Drawing Facial Expressions | Kyle Petchock | Skillshare

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Drawing Facial Expressions

teacher avatar Kyle Petchock, Kyle Petchock Art

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

7 Lessons (1h 60m)
    • 1. Course Introduction

      1:38
    • 2. Lesson 1: Happiness

      20:41
    • 3. Lesson 2: Anger

      15:55
    • 4. Lesson 3: Sadness

      18:11
    • 5. Lesson 4: Surprise / Shock

      16:33
    • 6. Lesson 5: Boredom

      20:30
    • 7. Lesson 6: Fear

      26:21
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About This Class

Hey everyone!  In this drawing course I’ll be showing you my artistic process for drawing convincing facial expressions.  I’ll be dividing the course into several lessons, each covering a different expression. I’ll be drawing faces showing happiness, anger, sadness, shock/surprise, boredom, and fear, and I'll show you how to draw expressions that capture the emotion you want your viewer to feel in your art. 

Meet Your Teacher

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Kyle Petchock

Kyle Petchock Art

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Hello, I'm Kyle Petchock and welcome to my Skillshare channel!  I'm a freelance artist who specializes in digital illustration / comic art, and I started this freelance journey just over three years ago. However, this didn't happen overnight.  Breaking into the art world is no easy feat.  It requires years of practice, patience, and most importantly, Perseverance to push through challenges.  Always believe in yourself, because if you do, you'll take the inspired action required to move you one step closer toward your goal, even if they're baby steps (yes, those count too). 

