Drawing from Observation: A Guide to Measuring | Mark Hill | Skillshare

Drawing from Observation: A Guide to Measuring

Mark Hill, Fine Artist

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16 Lessons (1h 33m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:53
    • 2. Pencil sharpening

      6:43
    • 3. Measuring Practices Pt. 1

      4:19
    • 4. Measuring Practices Pt.2

      9:29
    • 5. Bargue Book

      7:20
    • 6. Drawing Exercises

      4:44
    • 7. Shading examples

      2:51
    • 8. Shading Practice

      7:17
    • 9. Beginning Stages of Blocking In Pt

      5:53
    • 10. Beginning Stages of Blocking In Pt

      7:51
    • 11. Setting Up your Drawing

      2:31
    • 12. Bargue block in

      6:03
    • 13. Bargue block in 2

      5:57
    • 14. Bargue block in 3

      7:04
    • 15. Bargue block in 4

      7:04
    • 16. Bargue block in 5

      6:00

About This Class

This class is all about learning how to measure if your'e drawing from a live model, a piece of photo reference or still life. Measuring is probably one of the most important things that any student will have to tackle as they begin to learn the drawing process. In this class I'll show you various techniques on how to measure accurately as you begin your drawing. I will reference heavily from the book: Charles Bargue Drawing Course. 

NOTE: I don't often make recommendations, but the Charles Bargue Drawing Course book is probably one of the more important books that has helped me immensely in my own learning process. While it is absolutely not necessarily for the class, I would highly recommend investing in this book if it is possible for you to do so! If you are interested, you can have a look HERE

