Develop Your Digital Art Style: Draw One Illustration Six Ways | Stephanie Fizer Coleman | Skillshare

Develop Your Digital Art Style: Draw One Illustration Six Ways

Stephanie Fizer Coleman, Picture book illustrator/licensed artist

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12 Lessons (1h 42m)
    • 1. About This Class

      1:30
    • 2. The Sketch

      1:36
    • 3. The Color Palette

      1:23
    • 4. Why Photoshop & Procreate?

      5:17
    • 5. Bold Line/Offset Color

      16:50
    • 6. Bold Textured Shapes

      12:09
    • 7. Soft Pastels

      13:57
    • 8. Colored Pencil

      15:12
    • 9. Folk Art Details

      12:17
    • 10. Simple Watercolor & Ink

      9:46
    • 11. All Together Now

      7:12
    • 12. Your Project

      4:45
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About This Class

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Welcome to Develop Your Digital Art Style: Draw One Illustration Six Ways

Hi! I’m Stephanie Fizer Coleman, a children’s book illustrator and licensing artist. 

I use Photoshop and Procreate in my illustration work every single day and although I have a recognizable style now when I started working digitally nearly a decade ago, I was floundering. 

Digital illustration has its own nuances anyway and all those years ago I didn’t even really know what was possible when working digitally. 

So if you’re new to digital art or if you’re still searching for your style, just know that I’ve been there too and that I’m here to help you puzzle out your digital art style.  

In this class, we’ll take one sketch and illustrate in six different ways. 

By doing this, you’ll see a variety of approaches to illustrating the same subject matter and by trying those techniques, you’ll be taking the first steps towards developing your own digital art style. 

I’ll be demonstrating some techniques in Procreate and some in Photoshop, but rest assured you don’t need both apps to follow along.  The techniques I teach are interchangeable between the two and this class focuses more generally on finding the tools that are best suited for your style. 

A note about tech: To get the lovely line variation and painterly strokes, you will need a tablet and stylus of some sort.  If you're using Procreate, then you're probably already using your iPad and Apple Pencil.  If you're following along in Photoshop, something like a small Wacom tablet will be perfect.  I'm drawing on a Cintiq for the Photoshop demos and on an iPad Pro with an Apple Pencil for the Procreate demos.  

So if you’re ready start developing your digital art style, head on over to the next video and let’s get started!

