Diminished Lightning Vol. 3 - Advanced Gypsy Jazz Guitar | Alex Simon | Skillshare

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Diminished Lightning Vol. 3 - Advanced Gypsy Jazz Guitar

teacher avatar Alex Simon

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

23 Lessons (49m)
    • 1. 1 Introduction How this course is structured

      0:41
    • 2. 2 Diminished Sweep from Low E (Backwards, Ascending)

      1:45
    • 3. 3 One Note, Two Note Diminished (Backwards, Ascending)

      2:17
    • 4. 4 Box Shaped Diminished (Vertical, Ascending)

      1:41
    • 5. 5 2 Fret Diminished Sweep (Vertical, Ascending)

      1:19
    • 6. 6 Diminished Box Sweep (Forward, Ascending)

      2:29
    • 7. 7 Leading into Minor with Diminished Box Sweep

      4:29
    • 8. 8 Leading into Major with Diminished Box Shape

      2:31
    • 9. 9 Leading into Major with Descending Diminished Zig Zag

      3:14
    • 10. 10 Leading into Minor with Descending Diminished Zig Zag

      1:23
    • 11. 11 Leading into Minor with Diminished Zig Zag Ascending

      1:46
    • 12. 12 Leading into Major With Diminshed Zig Zag Ascending

      1:35
    • 13. 13 Leading into Minor with Sweep From Low E

      1:58
    • 14. 14 Leading into Major with Sweep From Low E

      0:58
    • 15. 15 Open String Diminished Arpeggio (Ab, B, D, F)

      2:55
    • 16. 16 Open String Diminished Arpeggio (E, G, Bb, Db)

      2:02
    • 17. 17 Open String Diminished Arpeggio (Gb, A, C, Eb)

      2:32
    • 18. 18 Rolling Diminished Lick

      3:34
    • 19. 19 Descending Lightning Triplet Lick

      1:08
    • 20. 20 Ascending Lightning Triplet Lick

      1:01
    • 21. 21 Chromatic Diminished Lick (Descending)

      2:43
    • 22. 22 Chromatic Diminished Lick (Ascending)

      2:02
    • 23. 23 "Cliche" Diminished Lick

      3:03
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About This Class

Electrify your guitar solos with Diminished lightning!

In this advanced Gypsy Jazz guitar soloing course, we delve into some of the most powerful uses of the diminished 7th Arpeggio!

The first section is an exploration of different ways to play the diminished arpeggio. This will help you to master the entire guitar neck. By using diminished to move in different directions, your fingers will effortlessly fly around the guitar!

We will also get into how to use diminished arpeggios to create momentum in your solos. By leading-in with diminished, you can imbue your solos with a sense of authority and drive the music!

In the third section, we will master the open string diminished arpeggios. Doing this will instantly give you more soloing options in the twangiest area of the strings!

Learn some lightning fast Gypsy Jazz diminished licks in the fourth section!  Everything is broken down in great detail so that even a beginner can get the hang of how to use diminished in a single-note solo.

If you want to take your playing to an advanced level, then join me on this dive into the world of diminished lightning!

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Alex Simon

Teacher

Inspired by the legendary Gypsy guitarist Django Reinhardt, Alex Simon
imbues dazzling technique and lyrical, impressionistic expression with a
twenty-first century sensibility.

Alex Simon has performed at The Guggenheim, B.B. King's Main Stage, The
Rainbow Room, as well as world-renowned cocktail lounges Milk &
Honey, Bathtub Gin, NoMad, Happy Ending and many other of New York
City's finest venues.

Simon's repertoire includes Early Jazz and Musette Classics, Tangos,
Bossas, Boleros, Rumbas, Mambos, Gypsy Valses, and original works.