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Transcripts

1. Introduction : Hey, everyone. So this class is going to be a little bit different than maybe some of the classes you've seen me do before in the past. And so it's gonna be a little bit more focused on some drawing exercises and some mechanical things that you can do that will hopefully help you improve your drawing, regardless of way or so a large part of this class is going to be how to actually measure from observation. And I'm gonna show you how to physically measure by holding out your arm on give you some examples about how I measure what's in front of for a large part of the class, all the referencing from the Charles Bar drawing course. And I'll discuss why this book had an important impact on me and my own personal training. And I'll be using it is to show you guys and different examples about how to measure while you're from there. I'll show you a diagram so that you can see some of the key elements that I look for when I start to measure out, are calling and what I would consider some of the more important things for every drawing that you begin, the remainder of the class is gonna be meat breaking down of art play and just kind of walking you guys through measuring process. And so, by the end of the drawing, you're going to see me go from a blank sheet of paper to what I would consider a more or less finished block in, but just a tiny little bit of shading at the end. But nothing too complicated and and definitely no modeling. So I wanted the majority of this class to really be focusing on the basic idea of measuring and what to look for and how to get to the beginning and end of a blocking. So I hope this all makes sense to you and that you can follow along and go through this process in your own. Thank you for watching 2. Pencil sharpening: Alright, guys. So I basically obviously starting with a just whatever pencil you have on hand. And realistically, the only other thing you need is going to be either, like a straight blade like this. You can also use a, um if you don't feel safe with these straight razors like this, you can always use a, um you know, you can use an Exacto knife or like a box cutter or any kind of like safety razor that has a handle on it. Um, you I've used these for, you know, 10 plus years and I've never cut myself. So as long as you're careful, you'll be totally fine. The only other thing you'll need is, um, you know, some sort of sanding block and the grand, you know, granted, I'm using graphite for pretty much everything. You could do this with charcoal. You can pretty much do this with any anything that's encased in wood. Essentially. And so afterwards again, like I said, I'll explain what I'm actually doing and other reason behind Rather, um, that I'm sharpening my pencil this way because there's a very specific reason. So, um well, first show you how I sharpen the pencil and like, how to approach doing it on. And then we'll go on to the why afterwards. And so depending on what hand you are, you may approach this differently. So I am left handed to a fault. And so what I do is I hold the street the straight razor in my right hand, and if so, you know, if you're right handed, you may decide to hold it with, um, you know, with your left hand, you know, basically just the opposite. So all I'm going to do is I'm gonna hold the razor blades stationary. So I'm not moving the razor blade. I'm simply holding and stationery and then pushing with my thumb, and it's just going to chip away a little bit of the wood. And I'm not pushing super hard. This is a fresh blade. Um, you know, so you just gonna just get a box of them at a hardware store for super cheap. And, uh so I'm gonna just trim until I get a little bit of the lead exposed. And now, obviously with pencil, because the lead is so thin you wanted you know, you want to be careful and not pushed too hard. And so take your time. You know this this in and of itself is kind of an acquired skill, like anything else. But, you know, so you may sacrifice a few pencils at first or inmate, you know, sacrifice a little bit more lead, then you want to, and we don't necessarily need a super long lead. I want to just maybe get, like, a good solid, I don't know, insure inch and 1/2 of lead exposed. So I'm not trying to make you know, javelin, you know, size, lead or anything like that. I really just want enough of the lead exposed so that I can then sharpen it with sanding block, which you'll see here, Um, and so the one, you know, sort of potential issue, As you can see as we ended with a lot of, you know, shavings and the if you continue to draw this way, you'll end up with a little spirits trash bin of just shavings just like this. Um, it is what it is, but so, you know, that's getting pretty close. They're like, That's maybe about enough lead so you can see here. It's unsure, pinned, but there is enough. Um, you know, there is enough of the lead exposed here where I could make a nice long point out of this. And so you can Some people like to trim the wood down a little bit farther so that it just come It becomes this nice stream, long streamlined point, rather not necessary. But, you know, kind of you can decide. You know what's gonna be best for you, but the important part. As I said, we want a little bit of the lead exposed so that we can make a point on. And that's where this guy comes in. So with sanding block, you know, it's basically just sandpaper. You've seen you confined these at any art store you can even just use. You could state you could literally tape staple a piece of sandpaper to a wood block or just have a loose sheet of sandpaper. Nothing to super great. You know, You want to find her grit. If you're gonna do that, you don't want to really course. Greg. Zoologist. Chew through the pencil. Um, and you literally you're just gonna and it, you know, just shave it down. So this is a HB pencil. So it's it's not super hard, and it's not super soft. It's just kind of in between. So it shouldn't take very long to kind of get this done. And so I'm just gonna putting a little bit of pressure on it so that it kind of makes a little bit more of a point. No, you will end up with some dust and I'm gonna go across this way to to kind of shave get more of like that cylindrical point, because any time it's a fresh pencil, Um, you know, you have that kind of squared off where they cut it. So I kind of just do that and and I try to rotate the pencil a little bit too. So because I don't want to get, like, a flat, beveled edge, I just want a simple rounded, you know, lead still and you know, so you end up with some dust here you can. Some people save that and you can use it to draw with, which can be fun. I just, you know, toss it because I have, you know, chart, I have graphite powder in a jar. But, um, you know you can just want to get a paper towel and then clean clean the lead, you know says otherwise. You end up with a dirty finger, but, um, so but you can see here now is that we have a nice pointed pencil. So, like, this is kind of what we want to be working with when we're drawing. And so, you know, just a good practice in general is have 2345 of the sharp end up before you draw that way, when one doles out, you just you just grab another one and it doesn't interrupt your workflow, you know, so always have multiple pencils sharpened before you begin drawing. And it's just a good work habit to have s O that, you know, Like I said, if something goes dull, you know, it's not a sharp as you'd like it. You just pull out another one. You don't stop working. You just keep going, you know? And then when you take a break, sharpen you know several of them again. You know, you just have to re You may have to trim a little bit more wood and then just re sand block the lead so that you get your point back and then you're back in business. So, um, like I was saying earlier, that's kind of you know, how you want, approach the sharpening and now kind of explain a little bit Why we want to sharpen the pencil this way on what that looks like. 3. Measuring Practices Pt. 1: Alright, guys. So before we actually begin, you know, drawing or anything like that, we do have to talk about measuring and how we're going to go about doing it and what that really looks like. And so a lot of it is is you're gonna need a couple of tools to kind of at least assist you with measuring, because obviously you're gonna be looking at your reference or in your model or whatever. You know, whatever you're drawing, you know. So what I do recommend is you can use a couple of things. Obviously, you're gonna have your pencil with you. And if you don't use the pencil, you're drawing with half maybe one on sharpened pencil that that is really long so that you have a very long sort of, ah, truell toe basically hold out and, you know, measure against. And if not, then the other thing you wanna haves, maybe like a knitting needle that you can get it like a craft store. And this is very common in what you would use a lot in school, and they'll come in different, you know, lengths. And when I just want you want one long enough to where you can, you know, you can comfortably hold it, you know, hold it out from you. And, you know, just find the angle and then be able to like, then make your mark on your paper and then go from there. And so that's all you would really need. I mean, there's other things that you could use, like plumb lines. But I'm generally not a big fan of those unless you're going to be doing something like site size, which I'm not really gonna cover, because I find that for the most part, most people aren't gonna do it in their in their or their setups or not may be ideal to do something like site size. So I'm not really cover that this is all gonna be more comparative measurement where we're just going to hold out our tool. You know, we're gonna observe, put a line down and then just go back and forth and make make those adjustments. And so the main thing that I wanted to talk about, the which I find that a lot of people don't do and this is something as I've taught in classes over the years, is that students, you know, they're kind of they're kind of measuring. And they're kind of, you know, what you really want to be doing is you want to hold your arm fully extended out. You wanna lock out your elbow, you're gonna be looking at your model or, you know, whatever you're drawing and you're gonna be looking for those angles and then plotting them down. And you're basically just going to go from one from one, like my reference to my paper reference to paper and so on. And so what I've seen in the past, a lot of the times is with students. Is that that kind of just they're bending their elbow and they're trying to measure like, like this and then put it down. But the problem is, is that between your shoulder and your elbow, you have all this range of motion. And by the time you actually take your you know, your measurement from your from your model and try to plot it to your paper is that there's all this range. There's this for all this entire room for error, which is not gonna really help you in terms of measuring accurately and trying to get ideal proportions and things like that. So what you want to deal is you want a fully lock out your arm and you don't You kind of want to just find the angle, and then you're gonna go ahead and get that same angle under paper, make a mark, put it down, and then you may have to go back and double check, and that's just sort of the process of drawing. But you don't want this bendy action to sort of happen while you're doing it, and I'll and I'll show you on a on a piece of paper. And you know what that looks like, You know, so you can see how I do it. But, um, you know, and the thing is, too, is that, you know, often times, and this is very applicability if you're drawing from an easel, which is kind of what I'm gonna be doing, you know, if you're doing it from a sketchbook and you're looking down on your drawing on a flat surface, that's an entirely different scenario. But nonetheless, you always want to be locking out your arm, finding your angle, making your mark and then just kind of moving forward from there. So I'll go ahead and show you what that looks like on you know what? When I'm gonna put a piece of paper appears so you can see it on all kind of demonstrate that just for you really quick point of reference. 