Transcripts

1. About This Class: Hi, I'm Stephanie Pfizer Coleman, a children's book Illustrator and licensing artist. I use Photoshop and procreate on my illustration work every single day. Although I haven't recognizable style now, when I started working digitally nearly a decade ago, I was floundering. Digital illustration has its own nuances anyway, and all those years ago, I didn't even really know what was possible when working digitally. If you're new to digital art, or if you're still searching for your style, just know that I've been there too and I'm here to help you puzzle it out. In this class, we'll take one sketch and illustrate it in six different ways. By doing this, you'll see a variety of approaches to illustrating the same subject matter, and by trying those techniques, you'll be taking the first steps toward developing your own digital art style. I'll be demonstrating some techniques and procreate and some in Photoshop. But rest assured, you don't need both apps to follow along. The techniques that I teach are interchangeable between the two, and the class focuses more generally on finding the tools that are best suited for your style. If you're ready to start developing your digital art style, head on over to the next video and let's get started. 2. The Sketch: Before we jump in, I wanted to show you the sketch that I'm going to be demonstrating in this class. I've chosen something simple enough for you to easily follow along with the demos, but complex enough that we can have a bit of fun illustrating this. Our focal point is going to be this really cute snail character and then we're going to have some just greenery in the background and I'm probably going to leave the background white for this class, just because we've already got a few different layers of things going on here with the snail and the shell and the leaves and then the grass in the background. Since we're going to be doing a few different approaches I don't want to be here for 12 hours boring you guys to death. This is the sketch that we're going to be working from. Now this class assumes that you have a beginner's knowledge of Photoshop and, or Procreate. If you're brand new to either or both of these, you might want to take a look at some of my other classes before tackling this one. Also, if you are more comfortable in Photoshop over Procreate or more comfortable in Procreate over Photoshop, either one that you want to use is fine. As I said in the previous video, part of the reason that I'm going back and forth between the two apps when I'm working on this class is because I want to show you that the techniques are interchangeable. Head on over to the next video and I just want to show you guys what the color palette is going to be for this class and then we're going to get into some of the techniques. 3. The Color Palette: All right guys. Let's take a look at the color palette I'm going to be using for this piece. I'll be using the same palette across each of the six approaches so I can focus on techniques and not worry too much over the palettes. I'm going to include this color palette in the class downloads that you'll find under the Project section. Just in case you want to use this to build your own illustration for the class project or if you just want to use this color palette just for inspiration. I've chosen a palette that is just some warm hues paired with some nice earthy tones. I'm thinking that probably these three tones right here might end up being the snail and then these three lighter value tones are going to end up being the background so it pops up. We'll see how that works out as we start working through our six different approaches. Of course, if you've seen my other classes, I love to layer color and texture so this is just an idea of what my color palette is going to be. As I get into using brushes and layering different textures, things might change up a little bit so it's going to be fun to see how that turns out. Let's head on over to the next video and we're going to get started with our first technique for this class, which is going to be a bold line with offset color. 4. Why Photoshop & Procreate?: So before we jump into the class, I just wanted to take a second to talk about why I'm using both Procreate and Photoshop in this class instead of choosing one or the other. The basic answer to that question is that it's because I use both of them every day in my illustration work. I just use them in different ways and for different things. Now, the way that I integrate Photoshop and Procreate into my workflow is not the same way that it's going to be integrated into your workflow, or anyone else's workflow. We're all different. We all have different preferences, so you just have to try out a bunch of different things and see what works best for you. Some of the main reasons that I prefer one or the other, just comes down to technical stuff. For example, when I'm illustrating children's books, I have a lot of layers. I like to have individual elements on different layers, I like to have textures on different layers in case I want to change anything, and if you guys have taken my classes, that I love using clipping mask so that's even more layers, I mean, my average book file has about 200 layers in it before I merge everything and send it off to my clients. When I'm working in Procreate, I very often can not get that many layers. So if I'm working on a book spread that is 8 x 10 inches, that means, that my file is actually 16 and by a 10 inches at 300 DPI, and