Drawing Lesson For Beginners | Eric Bossik | Skillshare

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

11 Lessons (46m)
    • 1. Drawing Lesson For Beginners Trailer Skillshare

      2:12
    • 2. Chapter: 1 - Introduction

      0:57
    • 3. Chapter: 2 - Materials

      3:21
    • 4. Chapter: 3 - Lighting

      0:41
    • 5. Chapter: 4 - Measuring and Landmarks

      2:23
    • 6. Chapter: 5 - Drawing the Simple Shape

      0:42
    • 7. Chapter: 6 - Developing the Shapes and Angles

      14:29
    • 8. Chapter: 7 - Refining the Drawing

      9:50
    • 9. Chapter: 8 - The Block-In

      3:54
    • 10. Chapter: 9 - Highlights

      2:59
    • 11. Chapter: 10 - Finishing Touches

      4:58
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About This Class

The Simplest Way to Create a Great Drawing
The Method is Revealed in This Step-By-Step Instructional Drawing Course.

Drawing is a skill that can be learned by anyone, and you don’t need a special talent to know how to do it. This video lesson can teach anyone how to draw.

This method of drawing has served as the foundation for some of the greatest artwork in history. Master artists from the Renaissance to the great art academies of the 19th century have passed this method of drawing along to their students. Today I would like to pass this method of drawing along to you. This simple method will be revealed to you in Drawing Lesson For Beginners, an easy-to-understand instructional drawing video. Modern-day master artist Eric Bossik will guide you and show you everything you need to know, step-by-step.

This entertaining video will show you how to ensure the success of every drawing you start.

Enroll in Drawing Lesson for Beginners and take your drawing skills to the next level, TODAY!

Video Benefits:

Drawing Lesson For Beginners is essential for anyone who would like to learn how to draw.

This video will teach you one of the simplest methods for drawing, and this method can be used to draw anything.

The lessons in this art course will raise your drawing skills very quickly.

Best of all, a modern-day master artist — Eric Bossik — will teach you the essentials in his video.

Eric’s drawings and paintings have been exhibited in prominent art galleries and museums.

His military history paintings have even been featured on the covers of books published by Harper Collins.

In this video, he will show you:

  • How to use the necessary art materials
  • How to set up a dramatic light source and illuminate your subject
  • How to create accurate measurements and landmarks
  • How to draw very simple shapes using geometric lines
  • How to find and draw all the unique angles of your subject
  • How to refine the line work in your drawing
  • How to mass in the big shadow shapes
  • How to use your paint brush to soften and even out the shadows
  • How to accurately place highlights on your subject
  • …and much more

Enroll in this art course today and take your drawing skills to the next level.

Get Drawing Lesson For Beginners an instructional art video.

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Meet Your Teacher

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Eric Bossik

Classical Painter and Draftsman

Teacher

Eric Bossik is an accomplished artist who combines the vitality of the 21st century with the virtuosity of an 18th century master. 

He has exhibited at the Albertson Peterson Gallery in Winter Park, Florida, the Coe Kerr and Master Eagle galleries in New York City, the Grand Armée Gallery in Palm Beach, Florida, the Images Gallery in Boca Raton, Florida and the Linda White Gallery in Delray Beach, Florida.