4. Measuring Practices Pt.2 : Alright, guys. So before we actually begin, you know, drawing or anything like that, we do have to talk about measuring and how we're going to go about doing it and what that really looks like. And so a lot of it is is you're gonna need a couple of tools to kind of at least assist you with measuring, because obviously you're gonna be looking at your reference or in your model or whatever. You know, whatever you're drawing, you know. So what I do recommend is you can use a couple of things. Obviously, you're gonna have your pencil with you. And if you don't use the pencil you're drawing with Hef, maybe one on sharpened pencil that that is really long so that you have a very long sort of , ah, tool toe basically hold out and, you know, measure against. And if not, then the other thing you wanna haves, maybe like a knitting needle that you can get it like a craft store. And this is very common in what you would use a lot in school, and they'll come in different lengths. And when I just want you want one long enough to where you can, you know, you can comfortably hold it, hold it out from you. And, you know, just find the angle and then be able to like, then make your mark on your paper and then go from there. And so that's all you would really need. I mean, there's other things that you could use, like plumb lines. But I'm generally not a big fan of those unless you're going to be doing something like site size, which I'm not really gonna cover, because I find that for the most part, most people aren't gonna do it in their or their setups or not. May be ideal to do something like site size. So I'm not gonna really cover that. This is all gonna be more comparative measurement where we're just going to hold out our tool. You know, we're gonna observe, put a line down and then just go back and forth and make make those adjustments. And so the main thing that I wanted to talk about, the which I find that a lot of people don't do and this is something as I've taught in classes over the years, is that students, you know, they're kind of They're kind of measuring. And they're kind of, you know, what you really want to be doing is you want to hold your arm fully extended out. You wanna lock out your elbow, you're gonna be looking at your model or, you know, whatever you're drawing and you're gonna be looking for those angles and then plotting them down. And you're basically just going to go from one from one, like my reference to my paper reference to paper and so on. And so what I've seen in the past, a lot of the times is with students is that they kind of just they're bending their elbow and they're trying to measure like like this and then put it down. But the problem is, is that between your shoulder and your elbow, you have all this range of motion. And by the time you actually take your you know, your measurement from your from your model and try to plot it to your paper is that there's all this range. There's this for all this entire room for error, which is not gonna really help you in terms of measuring accurately and trying to get ideal proportions and things like that. So would you want to dio is you want a fully lock out your arm and you don't You kind of want to just find the angle and then you're gonna go ahead and get that same angle in the paper, make a mark, put it down, and then you may have to go back and double check, and that's just sort of the process of drawing. But you don't want this bendy action to sort of happen while you're doing it, and I'll and I'll show you on a on a piece of paper And you know what that looks like, You know, so you can see how I do it. But, um, you know, and the thing is, too, is that, you know, often times, and this is very applicability if you're drawing from an easel, which is kind of what I'm gonna be doing, you know, if you're doing it from a sketchbook and you're looking down on your drawing on a flat surface, that's an entirely different scenario. But nonetheless, you always want to be locking out your arm, finding your angle, making your mark and then just kind of moving forward from there, So I'll go ahead and show you what that looks like on you know what? When I'm gonna put a piece of paper appears so you can see it on all kind of demonstrate that just for you really quick point of reference. All right, so I have just a piece of paper that I put up here, and I just wanted to show you kind of, you know, if I'm holding out my arm and plotting an angle down, I just want you to see what that looks like. And now keep in mind that I'm gonna be doing this at my easel. And so, depending on you know what your workstation is looking like, You know, if you're at an easel or maybe right, like a drawing horse, I'm always drawing in a vertical position. So I'm not I wouldn't be doing this if I was drawing on like a flat surface or anything like that. So kind of just keep that in mind. But the other thing that I would also talk about is that depending on if you're right or left handed, you do want to keep in mind about where you're positioning yourself and where you're looking, you know, So if you're in a classroom environment where there's more multiple people or anything like that, you may not have that kind of flexibility to make those choices. And you kind of just, you know, kind of make do with what the you know, whatever is available. But if you're working in your home studio, you want to figure out what's the best optimal way for you to make an observation. And so, using myself as an example, I'm left handed and I prefer toe look, toe have my subject matter on the right hand side. Now, I've heard people argue, You know that depending on you know how your position and everything like that to choose one way or another, honestly, just find whatever is comfortable for you. So if you're if you're left handed, you wanna look to the left, you know, whatever works, you know, so and vice versa. Just for me, I always it's been easier for me to have my ness station on, you know, on the site, and then look to my right and then plot my ankles. So if I'm observing something, you know on, you know, on a You know, whether it's like a still life for a portrait, whatever. Doesn't matter. I'm gonna basically holding on locking one arm out. And as I'm finding the angle, I'm literally just gonna kind of Pisit and I'm gonna put a mark down, and then maybe I have to go back and check it, you know, some way. But that's kind of what the motion is gonna look like. And so I'm going to essentially be is doing that for the entirety of the very first, you know, maybe our so of the drawing. You know, it always depends on the subject matter and how complicated it may potentially be. So something like a figure is certainly gonna take a little bit longer to plot out than, like, a portrait. But again, the idea being is that I'm gonna lock out my arm and then just carry it over to my favour, put down a mark and then just kind of repeat that process until I have some sort of a general block in of my subject. And, you know, again, it could take, you know, as long as it needs to. It doesn't really matter, you know, if you're just starting out. Actual recommends taking as much time as you need, because the more you can get into that habit of practice, that's what's really going to set you apart and kind of just you get faster and faster the more you do it. But it's a really slow process in the beginning. But the more you can focus on accuracy, the better your eyes gonna get. And that's just gonna make the drawing process so much smoother overall and just kind of as you start progressing, you know, over a long period of time. So the only thing again I just wanted stresses that as I'm as I'm taking those measurements , I am locking out my arm and I'm trying to keep it as straight as I can, putting down a mark and then just and there's repeating the process and then going from there. So there's no there's no bendy action again. You know, I don't want I don't want inaccuracy. One accuracy Aziz much as possible. So hold out my arm plot down my points and then like I said, once you have some information on the paper, it's much easier to go ahead and make corrections. You know, odds are a lot of the times The first measurements I put down there might be some angles that are often so you just kind of have to go and then reassess. But I need to put something on the paper first so that I can see those changes that might need to be made. So if you're hesitant to put, you know and you know are wrong lying down, you know, I would encourage you to just put, you know, just put stuff on the paper. You know, you gotta have something on the paper in order to move forward. You know, you really can't just be tentative and not put anything down and then expected drawing down It's just it's just not gonna work, you know, You gotta even if it's wrong, you know, I I encourage, you know, newer students is just put some information down, and even if it's wrong, you know, at least you have something to look at. And then you can assess why it's wrong. And you can always re measure angles and things like that and then figure it out from there . So you know, when you see me doing the exercises in the rest of the class. You're kind of this will, hopefully all kind of make sense. But I just wanted to spend a little bit of time talking about it, because I find that it's a very simple, mechanical thing. But if you if you kind of messed this up, it's very hard to get to get any sort of accuracy and your drawing, and then you just get frustrated on Did you know, having to make corrections and just kind of justice is this odd cycle, So keep that in mind, you know, as you get started, um, and we'll go from there. 