My personal mantra is 'Keep Persevering,' which also stands for my initials (KP).  More importantly, I use this motto to let aspiring artists know that even a normal guy who spent... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Course Introduction : Hey there, how's it going? I was just about to get started with the drawing, but before I do, let me ask you this. Are you a beginner or intermediate artist who's looking to improve any area of drawing facial expressions? Well, and you answer yes to that question. For you. Linings have a job and I'm a freelance artist who is trained in graphic design and commercial art, but I mostly specialize in illustration and comic art. In this course, I'm going to walk you through my entire process for sketching effective and convincing facial expressions that really give your character, life and emotion when you're telling your story through illustration. We're going to break this horse down into separate video lessons. Each one is going to cover a different expression. And those expressions are happiness, anger, sadness, shock slash surprise, boredom, and fear. And after you've completed the entire course and gone through all the video lessons, I had a class project for you to complete the variant as well, taking everything neat learn, and using it to draw your own character with a facial expression of your choice. Thank you guys again so much for choosing this course. I'm truly grateful for the support and you won't be disappointed. So with that said, why don't we get started? 2. Lesson 1: Happiness: Hey guys, how's it going? And this first video lesson, I'm going to be covering my entire process for sketching a character with the expression of happiness. You know, happiness is that feel good emotion, smiles all around and, and upbeat attitude. And I'll be showing you how various muscles of the face move and contort to form the expression itself. And also you had a really convey the emotion in an effective and convincing way in your character. In addition, I'll be briefly discussing the basic shapes and structures needed to construct a head. But for more on that, go to either my figure drawing courses and check out the head and facial features lessons where I go into that in more depth. So with that said, let's begin. Hey guys, welcome to lesson number one on my facial features. Horse. Here we'll be covering expression of happiness. So first I'm going to quickly sketch out equal repeating head. And we're going to use this as our template to build the expression. And I'm going to construct this using basic and simple shapes. But for more on Head Construction, visit either of my figure drawing forces and watch the head end visual features lesson. All right, and now that we've built the head, let's draw the expression. Let's first sketch them out, and this will be the feature and that really affects the rest of the expression, the most extended the edges of the mouth out towards the IRS and be sure to show plenty of those pearly whites. Now let's move up to the eyes. The shape of the smile is going to push the muscles in your cheeks up because the lower eyelids, That's not all though. You don't want to forget to make the eyebrows really expressing, bridged them up a bit so the expression looks more natural. Try to feel that sense of happiness while you're drawing. So you couldn't accurately conveyed in your character. And that way your viewer. We'll feel that emotion as well. Now when I'm sketching the eyebrows, one little trick I like to keep in mind is to imagine one single line going across the head. So I start with going from one side of the cheek over the eye socket, across the bridge of the nose and to the other side. This will ensure that the eyebrows are the same symmetrical shape on both sides of the head. And then simply just erase that area over the bridge of the nose and build up the eyebrows from there. Alright, and the last thing I'm gonna do here with this example is simply just clean up and refine the sketch a little bit and more details to the rest of the head, such as hair. And I'm also going to adjust the jaw line a bit from her initial sketch. That way it aligns correctly with the expression. Now that we've sketched out and discuss the basics of this expression, I am going to now draw a few more examples showing the head from some dynamic angles along with conveying happiness in each one. Okay, so the first dynamic angle that I'm going to sketch here is going to be from a lower angle looking up. Now if you still need some practice sketching the head from different dynamic angles such as this. Again, like I said before, checkout either of my figure drawing courses and visit the head and facial features lesson. There I go into the head from different angles and a lot more depth. So I'm just going to sketch this out following all of the same guidelines as before when we sketch the expression from the front view. Except this time we're gonna be looking at the head anymore three-dimensional point of view. Now this can be overwhelming at first, especially if you haven't had a lot of experience drawing the head from difficult angles, that's this, but I guarantee it with repetition and practice and patience, you will eventually become very good at it, and it'll suddenly seem effortless. Okay. No. Okay. Example number two here. Point of view or a bird's eye view. Now, this angle in particular is one that used to give me a lot of trouble. And it took me some time to really nail it down to the point where I can now draw it from memory. So I recommend looking at a lot of real life reference photos of the head from different angles. And that way you can really get a sense of how the structures will appear from different points of views such as a higher angle. And continually do this and practice again and again. And sure you might make some mistakes and it might not look right the first few times with a person. But eventually I guarantee you it'll be referenced. Okay. My delta, delta. Okay. Now an example number three, I'm just sketch the had run a Greek quarter point of view. And I love this angle is definitely easier than the burst too, but it's one that still takes practice and patients to be able to get better at. And I would recommend that you practice this angle first before moving on to the other two, because this is the closest one to the view that we discussed at the beginning of the video. So definitely start off with the easier of the three and then gradually work your way up to the more difficult ones. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. Alright, there we go. That wraps up this lesson. So congratulations, you're completing this. Two. I will see you in the next video lesson. 