Eric’s paintings and drawings have also been exhibited at the American International Fine Art Fair (AIFAF) in West Palm Beach, the Society of Illustrators, the Salmagundi Art Club, the Art Director’s Club of New York, the Heckscher Museum, the Roslyn Fine Arts Museum, the Boca Raton Museum of Art, the Armory Art Center in West Palm Beach... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Drawing Lesson For Beginners Trailer Skillshare: I believe that drawing is a skill that can be learned by anyone. And you don't need a special talent to know how to do it. With some solid instruction and practice, anyone can learn how to draw now , um 2. Chapter: 1 - Introduction: Hi America, Bosic. I created this video for the beginning artist or anyone that would like to learn how to draw. I believe that drawing is a skill that can be learned by anyone. And you don't need a special talent to know how to do it. With some solid instruction and practice, anyone can learn how to draw. Today I'm going to demonstrate the blocking drawing. This method of drawing has served as a foundation for some of the greatest all works in history. Master artist from the Renaissance to the great art academies of the 19th century have passed this method of drawing along to their students. Today I'm going to pass that method. 3. Chapter: 2 - Materials: you only need a few materials for this lesson. These materials are inexpensive and they are all you'll need to create the block in drawing from left to right, we have a stick of vine charcoal. You will use the vine charcoal to get your basic measurements, angles, simple shapes and big shadow values. The vine charcoal is very forgiving and easy to erase without damaging the paper. Next we have the charcoal pencil. I'm using an HB, which is Ah, hard charcoal. You can also use it to be if you wish. The charcoal pencil is used to refine the drawing we're creating using the vine. The charcoal pencil is harder to erase and therefore a bit less forgiving than the vine. We start using the charcoal pencil when we are more secure with the original marks and lines made with the vine. To the right of the HB charcoal pencil is our white chalk pencil. You can use either charcoal or pastel. This pencil will be used to add highlights to the object I'm drawing. Next, we have two types of pencil sharpeners. You can use either a simple metal or plastic sharpener. I use these sharpeners on the HB charcoal pencil and the white chalk or pastel pencil. I really sharpen my vine charcoal stick, but you can easily sharpen it with a small sheet of medium sandpaper if you'd like. Underneath the sharpeners, you see the kneaded eraser kneaded. Erasers are good for many reasons. They're soft, do very little damage to the paper. There, very malleable and can be shaped to erase anything. And they can be turned inside out, exposing a clean side to the eraser. They also last a long time before having to be replaced. In the very center, we have a hog bristle paintbrush, the paintbrushes used to soften smooth and model charcoal and white shock to the right of the paintbrush. We have a small paper towel sheet. You can use paper, towel or soft tissue for smoothing out charcoal lines and tone. And last but not least, we have the shammy skin. This is used to erase the vine charcoal. The shammy skin does not do any damage to the paper at all. Like magic, it makes fine charcoal disappear with almost no trace whatsoever. The shammy skin can also be used to model or smooth shadow areas. I'm using a great tone charcoal paper. For this demonstration, you can use charcoal paper or pastel paper smoother or more textured paper. I recommend tone papers so that you can use a white shark or pastel pencil for highlights. You can see that my charcoal papers taped to a fiberboard as a support. I used masking tape, but you can also use clips to fasten your paper to any rigid board. I'm using an easel for this demonstration. I using diesel. When working on all of my drawings and paintings, I recommend a good, sturdy easel. I also set my easel to a straight or vertical 90 degrees tow. Avoid any distortion of my drawing for this demonstration. I'm using a floodlight from my light source. There's a 100 watt daylight Bobin, the light fixture. They light bulbs will give you a more natural, cool, neutral light similar to north outdoor light. I'm using a pair is my subject matter, and I've placed the pair on a wood table surface 4. Chapter: 3 - Lighting: lighting is an extremely important aspect of drawing and painting, lighting effects, the values, forms, edges and mood of the subject we see in front of us. In this demonstration, I've set up the floodlights. Of that, 75 to 80% of the pair is illuminated in 25 to 30% of it is in shadow. This type of lighting is known as form 3/4 or Rembrandt Lighting. Form lighting will allow you to achieve the maximum illusion of form with a finished drawing or painting. I've also set up the lights that I would be able to get a long shadow cast by the pair onto the wood surface. A longer cash shadow creates more drama. 