5. Bargue Book: Alright guys. So I wanted to spend a little bit of time just really quick about the book that I'm gonna be drawing from and kind of why I recommend it so highly. And so, you know, there's a lot of drawing books out there that you can pick up and buy. And, um, if I'm looking back at all the years that I kind of spent in schools kind of studying, if I think about the one sort of reference book that I think probably helped me the most on and it's what we're gonna be drawing from throughout this class for the most part. But that is the Charles Bar drawing course. And, um, you know, I've referenced this book in the past in some other classes before, mostly because of its just a great all purpose book to teach people how to draw. And I think at the time when I discovered the book, it had a very large impact on me in the sense that the school that I started at was predominantly an illustration school and you know, so it really wasn't emphasized, or at least the academic component of learning art on academic way was maybe less important there. And so I kind of found the book on my own through some other people in online and eventually got it and just kind of started doing some of the exercises and looking at the drawings and trying to apply it to my own drawing as I was studying from life, drawing from models and such. So I'm gonna be using this book in the class quite a bit, I think mostly as a reference point. So there's gonna be a link in the description. If you want to get the book, I would highly recommend. If you invest in any book this year to pick this book up, you know if if you can get it new, Um, you know, it still may be a little on the pricey side, but if you can find it used as well, I still recommend having this book in your library. And it's certainly not, you know, required. Have it as there's a lot of other things you can do to kind of get some information out of this class and apply the principles that I'm gonna be talking about. But if you can, and it is feasible. I do recommend, you know, picking up this book. I think you know, if you're kind of just getting started with life drawing and kind of the academic, the telly, a style method of drawing This is hands down the best book that you could invest in for that kind of drawing an academic pursuit. So anyway, I'll kind of show you some of the inside of the books. You can see what that looks like, and you'll see a lot more in the examples that we do throughout the class. Alright, guys. So I just wanted again show you some examples from, you know, from this book and kind of what you want to be getting out of it. And so, um, this book again, like it wasn't It was 1/19 century academic book and teaching, you know, the art student how to draw and get prepared to start working from a model. And so it kind of guided them through a sequential process of learning where they would start with really simple things, like drawing the features on. Then it would kind of just gradually move up in terms of difficulty. Eso that student would kind of gradually make a progression on get better and, you know, as they kind of got through the features, they would get to some of the plates just like this. And so the book gives you a guide about how to get started, and it shows you an example like this where this is kind of the starting point, Um, you know of like, a block in on then this shows you the Finnish result and kind of gives you an idea of where you want to go with the drawing. And so the book describes how to approach, you know, working from the plates. And a lot of them would be blowing up the plate to an 18 by 24 Xerox and then, you know, doing an 18 by 24 drawing and then copying them and charcoal. And so I realized for a lot of people, that might be a little impractical. Um, and so and actually, when I did these as I would xerox them, and then I would actually do them in graphite. And that was a little bit more manageable than having such a large sheet of paper. Or, you know, having to make a large Xerox. And so, um, obviously, like I mentioned is that this book is not required. But if you've never, you know, seen it are or anything like that, I would highly advise you looking it up. Um, again, There's a lot of great material in here, and, you know, obviously I cannot reproduce these. I'm for fear of, you know, copyright there, anything like that. So, um, you know, even though I would love to. But if that's why I kind of do recommend getting this book, if you at all, cam or find it used. But even still, a lot of the exercises in the class you condemn definitely do without this book. But the final project and the thing that'll kind of spend a bit working on is gonna be one of these plates just so that you can kind of see what that looks like. But I'll show you some examples of the plates that I did when I was a student and kind of first getting started with this more academic approach. But, you know, all these plates are beautiful, even. Just just look at and just gonna have in your library. This is a wonderful book. And so, you know, the plates again. They would kind of get, you know, show you a schematic and then show you the finish, and they get dramatically more, Um, you know, difficult on complex, you know, as the book goes along. And, um, you know, I would mostly if you do end up doing this, stick with the basic ones and just kind of get used to that. And if you can by the end of the class, you know, even, like, you know, even if it's not this class. But just for your own drawing, this is kind of this is a beautiful linear drawing. And if you can get this kind of simplicity on dichotomy off line and your block, Ines, let's say it be a portrait of still life. What have you, um, to me, this is kind of the gold standard in terms off blocking in a drawing of any kind, because it's the least amount of lines, and it's describing the most amount of information and honestly, for me, like that level of editing is is very sophisticated. But that is, um, you know, that's to me is beautiful drawing when you could simplify something. So, uh, you know, so complex into just a few lines and it reads perfectly. So anyway, I could ramble on about this book, and I don't want to, but, um, this is just to give you an idea of what it's about, and we'll talk about more of this throughout the class. And again, if you can get it awesome, I think it's gonna be a great tool in asset to your library. If not, don't worry about it at all. They're still gonna be exercises that you can kind of dio, um, to follow along and at least practice with this course. 6. Drawing Exercises: So before we get too far ahead in the class, I did want to spend a little bit of time talking about some drawing exercises that you can do so that if you only drawn like you're right, before you can kind of practice some of these mechanical exercises to get used to drawing from your shoulder and just give yourself a little bit of time because it's gonna feel a little bit stranger first. So I have a tendency to hold the pencil a little bit farther back rather than choking up too much. And the reason for that is that if I'm choking up really high in the pencil, I'm gonna put a lot more pressure down. But if I hold it further back, it means I'm going to draw a bit lighter. And so, if you're very heavy handed at first, start by holding the pencil a little bit farther back, and it will force you to draw a little bit lighter. So I'm mostly gonna be using an HB for the majority of these exercises. But it's not too hard, not too soft pencils, so I can't get super dark, but it's dark enough to where I can still see what I'm doing, and it's very easily erase Herbal. So starting out I'd recommend just practice some very basic. And I know that almost seems two basic. But if you're used to drawing like you, right, working from your shoulder like this is actually gonna feel quite a bit different than maybe what you're used to. And so you could easily just do pages and pages of simple ovals like this and just do them on scrap paper. Don't use any nice fancy paper or anything like that. Just get Xerox paper and practice the motion and get used to moving your shoulder in a circular fashion because this is gonna help you with other kinds of lines as you move on. But this is a great exercise just to get started with trying people in clean. So the next thing you want to practice is just practice some simple straight lines and again just getting used to that motion of working from your shoulder so that you can keep these lines fairly clean on and easy to read. So going from verticals horizontal is gonna feel a little bit different. But, um, you know, again It's just one of those mechanical things that, especially with these academic exercises, will probably be using more straight lines than anything else. And so one thing to keep in mind. Choose that I'm always anchoring my hand on my paper. I'm never letting my hand hover, um, above the paper, because that would lead to a lot of instability. So don't worry about smudging or anything like that and always rest your hand under paper, and you can always go back and clean up any sort of smudge marks. So doing a variety of diagonal lines is also going to be very beneficial. And so, depending on what hand you are, you know, writer left. It's always gonna be easier to pull in the direction of your dominant hand because it's a little bit more natural. So the important of diagonals and kind of being able to pull these lines were very relevant . If you ever get into any sort of cross hatching when we get to shading or modeling or things like that, so you want to be able to cover all your bases with vertical, horizontal and a variety of diagonals as you practice these mechanical strokes, and so again, I know these air super basic exercises, and they don't seem all that complicated. But I remember when I was first starting using a pencil this way. Um, even these things felt very difficult at first. And so it's just a matter of time of giving yourself the practice time to just do some basic exercises. And you know, if if there's a day where you feel like you don't really want to tackle a drawing or anything like that. But you just want to move your hand, do these exercises and get used to just the mechanics of holding a pencil this way, Uh, and take your time with it. You know, give yourself a few weeks or so of just doing some simple exercises like these. And, um, by the time you move on and start doing some mechanical drawings or anything like that, I feel like you'll find a big difference and how you know you're working from your shoulder a lot better. And so take your time with these and I know they're super basic, but just get used to the idea of doing little things like this on a daily basis, if you can, so that you can practice 7. Shading examples: So I just wanted to show you some basic examples of some finish bark plates so that you can see what clean shading looks like. And so, you know, these were exercises that I did as a student. And, you know, there were some, you know, I'd already gone through some illustration kind of classes and done some life drawing. But when I got into these is this is when I really got into more of the academic approach of working from life and and maybe perhaps got a little bit more structure into my drawings , and so you can kind of see from the shadow patterns and hear that, you know, at the time for me, these were super clean shadows and, you know, looking back on them now, you know, I perhaps could have gotten them a little bit cleaner, But nonetheless, this is something that you potentially want to aim for in your own practice. And so whether you're doing the bark plates like this, or you're doing any sort of still life forecast rolling, you want to aim for this kind of cleanliness, And so, you know, you don't want any noisy shadows or any staticky sort of looking, um, areas of, like, half tone or anything like that. You want to try and keep things fairly smooth And even so that every little twist in turn or form looks very easy to read and look at. And it doesn't look, um, you know, it doesn't look like a very chaotic. It looks very controlled and deliberate, and and that's kind of what we want to aim for when we're doing these academic studies. So I just wanted to show you these as examples because this gives you hopefully a guide of what to aim for. And if you are using the book, you can see the finished examples in the book as well. And that's kind of the measure that you want to be holding yourself to as you're doing these, you know, these sort of academic exercises. And so if you're doing those you have a great template toe work from and if not and you're and you're just maybe doing still life or other drawings, you know, look at these examples and this is kind of what you would hopefully want to aim for if you're doing some academic exercises or even if you're not. And you're just, you know, just doing Ah, you know, another random drawing or still life or something. You want this sort of level of cleanliness, especially starting out. And you know that sort of excluding any sort of style, you know, or any sort of interpretations in terms of your own personal style. But we're speaking purely from just the academic standpoint in regards to just good practice habits on things like that. So, again, I just wanted to show you these as a separate example so that you have something toe sort of aim for as you practice. 