3. Lesson 2: Anger: Hey guys, what's up? And this second video, of course, I'm going to be covering my process for sketching it character showing emotion of anger. But before we get started, don't maybe angry. I'm kidding. Of course I had to throw a little marble Hope references in there just for fun. But I'll be showing you how to really convey this intense emotion and your character and how various muscles of the face moving contort 24V expression itself. So with that said, why don't we dive right into it? Alright guys, welcome to lesson two of my facial expressions, force. And here we're going to cover the expression of anger. Before we do anything else though, let's sketch out a word facing head using basic shapes to build it up. This will be our template to sketch the expression in a bit. And if you need additional practice when drawing the basic shapes of the hand as such, head over to either my figure drawing forces and visit the head and facial features lessons. One thing to keep in mind when you're sketching the head from the front view is symmetry. At the beginning, we started with the central line of action going down the middle. And as a beginner, it can be a little tricky to get the hang of this right away, because sometimes there's little subtleties that you might overlook, such as the shape of the jaw being the same on each side, or the distance between the side of the head and the eyes. These are things that you want to learn to take notice of and make sure that there is symmetry on both sides of the head. So the jaw should be the same shape on both sides, as well as the placements, the size of the eyes, the ear placement, and things like that. And it takes practice, but eventually you'll be able to see it easily. And if you see a mistake, you'll be able to correct it. No problem at all. Now that we fully drawn out the shape of the head, it's time to sketch the the two features that will impact this expression the most are the mouth and the iron's. When expressing anger. Don't be afraid to show some tea. Also play around with exaggerating the shape of the mouth to further enhance the expression. After that, we'll draw the eyebrows. And when anger each, I brought 1 downwards towards the bridge of the nose, which will cause some rudeness to form there and around in that area. Much like we did with happiness in lesson one, the lower eyelids will also move and close. In addition, the nostrils will be pulled up big of the expression overall as originating from between the eyes, as the visual muscle will contract and pulled them out, nostrils and eyebrows toward that point. Also, let's not forget to add in the pupils here as well. And now that we've sketched the basic expression, I'm just going to speed this up a tiny bit and refine the rest of the sketch and add some more details to the head. Well writing now that we've gone over the basics of the expression, I'm going to now sketch out a few more examples of anger from various angles and points of view. Will be sketching the head from a three-quarter lower angle, a high angle from the front end from the side view. Now, if you're still having any difficulty at all with sketching the head from different dynamic angle, such as this, I highly recommend taking additional time to really focus and practice on getting better in this area. Because when we're drawing facial expressions from different angles, Think of the head as the foundation for the rest of the drawing. So if the foundation looks incorrect, then the facial expression is going to look incorrect and it's not going to look very convincing to the viewer. If you need additional practice, you can check out either of my figure drawing courses and look at the head and visual features lesson. Or you can also practice a lot from reference photos that you find online. A couple of websites that I really recommend our Pinterest. And another one is called quick poses.com. That has a lot of great reference photos that you can use to practice from. Or of course, good old Google Images never let anybody down either. So just like we did with example number one, we want to follow those same steps. So we're going to make them out really wide open and exaggerated. This character is going to be yelling. So the teeth, they're not gonna be clenched here. They're going to be opened a bit. When you draw the eyes always start with two circles or spheres. And then we're going to draw the eyelids over this. This is going to make drawing the correct shape of the eyes for this expression a lot easier. And again, make sure those lower eyelids are close to emphasize the emotion and even further. And then when you go to draw the eyebrows, make sure you're angling them downward towards the bridge of the nose like we discussed in example number one. Okay, now that we've sketched and gone over the basics of the expression rubbish point of view. I'm just going to speed this up a little bit and refine in detail the sketch. Okay, now in example number two here we're going to be sketching anger from a forward facing high point of view. So since we are looking at the head from above, the placement of some of the facial features are going to shift a bit. So normally from the front view, the length of the ears on either side of the head are going to be the same exact length as the space between the island and the nose line. But in this example, they're going to appear to be a little bit higher up on the head. And this is only because we are looking at it from a high angle. Also, the space between the bottom of the nose and the mouth is going to be covered up by the nose since we're looking at it from above. Okay, now I'm gonna go and sketch the TPP. And since we're viewing the head from a high angle here, we're actually going to see more of the lower row of team than the upper row. And the last thing that I'm gonna go and do here is refine the eyes a little bit and sketch the eyebrows. And because of the high point of view we're looking at here, the eyebrows are actually going to overlap the eyes a tiny bit. And again, like in example, one makes sure the lower eyelids are close to really emphasize the effectiveness of the expression. Now that we've sketched out the basics of the expression here, I'm just going to speed this up a bit and detail. It's a little bit more. Okay, now in our third and last example here in this video, I'm going to be sketching the head, showing the expression of anger from the side view. So like I discussed before, we wanna just rough out the basic shapes that are going to construct the head. And we want to make sure that everything looks proportionally correct before moving into the details of the expression itself. Because again, think of the head as your foundation. And if the foundation is right, then neither will the expression. And we want to try to avoid that. So take all the time that you need to sketch and race and reschedule until the shape of the head is looking correct. And then you can move forward withdrawing the expression. Okay, so first I'm going to sketch the mouth and it's going to be open wide, like he's yelling, much like we did in the previous examples. When you're sketching them melt in an open position like this from the side. Imagine the shape of the mouth we sketched in the very first example when we drew the face from the front view. I said this time we're going to cut that shape in half. When moving up to the I and the eyebrow makes sure that the lower eyelid is close a little bit and the eyebrow is angling down towards the bridge of the nose. That way we can really feel the anger that he's expressing as the viewer. Make sure his nostril is also being pulled up a little bit as well as adding some wrinkles around the bridge of the nose. Because again, this expression originates from the center of the bridge of the nose. And when the facial muscles moving, contort, everything kind of gets pulled up towards that central point. Okay, now that we've covered all of that, I'm just going to speed this up and clean up the rough sketch a little bit by refining the lines and adding more details. So, I hope you learned a lot here about drawing a spatial expression. Thank you so much for watching, and I will see you in lesson number three. 