changes are doing. And to do that, hold on Z on your keyboard and then move over to rescinded and let go of Z. And I can see that point-like that we have they is causing some nice light on our object. But for our purposes, let's delete that. So with the light selected, let's press X and click Delete. Now let's go into a world properties. And you'll see this little planet Earth symbol we have here. So let's click on that. And this brings up the world Properties. And under color, Let's click on the color and bring that up to white. And under strength, Let's turn that up to two. And now we have a nice even light on our object. And then just put some highlights. It's add a sunlight as well. And to do that, Let's press Shift a, go down to light and select Sun mass inside our object of the moment. So let's press G to grab Z, to grab it on the z-axis. And then move that up and see what we're doing. And we want that to shine from the back a bit and create a nice rim around our object. And to do that is press M to bring up this little panel. And then with our sunlight selected, make sure we're on the item panel. And under rotation. Let's sit the x value to minus 45. Now I can see our sun is shining in that direction. And as you can see, it's not doing all that much. But when we have more reflective objects and so on, that will add a nice little highlight to the top. And we can always make more adjustments to the specific settings as we create our objects as well. Now let's select our camera over here and reset the rotation and the location of our camera. And to reset the location, we're going to press Alt G. And that reset the camera to the center of our scene. And then to reset the rotation as well. Hold on, Alt and press are. Now a camera is pointing straight down. Good. Let's go into side view with numpad three and then bridge G to grab our camera, move that over to the front of our object and our side panels still open here. Let's change the x rotation to 78. I found that gives us a nice angle when creating pixel art in Blender Qu. And now with the cameras selected, let's click on this little camera icon down here to open our camera settings. And under focal length, Let's change that to 100. And that'll just zoom the camera in a bit. And that makes it look nice in pixel art form. So now let's go into camera view with numpad 0. And as you can see, we are way too close at the moment. But if we zoom out, you can see we're not actually moving. Our camera is just zooming out our image on the screen here. So to actually move the camera viewport while we're looking through it, we can go into our little side panel over here. Go to view. And again, if you're not seeing this, just press N on your keyboard to bring that up. So it's go to View. And then you'll see camera to view. And with that enabled, you can see our camera viewport actually moves as well. Cool. And now let's click on this object that we created in the previous lesson. And we want to hide this, but before we do that, let's just rename that. It's called that taste. And at your Haida object with its selected, you can simply click on this little I. And then you see it's hidden. And we can accidentally selected and it won't be in our way anymore. Now let's create a new cube with Shift a. And under Mesh select Cube analogy, assign our good material that we made to this cube to click on the material properties. And then instead of clicking new, you're going to select the drop-down and click on taste. Nice wood block. Now we need to frame that would block nicely with our camera. And we can actually select our camera while we are in camera view by clicking on the edge of this viewport. And in this list you can see the camera is now selected. And while looking through the camera, we can still press G to grab and move, and then z to move it on the z-axis. And then move the camera down so that we can frame that would block nicely. And we've camera view still selected. We can use our mouse wheel to zoom in a bit as well. Cool, and I like that. Let's disable camera to view so that we don't accidentally move our camera. And then we can rotate around without affecting our camera anymore. Cool, and that is it for this lesson. In the next lesson, we're going to be looking at how to set up our render settings. 9. Render Settings: Hello everyone. In this lesson we're going to be sitting up our render and output properties. So to start with, it's going to camera view with numpad 0. As you can see at the moment, we have a 16 by nine aspect ratio. And for our textures, we actually want a one-by-one or a square aspect ratio. So to change that, it's going to output sittings. And that's this little print over here. So let's click on that. And you can see our current resolution is 1920 by 1080. So let's change that to 64 by 64. And now we have a nice square aspect ratio. Now 64 by 64 is a very low resolution, but that'll help us create our nice pixel art look to our images. And the next thing we want to do is go into our render properties. Necessarily camera appear, click on Window Properties. And under Render Engine, we're going to switch over to cycles. And that'll make the renders look a lot better, especially when we get to class materials and things like that. And the first lesson, I showed you how to enable your graphics card for using the renderer. So if you have a graphics card and I've selected it like I showed in the first lesson, we can change this from CPU to GPU compute. That should speed up the render time significantly depending on your hardware. Now the button to render our image is if 12 on the keyboard. So if you press if 12, you'll see it renders that object that we hid in the previous lesson. And that is because when we click on this eye to hide an object, it's only actually hiding it in the viewport display. And to tell blend and not to render the object, we need to click on this folder drop-down and then enable this camera, the display and that little pointer. And now we can click and drag across all of them to disable them all. And the first icon is for selection. So if that is disabled, you won't be able to select the object even if it's visible in the viewport. The next one is simply hides the object and it's very similar to this display icon, which displays it in our viewport. And then finally we have this little camera, and if that is enabled, it will render the object when we press F2. So we can have everything disabled except for the render icon. And if you press F2, it'll still be rendered. So let's disable that as well. Now if we press if 12 again, you can see it's only rendering our cube. So now let's select our cube and scale that up a bit so that we use more of our viewport. Press G to grab Z to constrain to the z-axis and move that up. And if your performance is suffering a bit, you can always hold down z and switched to material preview. And that should make it a bit faster as well. Or you can even switch to solid view. But then we won't be able to see the materials, but they will still get rendered when we press F2 to render, as you can see. So just for now I'm going to switch back to rendered view. And now we can have blended draw some outlines on our objects for us. And to do that, we need to be in our render properties. And then right at the bottom you'll see freestyle said it's an able freestyle and preserved 12 to render. An hour draws nice black outlines around the object. Let's rotate this object 45 degrees on the z-axis. So I'm going to press R to rotate. To constrain it to the z-axis. And then just type 4 5 and press Enter. And it's scale that down a bit. So let's press S to scale, scale it down a bit, and click to apply. Go. Now if you press F2 Alpha again, we can see blender starts drawing these nice outlines for us, but they're a bit too thick. And to change that, and the freestyle, if you're not seeing that, you can just click on this little arrow to open this up, you'll see line thickness. So let's change that to 0.4. Press Enter and preserved 12 to render. And now we're starting to get somewhere. But as you can see, it looks kind of blurred or faulted and we're not getting nice sharp lines from this render. And that's because blender is filtering the pixels to give us a nice smooth image and which is good for larger rings. But if you want to make a pixel art image, this is going to be a problem. So let's close that and then click on foam. And while we're here, let's click on transparent. And it'll give us a nice transparent background. And if you render that now, you'll see it gives us the image on a transparent background. And that allows us to easily insert this image into a scene later on. And it's unable to transparent glass as well as we're going to need that in future lessons. Cool analysis. Look at that pixel filter. You'll see there's a pixel filter and a width sitting that we're going to be looking at after press F2. Again, just to remind us what we're looking at. Let's make this a bit bigger. And you can see we are in slot one at the moment. And you can have eight different slots for these rendered images. And that makes it really handy when you want to convey changes that you're making between different ranges. So you can also see if we press 1 on our keyboard, it's in slot one. If we press to, it switches over to slot 2345678. You can see we can quickly go between these different slots. So let's go back to one. And that's the image that we read it now. So let's switch over to two by pressing too and our keyboard. And now we can close this. And let's drag this width all the way down. It goes down to 0.01. Now press F2 Alpha again. Make this window a bit larger. Zoom in with the mouse wheel. And now we can see we're starting to get nice sharp lines. And now if you press 1 on your keyboard, it switches back to the first render. If you press too, you can switch between these two. And as you can see, it's already starting to look a little bit like a pixel art box. We can always change the rotation of our boxes, get to see more of the top. So you can see these are red x-axis. So let's press R to rotate x to constrain to the x-axis. And then just rotate it a bit around the x axis like that. Click to apply. And impressive. 12 again. Cool, and that looks a bit better as well. Cool and sexy. Want to change the column management. So in our render properties still, right at the bottom, you'll see column management and click on that to open them up and scroll down with your mouse. You'll see the view transform is set to full mic. And for our purposes we just went to sit that the standard. And as you can see, that makes the colors a little bit more vibrant. We can switch back quickly. Just to compare. Cool, just makes it pop a bit more. 12 again to render glow and starting to look better and better. And the last thing we want to do is tell blender that when we have two different materials touching each other, we want blended to draw a nice outline there as well. And to do that, let's go into View layer properties. It looks like a little stack of photographs. So click on that and then right at the bottom, you'll see You have a freestyle line sit. And if that's clergy can just click on that to open it up. And they, we want to enable silhouette and border and crease and material boundary. So make sure those four enabled. And that'll make sure blended draws those black lines where we want them. Cool and that is it for this lesson. In the next lesson, we are going to be sitting up our compositor, and that'll really start giving us that nice pixel outlook. 10. Creating the Pixel Art Compositor: Hello everyone. In this lesson, I'll show you how to set up our pixel art compositor to give our index that pixel art look. So to begin with, let's click on this cube we credit in the previous lesson, press X to delete and then click Delete. Now let's create a little taste seen over here to make it a bit easier to see what we're actually doing in the compositing section. So let's press Shift a to add and then add a mesh and select UV sphere. And let's press S to scale. And in type 1.6. And press Enter. And let's press G to grab and z to move it on the z axis. And then just move that up to the top of our frame. And we're doing all of this in the camera view. So if you're not in camera view, remember you can just press numpad 0 to go back into camera view. And now let's create a plane for our sphere to stand on. And to do that, Let's press Shift a again, go to Mesh and select plane. Now we can press S to scale again, and the N-type silicon to make it seven times bigger and press Enter. Now let's go into front view quickly with numpad 1. Just so that we can see what we're doing. Zoom in a little bit. Press G to grab Z, to move it on the z-axis. And then just move that to just below the sphere like that. And click to apply. And let's go back into camera view with NumPy at 0, and then click on the sphere, and then right-click and select Shade Smooth. They regard. As you can see, we still have a default white materials applied to our objects. So with our sphere selected, let's go to the material properties. And then instead of clicking new, let's click on this little drop-down and select that taste wood material that we made in a previous lesson. And for the testing purposes, let's just turn the roughness up all the way to one, just to make that a little bit less reflective so that we can get a more accurate idea of what we're actually doing. And let's click on the plane. And let's create a new material for a plane. So let's click New. And then under base color, let's click on this white color and then change it to a green color. And I played around with a few sittings. And I found these work well. So click on hue and make that 0.3. For the saturation, we're going to make that 0.7. And for the value, you're going to make that 0.085 and press Enter. So now we have a nice dark green color for our plane. We just turn the roughness up to one as well, goo. And now we can go to our compositing section. So let's click on the compositing tab at the top over here. You'll see it says compositing. So let's click on that and then click on Use nodes. And it should add these two nodes for you automatically. If you're not seeing them, let me just delete them quickly. If you're not seeing them, you can easily just add them in. Just make sure Use nodes is enabled. And then press Shift a to add. And then under input, select render layers and click and click into place that down. Then press Shift a again to add in G2 output and select composite. And left-click to place that down. Now we can just connect the image pin, click and drag and plug that into the image Ben, for our composite. Cool. And what this does now is when we press if 12 to render, let's press F2. And it shows us our rendered image over here. What's actually happening is Blender renders the image through the camera and our 3D scene. That image gets sent to the render layers node. And then from image, it gets passed on to the composite node. And this composite node is actually what we're seeing. We increase F2. So if we disconnected that and it prints if 12, we now only see a black image because we are only seeing the default value, which is just a black color. So we can just plug that back in and press F2 Alpha again. And now we see our image again. And the cool thing about this is we can move part of it. And now we can add a whole bunch of extra nodes and processing in-between these so that we can take the original rendered image, make some changes to it, and then pass it on to the composite node. So to be able to see what we're doing is add a viewer node to this workspace. And to do that, we can simply hold down control and shift and then left-click on our render layers node. See it added the viewer node. And that's because we have Node Wrangler enabled, like I showed in the first lesson. So now we have this viewer node. And this little image shows us what the viewer node is seeing basically, now with the viewer node selected, we can click and drag and make this larger and smaller and move that around. But for pixel art, we want to make that a precise integer value. In other words, we want to scale it exactly two or three or four times, et cetera. And if you adjusted, drag it like this, you see we get that weird pixel flickering and some strange pixel artifacts. And we won't be able to see the exact image that we are getting. So to make that an exact value is press in on our keyboard to bring up the side menu. And under View you see we can sit the zoom value. So let's just make that F4 and press Enter. And now we have a nice integers scaled value, and each pixel will be displayed as exactly four by four pixels on the screen. Is pressed in again to close that menu. And we can click and then drag and place that in the top right corner for us, which is movies, another way of it. And now we can use the middle mouse button to move our workspace around. And as you can see, that preview image is staying in the top right the whole time, no matter how we zoom or move around in our workspace. Cool. Now the first thing we can do is change the shading of our object so that we don't have a nice smooth shading going from light to dark. And that'll help us give it more of a 2D drone look. And to do that, Let's press Shift a on our keyboard to add. And instead of going through all these sections and looking for the specific nodes that we want, we can simply click on Search and then type ramp. So we're looking for a color ramp and you can see color ramps and it's click on Color Ramp and then drop that on that line, going to the composite node and left-click to apply Qu. And that is see what this color ramp is doing. We can hold down Control and Shift and left-click on it. And you can actually see a preview of what it's doing. And I can see it's basically just giving us a black and white version of our image. And if we were to click and drag these little points around, we can adjust what that image looks like as you can see. So let's move those back to the edges and zoom in a bit so that we can see what we're doing. Now we want to add some more points in between these. And to do that, you can simply hold down control and left-click. Leg