8. Shading Practice: So I wanted to show you guys a basic shading exercise that you can do as just a very simple thing to get in the practice of shading cleanly. And, you know, this is gonna mean different things to everybody but in in sort of relationship to the Bard plates. Um, a lot of the shadows are very clean, and, um and so you that something that you want to keep in mind here. And so, as you can see, I'm just drawing and filling in a simple cube. And now, obviously, it's not a terribly exciting exercise by any stretch of the imagination, But, um, it is something I recommend at least doing a few times. And in the case of using graphite pencils, the the idea is that you don't want any static, um, in the shadows. The shadow should be a nice and even flat looking shape. And the more noise and sort of grain that you see in the shadow, the more it kind of breaks up the shadow, and it just kind of it doesn't really look all that great. And so I'm starting off with an HB pencil to kind of get a base coat down for the shadow and then, as I progress, will move up to an H lead pencil. And then if I feel like I really need to, I can get to a to H pencil. That's pretty much it. And that would be my entire range that I'm working in. And occasionally I'll pull out a B pencil, which is a little bit softer. And that's Onley if I need to go super, super dark. But I find that HB is actually if you take the time to build it off enough, you can get it fairly dark. And so the main important thing to keep in mind is when your shading and your flooding, your flattening a shadow is you want to keep your pencil fairly sharp. And so it's not something that you, you know, you wanna have like a few pencils pre sharp and so that you can kind of just keep a nice workflow. But all I'm really doing is is I'm kind of just gently I'm not pushing very hard is I'm just gently filling in the little cube here, and you could do this exercise. You could maybe draw progressive values scale if you wanted to And three idea here is that as I'm putting down graphite occasionally I'll get little spots of of the graphite in the in the shadow shape. And I picked those out with my eraser, which is why I kind of form the tip into a very small point and I can pick out those little specks of graphite, and all that's going to do in the long run is help me make the shadow that much cleaner. And so I kind of just go and very slow, small motions. I don't try and fill in a broad area. Um, you know, you would kind of do that with charcoal because you have charcoal has a little bit more liberties like that. But graphite, You kind of have to work in small sections in order to keep things fairly clean. And so you know, I'm just about good here with my HB and so I'll switch over to an H in. What it does is by using a harder pencil. If there's any little gaps in the graphite and there's kind of a grainy texture, a lot of that times is it's because of the softer lead and So by switching over to a harder lead, that harder lead will get into those little tiny pores in the graphite, and it will ultimately look a lot cleaner. And so the only thing that ends up mattering at the end is sort of what value you're trying to create. But regardless of that, this is sort of the process that I go through every time. If I'm flattening a shadow or if I'm even drawing in the lights or any sort of middle values, I try not to scribble in things, um, to, you know, abruptly, I just go very slow and I'll start with an HB work to an H and then if I feel like I need to, I'll pull out to age to get a really clean, um, you know, sort of shut set of tones, but I know that's kind of like a basic exercise that may not seem terribly exciting, but if you don't let's say, want to risk it on your drawing from the very start, go ahead And, um, you know, and actually tried doing this cube exercise s O that you could just do it as a very simple practice run and then try and do it on your drawing so that it works out to be a little bit better. And so another exercise that you can do as if you don't again if you don't want to kind of do this with your drawing, um at first is just draw practice, you know, sphere and fill in a shadow and try and get it as clean as possible. And so, you know, obviously this is going to be very sped up because it could take a while to fill in and trump all but what you want to be doing. Guinness I'm not gonna really concerned myself with modeling the lights or anything like that, but in terms of shadow is, you know, draw a bunch of, you know, if you're doing the drawing practice exercises like drawing spheres in anything like that, fill them in. You know, try and make little nice round spheres and then make up a light source. You know, draw a little form shadow on those fears and practice drawing just an imaginary sphere that's being lit from above or from different angles. But really, the important part is to just practice filling in a shadow and getting super clean with it so that it doesn't. There's no noise. There's no static in the shadow and that everything looks nice and even. And it kind of takes a little bit of discipline to kind of get that at first, because it's not a T least with the nature of graphite, it's it's more of a buildup thing. You can't just throw in a dark value right away. It just it doesn't necessarily work that way with graphite. Graphite is one of those things that has to be built up, very sort of gradual on slowly so that everything looks nice and even, um, and so again, this is just another simple exercise that you can try. Um, if you don't want to practice on your own drawing just yet. And so I'm gonna show you some other examples of some bark plates that I finished so you can get an idea of what clean shading looks like on. Then, in the final demonstration, you will see me fill in the shadows to a reasonable value as a you know, finish, you know, drawing for at least with this class entails. And so, even though I'm emphasizing more on measuring on. You know, the shading part does become a factor at some point. So I did want to talk a little bit about it, but it's not going to be the focus of this class in particular. But I feel like it's good to see, because at some point every student is going to get to it anyway. And so I just wanted to show you some practice exercises that you could do that aren't terribly difficulty. And if you don't want a practice and maybe potentially mess up your drawing, um, you know, after your block in is trying these out and and see, see how they work for you. 9. Beginning Stages of Blocking In Pt: Okay, So before we get started with the actual drawing, I did want to kind of do a little bit of a diagram using a bark plate so that you guys can kind of see what I'm thinking about as I begin a drawing in kind of what that looks like. And so what I want to be able to explain is is kind of what I would consider the more important things to begin any drawing with. And so whether it's a portrait or figure, you know, still life a bard plate, You know what have you These principles essentially apply to everything. So it does not matter what the you know what the actual subject is, and so beginning out what I want to dio and I do this for every drawing is that if this were a blank sheet of paper, what I would be marking off is my top and bottom of where I want the drawing to exist on the page. And so, depending on the size of my paper and then depending on the size of the drawing that I want to make by establishing the top and the bottom, I am sort of giving myself a visual idea about how large this drawing is going to be and you know, so that that can vary depending on what medium you're using. You know the scale that you want to draw at, but nonetheless, So once I have the top and bottom, what I want to be doing from there is I want to be able to find halfway point and I duly it's best, you know, to if you can find some sort of a landmark, you know, on the you know, the thing that you're drawing and you will kind of want to correlate some sort of landmark so that it's easy to find but nonetheless, which you want to be looking for is a halfway point. Let me just say it's right about, you know, here, you know, give or take, it might be a slightly lower, slightly higher maybe like around here. But what I want to be doing is I want to find the halfway point so that I can say okay if I take, you know, a measurement that I can say that this, you know, this is half you know from the two. And the only reason you want. That is because in terms of measuring, it's easier. You know, once you know where the top and bottom is, you have a halfway point. It's much easier to measure against a shorter distance than it is a longer distance. And that's kind of why you want that halfway point and, you know, ultimately to as you get farther along in the drawing, you may want to say, OK, well, now I know where halfway is. Maybe maybe I want to find 1/4 you know, Um, but it just depends. You know, everything is a case by case, sort of a thing. But this is what you want to be keeping in mind as you get started. So again, beginning you're drawing, find the top, find the bottom, find halfway. Um, and that is gonna be like the first I was a three things that you want to look for when you're getting started, and then we can break it down a little bit further from there. And so once I have the top bottom and halfway point established, the next thing I need to do is I need to establish a large shape, you know, for the drawing, so kind of I can, you know, if I'm working from my top and bottom. What I'm going to be looking for now is what we would call the envelope of the drawing. And this convey vary quite a bit, depending on what you're drawing. But the idea is is that you want to try and capture the majority of the subject matter into as large of a shape as possible. Um, and all it's doing is your kind of just saying, Okay, I need this to fit into everything that I'm establishing. With this shape, it can always be broken down farther afterwards, but in getting started, what I'm looking for is I want to find the overall exterior, and then I can break it down a little bit farther from there. But all it's doing is it again is it's kind of setting the scale for the drawing to come. And if you can kind of start with that big shape, it gives it kind of what it does is it gives your I a visual idea about Okay, the drawing is this big? Um, you know these. This is how you know you're establishing the whip over the drawing. And then from there you can kind of start breaking things down a little bit farther because the most important things that we're gonna have to establish early on it is the height and the width relationship. And really, that's one of the kind of the first things that you want to get started before you start breaking things down any farther into smaller chunks or anything more complicated is we need to find a very distinct height than whip of the total of the drawing that we're trying to dio. Once we have those established, it's gonna make decisions quite a bit easier to develop the drawing further because now we have some sort of direction to follow. And so, from here, I'll show you what we would do. Once we've established the envelope, then we can kind of break it down into smaller sections. That will make doing the rest of the drawing a little bit easier 10. Beginning Stages of Blocking In Pt: all right. And so with the envelope established, it really just comes now to breaking down the rest of the drawing a little bit farther. And so that could be You know, there's more variables involved with that, depending on what you're drawing. So but what I would be looking for is I would say OK, well, from my envelope, what are now the smaller plane changes that I need to establish. And so this is where I'm going to deviate from the envelope, and I'm gonna look for a distinct plane. Changes, uh, in in the rest of the subject. And so what you'll see here is I'm gonna be drawing in straight lines entirely, and I'll explain why