4. Lesson 3: Sadness: Hey guys, what's going on? In this third video lesson, I'm going to be covering why process for sketching a character showing the expression of sadness. Now what's like anger, sadness is another intense expression that codes with a lot of emotion. And you really want to convey this effectively. So that way your viewer feels that emotion as they're looking at your character. And I'm gonna show you how to convey this emotion by describing how different muscles in the face moved to form the expression itself. So let's get started and popular thing or to hear. All right guys, welcome to lesson three of my facial expressions course. And this time we're going to be drawing the expression of sadness. So the first thing I'll do here is roughly sketched out a rebasing head using basic and simple shapes for more in-depth detail about how to sketch the head and the structures that go into it. Check out either of my figure drawing forces and you, the head and visual features lesson. Okay, so since the head sketch that we're drawing here is going to serve as the basis and foundation of the rest of the drawing. We want it to look correct proportionally. So that means we want both sides of the head on either side of that center line to be symmetrical. And when you're starting out and drawing heads from the front view, it can be a little tricky to get the shape just right at first because you might overlook certain discrepancies or abnormalities. Like for example, you might draw the head and the jaw line might be shaped differently or angled differently on one side compared to the other. But you just might not be aware of it. So this is one thing to really get into the habit of practicing, is really inspecting and double-checking your work before you move ahead into details. That way, everything will look correct and the end results will look proportionally accurate as opposed to if the rough sketch is not looking good than the rest of the drawing, is also not going to look at either. If you noticed here in this, we are actually drawing the head tilting forward a little bit, it still from the front view, but the head is going to be valid for. This is going to help emphasize the emotion even more in addition to the actual facial expression itself, which means that some of the visual features are going to shift a little bit. For example, the IRS will appear to be higher up on the head and the nose is going to be shown more from the top. So we're not going to see the nostrils at all from underneath. All right, now that we've got that sketch out, this is going to be our template for drawing the expression. So why don't we move on to that next. All right, under the facial features, we'll start with the eyes and the mouth. And now the i's will be half closed with the pupils looking down along with bags under the eyes to enhance the overall mood of the expression. Since we're drawing a girl here, make sure that you give her thicker eyelashes. And now when you're drawing eyelashes or a female character, you don't have to draw each individual eyelash, much like we do with drawing longer hair. You wanna kinda bunch all of the eyelashes together by just drawing a fixed solid line. The mouth will also be contracted, meaning it will be smaller and not as long. To express that, I'll draw a shorter, downward curved line to form a threatened. In addition, the eyebrows will also move. With anger. The eyebrows pointed downward toward the bridge of the nose, toward that central point. But with sadness, the eyebrows will point in the opposite direction. Del, angle upwards and pinch towards the center of the forehead. Okay, now the basics of the expression are laid out. So when I'm gonna do now is just speed this up a little bit while I tighten up the sketchy lines and add some details to this drawing. Okay, now that we've gone over the basics of this expression in our initial template. Now I'm going to sketch a few more examples of sadness by showing the head from various dynamic elements, which will be a three-quarter view, a higher three-quarter view from above, and a lower three-quarter angle from down below. Alright, now if you recall in the example that we went over in the beginning of the video, we tilt the head slightly forward to further convey the emotion of sadness. We're gonna do the same thing here in this example. So tilt the head forward a little bit. And now you can think, I'm drawing the whole thing in this position. Kind of blame the torso on the human body bending to one side. When that happens, one side will expand and the other will contract. So think of one side of stretching and the other side pinching. After roughly sketching in things like the hair, eye sockets, knows and align For the mouth is going to go as well as the IRS and warming the cheekbones and jaw line. Now let's draw the expression. We'll start by roughing in the eyes and then closing the upper eyelids and drawing the pupils looking down. And remember how we angle the eyebrows in exemple of one. Well, we're gonna do that same thing here. Angle them upward towards a centre points in the middle of the forehead and pinch them up a little bit. That way we can really further convey this emotion. And now that that's all sketched, It's going to save some time here. As I go into more details. Okay, moving on to example number two, where we're going to sketch the head showing the emotion that sadness from a higher three-quarter view. Now, this angle can be a bit tricky, especially if you're a beginner. So I recommend that you still need practice throwing the head from this point of view. Take that time to do that, and then move on to the expression next. Because as I mentioned before, think of the head sketch as the template or foundation for the expression. So you want the foundation to be nice and sturdy and proportionally correct. Because if it's not, then the rest of the drawing is going to suffer as a result. And we want to try to avoid that. One thing to keep in mind is that when you're drawing the head from this high angle, and good thing to do is to start withdrawing the neck and then building the structures of the head overlapping it. Because and this I used to do myself when I was starting out, I would draw the head first. So what I would do is I I guess it and add more of the neck than should have been viewed from that point of view. And also because back then when I was starting out, I was still trying to get more comfortable with drawing heads from dynamic angle such as this. So I had the tendency to make But if you do it this way, I guarantee that everything will turn out proportionally correct and you can move forward competently with sketching the expression. And now this is still the rough sketch in stage. So feel free to be as messy as you want or add or raise as many times as you feel is necessary until you get everything looking right. Okay, so now that we've sketched in things like the hair, eye sockets, the nose, and the ear. Let's go ahead and draw the expression. First, sketch in the eyes very loosely, and then draw the upper eyelids closed a bit and make sure the mouth is contracted and has a bit of a downward curve to form a frowny. And would the eyebrows makes sure to angle them up slightly towards the center of the forehead. And then the last thing to do here is to sketch in the pupils looking downward. Now that the expression is all laid out, I'm gonna go ahead and speed this up in order to save some time while I go and detail the liner a little bit and tighten up the sketch. Excellent job. Now, the last example that we're going to show here is the expression of sadness. A lower three-quarter point of view. Now with this example, we're gonna go a little more extreme here with the expression. And we're going to draw this female character as if she is crying out. Which means we're going to open them out a bit more and further exaggerate the expression than what we've done in the previous examples. When drawing the head from a lower point of view such as this, makes sure that all of your proportions are correct when you're doing the rough sketch. This is super important. So that way, when you're adding details later on, everything looks proportionately and nothing is off. Which means you want to think of the head in a more three-dimensional point of view. So draw the line and the nose line wrapping around the sphere, which represents the skull. This way you can accurately place the ER when looking at the head from this position. Because of course, when the head is looking up or you're viewing it from a lower