lift. So let's add three more points in between those first two points. And that'll give us a total of five points on this gradient. I've played around with these and gotten a few values that I found that work well. So you can use these or just using as a starting point to create your own as well. So to change a value, let's click on this little triangle above the first box. And we can click on this large black box to change the color. Just move this up a little bit. And we want to brighten this up just a little bit so it's not completely black. So let's change the value. So click on that and n-type zero-point 000 and press Enter. Cool. Now let's click on our second. Click on its color and give that a value of 0.012 and press Enter. And the third one, Let's give that a value of 0.22 and press enter to kinda fourth, click on the color. And for this value we're going to make it 0.6 and press Enter. And then our brightest value can stay white. And that's already set to one. And now we can reposition these nodes a bit. So the first one can stay right there where it is. The second one, if we click and drag and move this around, you'll see this position changes as well. And we can also click on this position and move that around. We can click on this box once and then enter an exact position. So for the second it's at 0.27 and press Enter for the next one. Click over here and type 0.34 and press Enter, and then click on the next one. Click on the position and type 0.44 and press Enter, and then click on the last one and click on position and set that to 0, 54 and press Enter. And I can see our image got a lot darker when we did this to, to brighten up the whole thing. We can either move all of these nodes around. But an easier way to do that is simply add a multiply node in front of this node. So let's just zoom out a tiny little bit with our mouse wheel. Then press to add and then click Search and type math. While our functions like add and subtract and multiply, you can find those in the math node. So let's click on the Math node and then drop that onto that line. And it'll hook it up automatically. Now you can see it's set to add at the moment. Let's click on that and select Multiply. And it's changed that to a value of four. And I can see we're starting to get some detail back in our image. Let's zoom in again and this color ramp. And you can see we still have a smooth gradient in-between these points, even though there are much closer together now. And to change those into definite steps, we can simply click on this drop-down, which is linear. So click on that and select constant. And as you can see now we have definite steps between the different brightness values. And also with the shadow on our object of a day. You can see we have nicely defined steps going from bright to dark. And that'll help give us the exact look that we're looking for. So now let's zoom out and now we only have a black and white image coming from this color ramp. So what we need to do is take the original color image and then mix that back in with our color ramp that before we mix those together, Let's just make some adjustments to our original image. And to do that, we're going to add a curves node. So we can press Shift a again and then click on Search, and then type curves. And select RGB curves and drop that down. Cool. And now we can connect the image pen from our render layers into the image pin of our RGB curves. So you can just click and drag and plug that in. And now to see what this node is doing, we can hold down Control and Shift and left-click. And they can see our color image again. Now at this node does, is it takes an input image and impulses it through this curve. And as we make adjustments to this curve, we can make adjustments to the intensity of the dark and the light parts. Let me show you if you click and drag on this curve, we drag that up. You can see our whole image gets brighter. If you drag that down, the whole image gets darker. So again, to add some points on this curve. And with that point selected, we can simply type in the x and y values over here. And again, these are values that I've tasted and found that they work well for our purposes. So click on the X and make that 0.1, and then click on Y and make that 0.1 as well. And I can see it's not making any changes to our curve yet, but that will just keep that point in place as we make more changes to this curve. So let's click to add another point. And with that point selected, we can click on X. And let's set that to 0.45. Then click on y and set that to 0.85 and press Enter. And I can see our image just looks a bit more vibrant. And let's say we wanted to see what difference this node was making. We can simply click on it to selected, and then we can move to this node by pressing M on our keyboard. So if you press M, You see it as a red line through the node. And now it no longer affects our image. So that is what the raw rendered image looks like. And you press him again to unmute. That is what this node is doing. So it makes it a bit more vibrant and make the colors pop out a bit more goo. And how we can mix these two together. And to do that, we're going to use a mixed node. So we can press, Shift a again, click on Search and type mix, and then select the mixed nerve and drop that on this line. And allocator RGB curves up to the top image input. And then we can click and drag from this color ramp and plug that into the bottom image, input image you can see it's only showing us the shading again. And that's because our blending mode is set to mix. And what that does is it mixes between these two depending on the factor that we sit over here. Surface all the way to 0, we'll only see the first image. And if it's all the way to one, will only see the second image. But we can change this blending mode. And that'll change how blender mixes between these two images. So let's click on this drop-down. And for our purposes, let's select Soft Light. And now as you can see, as we turn that down, we go from the original image. And then it adds that shading back into our image, but we still keep the colors and everything. So it's turned us down to 0.75 for now. And press Enter and then mix add a use saturation value node after this. So press Shift a again, click on Search and type hue and insulate, use saturation value. So we click and then drop that on the line by clicking again. And that'll hook it up automatically. Now the hue we can leave it as is or else we're going to change the colors. As you can see. Let's undo that saturation. We can turn up to 1.15. And that will make the colors come out a bit more. And the value we can turn up to 1.85 and press into h2 and we are almost day. The last thing we want to do is add a pattern to the darker areas of our image. And with the resources for this class, I've included a delay pattern image that you can download and use for this. So to add that to our compositor, we can press Shift a again, then click on Search and n-type image, and then select image. And click to place it down. Let's zoom in on that a bit. And we can click on the Open button and then just go to where you downloaded the delta image for this one, I'm going to use the 128 by 128 dither. Let's click Open. And if you want to view what that looks like, we can hold down control and shift and click on the node. So that's basically what we have, just a black and white chicken Devitt pattern. Let's zoom out Tibet. Back, make some space. We're going to add another mixed node after the US saturation value node. So to do that, press Shift a again, click on Search and type mix. Let's just disconnect this for now and then connect the US saturation value to the first image and connect our data image to the second image input. And now sit that to multiply. And as you can see, that's applying the digit image to our entire image now. So we need to somehow tell this mixed node where to place. This did a pattern and way not to place it. And for that we're going to need the ambient occlusion of our Render. And to get that, we need to make some changes to our view layer properties. So we can go to this stack of images. And if you hover over that, it says View layer properties. So click on that. And then you'll see parses and underpasses is I liked section. And at the bottom of the light section you'll see ambient occlusion. So let's click to enable that. And you can see it added an AO pen to our render layers node and see what that's actually doing is hold down Control and Shift and then click on that pen to preview that pen. And now we have nothing way. And that's because we just need to update our render. So press if 12 to render. And now you can see it's showing our ambient occlusion over there. And as you can see, what ambient occlusion does is it darkens the ambient light as objects get closer together. So we can use this now to tell blender way to add this dither pattern. So it's just hold Control and Shift and click on this last node again. So we can see our image. And now to give us a more control over the ambient occlusion, let's add in another color ramp node like this one that we had here. So we can press, Shift a, click on Search and type ramp, and then select Color Ramp. And it's placed that right above the other colorRamp. And after that input, we're going to click and drag from our ambient occlusion pen and plug that into the factor. And then from this image, we're going to click and drag and drop that into the factor of our Multiply node. And I can see it's starting to do something. But you may have noticed that it's the wrong way around. In other words, the darker parts are not getting the dividend pattern and the brighter parts are getting the divot pattern. So to switch that around, we can easily just click and drag on these pins. Move this one to the left, and then click and drag and move this one all the way to the right. So now I flip them around. And as you can see, it's starting to add the date the patent only in the darker areas now. So let's move this one alphabet is change it from completely white. Let's click on this and give that a value of 0.8 and press Enter. And that'll just make the effect a little bit more subtle. And we're going to sit the position of my pens, the bright one, I'm going to set that to 0.5. Press into. And for the darker one, I'm going to set that to 0.875 and press Enter. And you're welcome to move these around and play around with them a bit. As you can see as we move them, we can get a different effect to our image. But I'm going to leave mine at those values that I gave you for now. And now one last thing, this press F2 again. And as you can see are rendered image is still just showing us the color ramp output. And that is because the colorant output is plugged into our composite node. So to fix that, we simply need to take this final node, click and drag and plug that into the image input for our composite net. Let's press F2 again. There we go. Now we get a final image in our composite note as well. And if you want to see the difference these nodes are making, we can simply hold down control and shift and click on our render layers node. That's the rule rendered image and control shift click on this node. And that is our final image. As you can see, it's quite a bit different and a bit more stylized as well. Cool. And that is it for this lesson. 11. Modelling the Chest: Hello everyone. In this lesson we're going to start creating our treasure chest. So the first thing we can do is just remove this test scene that we created for our previous lesson during tech on the sphere, press X, and then select Delete. Click on the plane, press X, and then select Delete. That, start our chest. Let's add in a cube. So it's pretty Shift a to add, go to Mesh and select cube. And to make the modelling a bit easier, Let's switch over to solid view. So hold down Z on your keyboard, move over to the right to solid and then let go of z. So now we're in solid view and let's turn on x-ray mode as well. Hold down z, move down and let go of z. And now we are in x-ray mode as well. So let's go to front view with numpad 1. Zoom in a little bit and it slices in half, but we need to be in edit mode for that. So with our cube selected, just press Tab to go into edit mode. And now to add a loop cut down the center is press Shift R to add a loop cut and position your mouse so that you get that yellow line down the center. They then left-click ones and then right-click to make it snap back to the center. Now because we have x-ray mode enabled, we can select the entire left side just by clicking and dragging. And that'll select the vertices behind those vertices as well. So let's press X to delete and select vertices. And now we only have half a cube. So Alice add a mirror modifier to add the other half back. And that'll allow us to only work on the one side. And Blender will mirror that over to the other side as well. So let's go to modify our properties. This little wrench icon, click on Add Modifier and under Generate, look for mirror. And they remember we need to enable clipping. Don't accidentally take our object apart in the center. Cool. So now let's start shaping our chest. And to begin with which drag and select the entire right side. And then move that on the x axis a bit to make our cheat a bit wider. So let's press G to grab x to constrain it to the x-axis. And then as we move that, you can see at the top left, you can see the distance that we are moving our vertices. And for these vertices I'm going to type 0.75 and press Enter. Now to give our chest more of a stylized look, we can move these top ones a little bit further out. So with that selected, we can press G to grab again, Chris, moving on the x-axis and move them out another 0.25. So you can type 0.25 and press Enter. And that will give it a little bit of a more stylized look. Now Let's click and drag to select all the top vertices. And we want to move those up a bit to make our chest a little bit taller. So we can press G to grab Z to constrain it to the zed axis and the n-type 0.3 and press Enter. These are just values that I found that gives you a nice proportion to your chest. But you can obviously play around and make the shape your own as well. Now it's going to decide view with numpad three. Just move that to the center of it. Now click and drag to select all the bottom vertices and its scale those down on the y-axis a little bit. So let's press S to scale y to constrain it to the y-axis. And the n-type 0.8. And that just makes it a little bit thinner on the bottom as well. I can see we're starting to get a nice shape for our chest. Now let's go into front view again with numpad 1. And let's add a loop, cut down the center with the opening of our chest would be. So let's press Control R to add a loop cut, click, and then right-click to make it snap back to the center. And now we want to start blocking out way the edge banding for achieved will be. So we're going to have a wooden chaste and then have metal edge banding going around the sides and down the middle and across the center of our chest as well. So we can start blocking that out by placing edge loops. If we were, we're going to create that edge banding. So now instead of adding multiple loop cuts, we can simply take this one loop cut that we created and Bevel that to split that into multiple loop cuts. And two bivalent h, we can simply make sure that our entire edge loop is selected. Remember if you de-selected the age by accident, or you just want to select any edge loop. Hold on Alt on your keyboard, and then click on one edge of that loop. And it will select the entire loop as you can see. So let's go back into front view with numpad 1. Zoom in a little bit, then press Control B to bevel Control B and ADG drag that out. You'll see it splits that age into two. And every year you can see the bevel width that you're creating. And I'm going to save mine to zero-point 15. So I just type that in and press Enter. So now you can see we're going to have a metal band going across the center like this. And to help us with feature cuts, let's just add another loop, cut down the center over here. So let's press Control R again. Move it until it jumps to the center. Click and then right-click. And I have another loop cut exactly in between these two. Now let's add another loop at the bottom so that we can have a Metal Age at the bottom of our chest as well. And to do that, Let's press Control R again, left-click and then move it down. And let's make that a little bit thinner than the middle band that we have a. So I'm going to move it down a bit and left-click to apply. Cool. Now to make this look more like a chaste laze round over these top corners so that we have a nice rounded top. Two are chaste. And to do that, let's go to edge select mode. And you can do that by either clicking this icon at the top, or you can just press 2 on your keyboard and it'll jump to that H Select mode as well. So let's click on this front edge and then hold down Shift and click on the package. And now we can use that same bevel to, to round over these corners. So let's press Control B to bevel. And as we drag that out, you'll see it starts rounding over the corners. And over here you can see we have segments, and the segment is currently set to one. So it's only going to add one new segment to our Bible. But if you roll up on your mouse wheel, you'll see it starts adding more segments and you get a nice rounded over corner instead of just a flat beveled edge. Roller mouse will up all the way to 20 America. And now as it gets closer and closer together, you see it starts clipping through one another. And that causes a problem at the top. They, as you can see. Now to prevent that, you'll see there's a clamp overlap function down here. And that's currently set to off. And you'll see just in front of that, it gives us the shortcut key, and that is C. So if you press C on your keyboard, it turns clamp overlap on and other clamps the edges so that they can't pass through one another. So let's drag that all the way down and left-click to apply. But now because we move that two different sides, those edges meet in the middle way. And what that means is we now have