See full profile

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Transcripts

1. 1 Introduction How this course is structured: welcome to diminish lightning. Volume three. In this course, we're gonna explore some of my favorite diminished arpeggios and shapes, and we're going to get into some gypsy jazz arpeggios as well. In the first section, we're going to take a look at diminished arpeggios that go in different directions of the guitar neck. In the second section, I'm gonna show you how to use some of those diminished arpeggios to lead into cords. In the third section, we're gonna talk about the 20 year open string, diminished arpeggios. And in the fourth section, we're gonna explore some of the diminished licks that get used in Gypsy jazz. 2. 2 Diminished Sweep from Low E (Backwards, Ascending): If you've been playing guitar for a while, you've probably come across this diminished arpeggio. I call this the staircase diminished arpeggio are the zigzagging lightning diminished arpeggio because it's shaped sort of like a lightning bolt. This diminished arpeggio is very useful because it's only two notes per string on it's also the same shape going up and down and I use it a lot for when I want to descend with a diminished arpeggio. There's another way to go up the neck with the diminished arpeggio that's not going liken in diagonal Slap. I'm gonna show you an arpeggio right now that goes this way, way have this interval right here eyes see an e flat on. And then we're gonna take this shape that we're doing with these two fingers when moving 1/2 step down and then up to the next two strings on. Then again, we're gonna move it up to the next two strings without moving at half Step down to get this on. Then when you break it up, you get that and I'm playing this just by sweeping through the strings with my right hand. I really like this arpeggio because it passes through a couple of octaves on the way up, and it's not as dense as the staircase diminished arpeggio. So it goes up pretty fast, has a nice kind of accelerating sound to it. Working with simple shapes like that could be very useful when you're improvising. 3. 3 One Note, Two Note Diminished (Backwards, Ascending): Another example of a diminished arpeggio that goes in this direction of the neck is this I like this diminished arpeggio a lot because it has the same skeleton as the other one. We're just adding a note. Way to play. This is take your third finger and put it in this case on the sea It's gonna be the eighth fret of the Lowy thing. You're gonna take your first finger, put it on the six fret of the Estrin on your fourth finger is gonna be on the ninth fret today strength to get this. Then we're gonna repeat that pattern over here on the D string and we're gonna start with the third finger on the seventh fret of the D string. The first finger's gonna play the fifth fret of the G string, and the fourth thing is gonna play the eighth fret of the G string. They're going to take that pattern again and repeat it on the top two strings and we're gonna play this s o. It's the same thing you're doing. The third finger on the seventh fret of the B string on and the first finger on the fifth fret of the and fourth finger is gonna go on the eighth. Fret of the theme picking pattern for this is Hammer pushed through, then lift love stroke like that. So I'm going to do that again. Over here. Thats arpeggio works particularly well with triplets because it's got three notes pattern. I found that an easy way to learn this is to practice this by playing the pattern separately. Start connecting them. If you can connect to them, you can move up into the 3rd 1 4. 4 Box Shaped Diminished (Vertical, Ascending): Here's an arrangement of diminished that goes straight across the neck and only uses the top four strings of the guitar. This'll arpeggio is made up of this on this thesis, sort of an inverse of the arpeggio we did before because whereas the other one started with one note on the low string and then two notes on a higher string, we're gonna play two notes on and then one note on a higher strength eso tu notes over here on the D string. We're gonna play the first finger over here in the seventh fret of the D on. Then your your four fingers could go on 1/10 fret of the d Andrea hammer a upstroke on. Then we're gonna hammer down on to the eighth fret of the G string with our second finger here. Then we're gonna repeat that up on the B and East drinks. They're gonna play with your first finger on the seventh fret of the be on your four fingers gonna go on 1/10 fret or the b upstroke. So down on then hammer on the eighth fret of the with your second finger This'll arpeggio comes in really handy when you want to access diminished color. But you don't wanna start on the Lowy. You want to start somewhere in the middle of the strings. You don't need to play all of the notes going up pia strings. 5. 5 2 Fret Diminished Sweep (Vertical, Ascending): here's another diminished arpeggio that sort of goes towards this way. It's sort of like that first when we had the difference now is that we play like this theme concept is that we're taking thes two notes and we're repeating them. Get these really big interval jumps in this version of the arpeggio. Put your first finger on the eighth fret of the Lowy and hammer on and then take your second finger and put it on the ninth fret of the a string push through So get on going to sweep through. We're gonna take that same pattern and move it over here so that your first finger is on the seventh fret of the D string and that your second finger is gonna be on the A friend of the G. So to get this thing, you're gonna move it up again. And this time we're going to the seventh fret of the B string with your first finger on. Then the second finger is gonna play the eighth fret with Heidi, you can leave out the low end of this. Just use the top part e find this to be very useful 6. 