point of view, the positions of the facial features are going to change a little bit and the IRR is actually going to appear to be lower than the width between the eyeliner and the nose line. We're also going to see more of underneath the nose. To start this off burst will just rough in the shape of the mouth. And now remember how we drew them out in lesson two, covering anger, we really want to open it up more and exaggerate that shape more than what we've been doing in the previous examples. Now from this angle, when we go to draw the eyes, remember that since we're viewing the head prone down below, there are going to sink back into the eye sockets a little bit more than if we're viewing the head I level or from the front. So we're actually going to see more of the space between the top of the eye and the eyebrow. Next we'll sketch in the shape of the eyebrows. And remember to angle them upward toward the center of the forehead. And here we're gonna exaggerate them a little bit more than what we've been doing in the previous examples. Similar to how we drew them in anger. Except this time there'll be pointing in the opposite direction. And just sketch in the hair. When drawing stylized hair, you don't have to draw every individual hair strand because one that would take too long. And too we're not really going for a photorealistic style. So you can represent this more stylized format by only drawing a few smooth flowing lines. And now the last thing that we'll focus on here are the eyes and the eyebrows. So unlike the previous examples, here, we're going to have the eyes closed completely. And when you're drawing a female character with the eyes closed, you only have to draw eight single thick line. And remember to vary the line weight, especially when growing eyelashes or girl. So we're going to just throw one single light. And also, let's detail the eyebrows a little bit more as well. Now that we've covered all the basics here, I'm gonna go ahead and speed this up while I detail a liner and tighten things up a little bit. And also to further emphasize the expression of sadness. You can even add some teardrops. Her eyes as well. Congratulations for completing. I'm very proud of you and I hope you've learned a lot. And so with that said, happy practicing. And I will see you in lesson four. 5. Lesson 4: Surprise / Shock: Hey guys. And this next video lesson I'm gonna be covering by process for sketching a character showing the expression of surprise. Anyway, I really love sketching this expression personally because of just how exaggerated you can get withdrawing the facial features and convey the emotion. And I'll show you how to do that by explaining how the different facial features interact with one another. As various muscles of the face move into torque to form the expression itself. So without further ado, why don't we get started? Okay guys, welcome to lesson four as bird of my visual expressions force. And this time we're going to be drawing the expression of shock, flush surprise. Now this is one of my favorite expressions to draw because of just how much you can have fun with exaggerating the facial features. So like I've been doing with the previous lessons to start, I'm going to quickly draw out our head template in which we will draw the expression on. So I'm going to sketch roughly a basic word pacing pad using simple shapes. As I've mentioned in the previous video lessons, you want to be mindful when you're drawing the head from the front view of the overall shape and accuracy of the placement of the facial features and structures. Because when you're a beginner, it can be easy to overlook inconsistencies with the sheep on either side of that center line. Because the end goal is we want there to be symmetry on either side of the head. And sometimes if you're not aware, the jaw line, for example, could be a different shape on one side than on the other. Or the placement of the i on the left side of the head might be a little further away from the bridge of the nose than on the right. And a good thing to do to check the accuracy of your facial features and the sheep the head is to take the sketch and flip it or invert it. Especially if you're working in a digital program like Photoshop, this is really easy to do. And doing this will allow you to see where your mistakes are and then you can correct them. Then you can flip. This gets back to what the way it was before app you corrected the issues. And the more you do this, eventually, you will be able to see these mistakes right away and correct them without having to flip the sketch. This takes time to build this IFR, these errors, but eventually you'll be able to get it and it'll become easier and easier. Before we move into the expression itself, we're just going to build out structures of the head is such that the eye sockets, the nose, cheekbones. We're going to add the ears. And a rough line for the mouth is gonna go. Because this is our foundation and we want it to look proportionally accurate so that way the expression can look convincing as well. Alright, now that we've done that, let's move on to the expression itself was shock or surprise. All the facial features will play a part. And the more features are exaggerated, the more effective the emotion will be conveyed in your drawing. All right, so first we'll start with the mouth. The edges of the mouth will be pinched inward to be more oval-shaped, unlike the mouth shape with anger or happiness. But think of how we contracted the shape of the mouth or when we drew sadness in the previous lesson, it's going to be a little bit contracted much like that. Now if you want, you could also draw this expression with the mouse shape being a little bit wider. But for this example alone, we're going to contract a little bit and make it more of an oval shape. And then next we're gonna move up to the eyes and the eyebrows. The AI should be wide open. Tuple should be smaller than normal. Raised the eyebrows high into the warhead is well, really exaggerate that reaction to whatever the character is being shocked by, are surprised by. This is what drives it all home, is the eyebrows. Because if they were just in a neutral resting position, the overall expression wouldn't have the same effects. And it would lose some of the emotion that you're trying to convey to the viewer. Another small but important details to consider is when the eyebrows are being pushed up like this into the forehead. This is going to cause some wrinkles to form in the skin above the eyebrows. So that can be represented by a few wavy lines going across the top of the head. Okay, now that we've gone over the basics of this expression, I'm now going to go ahead and draw three more examples of shock slash surprise, showing the head from a few different dynamic angles. That way, you guys can practice drawing this expression from a variety of different views and expand your horizons beyond just the front-facing view like we described before. So with that said, I'm going to be sketching three examples. One showing the head from the side view, another showing the head permit three-quarter view. And the third example is going to show the head from a higher three-quarter view looking down below. So first before drawing the expression we're going to loosely referred and the basic shapes to form the head from the side view. And we'll also lightly sketch in the neck and upper trap muscles as well. Now in this example, just like the other one, since we're showing the expression of surprise or shock, this mean that the jaw is going to be open more and the mouth is going to be wide. So therefore, we're going to angle the chin down more as opposed to when. It's just interesting. Now when you go to draw the eye here, since we're viewing the head from the side view, the eyeball should sink back into the