vertices that came from both sides that are exactly on top of one another. So we want to remove the double vertices. And to do that, we can just press a to select all and then merge those vertices together. So again, to press M on your keyboard to merge. And that brings up this little menu. And we want to select by distance. And what that'll do is it'll tell blender merge all vertices that are closer than a certain distance from one another. So it's open. This little menu down here, merged by distance. And then just click on this right icon to turn that up to 0.01. And I can see removed six vertices. So now we don't have any double vertices anymore. We can close that down again. Now it's going to front view again with numpad 1. Zoom in a little bit. And now let's add another loop. Cut down the center here so that we can have a nice band down the center of our chest as well. So let's press Control R to add a loop cut. And with our look at Position day, we can left-click once and then just move it towards the middle. And remember, because this is being mirrored, our middle band is going to be twice the thickness. Let me make it over here. So I'm going to make mine about that size. You see it's about the same as our bottom one. So we have a nice little square with a and you can make this as broad or as thin as you want, depending on the look you want for your chest. Now let's add another one down the side here. So we'll press Control R again. And with the loop showing there, we can left click once. Move that to the side. And I'm going to make that a little bit thinner than the center one. Left-click to apply. Cool. Now let's look at it from the side. And let's turn off x-ray mode quickly hold down z, movie mouse down and the curve z. And that will just make it easier to see what we're doing on the side here. So while still in each mode, Let's click on these edges on the side. So let's click on one hold down Shift, click on another one, hold down Shift and click Shift and click to select all of those. Now we want to remove these edges so that we have a nice solid phase here again. So let's press X to delete. And instead of selecting edges, we can go down and say dissolve ages. And what that'll do is it removes the ages, but it creates a nice full face for us with those ages. We're now let's go into face select mode by either clicking this icon or by pressing three on your keyboard. Now we can click to select that entire face. And now we want to add a nice age band around the entire face. And the easiest way to do that is to inset that face. And we can do that by pressing I on your keyboard. So I'll press I to insert. And as you can see, it creates a new face that we can use the mouse to sit the size of. We can also type in a value, and I'm going to set mine to 0.1. So I'm going to type 0.1 and press into Cu. Now let's go into object mode by pressing tab on our keyboard. And to get rid of these little steps, Let's right-click and select shade smooth. But as you can see that messed up the sharp edges of arches now as well. And to fix that, we need to go into Object Data Properties is this little triangle icon down here. Let's click on that and then look for normals. And then under normals you'll see auto smooth. And with older smooth does, is it smooths over all the edges that are less than this value over here. So our sharp 90 degree edges still stay sharp. But these little edges that we had going across the top of our chest, they get smoothed over because there are less than 30 degrees. Cool and Alice rename this before we forget. So double-click the cube and cool this chest and press into Cu. And in the next lesson we'll finish up the modelling by adding some details like the edge banding, a latch and a lock for our chest. 12. Adding Details to the Chest: Hello everyone. In the previous lesson, we created this basic shape for our chest. And in this lesson we're going to finish it up by adding some more details. So to start with, let's make a copy of this and we can do that by selecting our chest and embracing Shift D to duplicate the chest. And you can just right-click to snap that back to its original location. Now we can double-click that and it's called that chest banding and press into UX. And now we can hide the chest while we work on this. So to hide the chest, we can simply click and drag of all these icons. And other chest is hidden and we're only seeing our chest banding object. Now we can go back into edit mode by pressing tab on our keyboard. And now we can start deleting all the faces that we don't want. So I'm going to keep the faces we want the middle age banding to be. So over here I want to be able to see the wood of our chest. So you can click this face, press X to delete, and then move up and select faces. But you'll see the EF is underlined. And that tells us that if is a shortcut key. So you can either click the a to select faces. We can press F on our keyboard, and that'll make it a bit faster as we go along. So let's select this big side face, press X to delete. And if to delete face, go to the back. Select this one, press X to delete. And if to delete the face, Let's go to the bottom. Select this one, hold down, Shift, select that one and that one. So now we have all the bottom faces selected, express x. And if you delete the faces, and after this middle band, we want to keep these two rows of faces. So we want to start deleting from day all the way to the front over there. And instead of shift clicking all the different phases, we can simply select the face that we want to start at and then hold Control and click. And it'll select all the faces between the first phase we selected and the last phase we clicked. So now we can press. And if they, we've got our metal bands that we want to create. And now we're almost done, which is answer banding to our bottom of the chest as well. And to do that, let's go into edge select mode so we can click over there or we can press to on our keyboard. And now hold on Alt, deselect edge loops. So again, hold on Alt and click on this bottom edge. Now we have that entire bottom, each selected. And now we can press E to extrude and create another H for us. And before we click, we can press S to scale. And now as we scale that down, you see it scales nicely across the bottom of the object. And we can enter a value there as well. Let's just type 0.9 and press Enter. And there we have a completed metal banding for our chest. Now to add some thickness to that, because at the moment you can see it's just single faces with no thickness to them. We can add the solidify modifier. Do that. Let's go to modify our Properties. Click on Add Modifier. And the Generate, you'll see the solidify modifier. So let's click on that is selected. And as you can see, it already started to add some thickness. And as we turn this up. You can see we have some nice dimension to our age banding. But at the moment it's moving inwards. And we want that to move outwards from the chest. And that is what this offset is four. So kindly city minus1 and that means it'll move inwards towards the center of your object. If we said that all the way to one, it will now move outwards towards the outside of your object and get bigger as we turn the thickness up. So I'm going to set my thickness to 0.1. And to get rid of these rounded corners every day, Let's just select even thickness. Now we have nice straight lines again. Cool. And Alice going to object mode. So press Tab on your keyboard, make sure you're in object mode. And we can enable the chest again. So click and drag over all of those. And we can see it's starting to look like a treasure chest Kook. Then I'll just add some more details to this and it's taught by adding a little latch to the front Day. So let's press Shift a to add select mesh and the cube. And let's move that to the front a little bit so that we can see what we're doing. So let's press G to grab y, to move it on our green y-axis. And then just move it towards the front and lift click to apply. Now we can scale that down. So let's press S to scale. And we can scale it down with our mouse, or you can just enter a value. So let's enter 0.2 and press Enter. To make that a little bit thinner on the x-axis. Remember the red axis is our x axis. So to make that thinner on the x-axis, Let's press S again to scale X to constrain it to the x-axis and the n-type 0.4 and press Enter. And I can see our camera isn't focused on our latch over there. And to fix that, Let's just press the period key on our numpad, not focuses on our object. And as you can see, we can now easily work with this again. So let's round over this front. And to do that, let's go into edit mode by pressing tab on our keyboard. Make sure we are on each select mode. And click on this front top Age, hold down shift, and click on this bottom edge as well. And now we can label these to round them over as well. So let's press Control B again and drive it all the way down. And because we have clamping enabled, they won't pass through one another. So it's left-click to apply. And then remember we need to remove the double vertices. So let's press a to select all press M to merge, and then click by distance. And this time it removed two vertices Qu. So now let's go into object mode again with tab. Right-click, Shade Smooth, and then just enable auto smoothing again. So it's go to Object Data Properties. And under normals, Let's select auto smooth, maybe go. It's going to front view with numpad 1. And move that up until it's nicely in the center of our chest. So it's press G to grab Z, to constrain to the z axis, and just move it up to the center. And let's go into side view with numpad three. And then press G to grab y to constrain it to the y-axis, and just move it back until another rounded piece is sticking out, something like that. And click to apply. Cool. Now let's add a lock to our chest as well. So you can press Shift a again and under Mesh select Cube. Now we've got another cube. So let's press G to grab and move y to constrain it to the y-axis. And move that to the front so that we can see what we're working with. Coup and Alice scale this down as well. So it's press S to scale and the scale mine to 0.4. So I'm going to enter 0.4 and press enter. And to make that a bit thinner on the y-axis as well is press S again does scale. Why discovered on the y-axis and into 0.3 and press Enter, It's going to front view and just move that down a bit. So this press G to grab Z to constrain it to the zed axis with a down to near the bottom of our chest, maybe something like that. To apply. Now to make our life a bit easier, It's add a mirror modifier to this as well. And to do that, let's go into edit mode first by pressing tab. And let's make sure x-ray mode is enabled. So all down Z on your keyboard, move down to X-ray. And there we go. Now an x-ray mode. And then going to vertex select mode by clicking this icon or pressing one on your keyboard. And Alice add a loop, cut down the center over here. So let's press Control R and left-click and right-click to make it snap back to the center. Now we can select these lifts vertices, press X to delete and select vertices. Now go over to the modifier properties. Click on Add Modifier and the Generate. Let's select mirror. And you remember to enable clipping. There we go. Now to create things like the keyhole and the top shackle. We can add some loop cuts to the body of our lock to make that a little bit easier. So let's press Control R to add a loop cut. And before clicking, we can use our mouse wheel to adjust the number of cuts. And that is shown at the bottom left over here. So let's set that to five and then left-click and then right-click to make sure they stay nicely in the center. And let's add three luke cuts going horizontally down the body. So let's press Control R again. And with a mouse position over there, let's move our mouse will up to create three cuts, and then left-click and then right-click. And let's go to top view. And it's at three loop cuts over here as well. So Control R again. Roll your mouse up until the A3, left-click and then right-click. Now we can turn off x-ray mode just so that we can see a little bit easier. So all down z, move your mouse down and release z. And let's go to top view if numpad seven. And now going to edge select mode up here, or you can press T on your keyboard and just left-click to de-select everything. And we can select this middle age loop by holding Alt and clicking on it. And then delete that edge loop by pressing X and going down and selecting edge loops. Now the reason we added three to begin with is just to get the spacing right. So actually I only wanted to, but if we only add it to, there would be a little bit closer together. So decided to add three to get the spacing nice and even, and then just delete the middle one again. Now for that same reason, let's select the second loop gain around the front of our lock. And to do that is hold down Alt again and click on that loop. And now let's press X and select edge loops again. And now you can see we have a nice square at the top V. We will create our shackle for the lock. Let's create the keyhole. And to do that, we need to go back into face select mode. And we can do that by clicking this icon or pressing three on your keyboard. Now let's select these three phases. And as you can see, they're starting to look like a keyhole. And to actually create the keyhole, we're going to extrude these faces. So press E to extrude. And I can see we can either move them outwards or we can move them inwards and update. You can see the distance that we're extruding. So if you go outwards, it's a positive value. And if you go inwards, it's a negative value. So let's set this to minus 0.2. So we can just type minus 0.2 and press into cool. And let's just make this keyhole a little bit thinner. So let's select that inside face, hold down shift and select that inside face as well. Now we can press G to grab. Now you can see we can move those around to move him only on the x axis. And that way we can make our keyhole a little bit smaller. And if you look at the top there again, if you move them to the right, we have a positive value. And if you move them to the left, we have a negative value. So let's type minus 0.02 and press Enter. So now our keyhole is a little bit thinner and the proportions look a little bit better. So while still in face select mode, Let's select that face at the top, they go into front view. And now we're going to extrude our shackle for the lock. So it's e to extrude. And we've had up a little bit above the center of our latch and left-click. And now we want to extrude that out toward the center, but we need to add a new loop cut first. So let's press Control R again and left-click. Move that up a little bit, maybe something like that. Now we can pan around and click on face select mode or press three on your keyboard. You can select that face. And then we can press E to extrude and move it towards the center. And because we have clipping enabled, it won't move through the center part of our law. So we can just left-click to apply. Cool. Now let's go back into X-Ray mode quickly. So hold on Z on your keyboard, toggle x-ray and release z. And let's go to vertex select mode as well. So either click that icon or press one on your keyboard. And now press numpad 1 to go into front view. And now we can just round over these corners a little bit. So we can select those top corners. Press G to grab, and just move them down a little bit just to round it over. Slightly. Select. And you press G to grab, and then just move it inwards and upwards. Tiny little bit. And then select only this corner. Press G to grab again, and move that so that we have a nice rounded corner. And then left-click to apply goo. That is going to object mode by pressing tab on our keyboard and turn off x-ray mode, old and z movie mouse down and really see. So it's auto smooth this as well. So right-click, select, Shade Smooth, go to Object Data Properties, and select portray smooth. But as you can see, these corners and not being smooth. And that is because they are larger than 30 degrees. So to fix that, we can simply click and drag and turn up this value until they get smoothed out as well. And there we go. Cool. Now let's position on lock. So let's press three on our keyboard to go into side view. Press G to grab and move that back a little bit. I think let's rotate that backwards a little bit as well. I'm going to press R to rotate. And I think about eight degrees should be good. So let's type eight on our keyboard and press Enter. Then press G again, and just move that into place. And left-click to apply. And let's go into camera view with numpad 0. And you can see we've got a just looking object is please if 12 to render. Here we have the beginnings of our chest. Which class are down? And before we forget, let's rename our lock and a latch. So with the lock selected, let's double-click and cool that lock and press enter and select our latch. Here we go. Double-click, call that latch and press Enter. And I'm going to keep these separate until we finish applying our materials to this. And that'll just make it a bit easier when selecting the different parts. So to scale this up a little bit, we need to select all of the different parts. So you can simply select a part, hold down Shift, click on another part, and we'll still holding Shift-click, Shift-click. Now we've got everything selected now. So you can press S to scale and then just scale that up so that it fills the entire frame of our camera. And left-click two-ply. I can press if 12 again. And there we have the basic outlines of our chest. In the next lesson, we're going to add some materials and then render our final pixel art image. 