that's probably, I think going to give me maybe about 40 or 50 layers in Procreate, which is not enough for me. If you're a person who doesn't use a lot of layers, then you're going to be totally fine illustrating kids books and everything else in Procreate. Now the one thing that I really love Procreate for is doing like single pieces of art. So if I'm doing like a greeting card, or any pieces of a licensing collection or anything like that, I love doing those in Procreate. That's a small enough file that I can get as many layers as I want to and it works just fine. I also love to use Procreate for sketching, for doing thumbnails, for doing color refs, sometimes they'll block in my flat colors for my book spreads in Procreates, and then of course, I love lettering in Procreate and I just feel like it's a much more comfortable experience than trying to letter in Photoshop. It really comes down to how you work, and if you're new to Procreate, you're probably just going to love it, and you're not going to worry about Photoshop. If you've used Photoshop before, you're probably going to love that, and then you'll just integrate Procreate into your workflow other ways. But you don't have to use both of these things, and you don't have to use either if you're using like affinity, or any other pixel-based painting software or App, that's totally fine. You can still follow along with this class. The other reason that I'm using both Photoshop and Procreate, and you guys will run into this as you start doing professional work is because Procreates only right now as of this filming only allows you to do RGB files. That's the color space that you work in. Now, if you're creating work for print like for licensing, or children's book illustration, or anything like that, 98 percent of the time you're going to be asked to deliver your files in CMYK format. The difference between those two is like an entire class on its own, but what I will tell you right now is that CMYK is not as broad of a color space as RGB, so a lot of these beautiful colors that you're illustrating in Procreate, can not be printed well. If they're going to be printed in CMYK. If I've created a piece of art in Procreate, I will send it over to Photoshop, convert it to CMYK, and then make any adjustments to the color that I need to make before I send it off to my clients. So that's another reason that I like to use both Photoshop and Procreates in my daily work. One of the other reasons that I use both of them at my daily work is just brush preferences. I have brushes that I love in Photoshop, and have brushes that I love and Procreate, and I have techniques that I live in Photoshop and techniques that I love in procreate. Often what I will do is I'll just use my Dropbox, and I will pass files back and forth. If there's something that I want to do in Procreate real quick, I'll send a file over there, I'll do it, and then I'll send it back over to Photoshop. One of the techniques that we're going to go over in this class is going to demonstrate how I would start a piece of art in Procreate and then send it over to Photoshop to finish it, which is something that I do very often. Yeah, that's just the basic quick overview of why I wanted to teach a class so that shows how you can use both apps interchangeably. Most of the techniques that I'm going to teach you in this class, you can use in either Procreate or Photoshop, or you can be passing your files back and forth. Whatever workflow makes sense for you is exactly what you should be doing and it's exactly right for you. So don't worry about doing things specifically like I do, just think about how the things that I'm teaching you can be incorporated into your own work, and your own style, and your own workflow. Just to remember that at when it comes to art, there is never a wrong answer. Whatever feels good for you is correct. Let's head on over to the next video, and we're going to get started with our first technique. 5. Bold Line/Offset Color: In this first approach, we're going to be using procreate to create a bold line with some offset color. I've got my snail sketch set up here, and I'm just going to go ahead and change into multiply. I'm going to pull the opacity down around 25 percent. That's just so I can still see the sketch that I am working on, but it's not going to interfere with anything that I'm creating. I'm going to go ahead and make a new layer on top of the snail. Let's go ahead and just layer. Well maybe not. Yeah, let's just go ahead and rename this layer, so we know what's going on. Then the next one we'll just call line art, so everything's a little bit organized. Now for my line art, I'm just going to be using a brush that comes with pervades. That is going to be a brush that you'll find under the inking section and it's called dry ink. It's one of my favorite brushes. I use it all the time. It's great for all details and I really love it for the bold line style that we're doing because it's got a really lovely texture. I'm going to go ahead and I've got my little palette set up here. This is the color palette that I showed you in the previous video. I've got my color palette set up and procreate. I'm just going to pick a nice rich, dark brown, I think instead of going with a black color. I've got my drying brush and let me just show you what that looks like, so you see I've got this really nice bold textural line that I'm drawing here. The cool thing about this brush is that as I vary my pressure on my apple pencil, it gets fatter and thinner, so