skull and it's the eye socket a little bit. It shouldn't be placed too close to the edge of the bridge of the nose. But it also shouldn't be placed too far back into the eye socket as well. You kinda wanna place it where it's directly above the bottom of the chin. Let's also raise the eyebrow up high into the forehead, like we did an example there. And since this is going to be a female character, give her bigger eyelashes to. And now what I'm gonna do is just speed this up a little bit as I go and tighten up the sketch lines and add more details. Okay, in example number two here, we're going to show the head from a three-quarter eye level point of view. And the expression itself is going to be directed upwards. So this character is going to be looking up and being shocked or surprised by something that he's looking at. So first let's go and run in the overall shape of the head. Will also add the neck and the ear, eye sockets, nose, and a few quick sketching lines for the hair. Now that that's done, we're gonna go ahead and draw the mouth first. Now if you recall back in the beginning of the video, in example one, we drew them out as more of a contracted oval shape. So the edges of the mouth are not going to be pointed outward too much. And next will just lightly sketch in circles or the eyeballs while we continue to build up the details of the characters. So I'm going to sketch the hair in a little more detail, as well as continuing to refine some of the outer contour lines before we move on to detailing the eyes and adding the eyebrows. So you want to raise the eyebrows high up into the forehead, like we've been doing in the previous examples. And then sketch in his pupils. And keep in mind that they're going to be very tiny and pointing upward. All right, we're going to wrap up this example here by refining and detailing some of the lines and cleaning up the messy sketch lines. So to do that, I'm just going to speed this up to save some time. Okay, now last but certainly not least is example number three where we're going to sketch the head Rumi higher green quarter point of view. This angle in particular can be very tricky, especially if you're a beginner who's just starting out. So don't be afraid to fail if you make an attempt and it doesn't look quite right. In fact, don't be afraid to make dozens and dozens of failed attempts. You know, that's what it takes to get that one good drawing is you have to continue to try and try over and over until you get it. That's the whole idea behind improving. A lot of times I like to start by drawing the nose first ones I have the sphere for the skull weighed in the central line and I highlighted. This allows me to be able to go and place the mouth more accurately. And then in doing so, once I have the nose and the mouth loosely abrupt in, I'll be able to accurately sketch the rest of the face and the jaw as well. Now I'm just gonna go ahead and roughly lay in the eyes and eyebrows and start building the sides of the cheek and the jaw line, as well as adding the ear. After continuing to build upon the rough sketch and refined a little bit more, we're gonna go ahead and add the tuples, which are going to be very tiny as we've been doing in the previous examples. And I'm going to build upon the eyebrows more to, All right, now we're just going to finish up this example here by speeding things up and refining the contour lines and cleaning up some of the messy, rough sketch lines. All right, congratulations for completing lesson four. I'm so proud of you and I hope you learned a lot here about drawing this expression. Keep on practicing, and I'll see you in lesson five's. 6. Lesson 5: Boredom: Hey guys, in this next video lesson, I'm going to be covering my process for sketching a character showing the emotion of boredom. Now we've all been there before when you're sitting in a and you're merely falling asleep wishing the time would go by faster. Sounds relatable, doesn't it? Well, I'm going to discuss how to really convey that emotion in your character drawing by recalling a moment in your life when you felt this way and you felt really bored that way, your viewer can experience the same emotion by looking at her drawing. So don't fall asleep on me now, let's get started. Alright, you guys, welcome to lesson number five of my facial expressions course. All undrawn the expression of boredom. So like I've been doing, the first thing I'm gonna do here is sketch, rush forward facing head that we're gonna use as a template to sketch out and talk about the basics of the expression. Okay, so when you're going and sketching the head from the front view such as this, you want to really make sure that you're double-checking your work and making sure that there's no mistakes and consistencies with the accuracy. The facial features or replacement. For example, both of the ears should be in line with one another, so one should not be higher than the other or vice versa, as well as the eye sockets and the space between the eye sockets and the side of the head. Just little things like that. Make sure that they are symmetrical on both sides, as well as the overall shape of the jaw line. And one good thing you can do if you're just starting out in order to check your work, as you can, reverse your sketch if you're working in a digital programs such as Photoshop, this will actually allow you to see where your mistakes if there's any inconsistent Ds in the shape of the head. And then you can go and erase and Tweet them and then flip this gets back to how it was before, and continue doing this until it looks proportionately correct and you're ready to move forward, withdrawing the expression. And then after you've done this many times, you'll eventually develop an AI were this and you wouldn't have to reverse the sketch anymore. You'll be able to just see it right off the bat and correct the mistake. Alright, now I'm gonna go and draw the hair on this theme of characters. And we're gonna get for pigtails. And I'm also just going to continue refining the outer lines of this sketch and building out more details as I go along. I'll also add in the nose and aligned for the mouth is gonna go eventually. I'm also going to quickly run in circles for where the eyeballs are gonna go as well. Alright, now that I've done that, let's move on to the expression itself. With boredom, try to remember and picture a time in your life when you felt really bored and think about that feeling in order to really convey the emotion in your character to your viewer. First, we'll start with the mouth. The shape of the mouth will be similar to that of sadness, being more contracted and shorter. Next comes the eyes. The upper eyelids will be half-closed. And to convey the emotion even more, draw bags under the eyes to show a bit of tiredness similar to how we did when we drew in the, one of the previous lessons. Since this is a female character, be sure to give her thicker eyelashes. And similar to what I discussed at the beginning of the video when we were sketching out the head, you wanna make sure that the shape of her eyes are the same on both sides of the head as well. So keep in mind that general rule of symmetry. And if you think that there is an issue with the shape on one of the eyes, you can do. And I suggested before, if you're working digitally, you can flip the sketch or reverse it and you'll be able to more easily see the mistakes and then you can correct it. To help express this emotion further, we're now going to sketch the eyebrows. And now for boredom, we're going to leave them at a resting neutral position for the most part, but raise them up really slightly. Not too high like we did with surprise, but just a little bit. Okay, now that we've got the basics of the expression laid out, I'm gonna just speed this up while I go and clean up the rough, messy