13. Adding Materials to the Chest: Hello everyone. In this lesson we're going to be adding some materials to our chaste and also joining all the different parts into a single object and then rendering our final image. So firstly, we need to switch over to material preview to be able to see the materials that are actually applied to our object. And to do that, let's hold down Z on our keyboard. We've ever to material preview and then let go of z. And as you can see currently we still have the default white material applied to everything. So to begin with, let's select our chest. And we're going to make this a wooden material. And we can actually use that wooden material that we created in a previous lesson. So to apply material, let's go to material properties, the civil ball down here. And instead of clicking new, we can click on this little drop-down and select taste. And for now we can rename that to wood and press Enter. But now as you can see, the grain of the wood is going up and down on the z axis and actually want the grain to flow horizontally like that. So to change that, Let's go to the shading section. So click on the shading tab. And the way we stretch that out in previous lesson was by sitting the z value to 0.1. So we can click on that, change that back to one. And now we have that, and then change the x value to 0.1 and press Enter. And you can obviously play around with this to create the exact look that you want. So let's press if 12 to render and see what that looks like. And as you can see on this object, the wood texture is a little bit too bright. So let's darken that a bit by changing the values on this color ramp. So to begin with, let's click on this little triangle for the darker value. And for the position, I'm going to leave that at 0.395 and then click on the color and then change the value. By clicking on it, you can type 0.05 and press Enter. For the saturation, we're going to click and type zero-point 85 and press Enter. And for the value we're going to type 0.05 and press Enter. Now let's select the triangle and the other value over here, color for the hue. We're going to set that to 0.09 and press enter saturation. We're going to sit the 0.75, press Enter and the value we're going to make 0.15 and press Enter. Now let's render that again with if 12 Qu. And now we have a nice wood texture. So it's close that down and add a gold texture to this banding object. So let's click on that to select it. And now we can create a new material. Over here. Click on New, click on the name, and let's call that gold. Press into. Zoom out a bit to we can see our nodes. And remember these are the same options that we have in our material properties. So you can either change them here, will change them over here as well. So I'm going to click on the base color. And we're going to sit the hue to 0.12 and press into the saturation. I'm going to sit to 0.7 and press Enter. And the value I'm going to sit is 0.175 and press Enter. Now we just need to turn up the metallic value all the way to one. So you can click and drag, make that one. And we can leave the roughness and everything as is for now, is press if 12 and our keyboard again to render. Here we go, quite like that. And you can obviously play around and make that a bit darker or lighter or even change the color to make it your own. And let's apply the same gold material to a latch. So click on the latch and instead of clicking new, we can click on this little drop-down and select gold. Now we have a golden latch as well. And finally, let's click on the lock. Click on New. Let's call this steel and press Enter for the base color. We can leave the hue and saturation as is, and give it a nice dark value of 0.085 and press Enter. It's turned the metallic all the way up. For this one is 10, the roughness all the way up as well. It's pretty if 12. There we go. Now starting to look like a nice pixel art chest. Close that down. And let's go into our compositing view quickly. We can see our chest. And let's make some adjustments to this color ramp as well, where we add the data pattern. So let's go to this top color ramp. Let's zoom in a little bit so we can see what we're actually doing. Which is movies, all the active sites. See what we get. Now let's start moving this one in a little bit more. And I can decide how much of that did the pattern you want in the darker areas. I'm going to leave mine at 0.750.75. And the black value. I'm going to sit the 0.9. Cool, I quite like that. Now let's go back to the layout. And the moment this is still all different parts. So to join those into one single object, we first need to apply our modifiers because not all of these objects are using the same modifiers. And to do that, we can simply click on an object. Let's start with our chest. Let's go to our modifier properties, this little range, and then click on this little drop-down and click. Now you see we don't have any modifiers, but the effects have been applied to the object. So let's select our banding object. Now we need to apply multiple modifiers. And when doing that, we should always apply them from the top down. So select our mirror modifier first, click on this little drop-down. Click Apply. And then just make sure you're happy with the thickness of your bands. You can always make some minor adjustments over here as well. I'm going to leave mine at 0.1. And then click on this little drop-down and click Apply. Select our latch, and it doesn't have any modifiers applied. So you can click on the lock and apply the mirror modifier as well. And how we want to join all of these together. So I'm going to select the lock, hold on Shift, select the latch, and we'll still holding Shift, select the edge banding object. And then lastly select the chest. Now can press Control J to join them together. So it's Control J. And that join them all into one single object. As you can see, we only have one object there. And if you go into edit mode, you see everything is now part of the same object. So let's go back into object mode. And now we can easily move this around or rotate that around. And we don't have to worry about Shift clicking all the different objects anymore. It's just undo that move. It's going to camera view with numpad 0. And now we can make some final adjustments to the placement of our object. So let's zoom in a bit. I'm going to scale it down just a little bit. Chris, if 12. And now we can make minor adjustments until we have a nice flow of pixels around the edges and everything. So we can make that smaller, impressive 12. And we have a nice smaller lower resolution chased. We can scale it up all the way. Just make sure it fits in our frame. If 12. And now we have some more detail to the chaste as well. And to save this image now, we can go to image and select, Save As or you can see the shortcut Shift Alt S. So I'm going to press Shift Alt. And then we can select where you want to save your image is called as chaste and save as an image. And that image is saved. So we have a nice image file that we can use in any other software. Cool, and that is it for this lesson. In the next lesson, I'll show you how to make a quick and easy spinning animation for our chest. 14. Creating an Animation for the Chest: Hello everyone. In this lesson I'm going to show you how to create a simple spinning animation for a chaste. And we can use this technique for any other object as well. So let's close this window. And at the bottom here you'll see we have our timeline. And if you press Space bar on your keyboard, you can see it starts playing. If you press Space again, it stops. So let's click and drag and move that back. And these numbers that you see here are the different frames of your animation. And if you look at the right side over here, we've got this number that tells you the current frame that your cursor is on. So if you move this little blue cursor around, now it says 44, and Abby hears is 44 as well. So you can easily jump to any frame by clicking on this number, typing in a frame number and pressing Enter. Cool. And then we have the start frame and the frame, and this will determine the length of our animation. So for our animation, Let's make that 30 frames. So we want the animation to start at frame one, and then we want it to end at frame 30. So click on that and type 30 and press Enter. Now I can grab the side of this bar over here. Drag that to the other side to zoom in. And you can use your mouse wheel as well to zoom in an ad. And we can make this a little bit bigger. So let's hover over this dividing line in left-click and drag and just make that a little bit bigger to make it a bit easier to see what we're doing. And to give us more of an authentic pixel art look, which changed the frame rate of our animation as well. So currently, if you bar to play, you can see it runs through the animation fairly quickly. This pre space again to stop. Let's move that back. And now let's go to the output sittings. So let's click on this little printer over here. And you can see we also have frame Start, Frame end, so you can adjust the settings in here as well. And then we have frame rate. Let's click on that complete C2, basically 30 frames per second. So let's click on that, go to Custom. And its change that to 15. And press Enter. And you can make that 12 or 15 or 30 or whatever you want your animation to be. I found 12 or 15 frames per second gives us a nice authentic pixel Outlook. You press Spacebar again to play slower now. So it's just sit that back to 0. Here we go. And the way we're going to do this is by adding keyframes to our timeline. So let's click on the chest to select it. And then with our cursor at 0, It's press I to insert a keyframe set of trees I. And then we can select what we want blend to remember. So we want to create a rotation animation. So we're going to click on rotation. And I can see there's a keyframe added every day. And Blender will then remember this rotation that he chased had at that frame. So now we can click and drag and move this all the way to 30. And now we can rotate our chased around. So let's press R to rotate, z to rotate on the z-axis. And then we want to rotate that a full rotation, which is 360 degrees. So we can just type 3 6, 0 and press Enter. And now to tell blender to remember the rotation at that frame, Let's press I to insert a keyframe and select rotation again. And I can see blender added the in-between frames automatically for us. And our chest now spins around. But if you press space bar to play the animation now, you see this just starts spinning slowly and in speeds up and then slows down again towards the end. And for this animation, we actually want the chest is spin at a constant rate. So to do that is click and drag to select both of these keyframes. And then we want to press T. For time. And then we can sit the interpolation. So currently it's set to this Bezier curve and we want to set that to linear. So let's click on linear. And if you press Space-bar again now, you see it spins at a nice constant rotation and the animation loops perfectly now as well. Now you may have noticed that while it was spinning, it actually moved outside the bounds of our camera view. So if you put it in frame 1 over here, you'll see it starts cutting off the edge of our chest over there. And we can easily fix that by just scaling arches down a little bit. So let's press S to scale and hold down Shift on your keyboard. And then scale that down. Holding shift will allow us to scale it down much more precisely. Cool and nice lift, apply. And let's just go through this quickly and make sure it stays inside our camera view the whole time. And that looks good to me. Now we can render our animation much in the same way as we rented the still images. So for a still image, we press if 12, and that renders one still image or one frame. And add to render the entire animation. We can press control if 12. And that'll go through and render all the different frames of the animation. And I'll skip to the end just to save some time Qu and is done. So let's close that and how to view our animation. Instead of just pressing if we live in to view our Render, we're going to press Control if we live in. And that'll bring up this little window down here. Let's move that up. And now we have this nice spinning animation. Let's close that down. And to save that animation as either an image sequence or a video file, we can go to the output properties over here. If you scroll down, you'll see there's an output section. And currently it's set to tymp. That's just the temporary location that blend the users on your hard drive to render your images. And we can change that to anything you want by clicking on this little folder. So I'm going to click on that. And I've made this animation folder where I want to save my animation. And I'm going to call my animation chased spin. And click on Exit. And are below that, you can see the file format. And by default that is set to PNG. I prefer using PNGs because that gives us the ability to have a transparent background and that makes it a lot easier when using your objects later on. And just make sure the color is set to RGB so that we have that Alpha channel as well. And that'll give us the transparent background. So let's press Control if 12 again to render. And I'll skip forward to save some time. Cool, and it's done. Now we can close this. And if you open the folder on your hard drive now, you'll see we have each frame saved as a separate PNG image that we can either view separately. Well, we can use this as an image sequence in other software as well. But sometimes you want to render a video file instead of having a bunch of separate frames like we have at the moment here. And to do that, we can get back into Blender and go down to file format. And instead of P&G, we can select if, if mpeg video. And then under encoding, if you're not seeing this, you can just click on this little arrow to open that up. And for the container, I like to use impactful. And the output quality depends on what you're going to be using this video for. For a preview video, I tend to just leave it at medium quality. But as you can see, there's a whole bunch of other settings as well that you can use. So now we can simply press Control if 12 again coup and when it's done, we can go back into our folder on our hard drive. And I can see we have an MP4 video file as well. If you double-click that, it will open in the default video player for your computer. And this can be easily seen over e-mail or mobile or whatever, because only 27 kilobytes as you can see down the COO, and that is it for this lesson. 15. Modelling a Potion Bottle: Hello everyone. In this lesson we're going to start modeling our potion bottle. And to start with, let's add a cube by pressing Shift a. And then under Mesh select cube. Now let's press tab on our keyboard to go into edit mode and then go into face select mode by pressing three on your keyboard or by clicking this icon at the top here. And then select the top face. This can to solid view for now just to make it easier to see what we're doing. So hold down Z on your keyboard, move over to solid and release Z. And before we forget, let's rename this to double-click on cube. And let's call that potion bottle and press Enter. There we go. Cool. Now with this top face selected, this press E to extrude. And we're going to extrude that upwards. And for mine, I'm going to type 0.2 and press Enter. I'm going to scale that down. So press S on our keyboard. And then we can scale that down. And at the top there you can see how much we are scaling it. And I'm going to scale my zero-point 35 and press Enter. I'm going to extrude again to create the neck of the bottle. So it's press E to extrude and then move that up. And you can make this however long you want, just to make it easier to follow along. I'm going to make mine exactly one. So I'm going to type one on the keyboard and press Enter. Now to create the top lip of our bottle. Press E to extrude again. And then without clicking this press S to scale that. And I'm going to type 1 point 2. And that scales it up like that. So let's press Enter. And now we can press E again to extrude. And now we can create the top lip of our bottle. I'm going to type 0.25 and press Enter. And now let's make this body a little bit broader. So let's go into vertex select mode again. So we can press 1 on our keyboard, or you can click that icon at the top here. And to make it easier to select the vertices, Let's go into X-Ray mode. So hold on Z on your keyboard, moved down to X-ray and then let go of z. Now we can click and drag to select those lift vertices. Hold on. And then click and drag to select the right vertices. And if you press S to scale, we can scale those on their own. And I don't want to scale them on the z-axis, only on the x and y-axis. So we're going to tell blender Nazi skeleton on the z-axis. And to do that, we're going to press Shift Z. And I can see it's only scaling on the x and y-axis. So I'm going to type in a scale of 1.25 and press Enter. Now let's add a subdivision modifier to smooth out these corners. And to do that, let's go to modify properties, which is this little range over here. Click on Add Modifier and under Generate, we're going to look for subdivision surface. Click on that. And it's turned these up to four. There we go. And I'm going to switch over to material preview again, just to make it easier to see the subdivided object while we're working. So I'm going to hold down z with ERBB2 material preview and let go of z. And now we can see the object much easier while we're working. And I want to sharpen up some of these corners. So I'm going to go into front view with numpad 1 and the scammers getting in our way a little bit. So let's hide that by going over to camera and then click and drag and disable all these icons. Soon other camera won't be in our way anymore. Now let's add some loop cuts to tighten up these corners. So I'm going to press Control R to add a loop cut. Place whenever they left click once and then move that up to sharpen up that corner and left-click to apply. Now let's add another. Whenever they control our left-click, move that down, and left-click and sharpen up this bottom corner as well. So let's press Control R over. They click to place it down and then move it up and lift like again to apply and in one more over here. So it's Control R again. Left-click ones. Move that down just to sharpen up the transition between the body and the neck of the bottle. And I'm going to make mine something like that. And left-click to apply. There we go. It's going to object