you get the really juicy texture that we like so much. I'm just going to go in and start drawing in the line arts with my brush. I'm going to make that a little bit smaller. Let's see if that's a good size. You may get a tiny bit bigger because I really want like a bold chunky line with this. That looks really nice, and dig it. I'm just going to go in and fill in the rest of my illustration. Now I'm going to be careful to keep things on separate layers, which is something that I preach about all the time. In this case, I'm going to be using the line art as a reference layer so I can do some color dropping here in a minute. It's going to be important to me to either have my line art completely closed. I wouldn't have like these open spaces right here, or I need to have my line art on a separate layer. We'll go ahead and take a look at that. I'm going to speed things up real quick and I'm just going to go through here and create my line art for this little snail character. Then we're going to take a look at how we can add some bold colors as well. Cool. I have got most of my line art and drawing, and you'll see that I made a second layer for this piece and this piece, just because I want to make sure when I start dropping colors in here, I'm not having any interference. You'll see what I'm talking about here in a minute. For now I'm just going to go ahead and turn off my second line art layer because they don't need it right now. I'm going to start drawing colors on my first line art layer. There are a couple of different ways that I can do this. Let's go ahead and just rename this color, so this is going to be a pretty simple color. It's not going to have layers of texture or anything like that. It's going to be pretty flat and fun. There are a couple of ways that I can do this. First of all, I can just use my lasso tool. I can just lasso the area where I want the color. I want this to be a little offset so I don't want it to be perfectly within the lines. I just select my area that I want and then it can select my color. Then I can just drop that into my last node area and am done. That's one way that I can handle it. Another way that I can handle it is I can just use my brush tool that I already have selected. I can just use the dry ink brush again. I can just draw in what I want, which is also really easy. You see I just like this little bit where it's offset of the line here, so you can see a little bit of the white and then it's overlapping the outline. I think that looks really fun and less like a coloring page and more like a piece of art when we're working in this style. That is two options that we can use. Now the other option that we can use, and this one is a little bit easier. Let me turn my sketch layer off so you can really see here. I'm going to go to my line art, I'm going to tap it. I'm going to choose reference. That means that anything that I do on any other layer right now is going to use this line art as reference, then this dark brown line art is going to be the reference that it's going to be using. Let me show you what that means. I'm going to go to my color layer, and then I'm going to go up here and I'm going to start dragging my orange color in. Now this is really cool because this is on its own layer. This is not on the line art layer, this is on its own layer, but it's referencing the line art layer so it knows what shapes it wants to grab. I am just going to continue dropping these little fellows in here. I just think this is a really quick way to do this. You guys know that I love the lasso tool. If you've seen any of my other classes, it's one of my favorite things to illustrate with. But we'll get to the Lasso tool later in this class too. But for right now I think this is really awesome. This actually looks cute, but I want to scoot over a little bit so I get that offset look. I'm going to tap my "Move tool" and then what I'm going to do is I'm going to use my finger and I'm just tapping on my iPad to the right to scoot this over to the right just so I get that cool little offset look that I'm looking for. Then I'm tapping down below. I'm going to tap a little bit to the left. Now you can also just use your stylist to move this around. But I feel like by just tapping, I get those really nice little incremental movements that I can get if I'm using a keyboard. If you're using a keyboard, use the arrow keys and that works fine too. That looks pretty awesome. Now the one place we're going to run into problems here is our little grass down here, which doesn't actually have a closure on the bottom here. I've left it open, so I'm just going to go ahead and draw that and real quick, let's just use maybe one of our dark colors. I've still got my dry ink brush. I'm not switching brushes or anything, and I'm just going to draw this grass then real quick. So just keeping in mind that I want everything to just have that little bit of an offset look, and then I'm just going to erase here on the bottom so we can get a nice even edge. Then my next step is I'm going to be doing the exact same thing with this snail. So let's pick a color for the snail's shell. I think I'm going to go ahead and just stick with this dark color that I have right now. Let's go ahead and drag and drop it in here since we're still using this as reference. Now, here's the thing to know. So I've got everything on this color layer so far, so If I hit the Move tool now, it wants to move everything in this entire image instead of just the shell. So what I would do is I would select my