after this. But what I want to be doing is I want to be deviating from my envelope and breaking it down into more specific plane changes that so that it gets closer to the actual subject matter. And so what ends up happening is that, you know, you can see from my red line that I have here from the previous section is that I now have sort of a negative space, and that's kind of what I'm trying to do, um, a little bit is think about the negative space that's being created. And obviously, you know, I don't want to get too caught up in details at this point, So I made by, you know, I mean, I'm not trying to find exact contours, but I do need to start getting a little bit more specific so that I have a little bit more , um, you know, specific of a, uh of an outline of what the actual shape is. And so this doesn't mean contours or anything like that, cause contour would be one of the last things that I'd want to be really thinking because that's it's kind of a finishing detail. Once, you know, I've established the majority of the drawing, and so you can kind of see hear with this blue line is this is what I would be deviating from that original envelope in it. It's just a more specific line. And, you know, once I had that in there, then I can start thinking about Well, okay, in this particular case, I'm drawing ahead, so I might, you know, one have, you know, an axes line, you know, for the ear and let's say, you know, down to the nose and then you want to start breaking the subject down a little bit farther , and so maybe I'll have you know, the line for the jaw here. And, you know, again, this this will depend, you know, quite a bit on on the subject that you're drawing, and in this case, it's ahead. So I would kind of have to start thinking about OK, well, you know, this is, you know, I'm now kind of doing ahead drawing, and so I need to you know, the things that I would do to break down ahead I would start applying those kinds of principles. But the main idea that you want to be going is that you want to work from large to small. You know, we never start with details. Details are going to get you in trouble in the very beginning, So you'd want to find the largest possible shapes you can make. And once those large shapes are working well together, it's much easier to break them down into smaller shapes and then so on and so forth. But, um, keep that in mind as you're going. Is that We're always working from large to small and avoiding detail until, you know, until absolutely becomes a must to put those things in. Okay? And so the last thing I wanted to show you is that the reason I'm using straight lines for these drawings and pretty much for any drawing is that what it does is as I'm beginning and I make a straight line. Every every time I change the angle of that line, it's I'm considering it as a plane change. And so, but what it's going to do is that as I making these plain changes, it creates a point for me. And so I'll show you here just a second. And so, as I'm considering these plain changes, every time I make a plane change, it's creating a point. And why that's beneficial is that every time that happens is that I can relate those points to other things across the drawing, meaning If I say that, here's my angle of the ear and every time I have, I'm drawing these little hashes so you can see the points. But every time I have a point, I can relate those points to other things, meaning If I have a point that's on the forehead here, I can find a point in relationship to the ear, you know, or I can find a point from the eyebrow in relationship to the ear, you know, and then, depending on how much you want to get involved with this now, it can kind of go across the entire subject matter and find a relationship of points, you know. So from one point, let's say to hear the corner of the eye socket that becomes a point from the eye socket down to the corner of the jaw that becomes a point and and sort of. What ends up happening is you can have this back and forth process so that you can check yourself, and it's very easy to do that with a straight lines. And so, as I'm measuring and I'm holding up my pencil and checking these angles, it's so much easier to find these points on your subject and measure accordingly, versus if I were tohave around line and I try and get involved withdrawing different contours or anything like that, it's very hard with a curve to know where the apex of that curve in the eight packs is basically the highest point in a curve. And so if I'm if I have this sort of long, you know, broad curve, I have no way of knowing when a plane changes is occurring. So but if I draw a Siris of straight lines that are undulating and changing planes with the form, then every time I make a plane change, it's going to make it a very distinct apex or a point so that I can use that guide myself as a way of measuring and plotting out the rest of the drawing. And so think of it like you're building a constellation every time you're drawing these straight lines and connecting these points together, and by the time the constellation gets put together, that's essentially you're finished block in. So keep that in mind as you're drawing and try and get into the habit of using straight lines for your construction, because it's going to be one of the more beneficial things to aid you and the rest of the drawing. And then as you start adding information like shadows and you begin the modelling process, those straight lines will gradually soften up and you can always go back and make some adjustments so that the end drawing looks a little bit more organic like what you're looking at. Hopefully. So anyway, these air kind of just the basic tools to kind of get your drawing started and the things that I look for every time I begin a drawing, and so you'll see more of this in the actual drawing demo. But for now, this was easier to show in a diagram form, just using the iPad. So hopefully this made sense and hopefully you'll follow along all right. 11. Setting Up your Drawing: So before we get too far ahead in the drawing, I just wanted to show you guys my set up and what that looks like so that whether you're copying a bark plate like this or if you're working from reference of a photo that you took or anything like that, um, you want to position your reference right next to your piece of paper Because the idea is is that you're going to be carrying across one from one side to the other to help yourself measure accurately. And so for this particular instance, I position my paper on the right hand side. Um, because it's the only way I can sort of fit the paper into the camera frame. So, um, it really does not matter what side you choose kind of Just do whatever is comfortable for you and your hand position. So but you're going to see me throughout the block and stages. I'm gonna be holding my pencil across, and I'm essentially going to be going side to side eso that as I'm trying to measure, I'm literally just going back and forth back and forth to try and get accurate angles. And so you know, even if I was not doing this from a bark plate. But if it was like a piece of reference that I took, um, or anything that the procedure would more or less be the same. Um, you know, depending on the scale of the drawing and things like that. But in terms of measuring and finding angles, I'm doing the exact same thing. So whether you decide to do ah, this exercise from a bard plate or from your own personal reference, and if you're drawing from a still life or anything that is set on a table in front of you , you would want to try and get it close to your drawing board, Um, or your easel, Harvey, you're set up so that you can literally hold out your arm and take measurements from side to side on and try and plot things accurately. And so I just wanted to show you guys this in kind of what it looks like, so that if you're falling along, this is kind of how you would want to set it up, and, um, at the end of the day, it doesn't really matter. It's kind of whatever is comfortable for you. And so I just wanted to show you that this is what I do on. And it's what has worked for me for a good amount of time. So gonna just keep it in mind and just kind of keep it in the back of your head in terms of what a good practice procedure might be on, and we'll go from here for the block in. 12. Bargue block in: All right, everyone. So getting started. Um, obviously, this is going to be sped up so kind of there with me here. Otherwise, this video would be quite long if we went at normal speed. And so nonetheless, getting started is I'm marking off the top and bottom of my paper on and where this cast is going to exist. And so it's just like the overlay that I was showing you guys earlier, and and so I'll spend a little bit of time just getting that exterior shape to feel, you know, relatively comfortable on DSO. I'll start finding the top and bottom and look for the width of the cast and how much space that's gonna actually take up. And then once I feel comfortable about the large shape, then I'll start breaking it down into further smaller sections. And so you can see we more or less have ah, large envelope shape that I can start working into. And so I have my top and bottom in a relative width. And so now I'm looking for 1/2 way point. And so what I did you need to do and I'll show you guys this on the actual cast itself is where and relationship that halfway point falls. And so you always want to be looking for a landmark if you can. And sometimes it's easy. You know, depending on what the subject matter is, is to find a very specific halfway point, and you can sort of tie it to a specific landmark. Other times it's a little bit more difficult, but nonetheless, we found our top or bottom a relative width and then the halfway point. So I wanted to just do this particular section at a normal speed so that you can see what it looks like as I measuring. And so, for example, with the halfway point is, I'm using my pencil tip and then positioning my thumb on my pencil and carrying it down, and I'm trying to match. You know where I feel like things are gonna measure out to. And if you have to mark on your reference, go ahead and put a mark down. Um, you know, there's really no cheating with this. It's really kind of whatever is gonna be comfortable for you. And so as I'm finding these points for this particular exercise, I'm just carrying them over from side to side, and so you could do this to whatever extent you feel is necessary. So if I need to plot a specific width or angle, I need to find the relative distances. I start looking for other things to measure against. So, for example, like the the height of the ear Israel, you know, it looks, you know, pretty close to the relationship of the nose to say the chin. And so I can say, OK, well, that's a measurement, you know. And then I could mark a line down and so you can do this all over your drawing and find relative measurements and see how things relate to one another. And on depending on how you know, cautious you want to get, you know, do it as much as you feel like you have to, um, you know, especially if you're just starting out, maybe over measure, you know, think about think about all the little things that you have to keep and keep track of in your drawing. And if you have to over measure those things so that you can ultimately reach, you know, a stronger sense of accuracy. And so just kind of keep that in mind as you're working. Um, and, you know, do your best with that, so we'll go ahead and move on, and we'll speed this back up. Okay? So with those couple of key points kind of more or less figured out, I'm still not 100% sure. You know, at this point, because we're so early on in the drawing that I'm just looking for, you know, large shapes, but I have the envelope, and I need to start breaking it down further into some smaller sections. That way I can get a better sense off where things are going to fit with this with this particular envelope. And so it goes back to what I was saying kind of earlier on is that in terms of procedure, we're always gonna be looking, you know, from large shapes down to smaller shapes until we reach a point where we start, you know, focusing on details. But we're a long ways off from that. And so right now, I just want to take this large shape and start chunking it down into some smaller pieces so that that way, it's a little bit more manageable. And so at this point, I'm still just kind of finding relative angles like I'm whole. I'm kind of taking my pencil and measuring out the exterior portion of the face and just trying to find some simple angles. And I'm not, You know, by any means trying to find a contour or anything like that and in these early stages is, you know, you can kind of tell, you know, on camera that my pencil marks are fairly light and I'm using an H lead pencil. So it's not super soft, but it's not too hard. Andi, I want to keep a lot of these lines, you know, fairly noncommittal. Um, you know, at this point, you know, it's still kind of It's so early on in the drawing that I'm just gonna be looking for angles as much as I can. And but if something has to come out, something has to come out. And so I don't feel any commitment to any of the lines that I'm putting in. At this point, I'm still just sort of searching, um, you know, for the drawing and using my existing envelope that I started to sort of carve out um, you know, the the fluctuating shapes in the cast. And so from here, we just kind of keep breaking this down farther into some smaller shapes. 