mode with tab. And let's right-click the object and select Shade Smooth. Here we go. Cool. Let's go into front view again. An Alice creates a Coke for our bottle. And to do that, well, we're in object mode. We can press Shift a to add, go to Mesh and select cube again. And let's rename this before we forget something and double-click and call this potion Coke. And press Enter. And I'm going to move that up to the opening of the bottle. So I'm going to press G to grab Z, to move it on the z-axis, and then move it up towards the top of the bottle. I'm going to type 2.5 and press enter just to make it easier to follow along. So let's go back into solid view by holding Z on our keyboard, moving over to solid and releasing z. Now we can see 3D objects again in x-ray mode. Cool mileage scale down this cube. So let's press S to scale. And again, to make it easier to follow along, I'm going to make mine exactly 0.3. So I'm going to type 0.3 and press Enter. And we can go into edit mode by pressing tab on our keyboard. And while still in vertex select mode at the top here so that we can see the vertices. We can select all those bottom ones. Just make sure that you are an x-ray mode. Who else those backwards weren't gets selected. So let's go back into front view. And I will this bottom one selected. I'm going to move them down a bit. So I'm going to press G to grab and move x0 to constrain it to the zed axis. And I'm going to move that down, so that's minus on the z-axis. So if you want to insert a value, you need to type minus before that value. So for mine I'm going to type minus 0.2 and press Enter. Now let's click and drag to select all the top vertices. And let's scale that up to make it a bit wider. So I'm going to press S to scale, and then I'm going to enter 1.2 and press into Cu. Let's zoom out Tibet, look at it from the side. Now let's add a subdivision surface modifier to this as well. So with the modifies panels still open, we can click on Add Modifier, get the subdivision surface to in that active for as well. And now let's go into front view again. Zoom in a bit. And now let's add some loop cuts just to sharpen up these corners as well. So let's press Control R. Left-click ones. Move that up and I can decide how sharp you want that top age to be. I'm going to make mine fairly sharp. So something like that. And left-click to apply and Control R again to add another loop, cut left-click ones, move that down and lift click to apply. I can go back into object mode with tab and turn off x-ray mode. So old and Z, move your mouse down and let go of z and right-click and select Shade smooth. And it's easy as that we have the completed bottle for our Persian. And one last thing we can do just to make it easier to move this around, because at the moment these are still separate objects. So if we move the bottle, the coke does not move along with it. And we can easily fix that by clicking to select the coke first, then holding down Shift, and clicking on the bottle. Then we can press Control P to parent. So it's Control P. And then it asks us sit Parent 2 and you can select object. Now if we click the bottle and press G to grab, you'll see the coke moves along with a bottle. If you press R to rotate, it moves along with a bottle. And if you press S to scale, it scales along with the bottle as well. We can still move the cork on its own as well. And then it will stay in that position when you move the bottle. It's just undo and maybe go. In the next lesson, we are going to be creating the potion for our potion bottle. 16. Creating the Potion Liquid: Hello everyone. In this lesson we are going to be adding the potion inside of our potion bottle. And to start with, let's click on the potion bottle deselected. And it's set on x-ray mode by holding on Z on our keyboard within the mouse down and letting go of z. And now we can see through our bottle bit better cook. So the bottle selected is press Shift D to duplicate that bottle. So let's press shift D. And I can see we have made a copy of that bottle and let's right-click to set it back to its original location. Now we can double-click on the new object's name over here. You'll see is the one that says dot 000 001. And we're going to rename that to potion liquid and press Enter. And, and we want that liquid to be a little bit smaller than the actual bottle. And he can't just scale that down. Let me show you quickly. Let's press S to scale. And you'll see as we scale that down, if you look at the body of the bottle, that looks good. But then at the top The, you'll see it starts passing through the outside of our bottle. So let's undo that by pressing Control Z. Now let's go into edit mode with our potion liquid selected. So you can press tab on our keyboard to go into edit mode. Now we can press a to select all. And now we want to scale everything away from the direction that they are facing, all the faces. And do that, instead of just pressing S to scale, we're going to press Alt S. And now as we scale that down, you'll see all the faces scale inwards away from where they were facing. So it's scatter down little bit. And the amount that you scaling this down will determine how thick your glass looks in your potion bottle. So I'm going to make mine something like that and then just lift click to apply. So let's go back into object mode quickly. Now you can see our potion liquid is now perfectly inside of our potion bottle. Now we need to sit the level of our liquid. And to do that, we're going to create an object that cuts off a certain part of the liquid. And that allows us to easily adjust how full we want this bottle to be. So to do that, Let's press Shift a to add the two mesh and add another cube. Now let's press S to scale and type 3 to make that three times bigger and press Enter. And let's zoom out Tibet. And let's just rename that DoubleClick. I'm going to call that potion level and press Enter. Now to make it a bit easier to see through this, Let's go to the object properties is little square icon over here. And then under visibility, we can open that and uncheck renders because we didn't want to render this cube. And in under re visibility, we can just click and drag to disable all of these. And then under view-port display, we can open that up. And you'll see display as it's currently set to textured. And we can change it to wire. And I will only show us the outline wireframe of this object. So we can easily see what's going on even if you're not in x-ray mode. Now let's go into front view quickly with numpad 1. Select our potion level, and then press G to grab and move x0 to move it on the z-axis. And then just move that up. And we ever, we place this is going to start cutting off the potion level. So let's say we wanted to have something like that. Now the person will only be at the bottom part day. Anything that's inside this cube will be cut off, glue. Make this cube actually do something with select a potion liquid. So if you click once it will shake the bottle, click again and I'll select the potion. And you can just make sure that you have the liquid selected by looking at the blue bar in this list over here. Now with a person liquid selected, let's go to the modifier properties is little range over here, and it's add a modifier. And under Generate you'll see the Boolean modifier. So let's click deselect that. And I can see we have different settings for this Boolean modifier. And for our purposes we're only going to look at difference right now. So now under object, we want to select our potion level object. And you can easily do that simply by clicking this little eyedropper and then moving until it says potion level. And then click on that. And they can see it cuts off the potion way that cube is located now. So if you select that cube, press G to grab and move that around. You can see you can easily make the person level higher or lower. So it's sitted like that. And now you may have noticed that the performance gets a bit choppy in our viewport over here and fix it. We can simply select our objects. Let's start with the Coke. And under the subdivision modifier and the modifier properties, we can turn down the levels viewport sitting to two, but leave the render sitting at for today, I'll turn down the subdivisions in this viewport and make everything run a bit smoother. But then when we render, it will still use the highest subdivision levels to give us nice smooth arenas. So it's like the bottle as well, to the labels viewport down to two. And then click on the potion liquid and turn the levels viewport down to two as well. Now if we grab this again, move that around. You can see it's a lot smoother. Qu and Alex parent this potion liquid to the bottle as well. Because at the moment if you grab this bottle, you'll see the person stays behind. So let's click on the potion, deselected potion, hold down, shift, click on the bottle, and then press Control P again to parent. And select Object Group. Now we can select the bottle, press G to grab, and we can move that around. And as you can see, the potion level stays at that certain level where the cube cancel off. The cool thing now is we can rotate this bottle around and that liquid will stay in the correct orientation, as you can see. And it's just reset the location and rotation by holding on Alt and pressing G to receive the location and holding on Alt and pressing R to reset the rotation. And one last thing you want to do is make it so that we can move this bottle around without having to select our potion level object the whole time as well. A painting this 2D object won't give us the desired effect because they need would rotate with our object as well. Let me show you what the problem with that would be. So we're going to parent that to the bottle. Now if you select the bottle, if we move it, everything is fine. But if you rotate it, you see a person doesn't look right anymore because the level rotates along with the bottle. Now, let's undo that, undo, undo. Here we go. So now to fix that, we can sit a constraint to our potion label object so that it follows the location of our bottle, but not the rotation. And to do that, we can make sure our potion level object is selected. And we can go down to constraint properties. You'll see it looks like two little circles with a constraint around them. We can click on that and we can click on Add Object Constraint and in copy location. So click on Copy location. And then for the target, we went to click on this little dropper again and then select our bottle. But now it will always keep the exact location of our bottle and we can't move that around to adjust the level anymore. And to fix that, we simply need to enable offset over here. So click on offset and now it'll keep the offset so we can select our potion and adjust the level two what EBIT we want. But then if we click on our bottle and grab and move that around, it will move like that. And if you rotate that, we can rotate the bottle and the Persian level still stays correct. Cool. I'm going to reset the location and rotation again by pressing Alt G to receive the location and ALT are two receipt the rotation. Awesome. And in the next lesson we're going to add some nice materials to our potion. 17. Adding Materials to the Potion: Hello everyone. In the previous lesson, we finished up the modelling for our potion. And we can now adjust the level with this level object as well. And now let's add some materials to our potion. So to begin with, we're just going to camera view quickly with numpad 0. Here we go. And now we can just reposition our bottle so that it's nicely framed in our camera frame. And you select the bottle and everything else should come along with it. So let's press G to grab Z to move it on the z-axis. Move that down a bit more space to scale. And click G to grab. And click and is the scale. There we go. That should be good for now. If 12 quickly to see what that looks like. Gou, so we have the basic shape, but everything is still the default white material. So we can close that down going to the shading tab up here. And I will start with the bottle. So with the bottle selected, we can go to the material properties or we can add a new material over here. For now, let's click on New over here. And it's cool that gloss. And press Enter. And then for surface, we're going to switch this from principled BSD if we click on that, and we're going to change that to gloss BSD. And then we have a glossy material. Now we can turn the roughness all the way down. And the IOR, That's the index of refraction, and that is how the object Baines light. For our purposes, we can set that to 1.1, cool and insulate the coke. And we can create a new material over here. And I'm going to change that to cook and press Enter. The reason why I didn't do it over here this time is because we're going to leave the surface as principled BSD if so, you don't have to worry about changing it every day. But using middle mouse button to click and drag and move this over a little bit to the side. Now let's add a noise node over here. So we can press Shift a to add, click on Search and type noise, and then select noise texture. And to view at this noise texture is doing. We can hold down control and shift and then left-click. And I can see it's adding some detail to our object. And you change that from black and white, we can add a color ramp. So let's add a color ramp by pressing Shift a again and under search type ramp. And then select colorRamp and drop it onto that line. There we go. Now the black value, we can leave it black and the white value, we can click on this little triangle. And we're going to change that color to a dark brown color. So for the hue, we're going to make that 0.06 and press into the saturation. We're going to make 0.7. And the value we're going to make 0.2. And press Enter. And Alice just connect that color up to our base color. And then hold down control and shift, and click on the shader so that that is connected up to the material output like that. And it just turned the roughness all the way up to one as well. It's pretty safe 12 to see what that looks like now. Cu, now we're getting some way. Let's close that down again and click again to select the potion liquid and its create a new material as well. Cool that liquid and press Enter. And let's turn up the roughness. 0.8 and press Enter. And for the base color, let's make that a nice red color for now. So click on this white value. And in the hue we're going to leave at 0 saturation. We're going to turn all the way up to one. And the value we are going to make 0.2 as well. And as you can see, we can actually see through the glass at the moment. And that is because we are in the material preview mode. So to see what the final render looks like, we can just change it over to rendered view so we can hold down z, move over to rendered, and indeed curve Z. And then we can start seeing our potion inside the bottle. Now, cool displays if 12 again to render. And there we go. Now we can always go into camera view, zoom out Tibet, it select our bottle. And now let's press R to rotate. This, rotate that sideways a little bit. Press G to grab. Lifted to apply, press S to scale. And left-click to apply g to grab. Deftly, to apply R to rotate. Just to get a bit of a more interesting image. So let's press F2 Alpha again. And there we go. A simple potion bottle. And now it's very easy to change the color of this potion as well. And simply click to select the potion liquid. And we can then click and drag to make this Green received 12. And I shiny green magic type of person. Let's make that blue to make it a manner Persian. Maybe. There we go. And we can obviously still easily change the level of operation by selecting our person-level object, pressing G to grab and move. I'm just gonna constrain that to the zed axis by pressing Z as well. And then we can change the level of our potion as well. And I want to show you how easily we can create simple variations on this bottle as well. So let's click on the bottle. Let's go back to the layout panel and make sure we are in solid mode. And x-ray mode is enabled. Maybe go, oops, it's just enable that. Cool. Now let's revisit the rotation of our bottle by selecting the bottle and then pressing Alt R to reset the rotation and then go into front view with numpad 1. And now we want to select the bottle and the potion liquid. So with the bottle selected, we can hold down Shift and then click on the potion liquid. And I can see they are both selected. And if you then press Tab to go into edit mode, you can see we can now edit both of these objects together. So let's select those corners, hold down, Shift, select corners. And then we're going to press G to grab Z, to grab it on the z-axis and move that all the way down. Here we go and lifted to apply. Let's go back into object mode. As you can see now we have a very different shape to our Flask. And that way we can easily make different variations on our objects. Let's go back into edit mode quickly with tab. Go into front view with numpad 1 is select all of these bottom vertices. Press S to scale. And now we don't want to scale them on the z-axis. So we're going to press Shift Z disk held him only on the x and y-axis. And it's moved those in a little bit. Let's go back into object mode. With this potion level up a bit. And as we can easily make a little potion vial. So it's undo that. And we are back to our original shape. Let me show you how we can duplicate this so that you can easily make different variations. Let's select the bottle, hold down Shift. Select the Persian hold down Shift again, select the coke and hold down Shift again to select the level objects. And now we have everything selected. Then we can press Shift D to duplicate and right-click to apply. Now just click to select one of those bottles, press G to grab, and move that over to the side. And now you can see we have a perfect copy of our first bottle and we can make adjustments to which change the shape for this one. So select the bottle, hold down, Shift, select the potion liquid, going to edit mode with Tab. It's going to front view again. Select these corners, hold down, Shift, select those corners. Press G to grab Z to constrain it to the z-axis. Move it down a little bit. Lift lead to apply, click and drag to select the bottom one's. Press G to grab Z to constrain to the z-axis and move this up. Click to apply. Here we go. Now we already have two different bottles. Now to quickly change the color of the potion liquid for this bottle, Let's go into rendered view. I can go to Shading again. Click on one of these potion liquids. Let's call this liquid blue. It's linked the other liquid over here. And as you can see, it's currently using the same liquid blue material. To make a copy of that, we can simply click on this little papers icon, which is new material. And that will create a new material, but it will use the same settings as the other material. So let's rename that to liquid red and press Enter. Now we click over here, change that to red. And then we have a red person and a blue persian. And we can easily adjust the levels of either there. And that way you can quickly create variations on your objects and materials as well. Cool, and that is it for this lesson. 