selection tool, Lasso [inaudible] , then I can hit the Move tool and then I can do my little taps to get that really cool offset look that I wanted. Now my last step is going to be to drop a color in on our little snail friend here, and then we're going to do the same thing. We're just going to use the Lasso selection tool, select the Move tool, and now I've got him in place. So I'm just going to go in with my eraser and I'm going to clean this up just a little bit. You can see right here, I've got a little bit of this burgundy color that was showing through, and then let's pick this burgundy color again and let's just color in this little line on the shell and we'll just leave the little white space there so we can stick with the offset look. That looks really great so far. While we're here, let's go ahead and just add some little details to our snail friend. Just pick a lighter color and I'm just going to go ahead and turn the sketch back on, drag it on top, so I can see what's going on here and you see I included in the sketch just some little dot details, so I'm just going to go ahead and add those in right now. Again, I still just have my dry ink brush. So I'm using a brush that's native to procreate, it's nothing special, and I'm just using the same brush for this entire illustration so far. So you don't need to buy every single procreate brush that comes out. You just have to find one that works well enough for what you're interested in doing. So let's turn on our other line art. Now, we're going to have a little bit of a collision right here where some of this line art overlaps, but we're going to take care of that in a few minutes. So I'm going to speed things up real quick and I'm just going to go ahead and drop some color into these leaf shapes in the back. Before I do that, I'm going to go in and turn my first line art reference layer off, and then I'm going to tap and turn my second line art reference layer on, and then we'll make a new layer for our second batch of colors so we don't have to worry about using the Lasso tool so much this time. I'm going to speed up and let's get going with this one. So let's take a look here where we've got a little bit of our line art that's intersecting. I'm just going to go back to this line art layer. This is our second layer of line art. I'm going to go ahead and turn the reference off, and then I'm just going to select my erase tool, and I'm going to go in here and just erase some of this where it overlaps a little bit. It's just a little bit distracting. I just want to clean it up a little bit and have some nicer lines. I think that look a lot better. Then what I want to do is go and add on my color and where I've got this lighter orange right here overlapping this darker orange right here, I just want to erase this bit. Because I want that white to be showing through instead. So I've got a couple other spots where I need to erase that, and this is all just personal preference. You just play around and see what you think looks best. This is my preference. Now I'm going to get back to my line arts and let me pull this darker color again and I'm just going to add in some of my leaf details. Just so they don't look so boring, I'm just going to add a little line on these leaves over here, and it just adds a little bit more edges, really light on this line. So then all we have left is we need to add something to the background. Now, for the background, for these little grass shapes back here, I really just didn't feel like I wanted to do a dark line art back there, I'm just not sure it's going to work really well, so I think instead I'm just going to do a little bit of lassoing and drop some color in there. That is probably what's going to work there. So let's make a new layer, I'm going to drag it behind everything else here, and I'm just going to pick my lightest color and then let's just stick with our dry ink brush, and actually I think what I'm going to do is I'm just going to draw these in and then just do a quick color fill on them. So I'm just going to draw these in as little blades of grass. So I've got my sketch layer turned off again, I'm going to go back in with my erase tool and do the same thing that I did before where I just want to erase this little background grass out of my white offset area. I don't really want that to overlap. Then I'll also just clean up these bottom lines here so we have a nice even edge. That's sort of the theme with this illustration. I'm not sure if I mentioned this at the beginning, but if I didn't, the size of this is eight by ten inches and it's at 300 DPI. Which is a good size if you think you're going to be printing something in the future. Because if you know the size that you need to print out, you should definitely do that instead. You should work at that size instead. But this is just a good size to use if you're just messing around or just working on some art that you don't know what it's going to be used for. That looks pretty good. Then I think maybe we just need to give him a little bit of ground to be chilling out on. So again, I'm just going to take my dry ink brush, actually, I'm going to make it the same color as the grass. Let's do that. I've got my dry ink brush, just going to go ahead and make a straight line across, and then I'm just going to make another couple of straight lines here. Now, I could do this as a rectangular quick shape, but I'm just going to draw in some lines, so let me drop a color in there. Let's try that again. There we go. That fills in a little bit better, and then I'm just going to go in and connect the grass to the ground that we've created for him so he looks like he's actually chilling out and crawling on somewhere. So this is example number one of how we would illustrate this snail. Now, for the next video, I'm going to hop over into Photoshop and we're going to talk about creating some bold shapes and texture for this illustration. 