13. Bargue block in 2: So with the relative shape more or less established, I feel OK. Just start maybe breaking things down a little bit farther. And so, you know, this is gonna feel different for everyone, and it will always depend on the complexity of the drawing or what you're trying to draw. But the thing that remains constant is that we're always gonna be working from large to small. And so, for the most part here, the large shape is kind of established. Um, you know, and I have a couple of landmarks, you know, with having the shape of the ear. And I know where the eye line is, and I know where the nose is sitting on. And so at this point, I feel comfortable enough toe to maybe move on and to start breaking things down a little bit further. And so keep in mind that I'm still not gonna be 100% committed to this, and I'm going to be making changes. And so that's why I'm still drawing fairly light. And so, given that this particular plate is more or less a portrait, for the most part, I mean, it's kind of like a portrait at an angle, then I'm kinda now start thinking about, OK, While there has to be an eye socket, there needs to be a cheek, you know, obviously a nose, a mouth, etcetera. And so then, you know, But it doesn't really matter. You know what that is? I'm still going to be looking for angles and plotting points. And so I never get to, you know, bogged down about what I'm trying to draw. I'm just thinking abstract li about, You know, this is literally just a Siris of lines and angles and shapes. And if I can plot things accurately than hopefully by the time I get to the A relative finish is that it will look like what I'm trying to draw. And so, you know, in this particular case, I'm looking for larger things, and so it's gonna be like the features on because there's a lot of a cheek plane involved. It's kind of bisecting the face here because of the angle. The head is tilted, so but I can use that to my advantage to help plot some of the features and make that a little bit easier. So what ends up happening, though, is you go through this pattern of working from large to small until you may be ultimately get to a point of some really small details. And in this particular cast, there's really not of really tiny details in terms of shape. And, you know, there's obviously, like shadow patterns and things like that to take into consideration. But in terms of the overall large shapes, there's really not a whole lot to really develop. And so, in terms of a block in, you know, kind of just plotting out, you know, the the eye socket. You know, the I, you know, finding let's say, like the nose in the nostril. And those are gonna be like the smaller shapes that Aiken develop. You know, some of the shapes in the ear, and then, and that's kind of more or less it. Before I start mapping out, you know, shadows and things like that, and so again it will depend on what you're drawing. And so if you're if you're working from a piece of reference and it's a full portrait in depending on the lighting, you may have more to deal with. If it's a basic cast or a Bart plate, then you may have less. You know, just there's there's kind of an infinite number of variables, but, um, the thought process eyes still a constant. And so we're still working from large to small until we get to a comfortable enough of a block in tow where we can maybe start adding some extra information. And so you can see with this, you know, compared to where we started from the just the very beginning of the block. And I haven't really added, you know, a significant amount of information. But what I have added is I've tried to make it count so that I'm getting the most out of. You know, what information I do put in is describing something very specific in relation to what I'm drawing. And the more you can do that. And you know, because what ends up happening here is you can kind of see is that we have a club, you know, kind of a cluster of lines and and that can get a little confusing. And so the only reason I keep a lot of the initial lines in is so that if I'm making a mistake or anything or If something is off, I can use those previous lines to help guide me a little bit better. And so, if you're if you're unsure about whether a line that you put down is inaccurate at first, try and hold on to that line for a little bit, and then you re measure double check yourself. And then if you feel like you need to make a change, may go ahead and make that correction in the drawing. And then, you know, erased the line afterwards because if you start taking out lines too soon on and you start making corrections, you really it's easy to get lost with the amount of lines that you end up dealing with. So kind of keep that in mind for your own drawing and will continue to break this down. 14. Bargue block in 3: all right. So we kind of have, you know, more or less kind of. The smaller shapes have been established, and so the next sort of step after this is to go back in and start refining things a little bit farther. So we started from large shapes down to smaller shapes, and now I can start breaking things down even a little bit farther. So there's still, like, a lot of detail that I'm missing from this particular drawing so far. And I don't intend this drawing to be like a finished our plate. I'm really just going to get to what I would call a somewhat finished block in stage and then adding a little bit of light tone. So and this is kind of the steps that you would want to follow as you're developing your drawing, Um, you know, you wouldn't want to just kind of skipped past anything in jump ahead too soon. Um, because I feel like once you once you start adding tone, um, to the drawing, your kind of sort of mentally telling yourself that you're in a different stage and so I like to refine things as much as I possibly can before I feel like I have to add any tone. So in this particular instance, I'm just gonna be looking for some smaller shapes inside the larger shapes that I've already established. And so a lot of this will consist of maybe mapping some shadow patterns and looking for more specific. Uh, you know things in this particular case, like the nose in the mouth. There's a lot of little small shapes, their kind of taking place all in this little area. And so I'm gonna give myself the opportunity to kind of refine those shapes a little bit more because really, once I get that stuff in the next logical step in terms of progression is going to be toe add tone to the drawing and kind of getting closer to, you know, if we were gonna model the drawing, that's kind of the last sort of finishing step. But all throughout this process, it's really just a matter of constantly reassessing myself and trying to refine the shapes until I feel like I can't do it anymore on. And then I start. I literally have to start adding tone and then be Gittel beginning the modelling process and this is going to be different for every drawing that you do. So you know, depending on what you're drawing, whether it's a portrait figure, you know, or anything like that, there's always gonna be a sort of amount of detail that you're gonna want to try and get in before you move onto the next step. And so it really kind of depends on your comfort level and how difficult you know. The subject matter is and you know lighting plays a big factor as well. So, you know, in this particular instance, there's a limited amount of shadow patterns in the bark plate. So you know things like the ear. There's a lot of information going on, so I'd want to spend some time resolving those kinds of shapes before I move on to any tone . And, you know, the hair would be another big thing that I would probably want to spend time on. But for this particular demonstration, I'm not gonna get bogged down with a lot of the finer details. I really just want you guys to see kind of the starting process and kind of how we ended up with the result that We're looking at here so far, which right now it still has to get refined quite a bit. Uh, you know, in terms of just kind of looking for those smaller shapes, and then I need to double check, you know, kind of some of my angles, and I'll probably have to make some adjustments. But from where we started in the beginning, off until here, you can kind of see the steps that we followed to arrive at this particular result in So from here on out, we're just kind of taking what we already have on the paper and refining it farther, you know? And the thing that will vary the most is really kind of again. It's gonna be more up to you and making these kinds of decisions for yourself and and sort of like, how much detail do you feel like you have to add before you can make enough progress to jump onto the next step. And that's gonna be a little bit different for everyone. And what I would encourage you is, if you're just starting out, is find as much as possible. Um, you know, you still want to find things that are the largest possible shapes and then find the subtle details. You know, don't go too crazy with it, because then you could literally spend forever before you move onto the next step, you know, finding all these little tiny things, but find, try and find a balance and it's hard to say when and you just kind of you kind of have to feel it out. And if you mess up a drawing, you mess up a drawing. But that sort of thing is gonna be different for everyone else and kind of their comfort level. But, uh, you know, do as much as you can in the block in stage and then kind of save the shading for the very last and so realistically for me. At this point, I feel comfortable enough in the block in where I'm gonna start to refine the lines down and start taking my eraser out quite a bit more. And ideally, what you'd want to aim for is, as you feel confident with your block in, try and go back over the drawing again with a really clean line and use your eraser to kind of skim over any excess line so that by the end of it you have a super crystal clear line drawing that you don't feel any sort of ambiguity about where things are sitting location wise or what a particular line is. Describing that sort of the ideal best case scenario. And, you know, there's always the potential for