sketch lines and add more detail to the line art. Okay, now that we've covered that and discussed the basics of the expression, I'm gonna go ahead and draw a few more examples of boredom by showing the head from a few different points of view, which will be a three-quarter view, a lower three-quarter view, n, Then a higher three-quarter view. Okay, so here in this first example, we're going to draw this male character and we're gonna follow all the same steps and the process that we discussed in the front-facing example at the beginning of the video. So we wanna make sure the email is shorter and contracted, almost similar to that of the cheapen the mouth in the emotion of sadness. And we're going to draw the eyes the same way as well, where the upper eyelid is closed. When the eyebrows for this character, one is going to be slightly raised up while the other rests in a more neutral position. Doing this can help convey a little bit of attitude in this expression aboard on. So it's always fun to play around with little details like this that can slightly enhance the expression further. Now that we've got the basics of the expression laid out, I'm going to just speed this up while I go and clean up the rough, messy sketch lines and add more detail. And further down. Okay, let's move on to example two where we're going to show the head from a lower three quarter point of view. Now with this angle, as I've described in earlier videos, this can be very tricky if you're just starting out drawing the head from this perspective. But if you put in the time and the practice and the work, you're going to eventually the improvements. And it's all about just knowing how to shift and move around different facial features when you're looking at the head from a different angle. So as I've said before as well, when you're looking at the head from down below, the ear, is going to appear to be placed lower on the head than just being allied with the width of the line of the nose line. Because think about it. When you're looking at the headroom that front, all of that appears to line up. But remember, the head is a three-dimensional sphere. So when it's tilted or angled, everything's gonna shift as well. And you wanna make sure that I didn't nose line wrap around the head. So that way you can place the ear more accurately. Also, the i's are going to appear to sink back into the eye sockets a bit more. And we're going to see more space between the top of the eye and the eyebrows. And also we're going to see more of underneath the nose. And we're gonna see nostrils a lot more. And the nose is going to cover up the eye that's furthest from us. So we're not going to see that as much. So we're going to follow all the same steps here with the shape of the mouth to the upper eyelids being closed and the eyebrows resting in a neutral position. One other small detail to also keep in mind is when you're looking at the head from below like this, we're not going to see as much of the forehead because think about it. The forehead kind of angles back a little bit. So from down below, it's not going to be as big. Now that we've got all the details of the expression sketch out, I'm just going to speed this up a little bit as I go and refine the LIDAR and add more details. Take down there. All right, awesome job. Now we're gonna move into our last example here, where we're going to show the head from a higher Greek border point of view. Now this always tends to be the trickiest angle. Or at least when I was starting out, I found it to be very difficult. But the more time and practice I put in, the better I got added. And as I mentioned in the last example, you want to remember that the head of a three-dimensional sphere. So you want to wrap the airline in the nose line all the way around. That way nothing appears to be too flat or disproportionate. And in this case, the ear is actually going to be placed N appear higher on the head. The width between the island and the nose line. And that's only because we're viewing the head from a higher. Also, since we're viewing the head from a higher angle, we're not gonna see a whole lot of space between the top of the eye and the bottom of the eyebrow. That space is going to be covered up and the eyebrow is actually going to overlap the eyes a little bit. And I'm also just going to draw in some longer hair since this is going to be a female character. And since the head is being viewed from above, that means we're not going to see a whole lot of the neck because it's going to be covered by the jaw line. And the upper trap muscles are going to appear to be higher up. But this is only because reviewing everything from above, which is going to change the placement of everything. Okay. Now we're gonna go ahead and draw the upper eyelids halfway closed and sketch and the pupils looking to the right side. Also be sure to add some bags under her eyes. And when we go to sketching, eyebrows were actually going to angle them downward a little bit beyond just that neutral resting position. Similar to how we did when we were drawing anger except not as intense, just angled down slightly to give off the vibe of being annoyed. Okay, now that the expression is always out, we're just going to continue tweaking and erasing and refining the sketch to get ready for detailing the wider arc and a bit. And this is still the rough sketch stage, so feel free to do this as many times as necessary until everything. Incorrect. Sometimes when I'm drawing the head from this point of view, I have the tendency to make the skull a little bit larger than it should be. But that's okay. You can just erase like I did here and kind of adjust the size of the top of the Hadoop so that way it's not too large. And now I'll just go and speed this up as I clean up the mess and sketch lines and refine the line art a bit more. Delta delta. And that concludes lesson. So congratulations, and I'm very proud of you. Keep on practicing. And I will see you in the final video lesson. 7. Lesson 6: Fear: Hey guys, what's up? In this final video lesson, I'm going to be discussing my process for sketching and character showing the expression of fear. Now, unlike anger and shock, fear is another one of those emotions that's really fun to exaggerate in your art. And I'll show you how to do this by explaining how different facial muscles moving in tort to form the expression. And how to really convey the emotion to your viewer by putting yourself in the character shoes and recalling a moment in your life when you felt really afraid yourself. I'll also briefly discuss how to construct the head using basic shapes, but for more in-depth detail on that you can, you, either of the head and facial features lessons in my figure drawing horses. With that said, why don't we get started? All right, welcome to lesson six and final lesson in my facial expressions course. All on drawing the expression of fear. Much like anger and surprise. Beer is another emotion that you can really exaggerate a lot in the expression and have fun with. So first I'm going to sketch out a front-facing head, kind of like a template that we're going to use to cover the expression itself. And I'm going to draw this up one basic shapes. Okay, now that we've sketched up the general shape of the skull and jaw line and burn in the neck and ears. We run the eye sockets. I'm going to draw the nose. And we're going to just sketch a quick line to represent the placement of the mouth. So as you practice on your own, and from what you've seen here, these video lessons, I've been varying the shape of the heads in all the different examples. Because I think it's important to switch things up each time to broaden your horizons a little bit more. So you can do the same thing. You can have fun and experiment with different head shapes and sizes. And you can even vary the