6. Bold Textured Shapes: So here we are in Photoshop and we're going to have another go at our snail illustration now. This time we're going to be working with bold shapes and textures. What I'm going for is almost like a collage style, like an Eric Carle painted tissue paper look, so we'll see how that goes. I've opened up my snail illustration that I sketched in Procreate and I'm just setting this up the same way where I have my snail on its own layer. I'm going to go ahead and set it to multiply and set the opacity just 25 percent so my sketch isn't interfering with what I'm doing because my sketch is not going to be a part of my final art. Then I've got my snail color palette over here. I'm just going to go ahead and I drop these real quick. I'll leave this palette open, but these colors are going to appear right here now and my little most recent swatches, so I can just pull every from there if I want to, or I can go back here if I need to pull some colors. For my brush, I'm going to use just a standard Photoshop brush. This is a chalk brush. Let's get this on another layer here. This is just a chalk brush with a lot of really nice texture and I'm going to switch the mode to Multiply. That means that whenever I lift my stylus up, I'm going to be able to get some nice layered, almost painterly colors. I really dig that. We're going to be pairing that brush and you don't have to use that specific brush. It's just a chalk brush that comes with Photoshop. You can use any brush that you like. I would just recommend for this technique using a brush that has got some texture. You can see some brush strokes or something like that. But really this whole class is about you finding what works best for you and experimenting with brushes and techniques and figuring out what really speaks to the artwork that you dream of creating. We're just going to go ahead and get started with this guy. I'm just going to select my Lasso tool. I'm going to lasso his shell first so let's just go ahead and lasso that guy. We'll just go ahead and get this bottom part now. Because I'm trying to do like a collage style, I'm really going to try not to avoid using a lot of Lyon arts. I'm going to try to just use this painterly style to get everything worked out here. We'll see how that works because I almost always give in and add some line arts. We'll see. There's his shell and now you see because I am using this technique that I'm getting a lot of really good layered texture, but it's also affecting my colors. The last technique that we were using everything was super flat and this is going to be a lot more of lush and have a lot more depth to it. I'm going to be creating probably a few more layers this time so let me go ahead and just label these real quick so we don't get too lost in our labels. I'm going to try to keep a lot of these things on different layers just because we are using a brush that's set on multiply, which means that it's going to let whatever is beneath it show through. We're not going to want that in some cases and it's going to work to our benefit, to have everything on its own layer. You guys know I love layers. If you've watched any of my previous classes or if you follow me on Instagram. I'm just going to go through here. Now because I have got the shell on a separate layer, I'm able to take my lasso line under that shell a little bit. That's going to make my life a little bit easier. I'm going to go ahead and circle in his eyes and also the stems for his eyes too. I'm just holding down the Shift key on my keyboard while I do this, that way, I can add to my lasso selection. You can actually use this technique in Procreate as well. Like I said, most of the techniques that I'm showing you in this class can work in either Procreate or Photoshop. I just have personal preferences depending on the kind of work that I'm creating or the brushes that I want to use. I have brushes that I love in Procreate and there brushes that I love in Photoshop, so that definitely helps me decide whether I'm going to use Photoshop or Procreate. This looks a little bit dark, but I'm going to go ahead and just leave it for now because I can adjust it in a few minutes. I'm going to go ahead and speed things up real quick, and I'm going to fill in the rest of the greenery using this exact same technique. I have got all my colors worked in and you can see now that what we have is a little bit of a mess. Value wise, a lot of these colors have become very close in value just because I've had my brush set to Multiply, layering color on there so it doesn't look as nice and neat as our Procreate illustration did. Now what we need to do is we just need to start making some quick adjustments to this to get everything looking right. I am actually happy with the color of the shell, but for the snail I'm going to choose my snail layer. I'm going to go to Adjustments and then I'm going pick Hue/Saturation. Let's just go ahead and lighten that sky up a little bit. See I think that looks better already and then we're just going to do the same thing as we go through here. Let's pick our leaves, we go to Image> Adjustments > Hue/ Saturation. Again, I think I'm just going to lighten this up a little bit so we can really work with our values a lot. Same thing here. We're just going to go in and adjust these individually. This is really why I love working with different layers because it makes that a lot easier when I need to go in and make adjustments like this. I've got everything on its own layer and that means that it's going to be a whole lot easier for me to tweak colors if I need to. Whereas if I have everything on one layer, then I can still tweak the colors. But I'm going to have to do a little bit of lasso layering and a little bit of finessing that maybe I don't want to do. Let's just adjust the rest of these. You guys remember when I showed you the original color palette, I mentioned that very often where I end at is not where I started. I think that this is definitely a case where I had started out with a particular color palette and then as I am working through here, I'm just letting the illustration speak to me and it's leading me where it wants to go. Just to make those really light in the background. Just so we have little indication of the backgrounds, but nothing too crazy. Now I think I'm going to go back to my first layer of leaves here. I think I'm just going to adjust those a little bit because we're getting a little bit lost. Let's just bump the color backup a little bit and I think that that looks a whole lot better. Let's go ahead and turn our sketch layer back on. I'm just going to pull the opacity back up to about 50 percent so we can actually see what's going on here. Then we just need to see what final details that we have left to do. The final details that I'm going to go in and add, and I'm still going to be using the Lasso tool and the same brush because like I said, I really want this to have a cut paper collage look so I really don't want to do a lot of line art or anything like that. I need to go in on these leaves right here and add some line art. I'm going to have to go in on the shell and add the little spiral. Then I need to add his eyes, also his facial features and his little spots. Those are all things that I need to do and I'm just going to do that on a separate layer. I'm going to go ahead and speed things up from here and I'm going to get going on that. That's it. You can see that I have added some leaf details here to the orange leaf, let's just label that. That's our grounds. Helps if you can't spell and then this is the details on the snail himself. This is the shell, the little speckles and then his cute little face details as well. Then now we're all finished up with this illustration. This is a really great example of what you can do when you're just using the Lasso tool and a texture brush. We didn't draw any line art or anything. It basically just acted like my Lasso tool was a pair of scissors. That's what I had to create everything that I wanted to put in this illustration, which I think actually turned out pretty cute. We're actually going to stay and Photoshop for this next one and we're going to take a look at how to create this illustration using some soft pastel textures. Head on over to the next video and we'll get started with that. 7. Soft Pastels: All right guys. In this video we're going be tackling our third technique for coloring this snail illustration. You'll see that I have got my snail pulled up in Photoshop and then I've got my little palette set over here as a separate document. I'm going to do what I've done before. I'm just going to make a new layer, and this is going to be the layer that I'm going to be drawing on. So this technique, I'm calling it soft pastel. Basically whether you're using Photoshop, or Procreate, or Affinity, or whatever you're using to draw digitally what you're going to be looking for is a pastel brush. Just something that's got some texture and some rough edges that you'll be able to just block some color and width. Now, I'm using a hard pastel brush, which is one of Kyle Webster's brushes and that is from the Winter 2019 pack. Which if you're using Photoshop CC, you can get more brushes by going from your brushes palette, hitting this little drop-down and if you tap on "Get More Brushes" it'll take you to a website where you can access all of the currently available brushes in his collections. I believe if the Winter Brushes set is no longer listed there, you can download the update for the MegaPack and these brushes should be in there. If not, he has a ton of other really awesome pastel options. I've just really liked this one because it's super buttery and it fills really fun to draw with. Like I said, you don't have to be using Photoshop to follow along with this. You're basically just going to be using these same techniques no matter what software or app you're using. So if you're only using Procreate to follow this class, you should still be able to do this. Just look for a pastel or a charcoal brush that has, like I said, a lot of texture and some rough edges so that way you can really get this effect that we're going for. One thing I'm going to keep in mind when I'm working on this is I want to have just those really rough edges. So, I'm going to watch what size I make my brush. That means up here in the upper left-hand corner, I am probably going to keep my brush between 150 pixels, and I think maybe about 50 or 60 is about the smallest that I'm going to be making it. That's when I'm filling in the color. When I start working on the details, I think we'll do it a little bit differently. But we'll have