5. Chapter: 4 - Measuring and Landmarks: I start by making a few marks on my paper to figure out how large I'd like to draw my pair . I then hold out my hand horizontally with the point of the vine charcoal lined up with widest age on the left side of the pair and slide my finger across the vine to the widest edge on the right side of the pair. I then rotate my hand and vine charcoal vertically, comparing the with with the height of the pair I see in front of me. I use my fingers to translate the comparison of within height. On my paper, I make small marks on the paper with the vine charcoal. You can call these marks landmarks for the height and with measurements of the pair. These marks are approximations and never 100% accurate. These marks will help bring me closer to the true relationship between the height and width of the pair. You can call this mark making a kind of GPS for where I will draw my lines. Doing these measurements and marking the paper will help me to be more accurate than if I try to draw just by eye and without measuring. You can see that I've drawn a curved line string in the top of the pair to the bottom of the pair. You can call this line in action line. Even though the pair is not an animated object. I'm also establishing landmark lines for the top and bottom of the pair. Yeah, like 6. Chapter: 5 - Drawing the Simple Shape: At this point, I'm looking for the big angles on the pair. Even though I see a lot of curves, lumps and bumps, I just want to simplify the overall shape. I'm looking to get the shape of the pair by drawing a few lines as possible. These initial straight angle or geometric lines will help me to establish a simple shape and character of the pair. 7. Chapter: 6 - Developing the Shapes and Angles: I'm now working small lines or angles into the big angles or geometric lines I've drawn. My goal is to make my drawing look more and more like the pair. I want to stick with straighter and more geometric lines as long as possible so that I can record all the unique angles I see on my subject. Thank you. - It's very simple for me to use my finger to wipe away a line. I'm not happy with the vine. Charcoal is very forgiving and comes right off. Use your finger to wipe away and shape the charcoal lines. This is part of the process of drawing a lot of the drawing processes about getting it wrong before you can get it right. You're working to solve problems on the paper. Good. - When I've drawn enough angle lines, I will begin to round them out. Yeah, - you know. - Okay , - you're but move it. - Yeah . I continue wiping away, drawing, redrawing and softening my lines. I'm working to make my lines more and more accurate. Draw lines that suggest direction, action and form. I'm now creating a simple shadow line or what is referred to as a Terminator line. The Terminator line indicates with light ends or terminates and becomes a shadow. This line that separates light and shadow is extremely important. I continue to use geometric lines to create my Terminator line, and I simplify the shape of the shadow I see here. - Here , - it's good practice to rejoice your angles. If something seems off on your drawing, always go back to the basic angles as a way to get your drawing back on track. Thank you. - I'm now using the vine charcoal stick to measure the cash shadow shape. The cash shadow is a shadow that is being cast by the pair onto the table. You can see that I'm holding out my hand with the vine charcoal horizontally and sliding my finger across the charcoal to measure the width of the pair. I then move my hand to the right of the pair, comparing the width of the pair to the width of the shadow being cast by it. I'm always measuring and re measuring to check the accuracy of my drawing. I use my fingers to translate the measurements on the paper and then make new marks to draw the cash shadow shape. Once I'm satisfied with my marks, I start drawing the shape of the cash shadow. I observed the shape I see and translate that shape into straight angles. I start with a few simple lines and then add more angles to them. 8. Chapter: 7 - Refining the Drawing: Now that I've recorded enough information with my vine charcoal, I start refining my lines with an HB hard charcoal pencil. I'm using the pencil to develop and advance my drawing to the next level. My goal continues to be focused on getting my drawing toe look more and more like the pair I'm observing. I used the HB charcoal pencil to add more detail, more curves and shapes to my subject. I can also better control the quality of my line with the HB pencil by quality. I'm talking about hard, soft thickness and thinness of lines. The HB pencil is harder to erase and therefore a bit more permanent than the vine charcoal . I hold the pencil from the back and use my entire arm to draw instead of relying on my hand and wrist. This gives me more control. I wipe away some of my darker lines from the vine as I drove with the harder pencil. When I wipe some of the vine away, I'm still left with a ghost line that I can follow with the H B. - Oh , don't just draw the contour of your subject. Draw lines that follow the forms from the outside to the inside surface use line to describe the movement of forms. Yeah, little I use the kneaded eraser if I need to erase line from the pencil. The