6 Diminished Box Sweep (Forward, Ascending): This is one of my favorite diminished arpeggios on. I like this because it has a boxy feeling to it. It's over here. It goes up a little bit, but I found it to be very useful. When I want to lead into cords to play this one, we're gonna take our first finger, put on the seventh fret of the D on going to go up to the 10th fret of the d with our second finger eso hammer thin upstroke on. Then we're gonna put our first finger over here on the eighth fret of the G string. So the down stroke there, then we're gonna push through and put our second finger on the 10th fret of the B string on . We're gonna push through again with our first finger on the eighth fret of the high e and end it. We're gonna play the 11th fret of the high e with an upstroke jangle. Use that arpeggio in his Hungaria solo. It's a cool art because it has a mixture of octaves and some of the other diminished seven notes. Now you've got a few different ascending, diminished arpeggios going in different directions to play with Usually when I do a descending, diminished arpeggio, I will use that staircase shape. Part of this has to do with the right hand technique and gypsy jazz. I like to have the right hand just going up and down as much as possible. And I don't want to have to complicate my picking to accommodate some lick. I would rather if I can just go down, up, down, up To help keep the flow of the music going, you could play any of those Arps descending way. You just need to make sure you preserve the rule for the gypsy picking technique, which is that you're always gonna land on a down stroke when you switch strings. In this case, it's down, up, down, up, down, up, down, on down, up, down. For some of the other ones, it's just gonna be down strokes 7. 7 Leading into Minor with Diminished Box Sweep: If I was soloing over a chord progression and I knew that a minor was coming up, I could use a diminished arpeggio to lead into that. A minor things can create the sense that you are the one driving the music instead of music driving you. And by that I mean, you are anticipating that you're going to be going the same on record. You're doing something ahead of time to lead into that court instead of waiting for that court to hit on. Then you reacting to the cord. It almost sounds like the court is reaction to what you're doing. This can help to create momentum in your solos. The way I do this is when I'm soloing. I have to think ahead of the courts and it takes a little bit of practice to get used to this. But I'll be in a solo and I'm thinking about the A minor quarter's coming up and I start to think, well, which diminished can I use or where can I play diminished? That's gonna lead into that. Well, I'm gonna use this shape that we use the last shape from the last section that diminish shape and this one happens to start over here, so I think a bit I think of it as being half step up from things. Cord eso If this is the root of the cord Oh, I'm gonna be starting this over here. Half step up. We're here. Something about that note. I know that this arpeggio is gonna start. Here s so I play this arpeggio on that I landed on one of the notes of the A minor Chorzow thistles The minor third. Since you're thinking ahead of the cord, you have to time this very precisely. In this case with the way that I'm playing it, I'm playing it on the end of three. So if you were counting, you go one and two and three and on, If you're gonna play it as a triplet, you'd have to start right on the three. 1232233234 to 3. So you want to end on the one of the next court or the next beat? Want to get good at timing the leading into this shape for a minor you and also want to learn how to lead into this shape on this shape. This is the first inversion of the minor on its The second version on the way to do this is you're gonna find with the what's the closest diminish lead into this shape. And you could do that by finding on then moving that up a minor third eso If I was thinking about this shape way Get that through this one. It's on. It takes you to the other a minor shape again. This is gonna take some practice to get used to it, cause you really are having to think ahead of the court. But it sounds really cool when I'm going to that a minor or if I know I'm going to a minor . But I'm over here in this area, the guitar in my guitar solo. I know I can relate that diminished arpeggio to this shape. In my mind, I relate this note the first note of the diminished arpeggio to this note. The bass note of that version version. So it's in this case is 1/2 step above, and then it's gonna be up two strings. So it's on the D string. The 1st 1 was similar relationship thing, this one is the theme for the second inversion of minor theme, the diminished arpeggio is gonna relate to it. So we're going to start it right here on top of the route. So if this is the route waiting to be on the same fret we're going to start that arpeggio on the D string theory or you could end it on that same shape. 8. 