18. Modelling a Mushroom: Hello everyone. In this lesson we're going to be modelling this mushroom. So to begin with, let's hide these bottles that we created in the previous lesson. And because the liquid and coke are parented to the bottle, they are contained inside the bottle object in the list over here. So do you hide them? We need to click on this little arrow to open it up. And there you see the coke and the liquid. Now we can click and drag over all these icons to hide all of those. Click on this one, sees that bottle, click on this little arrow, and then click and drag over the liquid, Coke and the bottle. If not seeing all these icons, just click on this little filter icon at the top and you can just make sure those four are enabled. Gpu, the potion level object, and just hide that as well. And the other one, here we go, you can just move him off to the side as well if you don't want to hide them. Cool, Let's go into front view with numpad 1 and with shift and middle mouse button, click and drag to reposition that nicely in the center. And at the start, let's add a cube. So let's press Shift a. And then under Mesh select Cube. Who is rename this? Before I forget, I'm going to call this mushroom and press Enter. There we go. Now let's scale this down a little bit. So I'm going to press S and n-type zero-point for and press Enter. And again, I'll give you these values in case you want to follow along exactly. But you can obviously make your mushroom thinner or thicker or taller or shorter, or whatever you want. Now it's going to edit mode with Tab on your keyboard. Make sure in x-ray mode and they can see extrema is blue, so it is enabled. Now we can click and drag to select the top vertices. Just make sure you're in vertex select mode. And then we can press G to grab and move x0 to move it on the z-axis. And we can move that up. And I'm going to move mine up exactly 1.75. So I can type 1.75 and press Enter. And now we can press E to extrude. And without clicking it press S to scale and n-type five and press Enter. So that made that new extruded face five times as big as it was before. And I press E to extrude again, and I want to extrude that upwards. And I'm going to type 1 and press Enter. And let's make that a little bit larger. So let's press S to scale and type 1.1 and press Enter. Now we can press E again to extrude, and then I'm going to type 0.6 and press Enter. Let's scale that down. So press S again to scale. And I'm going to make mine 0.3. So I'll type 0.3 and press Enter. Here we go, as smooth as outlets add a subdivision surface modifier to the mushroom. And to do that is go to the modifier properties. Click on this little range. They can add modifier and under Generate, you'll see the subdivision surface modifier and its turn. Both of these up to full day weaker. And the smooth everything out nicely. How to sharpen up the edges in certain places. It adds some loop cuts. So we can press Control R to add a loop cut. And its place whenever here, left-click ones, then move that down almost to the age and left-click. And they admit add one over here, control our left-click ones. Move that up towards the top and left-click again. And then one for the bottom as well. So it press Control R again. Left-click ones, move that down and left-click. And let's add another one to the middle over here. So let's press Control R again, left-click and then right-click to just place it back to the center. Now we can click and drag to select all these bottom vertices. And let's scale this up a tiny bit just to give some shape to our mushrooms stim. So with that selected, let's press S to scale. And we're going to type 1.2. Now to make a machine look a bit more interesting, Let's click and drag to select the entire top. And with the top selected, this press R to rotate. Take that a bit and left-click to apply. Press G to grab that a bit to the side. So we give the stem a little bit of a bend, left-click to apply. Now let's go into camera view quickly with numpad 0. And let's rotate the top backwards a little bit so that we can see the underside of the mushroom just a little bit. And to do that, Let's press R to rotate. And we want to rotate that on the red X axis. So we're going to press X to constrain it to the x-axis. And then just move that. See a little bit of the bottom of the mushroom. And that'll just give us a more interesting look. And left-click to apply. Now it's going to object mode with tab on our keyboard. Right-click the mushroom, select, Shade Smooth, and then press G to grab and just move that towards the middle. Press S to scale, scale it up a little bit, G to grab. And I can see this bottom part of our mushrooms top anymore. So let's go back into edit mode with tab. And with that top still selected, luscious berries are again to rotate and then extra constraint to the x-axis. And it is related that backwards a little bit more. There we go. It's press tab again to get into object mode. Nice, and you can see the underside of the mushroom now as well. So let's hold down z. We've done to toggle x-ray and release Z to disable x-ray mode. Now we can press F2 to render. Cool, and then we have the basic shape for our mushroom. In the next lesson, we'll create some cool materials for a machine. 19. Adding Materials to the Mushroom: Hello everyone. In this lesson we're going to be creating some nice materials for this mushroom that we modeled in the previous lesson. So to start with, let's just add some materials to our mushroom. So click on the material properties over here, and then click on New to create a new material, I'm going to call this top and press Enter. And everyone's a separate material for the steam of our mushroom. So we can click on this little plus icon to add another material slot to our object. And we can click New and then call that steam and press Enter. Cool. Now to see what we're doing, Let's just select the top and go to base color, and then change that to a nice red color. Here we go. And let's switch over to material preview by holding down z and moving to material preview and then release Z. And I can see the entire mushroom is rate at the moment. And you sign some parts to the stem material. We need to go into edit mode with tab and then enable X-Ray mode by holding z, moving a mouse down and lingo of z. Now we can click and drag to select all these bottom vertices and how to expand our selection, we can simply hold down Control and then press numpad plus. Each time a press Plus, you'll see it expands the selection and is press Plus until we have everything selected up to the bottom of our mushroom over there. Now select the steam material and click Assign. And there we go. So now press Tab to go back into object mode. And now the steel material is assigned to the steam and the underside of our mushroom. Cool. Let's get to the shading editor by clicking on this shading tab at the top here. And just switch to material preview again, hold down z Goto material preview and really see zoom in a little bit, coo. And how the objects selected. We can select the different materials by clicking on this little drop-down. And then we can either select the top or the steam. So let's click on the stem to select the stem material and how we can make some changes to our steam material. So let's change the base color for this. Let's click over here. And I'm going to enter some values that I found that work nicely, but you can always play around and make different colors as well. So for the hue, I'm going to make that 0.085 and press Enter will the saturation. I'm going to make it 0.4 and press Enter. And then for the value, I'm going to make that 0.1250.125 and press Enter. And now it's turn the roughness all the way up to one. Let's press if 12 to just see what that color looks like in our render. Here we go. I quite like that. Just adds a little bit of color to the stem. So it's close that down. Analyse electric top material. So click on this drop-down and select top. And now we're working with the top material. As you can see, we've got that red color. Now I want my machine to be red with white spots. And to do that we're going to use a noise texture called the Voronoi texture. So let's press Shift a to add. And under texture, you'll see the Voronoi texture. So let's click on that and click to drop it down. Click and drag from this distance pen and plug that into the base color. Now I can start seeing what this texture is doing. And to give us a more control over this texture, which just click to select it and press Control T to add some mapping nodes. And that will allow us to change the position and the scale and rotation of this texture. And it's switched the texture coordinates to Object. So click and drag from this object, then plug that into the vector. And it's turned down the scale to 0.5. Now to get more definite spots, we can use a math node. So let's press Shift a to add, click on Search and type math. Did select the math node and drop that on this line. And after the operation is click on this. And instead of add this, change that to less than. Now what this is doing is taking this texture and the texture is less than this threshold. It's going to make it white. And if it's higher than the threshold is going to make it black. So we can turn this down to 0.25. So I'm just going to type 0.25 and press Enter. Now we can see we're starting to get some nice spots every day. Now to move the spot around, we can click and drag on any of these XYZ coordinates. You can see we can click and drag to move these around and it'll change the look of your spots. And to change the scale of the spots, we can just use a scale value on the voronoi texture itself. So you can click and drag to make those bigger or smaller. And you can hold down Shift to make that a little bit less sensitive. So I'm going to leave mine at 0.5. And for the location valleys, I found that sitting x to 11 gives us a nice result which is make the y and the z 0 again. Now we have nice spots on our machine, but now it's still black and white. So let's just click and drag to select all of these, move them back a bit. And now let's add the two colors that we want to use. So we can press Shift a to add getting input, and then select RGB, which is just basically a color. And let's make that red, something like that. And then press Shift a again. Go to Input RGB. And I'm going to make that white. And you can play around with these colors to change them to whatever you want as well. Now we need to mix these together. And to do that, let's add a mixed node so that press Shift a again, click on Search and type mix and intellect, mix RGB, and click to drop that down. And we can click and drag from our red color, plug that into color one. Click and drag from the white-collar, plug that into Calit2. And I would plug the output from the mixed node into our base color and currently is only mixing between the red and the white. And to fix that, Let's just plug the value from r less than node into the factor of our mixed node. And there we go. Let's press F2 to render. Cool, I think is a bit too shiny. That is just turn the roughness up a bit. Currently cities year 0.5, literally 0.7 and press into the piece if 12 again, there we go. I quite like that. And that is it. And I can easily duplicate this mushroom makes them larger and smaller variations simply by pressing Shift D to duplicate. Move that over to the side, Scalar down or scale it up, rotate around the z-axis, maybe. Scale down. There we go. Now we can easily create a whole bunch of mushrooms and you can change the colors over here to whatever you want. And let's say you wanted to create a new California separate mushroom. Let's select this mushroom. And while, when slot one, you can see it's using the top material. Let's click on this new material Icon. The change that the top two and press Enter. And now we can change the color for this one, and it won't affect the other color as well. If you want to change this color, simply click on this again and change it to whatever you want. We're going to move this to the side a little bit. Scale it up a tiny bit. Here we go, especially if 12. Cool, I like that. And that is it for this lesson. 20. Modelling a Key: Hello everyone. In this lesson, we're going to be modeling this key. So to start with, let's press Shift a to add and then go to Mesh and select cylinder. Now we can click down here to open up this little menu. And we can adjust the settings for our cylinder and we can sit the amount of segments that we want. I'm going to set that to 30. And then we can close this down again. Qu and Alice go into edit mode by pressing tab on our keyboard. Press a to select all. And then we want to rotate that around the x-axis so that it's facing us. And to do that, this press R to rotate x to constrain to the x-axis. And it's typed 90, so it's 900 and press Enter. There we go. It's rotate the view a bit so that we can see this side of our object. Now with everything still selected, let's scale that on the y-axis to make it a bit thinner. So there's press S to scale. Why discovered on the y-axis and the n-type 0.2 and press Enter. There we go. And let's hold on Z and go to Solid mode and release Z. And if x-ray mode is enabled, Let's disable x-ray mode, so we can hold on Z, move that down. And in real easy to disable x-ray mode. Now we can go into face select mode. So we can either click this icon at the top here, or you can press three on your keyboard. And we can select this front face. Rotate with the middle mouse button. I will do the back, hold down shift and click on the back face as well. So now we have both of those faces selected. And now to create our hole in the middle of the key, it's inset these faces. So again to press I to insert. And then we can either move that down, we can enter a value and I'm going to enter 0.6 and press Enter. And now to make the hole, we can just press X to delete, and then select faces. There we go. But now you can see the inside of those faces and we don't want that. So what we can do is go to edge select mode by pressing too on our keyboard, or by clicking this icon at the top. Then hold down Alt, deselect an edge loop. So we can hold on Alt and click on this first loop. And as you can see, that selected that entire loop and hold down Shift and Alt to select the other edge loop as well on the other side. So now we have both of those selected. And to connect those, we can press Control E to bring up our age menu and look for bridge edge loops. So you can select that and that bridge those edges. And it closed up our object again for us. Camera view with numpy zeros just to make sure that we are looking at it from the right side. Now we can move to the side and go into face select mode again with three on your keyboard or by pressing this icon. Now we want to select this face with the x-axis into our key. And then hold shift and select the one above that and the one below that as well. Now let's go to front view with numpad 1. Zoom out a little bit, press E to extrude. Now we can extrude this part of the key. And to make it easier to follow along, I'm going to type 2.5 and press Enter. And now we need to create the teeth part of our key. And do that, Let's add some edge loops over here. So let's press Control R. Left-click once, and then move that almost to the front like that and left-click again to place it down. And then Control R again, left-click once. And then we can decide how broad we want those teeth to be. I'm going to make mine something like this. And left-click. And now is press Control R one more time and enroll up on our mouse wheel to create two more edge loops between those ones that we just created. And left-click and right-click to place them back in the center. Now we can rotate down to look at it from the bottom. It's going to face mode again. So it's this icon or three on your keyboard. And it's select this face, this face and this face by holding Shift and clicking on them all. Now if you press E to extrude and extrude those a little bit. There we go. And then select just the back one. And it's going to front view again with numpad 1. Press E to extrude and extrude that down almost to the same level as our key over here. And we'll just rotate down again, select the front part, go into front view again with numpad 1 e to extrude. And I'm going to extrude mine a little bit less than the background, just to give it some variation. Cool. And I was going to object mode by pressing tab on our keyboard. Right-click and select Shade Smooth. Now to fix these shading issues, it's going to Object Data Properties, this little triangle icon. And then under normals, if you're not seeing wishing, you just click the triangle, select Auto Smooth. And we got, and we have smooth faces of a day. And we can still see the edges with our shop. And let's go into camera view quickly with NumPy 0. And let's press G to grab and move ourselves in the center of our camera view. So the distance from the edges are the same. And the thing now is, let's say we wanted to rotate this key. If you press R to rotate, Z to rotate on the z-axis, you can see it doesn't