shammy skin won't erase THB charcoal pencil line as easily as it erases divine charcoal . I continue to keep my lines on the lightest side so I can keep my drawing open for corrections. I like to keep my HB pencil point sharp. This gives me control over finer detail lines. I continue refining the Terminator line. My goal is to accurately define and separate the light from the core shadow of the pair. 9. Chapter: 8 - The Block-In: I'm now shading or blocking in the shadow value. Using my vine charcoal, I block in the shadow value on the right side of the Terminator line as a light source is coming from the left. - I filled both the core shadow on the pair in the shadow cast by it. Once my shadow value is laid down, I soften it up. Using my hard hair bristle brush, I use a brush to scrub the tropical around, mixing it into the fibers of the paper to get an even tone. The vine charcoal has similar properties to paint. Even though it's a dry medium, it's very soft, and I'm able to easily soften up the rough shading I established using the paint booth. In addition to the brush, I use my finger and a small piece of paper towel to smooth out the tone some more. I'm interested in Onley establishing a flat, even shadow value for my block in 100 you know 10. Chapter: 9 - Highlights: I'm now looking to establish a few highlights on the pair. To begin, I hold my hand out with the vine charcoal stick horizontally, I positioned the charcoal along the top and bottom of the highlight I see on the large form of the pair. I then make a mark on the paper with my white shark pencil. Next, I hold out my hand with the vine charcoal vertically and look for the position of the left and right side of the highlight. I make a mark on my paper indicating the left side of the highlight. I can now block in the highlight on the big bottom form of the pair. I block in the highlight by shading towards the direction of my light source, or perpendicular to my source of light. This helps me stay conscious of the lights, direction or illumination on the pair. I block in the shape and size of the highlight I see on my subject. Now I want to find the highlight on the smaller top form on the pair. Once again, I pick up the vine charcoal stick to measure the position of the highlight. I move my hand both horizontally and vertically to figure out both the height and with of the top highlight and then make two marks on my paper for both the top and left side of the highlight. Remember that these marks are estimates of the highlights position on the subject. They may not be exact in position in size. They will, however, get me closer to the true position and size than I could get without taking the time to make any measurements at all. I shade in the top highlight with my white short pencil. I'm shaking the white in perpendicular to the light sauce. - Now that I have both highlights established, I can move back and forth between them in order to relate them to each other. I model and shape them with white truck pencil and my finger. I use my finger to soften or melt some of the highlight edges into the form of the pair. 11. Chapter: 10 - Finishing Touches: I shaped my kneaded eraser into a point, and I'm cleaning around some of the lines I've drawn needed. A race is a very malleable, making them easy to shape in order to erase more precise areas of the charcoal. The needed erases are very soft and do less damage to the paper than other erasers. Okay, at this point, I'm using my HB charcoal pencil to further refine some of the lines I've drawn. My goal is to have darker and softer lines on the shadow side of the pair and sharper, lighter lines on the light side of the pair. Um, as you can see, I always stand at arms length from my drawing. I hold my pencil from the back and use my arm to draw, not my wrist and hand. This takes some practice, but you will eventually develop more control over your line work. I'm always working to improve the drawing. I try to get my lines more and more accurate. Drawing is a process. You're always working out problems and making refinements. You can see that my easel is at an angle to the pair of viewing when standing at arm's length from the easel. I can see what I'm drawing and the object I'm looking at at the same time, this helps me to be objective about my drawing. If you stand too close to the easel, you will make a lot of mistakes. When you stand back, you can see everything that's going on. I use my finger to soften the dark lines On the shadow side, Drawing is a foundation and most important aspect of any finished or unfinished artwork. Drawing ranks number one in importance. Value is number two edges air number three and color is number four. I've now shifted the camera to a frontal view of the drawing, and you can see that my block in drawing is complete. The drawing can now be advanced to a finished rendering or form drawing in charcoal on this paper. This drawing can also be traced and transferred the canvas for a painting. My next film will teach you how to take your drawing to the next level. You will learn all the methods and techniques involved in creating a finished realistic form, drawing with charcoal on paper