8 Leading into Major with Diminished Box Shape: We're also gonna want a master how to lead into major with that diminished arpeggio. So that's our major chord. We have a major. Leading is actually gonna be in the same place. We know we're going to a thin this case. Instead of ending on the minor note, I'm ending on the major note. So on right there. I just played in a arpeggio. We have the root position major chord on. Then we have the first inversion major accord on when it's we're going into the first inversion major chord. We know that the diminishes going to park right here, which is right on top of the bass note so thin this case is gonna be we're gonna go to the same Fred is the bass note on Go to the D String. So for the root position Arpeggio is gonna launch from 1/2 step up on the D string from the first inversion, it's gonna launch from the same fret as the base note just on the D string. The second inversion of Major, it's gonna launch right from the same fret as the base note, just like it was with minor. You can associate the departure point for the position with this note for the first inversion. With this on for the second version, you you can drill these lead ins by putting on a Metrodome and picking an area of the guitar neck and playing different types of chords major and minor at random and then seeing if you can play them. So, for example, this court thing is a flat major. If I know, I'm gonna be going age flat major with this route position, shape E o. If I was gonna go Teoh e d flat minor do this thing. And if I was gonna go let me to pick a random one right now. This is F sharp, major. There you go. Those air some diminished lead ins. 9. 9 Leading into Major with Descending Diminished Zig Zag: if I want to do a descending diminish lead and I will probably use that staircase shape. So if I was gonna go to a I would do something like this leads really nicely into a something about that root position a on and I'm relating it to this things. This leads into a theist diminished shape. Things departure point on this one are gonna leading Teoh, start with your fourth finger on the seventh fret of the high e do down stroke, and then you're gonna play it upstroke on the forefront of the high e You're gonna take this minor third interval on, then bring it down to the B string, but 1/2 step lower on and then you're gonna do it again on the G string. But a whole step lower that leads us into than a over here. I would launch this diminished AARP on the end of the three coming before that a court hits . So before we go into that a I'm gonna go one and two and three. If I was gonna play it is a triplet. I would start right on the three. So 12322332343 Relating this diminished arpeggio to the top of this route position Major Chord s. Oh, I know I could start it half step below are a whole step up way. Have this A We also have this a thesis the what I call the first inversion of a major even though it's not really the first inversion I'm thinking about that person version major court were playing the top part of that. So lead into that you would start over here, so it's gonna be right here. Half step up from the this'll note on the high e of the A major, you start up right there. E If I go up to the second inversion of a the departure point is gonna be right here. It's gonna be 1/2 step up from from that note. So we're looking at the top part of this. A second version are diminished. Arpeggio is gonna lead into over here half step up or you could go thistle 1/2 step down from the group position right there 10. 10 Leading into Minor with Descending Diminished Zig Zag: for minor. It's pretty much the same thing for the root position that's gonna start whole step up the first inversion minor. It's going to start a whole step up from this note. It's gonna start right there for the second inversion of minor. It's gonna be just like the second inversion of Major. We're gonna lead in with a diminished arpeggio that starts 1/2 step up from the highest note of this a cord eso. In this case, it's this'll one on our diminished arpeggios Start here. Or you could start that descending diminished arpeggio half step below the root position shape for a minor on the top three strings way did before. You can drill these by picking a position of the guitar and then throwing out some random major reminder cords and seeing if you can lead into them. So, for example, F minor was gonna lead into that. This kind of thing will really help you to get to know how toe descend with diminish lead ins 11. 11 Leading into Minor with Diminished Zig Zag Ascending: I also like to use that zigzag shape as an ascending leading to cords. For example, if I was gonna lead into an a major chord, I can relate the diminished arpeggio departure point to the base note of that a shape Onley . Instead of playing this string, I'm gonna do it on this string A string, the same fret. And we're gonna launch it using triplets on the second beat of the measure before the A. So it's gonna be 1232233234231 That's gonna get us into an A If I'm in this position of the guitar neck and I know that there's an a major coming up, I can think about that first inversion of a on relate that run that we just did waken do that over here, Theo, starting point is gonna be 1/2 step below on and on the a string. So if this is the bass note thing, starting point is gonna be here half step below on the a string. I'm over here and I know that there's a coming up Aiken launch that diminished arpeggio from 1/2 step below the bass note of the second inversion of a major. So take this fret. Go half step below. So leading into major records, we have this this'll one for the first inversion theme for the second inversion. 