rotate around the center of our key. So let's right-click to cancel that. I can see that little yellow dot over there that is the origin of our object. And when we rotate the object, it will always rotate around that origin. And sometimes you want that, but sometimes you want to change the origin. So I'm going to sit the origin right to the center of this object now. And because our 3D cursor is at the world center, directly, we are cameras aiming. If we sit the origin to that cursor, it'll rotate nicely around that point. And again, to change the location or the 3D cursor, we can hold down Shift and right-click anywhere. And to sit it back to the center, we can just press Shift C for sinter. Now just go back into camera view with NumPy 0. And as you sit the origin to that 3D cursor, which right-click our object. And then select sit, origin and the origin to 3D cursor. Let's click on that. And I can see that yellow dot jumped to a 3D cursor. And if you press R Now to rotate Z to writer on z axis, it rotates nicely and it stays within the bounds of our camera view. So it's right-click to cancel. And I have to press S to scale. You see it scales up nicely from the center as well. So let's make that about that big and left-click. Now let's press if 12 to render. I would like to have a little line going across the top of these teeth as well. And to do that, we can tell blended, draw these freestyle outlines in specific places instead of just around the edges of our object. So let's close that. Now let's go back into edit mode by pressing Tab and our keyboard. Zoom in a bit. Just make sure you're in H Select mode by either clicking vasopressin 2 on your keyboard. Now we can click and then hold down Shift and click on all these edges where we want to draw the lines. So I'm gonna hold down, Shift, select those back three, and those three Cu now can press Control E to bring up the H Menu. And then at the bottom here you can see mock freestyle age. So let's click on that. And at ages of turned this green color. And I just tells us there'll be drawn as freestyle lines now as well. But let's press if 12 quickly to render. You can see they are not being rendered yet. And that is because we just need to activate these marked ages as well in the freestyle sittings. So it's closer down and click on View layer properties. It's a little stack of images and we can scroll down all the way to the bottom. And here we sit the H types in an earlier lesson, you can see we've got silhouette, border, crease and material boundary, which is enable each mark as well. So click on that and have you press F2. There we go. Now draws those ages as well. And in this way can add lines anyway on your object where you want them. So if we were to select these four edges, press Control, E, Mark freestyle, age, permissive 12. And I can see draws those ages as well. And to clear those again, we can simply select them all. Press Control E and select Clear freestyle age. And now they're no longer green. So the one kid drawn as edges anymore. Cool, and that is it for this lesson. In the next lesson, we'll create a nice material for the ski as well. 21. Adding Materials to the Key: Hello everyone. In this lesson we are going to be creating some materials for this key that we made in the previous lesson. And before I forget again, let's just rename this to double-click on cylinder, and it's cool that key and press Enter. Now we can select our key, go-to material properties, click on that and click on new. And it's cool at key and press Enter. Now we can change the color for this to anything you want. So let's say we wanted to have a red, blue, yellow key or whatever. You can just change the color over here. So I'm going to make mine a reddish key. Turn that down a little bit, please. If 12 to see what that looks like. Maybe a little bit darker. Cool. Let's turn up the saturation a little bit. I'm going to turn up the metallic value as well. Let's make that 0.5 press into a nice deep red color. But as you can see, we're getting some reflections on the inside at that key. And that's sometimes just adds one light pixel like that, which doesn't really look nice. So let's close this down. Let's go back into edit mode quickly. And now let's make the inside of this key a different material. And to do that, it's going to face select mode by clicking this icon or by pressing three on your keyboard. And now we can select these faces. And to select this entire face loop, we can hold on Alt and then click between two of the faces that we want. So we can click on this edge. And I see it selects that entire face loop. Let's say we wanted to select this entire face loop on the outside here, we can hold on Alt and click on this age to select that entire face loop. At least select the inside one again. So let's hold on Alt and then click and illustrate a new material for this inside part. So let's click on this plus icon. And then we can click New. And I'm just going to call that black and press. And it's click over here, make that black turn the roughness all the way up. And now with this insight still selected, we can make sure our black material is selected as well. And then click assign it, just hold on Z, move over to material preview and release Z. And then we can go back to object mode with tab. And now we can start seeing that inside of our key, expressive 12 again. And I can see that bright reflective spot is a lot darker. If you want to get rid of that completely, we can always turn the specular down as well. And as you can see, there are no reflections at all coming from the object. We go. Now we can use this lick the key color and then change this value just by dragging them around. So let's say we wanted to make a green key. Received 12. There we have a green key or a blue key or whatever key you want. I'm going to sit mine back to red. Let's go into camera view quickly. And it's just rotate this around and see what other angles of this looks like as well. Cool, and I'm quite happy with that. And in the next lesson, I'll show you how to quickly create a spinning moving animation for this key as well. 22. Creating an Animation for the Key: Hello everyone. In this lesson we're going to be creating a spinning animation for this key that we created. So to begin with, let's just reset the rotation of this object. So hold on Alt and press R to reset the rotation. And now we can make a timeline a bit larger by dragging this upwards a bit cool. Now let's tell blender to remember the rotation of the key at this frame. So we can insert a keyframe. So let's press I to insert. And in select rotation. And just make sure you are in object mode or else this won't work. Qu, and let's drag this all the way to 30 frames. And now with the objects selected, let's press R to rotate, Z to rotate on the z-axis and n-type 36 0. And press Enter. Now let's insert another keyframe. So let's press I again, an insulated rotation Qu, and I can see it spins around as we scroll around the timeline. Now let's make this move up and down as well while it's spins. So let's press G to grab Z to move it on the z-axis. And just move that down a little bit like that. Now we want it to be in the same position in the beginning and at the end so that it loops nicely. And to do that, let's insert a keyframe over here. So press I to insert. And now we're going to be changing the location. So click on location and drag it to the end. I again, and click on location again. So now we'll always be in this exact spot at the beginning and at the end of our animation. So let's go to 15 frames, which is the middle of the animation. And let's press G to grab Z, to move it on the z-axis. And move that up a little bit. And literally to apply, now we can press I to insert a keyframe and then select location again. So now it moves up or down. But now we have that same issue that we had with the chest, which starting slowly and speeds up and then finishes slowly again. And that looks good for the up and down movement, but for the spinning movement, it just looks a bit strange. And how to fix that, we can select these keyframes and press T and in select linear. But now we set everything to linear movement, even the up-and-down movement as well. So now you see it kind of bounces off the top and the bottom. Let's Play. And that's something that you want them, it's good. But I want mine to move up and down a bit smoother. So let's click on this little arrow over here to open up the side panel. Let's click on Summary. And the we can see we've got a different key frames and then click on Object Transforms. And over here you can see we've got the x, y, and z rotation and the x, y, and z location. So those are the different keyframes for this animation that we just made. And now we can select any of these separately and change the interpolation for them as well. So let's click and drag and select only these bottom ones. These are the location keyframes. So now we can press T again and sit them back to Bezier. Let's press Space again. And I can see it's spins nicely and it moves up and down smoothly as well. And now let's get to the output sittings quickly. This little printer over here. And we're going to switch the output format back to PNG so that we have the transparent background. And for the output location, let's click on this little folder. And this is a new key folder that I made. I'm going to call this key spinning and select, except maybe we go. Now I can press Control if 12 to render your animation, Qu, and it's done. Let's press Control. If you live in to view the animation. Smooth this up. Wu and you can see we have a black background. That is because we've forgotten able RGBA. So we didn't have the alpha channel list is rendered that again. And it's done this press Control. If you live in, There we go. Now you have a transparent background to our key as well. And if you wanted to make that a little bit less reflective, maybe. I don't know if it's a little bit too much. Let's just look for one of those angled frames. Let's press if 12 to read a one frame. Now we can just make some minor adjustments to the roughness up a little bit risky of 12 again. There we go. It's going to render the animation again quickly, skip to the end. Cool. And is press Control if you live in to view. There we go. I quite like that. Cool, and that is it for this lesson. 23. Creating Variations with a Lattice: Hello everyone. In this lesson I want to show you how I can easily create variations on any of these objects that we created by using a lattice. Now a lattice is, is basically a simple shape that we can manipulate. And as we manipulate the shape of the lattice, it also manipulates the shape of our more complex object. So let me show you how that works. Let's hide this key by clicking and dragging all those icons. And let's re-enable our chest that we made earlier. Now if you select the chest, I'm going to edit mode with tab. You'll see we have a fairly complicated geometry. Now, let's go into vertex select mode. And that makes it very difficult to change the overall shape of a complex object like this. So let's go back into object mode. And what we can do now is press Shift a to add, then go down to lattice and click on lattice. And it's going to solid view by holding on z, we will have to solid view and releasing z and then activate x-ray mode as well by holding on Z, moving a mouse down and releasing Z. And then we can see the lattice that we created now. So it's going to front view with numpad 1. And now we can press S to scale, make that a bit bigger and lifted to apply, press G to grab Z, to change the z axis and move that up. And basically we want to do is make sure the entire chest is contained within the shape of our lattice. So it's pretty scale again, x discount on the x-axis. And left-click. Cool. I can see the chase this inside the lattice completely. Now the lattice selected. Let's go to the properties of the lattice over here, and let's click on that. And then we can see the resolution for the lattice. And as we increase this, you see we have more detail to our lattice object. So we're going to turn the u value up to four and the v and the w values up to three. Cool. So now we have a bit more control over the overall shape. But still simple enough that we can easily change the shape of this lattice. And now we need to add a lattice modifier to our chest. So let's click on the chest. Go to modify our Properties. Click on Add Modifier and then undeformed your CV letters modifier. So let's click on that and info object. We can click on this little dropper and select our lattice that we created. So let's click and they can see it says lattice. Now insulate the lattice again and press Tab to go into edit mode. And now we can select any of these vertices of the lattice. And if you press G to grab, you'll see changes the shape of our chest as well. Let's go into camera view quickly with NumPy at 0 and if 12 to render. And let's make this a bit bigger. I'm going to switch this over to slot one, if 12 again. And then we can switch over to slot t2. And now we can make some changes to the lattice. I'm going to select those corners and those corners. Press G to grab Z to constrain it to the z axis and then move them down. And click Apply, then click and drag to select these top vertices, press G to grab again Z to Christianity the z axis, and move those up. If 12 again to see what that looks like. Ooh. And I can see we can easily make some cool variations on the objects that we created already. So let's switch back to slot one by pressing one nano keyboard. So this is the original chaste, and this is the variation that we made. Now let's press three to go two slot three plus that down. And with those middle ones still selected, let's press G to grab Z to move them and visit axis. Move him down. In select this corner ones again, holding Shift and select those. Press G to grab Z to constrain it to the z-axis and move those up, something like that. And let's select these middle-sized ones as well. Hold down, Shift, select those. And I went to scale those inwards on the x axis. So I'm going to press S, scale x to constrain it to the x-axis and move those in a bit. We go, It's press if 12 again. And then we have another weird variation on our chest. And then we can switch between the slots to see the difference between the variations. So you can either select the slots over here or we can just place 123 on our keyboard. So that's the first one, that's the second 1, third 1. And in this way you can easily create variations to the shape of your objects. And you want to take this one step further. You can go in and change the colors of these different variations as well. Let's go back into object mode. Now we can make a copy of this object in this shape. And do that. Let's press Shift D to duplicate and then right-click to sell it back to the original location. And then in the modifier properties, we can click on this little drop-down and click Apply. And now if we move this out of the lattice, you'll see it keeps that shape. So now I can click on the lattice again, go back into edit mode. Let's look those ones. G to grab Z to constrain to the z axis. Windows down. I'm just going to move these up again. Go back into object mode, select our chest again, press Shift D to make a duplicate copy of that. And then Katia modify properties and apply the lattice and press G to grab, move that to the side. And if you go into material view, you can see we have different variations to our chest. And if you want to go back to the original shape of your chest, we can simply go back to the modify properties and remove this lattice modifier Qu. And that is how easy it is to use the lattice to make some different variations of your objects. 