things to change. Or maybe you slightly mis measured, you know. And I'm sure in this particular drawing, even for myself that there's probably some things that aren't, you know, 100% perfect. And, you know, I want to keep this relatively short for the sake of demonstrations. So I'm kind of moving a little bit quicker than maybe what I would normally do if I were drawing for myself. But, um, once you have that completed block in, you know, go take a nice, sharp pencil and you don't necessarily want to create a specific contour line just yet. That's something I would maybe save towards the very end. But you want to go back over your lines again, maybe double check yourself and try and clean things up into a very, ah, nice and clean lines so that you know for yourself visually, where everything should be sitting on and there's no sort of ambiguity about it. 15. Bargue block in 4: So with the relatively cleaned up drawing, I'm gonna just try and focus on the front part of the face. And, um, like I said before, this isn't going to be a finished bark plate or finished, you know, sort of rendering or anything like that. The most important part was really just to go through the initial block in stages and breaking down, Um, something from, you know, from life or in this case, from a plate and just kind of going through the different stages of from starting from nothing to, uh, essentially a completed block in. But I do want to talk a little bit about filling and shadows and maybe what you want a potentially aim for as you get closer to finishing your drawing. And so this is the stage where I would not enter, uh, or start doing any of this until you feel like the blocking isas. Good as you could possibly get it. And so, you know, I try and keep things as clean as possible as I go along. Um and you know, you want your shadow shapes to be very well defined before you get started, so but going from here. I'll kind of show you what this looks like. A zit gets close to being filled in. You can see here. What I what I really want to dio before I get to any shadows is I'm just going over the areas that I've already visited. And I'm just trying to get things, you know, as relatively clean as I possibly can, because I always feel that by the time he start adding, you know, shadows and tone to the paper, you're entering a different stage of commitment to the drawing at that point on. And so I really want to be as sure as I possibly can before I go too far. And like I said, that the sort of level of comfort is gonna vary from person to person quite a bit. But, you know, I think a lot of that comes just from experience and doing lots of drawing. And as you get better and more confident, you can maybe skip steps and start jumping ahead a little bit sooner than maybe what you previously have done before. But in terms of a procedural standpoint, this is kind of when I like to go through before I start committing to any sort of values on the paper or anything like that. And in this particular case, a lot of the you know, the meat of the of the cast itself is gonna be in the front part of the face. Which is why I'm spending a little bit of extra time trying to get these shapes really clean. And so I'm gonna go ahead and slightly start to fill in some of these shadow shapes here and, you know, just pick an area. You know, where there's a lot of shadow, you can essentially start anywhere because at this particular point, we're just trying to fill in the shadows as flat and even as possible, so that we can get a better idea of what the shadow shapes look like against the light shapes. Um, in the rest of the image. And I still like to start off a little conservatively, so I don't try and just rush in and put in a dark value. And also a factor is the fact that graphite really doesn't work that way. It's it's one of those mediums where you have to build it up and charcoal you can kind of go a little bit quicker in terms of getting a nice, dark, flat value. But me just being me, I always error on the side of caution, and I like to put in a middle value very lightly at first, because what it does for me is it allows me to see the shadow shapes that I've made. And if for whatever reason, I miscalculated or something was looking terribly off, hopefully I can catch it at this particular stage before moving forward and getting to dark where I don't have any options to fix or erase it. And that's kind of my general mentality in terms of procedure is that I always like to give myself a little bit of room for error on DSO. I don't slam in values too dark too soon. So a really conservative when you start and so basically what I'll do is I do that for every every little piece of shadow in the drawing. And so with this particular cast, there's actually not too many strong shadow shapes. There's really just a small handful in the front of the face and then in the neck. Ah, lot of the stuff through the jaw and in the cheek are actually more mid tones that aren't really full on shadow shapes. And so that's why I've omitted them. And you're just gonna see me fill in, you know, some of the nose in the mouth and then a little bit through the chin and the neck. But again, what you'll see is that I'm just putting in a nice, even middle value. And I'm actually filling this in with an HB pencil. So it's not terribly soft. It's not too hard. And if I need to, I'm just gonna gradually build up the graph I and try and keep my pencil really sharp so that I don't get too much noise or kind of, Ah, little grain in the shadow. I want those to be sort of super flat and clean so that there's no noise or no sort of air , if you will. In airports, I want everything to look super clean and even. And so with graphite. It just takes a little bit of extra time, and if I need to, I can always then go back to ah, harder lead liken H pencil on and fill in those tiny little gaps. So I went ahead and I just filled in the the chin and then the neck shadow shape. And you can kind of see here just with those simple kind of light shadow values that we have, Um, you know, a graphic read about what's sort of occurring from the plate. And this is kind of where with your drawing, depending on what you're doing, you want to get a nice and simple sort of poster effect, and you want to see these graphic shapes, Aziz, clearly as you possibly can. And if and if at this point there's something off still, then you can go ahead and try and make those corrections without having toe hopefully remove too much of the drawing eso. But at this point, I feel relatively comfortable with shapes that I have. So I'm just going to darken down a little bit more so that I get a little bit closer to the final value that I feel like the shadow shapes have to be 16. Bargue block in 5: and so again, at this point, I'm kind of just going over the shadow shapes that I've already established. And I'm just darkening down things a little bit farther, and there's a couple of different ways that you can kind of handle it. And what I'd recommend is once you feel that the shapes are as accurate as it is, you possibly could have made them. You want to try and get your shadows to a relative darkness to where it's almost their final value, if not their final value. And what I mean by that is you want it to be where if, by the time the shadows are all filled in that you have no intention of going back into the shadows on and at this point and you could say that the shadows air now a completed thing and now I can solely focus on modeling in the light. Um, now again, me just being a little bit more cautious as I like to always give myself a little bit of extra room so that if I need to darken a shadow a little bit farther, I'd like to give myself that. But for the sake of doing like a bark plate, you know, or like an academic exercise like that, I'd recommend just putting in the values as you see them. So get him, as you know, as sort of dark, um, as you can. That's relative to your reference so that you can say that. Okay, this stage is now complete, and now I can focus on, you know, modeling the lights and thinking about form and how things were gonna be turning in space relative to the shadow patterns. And so, even though it's not the most exciting thing that you're going to do and drawing, really take your time, uh, to get your shadows really clean and flat and even. And if you can take your time to do that, it's going to save you so much extra time in the long run because you can. If those things get taken care of first, you can confidently move forward with the rest of the drawing, knowing that you have these nice even shadows toe work into and out of as you're rolling into the lights and and I think for your first, you know, few academic drawings. If if this is kind of something your started with. I feel like there's a good amount of discipline to be learned by just taking the extra time to get these really clean shadows. And you may not desire to do that in your personal work or anything like that. But in terms of just from a learning standpoint, I found it very valuable to just really take the extra time. Um, you know, even though it's not really all that exciting, you do learn a lot, Um, and you learn what clean drawing is really like as you move forward in your studies. And so I filled in the nose in the mouth and these air pretty much more or less the final values that I would probably go with if I were going to complete this drawing. And I repeat this process throughout the chin and in the neck area. And then once I had that in, I could feel more or less comfortable moving on, um, and basically just filling out the rest of the drawing. So modeling the lights, modeling mid tones and things like that, and, you know, finding the detail in the hair and in the ear and basically finishing the drawing. But this is kind of where I wanted to end up in the demonstration. So it's really just a very simple drawing, you know, Like I said, it's probably not bang on 100% but it's pretty close for the amount of time that I've spent on the drawing and again the main take away from me and showing you guys. This approach is that hopefully you'll have a better idea about how to start a drawing from a procedural standpoint and that it doesn't matter if you're doing a barg, a cast, a portrait. Um, you know a figure. It's this process for me is sort of a continuous thing that I've used throughout my, uh, through my art career. I've never really deviated too much. Once I picked up this approach to drawing on, and it's, you know, for the most part, I feel like it's gotten me pretty solid results, um, in its approach. So ultimately, for this particular demonstration, this is kind of where I'm going to leave this drawing, and obviously you know, it's just some shadow shapes and there's no modeling, but that really wasn't the intention for the class and for the demonstration. And so the important part for me was to just guide you guys through my thought process and how I measure and how I break something down from large to small, ultimately to some of the finer details. But really, you can't get to any of the fund modeling stages until you get this particular procedure under your belt. And so I'm gonna show you just some examples of some cast drawings that I did back in my student days. And all of these drawings were done in this exact same manner. And so, even though it seems kind of, you know, maybe not super exciting in terms of its approach, if I wasn't able to follow that approach, there's no way I could have done these drawings to this level of finish. And so hopefully this all made sense to you, and you're able to take away a solid approach to your own drawing, whether it's from life from reference. What have you that give this a shot if you've never done before? And I think you're gonna be quite surprised about the results will be able to get if you follow the procedure. Thanks for watching