12. 12 Leading into Major With Diminshed Zig Zag Ascending : for minor is pretty much the same thing. The diminished lead in for the A minor rue position cord is gonna be right here. It's gonna be on the same fret as the base. So way for the first inversion, it's actually gonna be right underneath the base notes. So here's our minor Third on our diminished arpeggio is gonna launch over here on that note . So, theme for the second inversion minor, it's gonna be 1/2 step below just like it was for the major. Eso for minor is pretty much the same thing as Major. It's just that when you go to the first inversion, the diminished lead in is going to start right on the same fret just on the A string as this note. So it's right here to practice those. You can just pick random cords in a position of the guitar and lead into those. Or you could take the courts from a tune and try it that way. So the first quarter diners G. So if I was gonna lead into G, I do this theme second quarters D seven. Well, I could do this thing back to G. That's just a good way to get to know how to associate the departure points with the cords that they're going to 13. 13 Leading into Minor with Sweep From Low E: You could also use some of those sweeping, diminished arpeggios that we learned in section one to lead into major or minor. So for this route position minor chord. You can start by going up a whole step from the base. Note on using that as our departure point. It's got 123456 You can either do those triplets. You'd have to start that right on the three to get to the A minor. So 1232233 43. And you can also do this shape thing is, the other one that goes through supposed Teoh point is that this is our departure point hole. Step up. Or you could do it 1/2 step below those the two closest departure points toothy root position, a minor chord or the first inversion of a minor. You can pick a departure point that's either gonna be 1/2 step below so or whole step above again. You can either use this shape or this one. The second inversion minor chord. We're going to take the bass note on, go up 1/2 step to find our departure point, so it's gonna be right here 14. 14 Leading into Major with Sweep From Low E: for Major. It's pretty much the same thing. It just want to go to the first inversion. We're gonna be starting 1/2 step above the base note instead of a whole step. What we did for minor majors 1/2 step above. But the root position is the same on the second inversions of Samos. Well, you could also do this 1/16 notes starting on the end of the third beat before the cord that you're going to. So, for example, one and two and three and have a lot of options to use diminished, single note arpeggios to lead into other chords. 15. 15 Open String Diminished Arpeggio (Ab, B, D, F): in this section We're gonna learn some open string, two minutes arpeggios thing eyes. A couple reasons why you might want to learn these open stream diminished arpeggios. First of all, the tone is great. It's very 20. Get a really sharp biting tone when you play down here. The second reason is that if you memorize those three diminished arpeggios on the open strings and you remember how they relate to minor chords and dominant chords, you'll be able to use bees three diminished arpeggios to play almost any chord. The 1st 1 we're gonna take a look at starts over here on a flat. Use your second finger to play that with a down stroke number to go to the second fret of the A string with our first finger to get this on gonna push through. So hammer on, then pushed through on. But you're gonna play an open D. Uh, we're gonna take our second finger and place it on the third fret of the D string and doing upstroke on. And then our first finger is gonna be ready to play on the first fret of the G string for a down stroke. Eso you could see this roles really well on. Then we're gonna play an open D string by pushing through with the pick so on and then use your second finger on the third fret of the B string upstroke. And and then the last note is gonna be the first fret of the high E with your first finger . Eso altogether it's and I'm playing it sort of as a triplet. 123123123 Wealth played as triplets. You can add a note on the top over here at the fourth fret of the high E with your second finger, this open string diminished arpeggio come used as a substitution for a flat minor or B minor D minor or F minor. You can also use it to play over D flat seven. Dominant E seven dominant. And actually, if you want to do e seven, you can even start this diminished arpeggio with an open E like that and play it like this . You hear that a lot in gypsy jazz even go backwards as well. Just make sure that you are doing the correct picking will also work over G seven or G major on. It'll also work really nicely over B flat seven 16. 