24. Creating Sprite Sheets: Hello everyone. In this lesson I'll show you how to take the image sequences that we rendered in previous lessons and create a single spreadsheet from those. In some cases, a single spreadsheet is preferred over a bunch of individual frames that we have in an image sequence. First, let's create a new project. So click on File, then click on New, and then select video editing. In the class resources for this class, you'll find a sprite sheet creator add-on for Blender. This is an add-on that I made based on the sprite sheet generated from say, productions. So all credit goes to them. So let's install the add-on, click on Edit, go to Preferences, then click on Add-ons. And over here we can click Install. And I just go to where you downloaded the sprite sheet, create a file, click on that, and click on install add-on. And then as soon as it loads in here, you can just activate it over day and close this window. Now you see we have a sprite sheet tab at the bottom right over here. So now what we can do is go to the timeline and click on Add, and then select image sequence. Not just navigate to your image sequence that we rendered in previous lessons. You click on one of the frames and press a to select all. And we can click Add Image Strip. And I can see we have our animation on the timeline over here to create a sprite sheet from this animation, which is going to anyway after the animation. And then click the Select the animation. And you can click Create Spreadsheet. And as easy as that, we have our spreadsheet created, to save this as an image, we can simply press if 12 again. And that'll render that frame to an image for us. And we can click on Image, Save As. And then we can save that wherever we want. It. Just quickly look at some of the settings that we have in this add-on. Firstly, we have Match Source tile size. With that checked, it'll automatically set the size of each tile to the same size that we have for our source image over here. So most of the time we can leave that on one place where this can be useful is if we have a lot of blank space around the image for each render, then we could simply disable this and make this a bit smaller if you wanted to. Click into liters. Because our image strip again to create spreadsheet. And I can see the chase or closer to one another. In this case, it won't work because our chest, we're already at the age of our frame. So we can simply just click on match. So style, size and the details, click on the actual strip again, and then click Create Spreadsheet. They regard. As you can see, different frames or very close to one another, which should not be a problem. But sometimes you want to add some padding around each frame. And you can do that by clicking add margin. And then you can select how many pixels you want to add around each frame on your spreadsheet. So let's leave that at two. That means it will add two pixels above, to the left, to the right, and at the bottom for each of the frames. So let's click and drag this to delete those. Click on our image sharp again, click Create Spreadsheet. Now I can see we have some more space between these as well. Now if your image SRP has more than 30 frames, you see creates multiple new strips on your timeline over here. So if I move this to the side, we can see this bottom one is the first 30 frames, and then this next one is the next 30 frames. So you can just leave those as they are generated. And then press if 12 to render your final image and save that as an image. It's licked dose and press Delete to delete them. Now you also see we have tiles X entails Y. These are just simply the number of tiles that will have on our sprite sheet. So let's click on this. Click Create Spreadsheet again. Now you can see we have six by six tiles, but that only gives us space for 36 tiles. You have anything over 36. They won't get added to the spreadsheet over here. And you can easily check how many frames you have in your image sequence by simply zooming in and looking at this little number over here. And as you can see, we have 60 frames in the sequence. So we'll have to sit these tiles so that we have a total number of tiles that are larger than 60. So 8 by 8 gives us 64 loops. And this happened because our timeline marker, we're still over the original image sequence. We had to just move it off to the side. Delete that little one, delete that little one. Select our image, trip again, click Create Spreadsheet, and there we go. Let's delete all of these quickly. Move that back to 0. I'm going to add a new image sequence. Click on the first frame, press a to select all click Add Image Strip h2. And then we can just zoom in over here. And you can see we have 30 frames to the sequence. And now we can have a look up here. We've got eight by eight tiles, that gives us 64. We can turn that down to six. And I'll give a space for 36 tiles. So our 30 tiles will fit into that nicely. And some applications require a square aspect ratio, two images. So keeping the x and the y tile amounts the same. We'll give you that square image aspect ratio. But if that is not an issue, we have some more freedom to change these to match our exact number of frames a bit more. So you have 30 frames. So we can say that six times five, and select our image sharp and click, Create Spreadsheet. And again, let's just make sure that we are not hovering over our image trip. Let's delete that one. Select the image trip. They can create spreadsheets. And there we go. Now they fit in perfectly. I think we have a bit of margin around the screen anyway. So we can disable add margin, select that, delete the sprite sheet, select our image strip. We can create spreadsheet again. And now they're packed much nicer onto the spreadsheet. Finally, we have these horizontal and vertical and up and down sittings. The horizontal simply means it'll go from left to right and populate our spreadsheet like that. If we do vertical that select our image strip, you can create. Now it starts at the left top, goes down and then down again and then down again. And let's switch that back to horizontal and select up. Delete that, then click on our image sequence. Click Create Spreadsheet again. And I can see it starts at the bottom, goes to the right, and then continues all the way up until it's finished. I prefer to leave that at horizontal down. But depending on the software that you're going to use this in R, you may need to play around with these. Cool, and that is it for this lesson. 25. Where to from here?: Hello everyone. In this lesson we're going to be looking at way to go from here. So one thing I recommend is when you're thinking of making an object, try to think of that object in the simplest shape that you can imagine. And see if you can relate that back to either a cube or sphere or a cylinder, who any of these basic shapes that we have in Blender. And that'll make it easy to know where to start when modelling an object. So as an example, let's create a quick bomb shape. Now if you look at the classic bomb shape, we basically have a bowl and that is a sphere. So let's press Shift a and add a UV sphere. Scale that up a little bit. And then it's going to edit mode. Tend to solid view. And it's switched to vertex select mode. Select that one little single vertex at the top. They then hold down Control and press numpad plus to expand your selection. Now we want to flatten that and to flatten that, we can scale that on the z-axis. So we press S and Z. Now we can scale that. We can just type 0 and press Enter and then press G and Z to grab that on the z axis and then move that down just to make that a round curve again. And click to apply. And we can press E to Extrude, extrude that up a little bit. And now let's look at it from the top. And then hold down Alt and click on this loop to select that entire loop. And press S to scale, scale that down. And click this lake, that center vertex again. Hold control and increase numpad plus again to expand our selection to that little loop as well. And you can press E to extrude, move it up, rotate that a bit. E2 extrude. Rotate that a bit. And each extrude. There we go. There we have a basic bomb shape, as you can see. And you can easily make a candle or dynamite or any similar objects by starting with a cylinder instead of a sphere. So let's delete that. Now. Let's create a coin like you would find in the Mario games. So let's press Shift a and then an image. If you think about it, I coin is basically I flattened cylinder. So you can click on cylinder. And it's going to edit mode by pressing Tab, press S to scale z discarded on the z-axis. And then just scale that down to have a basic cone shape. Cool. Now it's going to face select mode and select that face. Rotate around so we can see the bottom hold down shift and click on the other face. Now we have both those faces selected. Then we can press I on our keyboard to inset and then insert those faces a little bit to create that age of the coin. And we can press E to extrude. And then without clicking, we can press S to scale and the z scale and the zed axis because we want to scale those up and down and just scale those inward a little bit like that and left-click. And that should have done that on the other side as well. While we are in edit mode, we can also add Misha's to our object. So let's add another cube is press Shift a sec cube. And it's going to top view with numpad seven. Press S to scale, scale that down a little bit like that. Left-click and an S to scale again. And then X to scale on the x-axis. A little one shape like that. Now let's go to front view with numpad 1. This is the scale, z to scale on the z axis. And the move that down until it's about the same thickness as our coin like that. Now if we go to object mode, you'll see there are both contained within one object. Could just go back into edit mode quickly. Press a to select all, press R to rotate extra rated on the x-axis. And type 90. Just to turn that are bright. Let's go to object mode, right-click Shade Smooth. And to fix the shading, Let's click on this little icon over here and then select Auto Smooth under normals. Now we can give that our same gold material that we made for our chaste gold. Let's go into camera view. It's just scale that up a bit and press F2 to render goo and they have our basic coin. Now one thing you would notice, let's say we press R to rotate Z to zoom in on the z axis as we rotate this around because our camera is not facing the coin straight on from the front, you get this weird wobbling movement from the coin. Let's right-click and cancel that. And to fix that, sometimes you want to have your camera look at the object straight from the front instead of at a slight angle like we had here, which is enable our camera over here so that we can see it. Click on our camera and compress in to bring up the side panel over here. And then while we're in the Item tab, we can see the rotation for our camera very accurately over here. So let's click on X, type 90, press Enter, and it's going to decide view with number three. Then we can just move our camera down on the z-axis. So we click on the z component of our location and the type 0 and press Enter. Now if you go into camera view with NumPy 0, you'll see it at the coin straight on from the front. Let's press F2 to render. So now we have nice straight lines and there's no perspective distortion on the coin itself. And if you select the coin, press R and Z to rotate on the z-axis, I see it spins around nicely and you can easily create a nice spinning animation for this. 12 again, you can see the coin from another angle as well. Q2, which is undo this camera move for now, Control Z until our cameras back where it was, maybe go, I'm going to delete this coin. Now, very common item that we have in games are barrels. So that really quick barrel by pressing Shift a go to Mesh, and then think about it. A barrel is simply a cylinder. Again. Let's add a cylinder. It's going to front view with numpad 1 Tab to go into edit mode, bits add a loop, cut down the center of a here. So let's press Control R and left-click, and then right-click, snap it back to the center. And it's going to vertex select mode. Make sure x-ray mode is enabled. Select the top hold down, Shift, select the bottom ones. And then we want to scale those on the x and y axes to make them a bit thinner, but not on the z-axis. So we're going to press S, and then we're going to press Shift Z. Then we can scale those down and left-click. At improve the shape a bit more. Let's click on edge select mode and then hold down Alt and click on this edge loop that we created in the middle, deselect that entire age. And we can split that into multiple edges by using the Bevel tool. So let's press Control B to bevel. Now we can split those and if you roll up on your mouse wheel, you can add more cuts or you can make them less. Syllabus, add one more so that we have three new loop cuts going around our barrel. Make it something like that. And left-click. Now to create the metal rings around our barrel. Let's delete these new age loops that we have for our barrel. So hold on Alt again. Click on that one, holding Shift and Alt, and then click on this one and this one. Now we can have all those again by pressing Control B and moving a mouse up. Let's roll down on mouse all the way. So it's any splitting them in tea and make something like that and left-click. And to give those some dimension, Let's extrude them so you're going to press E and then right-click. And we can press S to scale. Now if you just scale them up like this, you see it doesn't look quite right. Let's press Shift Z to constrain our scaling to only the X and the Y axis and not the z-axis. Now we can just make them a little bit bigger. And left-click to apply. Let's just turn off x-ray mode that you face select mode, click on the stop. And now I want to create an opening for the top. And to do that we can simply press D to extrude a scale. And then just scale it down until we have the correct thickness, maybe something like that. And left-click and increase E again to extrude. And just extrude that down a little bit. There we go. Let's right-click Shade Smooth. Go to this icon under normals, totally smooth. There we go. And now we can just assign materials to our barrel and all the different parts of the barrel. So to do that, let's go to Shading quickly. And let's scale up our barrel so that it fits nicely in our frame. Maybe go, ooh. Now the barrel selected, let's add that wood material that we made in a previous lesson, the word, There we go. Now I want to modify this so that the grain is running up and down on the z-axis. But I don't want to modify this material that we already have. So I'm going to create a new material with the same settings. And to do that, we simply need to add the material like we did now. And then click on new material. Now created a new material. So let's call that barrel wood and press Enter. And Alice adjust the scaling, this mapping texture. Let's tell me X back to one. And it's ten z down to 0.1. And there we go. I'm going to turn the scale up a little bit. Qu, quite like that. Now while we're here, I'm going to show you another thing that I want you to try out. And that is press Shift a and then look at all these different texture nodes that we have. We've got white noise wave voronoi, and we've looked at a few of these. One that'll be useful for us now is the brick texture. The brick texture. Drop that down. This hold on Control and Shift and click on it so that we can see what it is doing. And it's just press Control T as well to add a mapping node. And we're going to switch over to UV to get a nice mapping on our object. So now these are bricks. So you can obviously use this for walls and stuff like that if you want to make a brick wall for your scenery. But I'm going to manipulate that so that we have the different wooden staves for our barrel. And to do that, Let's zoom in a little bit over here. And over here you can see we can sit the Mozi size, especially those black lines. If I hold down shift, you can scale the much more accurately. Now, let's look at the offset, the offset 0, and that'll make everything line up nicely. Then we can sit the brick width to analyze one vertically and the row height. We can adjust that and hold down shift until we basically only have one, the RCA. With something like that. They recur again to make the motor size a little bit larger. So I'm going to hold down shift and do something like that. There we go. I want to mix this with our width texture. And to do that, let's add a mixed node, shift, a click on Search type mix and select mixed RGB. If you drop that on our wood material so that the wood is connected to the top layer, may connect this color to color 2. And instead it from mixed to multiply. Now can hold down control and shift and click on our shader again. Go and then just turn the factor all the way up to one coup. And now we have the separate wood stapes. Let's press F2 to render. Turn down the specular. Go. Cool. And then another thing we can do is select our barrel edit mode. And then while we are still in face select mode, we can hold down Alt and select these bands around our barrel, holding Shift and Alt and click on the next one and the last one as well. Now to expand our selection, to select the sides as well, we can hold down Control and press numpad plus. There we go. Let's go into our material properties. Let's add another material over here. And for that, I'm going to select the steel material that we made for our lock and just take a sign to assign those to the steel material. It's going to object mode. They recur if 12 again to render. They were starting to get our barrel. And one last thing, the select this top face, create another new material. I'm going to select New and school that water. And let's make that a dark bluish color, maybe something like that. Then the roughness up a little bit so that it's not too reflective. Go and then we just need to assign that. Click, Assign. The weaker. It's going to camera view. I'm going to rotate this forward a bit so that we can see the top of the barrel little bit more. So with the borough selected in object mode, press R to rotate an extra rotate on the x-axis, and then just rotate that down a little bit. Maybe something like that. Again. Can make my water a little bit darker. If 12 to the roughness up all the way. So it's not as reflective. Oop is turn the saturation up a little bit. Qu, quite like that. You can play around with the settings obviously to adjust it a bit more. But that's the basic idea. Now that shows you that you can easily create cool objects simply by manipulating these simple shapes that we have in Blender. I'm going to delete this barrel and once more I'm going to add a sphere. This is the scale, make that bigger, and then create a new material. And then press Shift a go and texture. And let's just look at one or two more of these. It's like the wave texture. So click on wave. Let's add some mapping nodes, press Control T as well, and then connect that up to our base color. Now we have this and you can see what difference this makes. We change the texture coordinate from generated to maybe UV. That looks quite cool object. But finer. We're going to set mine to UV for now. This is right-click and say shades me. Now to get these lines a bit sharper, we can always add a math nerd, The Khan math and drop that on the things that I often use. A multiply to make the difference between the dark and the black areas. Bit more apparent. Power will do that as well to a different degree. And then one very useful one is less than and greater than. And select list them quickly. And it's turn that down to 0.5. Now we have very definite lines and we can adjust either black lines or just to the other side to get white lines like that. And then you can obviously play with these different coordinates again to get the effect that you're looking for. For the project for this class, I would like to encourage you to make some variations on these objects that we made in this class. And then shade them on the project page for this class as well. As you want to challenge yourself a bit further. You can try and think of something that we didn't make in this class now. And try to use the basic shapes to create those objects. I hope this helps and I want to say thank you very much for joining me in this class. And any feedback that you have for me will be much appreciated. This is my first class. I would love to hear what worked for you and what I can improve on in the future. Thank you very much and have a great day.