sizes and shapes of the different facial features as well. All right, we've got the basics of the template sketched out here. So now let's move on to the expression. Now with this emotion. And that will actually be combining aspects of three of the emotions covered in previous lessons, which were anger, sadness, and surprise, will be using similar mouse shapes to anger. The same wide eyes like we didn't surprise, and the eyebrow positions of sadness. So first we're going to start with the mouth here. You can either, why didn't the mouth to show the teeth clenched? Or you can draw them out with the jaws wide open. For the appearance of the eyes, recall how they looked when we covered shock and surprise in the previous lesson, we wanted them to be, why would the pupil smaller bags under them? And finally, for the eyebrows will enable them upwards toward the center of the poor head, towards the central point, similar to how we did when we covered the expression of sadness. Now the eyebrows, another feature here that really drives this expression. And you can really exaggerate them as much as you and lower them to the point where they're almost overlapping the eyes. This is going to really enhance and be able to convey the emotion to your viewers. Another small but important detail to remember here is that anytime you're pinching the eyebrows up towards the center of the forehead, such as in this example, there's going to be some wrinkles that form up there. I'm gonna go ahead and finish up this example now by speeding it up. When I go and tighten up the sketchy lines and clean things up and add more details. Okay, so now that we've covered the basics of fear, let's go ahead and explore a few dynamic angles of the head. So we couldn't accurately convey beer from some different perspectives other than the front view. And the three examples that I'm going to draw here. Are a lower front view from below, a three-quarter view from over the shoulder, and a side view. Since we're viewing the head from such a low point of view, this means certain facial features such as the ears, the nose, and the eye sockets are going to shift a bit. So the ears are actually going to appear pretty low on the head. And that's because when we're keeping them in alignment with the ion line of the nose line because the head is a sphere, essentially, all that's going to shift. And when the eyes and the nose point up, the ears are actually going to be moved down. And with the nose we're really only going to see underneath or the nostrils are, we're not going to see the bridge of the nose very much Z. You can sketch this with just a simple triangle shape. And the eye sockets are gonna be placed pretty high up on the skull. And we're not going to see a lot of the forehead. Also sketch a line from where the mouth is gonna go. And I'm just going to quickly rough in some smooth flowing lines for the hair. After we're done doing that, we're going to quickly just sketch in a few lines to the eyebrows and they're going to be pointing upward, similar to the last example we just did. If you notice here we've left a lot of space open between the bottom of the nose and the chin. This is because in this example, the character is going to be screaming. So that means for Bout needs to be open wide and we're going to have to have plenty of space to be able to exaggerate that shape to enhance the overall effectiveness of the. Okay, now we're gonna go draw the pupils and we're also going to sketch her lower eyelids being closed to add to that overall effectiveness of the emotion. Also be sure to give her a thicker eyelashes as well, since we're drawing a female character here. And I'm just going to continue refining the sketch here and adding more details that getting the eyebrows a little bit and getting the sketch ready for when I go and clean up the line art here in a minute. And now I'm just going to speed this up a tiny bit while I do just that digital lines and clean up the rough, messy sketch lines. Okay. Okay, with that, when it wrapped up, let's move on to example number two, where we're going to sketch the head from a three-quarter view, looking over the shoulder. Drying your character with the Hadean disposition, looking over the shoulder can also really add to the overall effectiveness of the expression and emotion of fear. Because it creates a sense of anxiety or anxiousness. And also a bit of paranoia. Looking over your shoulder because you get the sense somebody's watching you or you're being followed. I've also gone and changed up the mouth position and shape a little bit from our previous examples. So here we're going to show this character is sort of biting her lower lip as a means of enhancing the emotion of fear even further. And now I'm gonna go and loosely rushed in her hair, as well as adding in her pupils and drawing the eyebrows, which will be in the same position that we've been drawing it in, in the last year. Examples. Okay, we've got that all sketched out now. So I'm just going to speed this up a tiny bit while I go and clean up the line art and add more details along the way until we can wrap this one up. Okay, now we're gonna go ahead and move into our final example here, which is going to show you delta, delta. A lot like we did with the side view examples in the anger and jog slashed Brian lessons. We're going to draw the jaw line a little bit lower and the chain is going to be pointing down because the jaw is going to be hinging open to show that this character is screaming out of fear. So you wanna make sure you do that correctly so that way there's enough space to be able to open the mouth wide and really exaggerate that shape. We're gonna get this character some bushy facial hair and a beard. And then we'll move up to refining the nose and bid, sketching in the eyeball. As I've explained before, the eyeball should sink a little bit back into the skull, into the eye socket. And it shouldn't be placed too close to the edge of the bridge of the nose. When also don't place it too far back either. Make the, I appear really wide as we've been doing in the previous examples. Sketch in a small pupil and sketch the eyebrow pointing upward towards the center of the forehead. Because it seems appropriate for this example, I'm gonna go ahead and give this male character a bit of a MAN button here. Now that I've outlined in the schedule a little bit further and added all the details that are necessary. I'm gonna go and speed up is last little bit here. As I clean up the line are add more details as we finalize this example. Okay? Okay, this concludes Lesson number six. So stay tuned to the end of the video where I'll describe the class project. Hey guys, congratulations for completing this course. I'm so proud of you, and I hope you'll learn a thing or two about sketching facial expressions. Now with that said, I have a little assignment for you. I want you to take what you've learned in these video lessons and draw your own. When a facial expression of your choice based on the ones that were covered. You can be as creative as you like with the appearance and the output of your character. And it can be anyone you like. It can be a self portrait. It can be a portrait of a friend, or you can draw your favorite comic book character, can be your favorite superhero from a movie like or a show. Or it can be a character that you make up entire. The choice is up to you. The important thing is that you have fun with it and really coping you've learned here ends up practice. Also, when you upload your work, be sure to upload it to the class project gallery. So that way I can take a look, constructive feedback and tips for her. And it makes sure uploaded as a high resolution digital JPEG file. Again, thank you guys very, very much for watching. I really appreciate it. And until that time, keepers severity.