16 Open String Diminished Arpeggio (E, G, Bb, Db): the second open string diminished arpeggio We're gonna take a look at Is this one way to play? This is You're gonna do a down stroke on the Lowy. Then take your second finger, Put it on the third fret of the Lowy doing upstroke thing Take your first finger and put it on the first fret of the a string Do it down strokes we have Thank you. Take your second finger, Put it on the fourth fret of the a string and do an upstroke so thing you're gonna take your first finger and put on the second fret of the D string And do dad stroke eso Thank you. Gonna play an open G thank you. Take your second finger and put it on the third fret of the G string and do an upstroke. Take your first finger now and put on the B string at the second fret way. Then you're gonna play an open hi e by pushing through And then the last note is gonna be your third finger on the third fret of the high E With an upstroke, you can usually use this diminished arpeggio to play over in e minor or a G minor or B flat , minor or D flat minor. It also sounds good. Oversee seven E flat seven G flat seven were a seven. You can also use it to substitute for the major versions of those dominant chords as well. 17. 17 Open String Diminished Arpeggio (Gb, A, C, Eb): Here's the third open string to Minister Arpeggio. The way to play this is to take your second finger put on the second fret of the Lowy and Hammer they're gonna push through to play the open a string Eso thank you can use your second finger or your third finger to play the third fret of the A string and doing upstroke eso Or you could figure it like this with your first finger on the first note. Whatever is easier for you. The next note over here, you're gonna use your first finger and play the first fret of the D string. So we have down pushed through upstroke on hammer on the upstroke over here on the fourth fret of the D string her And then you're gonna do a hammer on the second fret of the G string with your second finger, right, There s So we have this going to take your first finger and put it on the first fret of the B string and pushed through your fourth finger is gonna go on the fourth fret of the B string and you're gonna do an upstroke on The last note is gonna be your second finger on the second fret of the high E. This will work really nicely over G minor, a minor C minor or B flat minor. You can also play it over. Be seven or sometimes be major D seven F seven or a flat seven. Teoh. Practice those open string arpeggios. Throw some random cords at yourself and just say, Well, which one is going to relate to which arpeggio, for example, E seven g minor, A flat seven and you just go through that and you just drill yourself on random cords. So I've got some really 20 open, string diminished arpeggios to play with. 18. 18 Rolling Diminished Lick: in this last section of diminished lightning. Volume three, we're gonna get into some gypsy jazz diminished licks. The 1st 1 is what I call rolling diminished like thing to get really good at this, we're gonna probably want a first master the right hand picking pattern. To do this, you're gonna play open strings and you're in a hammer. The G string I'm gonna push through the B string on. We're gonna push through the high e on going to an upstroke on the high e on. Then you're going to repeat that pattern like this s o. Once you get that right hand picking pattern down, you can just use this simple backwards triangle shaped for the diminish thin. This case, the way to make it is to put your second finger on the third fret of the G string on. Then your first finger's gonna go right here on the second fret of the beast room, and your third finger is gonna play the third fret of the high e s eso That's gonna be the oh, that's That's our down stroke swept through to the high E. But then for that upstroke on the high, you're gonna move, You're gonna go up in position a minor, third toe over here. So this court do this s o that upstroke is gonna be on the next position of that shape up a minor third. In this case, we're going to the six fret of the high e s o thing. Repeat the pattern up another minor third and this is on the ninth fret of the high E. You can keep on going with it up in minor thirds thing. Sometimes I like to start this by playing on open High E. And then going that one's gonna work for any minor diminished shape that's on that minor third spectrum way could also do it over here. You're gonna have to figure out which for whatever court you're on, which of those channels have diminished you're gonna be accessing In Django Reinhardt's famous Dark I solo, he extensively uses this rolling diminish like what he's doing is he's playing this over a seven when it switches to D minor. He knows that he has to go down here is changing the channel. He's doing the same picking pattern, but switching it for the different chords. A seven switches channels to D minor back to a seven. The theme for the last one. He's doing this. Think he's doing over a D seven in his mind because that's the next court. After that, in the progression is G minor. 19. 19 Descending Lightning Triplet Lick: thistles, one of my favorite Gypsy jazz licks. And it really captures the essence of the diminished lightning feeling we're gonna use that staircase shape. But we're gonna do is we're gonna play a triplet at each note on that arpeggios over. The 1st 1 is gonna be on. Then we're gonna dio and then away down until we get to the Lowy and I'm using my first and third finger when I do this. That's pretty much it for this lick. You just want to practice it very slowly and then build up speed with the Metrodome and you'll notice as you start to play it, that it flows really, really well because of the right hand picking. 20. 20 Ascending Lightning Triplet Lick: You can also go up the guitar neck with it as well. So we have down, up, down push them back down, push through love stroke down on and hammer on, then put back down to the lower string, pushed through that upstroke. So down, up, down. And so it's alternating between these thank down Theo. And this sounds really cool because it almost has, like, an echo effect on it. He's Notre. Without any special effect pedals, you can get that echoey sound. 21. 21 Chromatic Diminished Lick (Descending): that's an example that kind of more chromatic diminished lick that I like to play, and you're sort of what it looks like when you slow it down. Thing I'm using that staircase shape is a skeleton play. This going to take your second finger, Put it on the 13th Fred of the High E and you're gonna hit a down stroke on. They're gonna take your hand and drag your second finger down like this and do an upstroke to the 12 threat and then down again. So keep in mind that when you're dragging your finger, you're not using your not doing it like this with your hand, you're using your arm. It's actually drag your hand, which is gonna drag your finger. It's really important to get that liquid llegado sound so on. They're gonna do an upstroke over here on the 10th fret with your first finger suits on. Then you're gonna push up with your hand and your first finger like this Thea 11th fret and then you're gonna do an upstroke with your second finger on the 12th. Fret to get this thing. You're gonna roll your second finger down to the B string on the 12th fret so on. Do a down stroke there. You repeat that what you did on the high E down on the B string. So now when we switch down to the G string, you're going to use your first finger instead of your second finger. I'm gonna do that on the 10th fret of the G string. So thin Use your second finger to go down to the D string and that's over here at the ninth . Fret on. Do the same thing over here on the A string, your second finger's gonna go down to the eighth. Fret on. They're gonna do it over here on the lower East. Your second finger's gonna go to the seventh. Fret. Remember to use your hand to move around instead of trying to reach for those different frets by keeping your hand the same position. It's just a bunch of position changes, but you're using your hand to create that liquid motion 22. 22 Chromatic Diminished Lick (Ascending): so you could do that, Going up the strings as well and it's gonna look like this. It's still the same concept of just going down, up, down with the pick and start here with our second finger on the seventh fret of the Lowy on they dragged the second finger down. Use your first finger over here on the Lowy at the fourth fret so on. Then push up with your first winner on and go up to the six fret of the Lowy so thin you're gonna use your second finger and position change and jump up over here to the eighth fret of the A string. So way have this on you Just keep on jumping up until you get all the way up the next. So over here I did. I jumped up to the ninth fret of the D string, waiting to jump up to the 10th fret of the G string. Way to go a little bit further for the B string. Going to go up to the 12th fret Theo second finger. And then the last one is gonna be the 13th fret of the high e. Theo's to lix used diminished as a skeleton fill in the notes between with chromatic, uh, enclosures. Little chromatic runs you can think of them like that can create a kind of dizzying feeling . 23. 23 "Cliche" Diminished Lick: thing is a really fun lick its very fast once you get it down. But it's pretty interesting pattern that we're using diminished on pushing these notes into each position of the diminished. So Thiers the basics of this lik you're gonna take your pinkie and put it on the seventh fret of the B string and hammer and use your first finger Put it on the fourth fret of the B string and doing upstroke So you get this we're gonna your down stroke on the G string at the fifth fret with our second finger eso ongoing user pinky again Over here on the seventh fret of the d string with the down stroke gonna push through and use our second finger over here on the fifth fret of the G string on, then pushed through to the first finger on the fourth fret of the B strain. See at this on and that's the main part of the pattern. And then we're gonna slide up a minor third to the seventh threat of the B string with our first finger thing slide up again so that our first finger is on the 10th fret of the B string and we're gonna hammer over here with our pinky on 13th from the B string theory. So this is a pattern. What? You find the diminished channel. You can do this pattern at any point on the channel. You could think of this lick as during this e, but I like to do this, but adding that upstroke right here that sets us up for the down stroke over here on it also sounds kind of cool, actually makes it easier to pick those air some diminished lightning likes to play around with. We've come to the end of diminished lightning, Volume three. I hope you've enjoyed this course and gotten a lot out of it. Once you master diminished and all the different ways you can use it, it will really send your playing up into the clouds and you'll be ableto strike down with some diminished lightning as well. If you're interested in learning more about diminished, feel free to check out some of my other diminish lightning courses. And if you're interested in learning more about gypsy jazz guitar, I've got plenty of courses on that as well. Keep on playing diminished and keep on jamming and keep on enjoying the music