to see how that works out. I'm just going to go ahead and pull my orange color from my color picker and let's just get our brush bumped up again. Now the reason I want to keep my brush big for this one is, like I said, I really want those rough edges and I'm okay with this being not perfect. If you follow my work, you guys know that I really love the lasso tool, so I really like those crisp edges. But for a technique like this, I really like to have just those raw unfinished edges and using a brush that's a little bit bigger is going to help me do that. It's going to make sure that I'm not being completely precious with the work that I'm creating. I want to go ahead and just layer in some color while I'm in here and I can do that in a couple of different ways. Whatever you decide on is just going to depend on your preference. I'm just going to pick a darker color and I can just go in here with my big brush and just block the colors in, which works great. You'll see I'm getting outside of the bounds of the base color that I've already done here, and that's fine. That's fine. We just add a little bit of extra character to it if we do that. Now the other thing that I can do, is I can do a clipping mask. I can just make a new layer, right-click," Create Clipping Mask". Now if I want to, I can go in here with a lighter color. Let's just yellow that up a little bit. Then whatever I do is just going to stick to the orange shape that we've created below. Let me show you what that looks like. If I release my clipping mask, you can see that goes way outside the original shape of the shell. But if I create my clipping mask again, it keeps everything inside or at least keeps this yellow part inside that I just added. I'm just going to merge that down. Either one of those methods works fine. If you want to use a clipping mask, use a clipping mask. If you don't want to use a clipping mask, that's fine. Just go ahead and go for these awesome rough edges and just do some experimenting and see what really speaks to you and makes your heart sing when you're working on your illustration. All right guys. I'm going to go ahead and speed things up real quick. I'm just going to block in all of my colors for the snail and for the greenery in the backgrounds. Then we're going to talk about how we can add some details just using this same pastel brush that we're already using or something very similar. Whatever you found that is working really well for you. Let's go ahead and speed it up and I'll see you on the other side of the music. You can see now that I have layered in all of my color and some texture just using that hard pastel brush that we were working with. Let me go ahead and just label my layers real quick. This is our shell, this one is the body, this one is our rounded leaves, and these are other leaves, and then this is our background grass, we'll call it. Now what we need to do is we just need to go in and add some details. I'm going to turn my sketch layer back on so we can see what's going on here. Then let's just zoom in a little bit. I want to start with a snail. Zoom out a little bit. I've still got my hard pastel brush, but this time I'm going to go ahead and take it down to about 20 pixels, maybe a little bit smaller than that. Maybe we'll go down to about 10 and on some of the parts. That's just going to give me a nice little textured line, which looks really awesome. I really love the idea of being able to complete one illustration using a single brush and not having to fret over which brush that you use and all that stuff. So, I think that this makes it a lot easier. I'm just going to go in here. I'm going to pick a darker color for the shell. I'm just going to start putting in some really rough little line work details here with this darker color. I'm sure that shows up really well. Then we'll just go ahead and turn our Sketch Layer off here. I just want to add in some cute little line details on the shell. Then I think maybe we'll go in here and do a lighter color of details too. Maybe we'll just pick this yellow color and lighten it up a bit. Then we'll just add in some lighter line details just for some added interest. Even though I'm using this brush at about 20 pixels right now, you can see it's still pretty chunky with this sort of brush, it's not really possible to get in and do a whole lot of fine detail. The detail work that you're going to do is going to look chunky, and textured, and rough and I think that's part of the charm of working like this. Let's go in now. Now our snail body in our sketch has some little speckles. So, instead of just drawing circles, I'm just going to go in here and just add some little swashes basically of our colors just to add that little bit of speckly texture. I think that's pretty fun. Then we need to go in on his eyes. We need to give him a little eyeballs. Then we also need to give him a bit dark part of his eyes. So let's make a nice dark color. That looks really good. Then we'll go back to our lighter color again and give them a little light. It's really cute. Then we also need to draw in the stems on his eyes. So we'll go back to about 20 pixels on that. Then let's pick up a darker color again to add his nose. Again, I'm just going to do a couple of swatches on here instead of last sewing, or outlining, or anything like that. Then we'll just do his little mouth there. That pretty much takes care of it for the snail. He's looking really lovely so far. We really did get all the texture and all of the chunky line art. Our next step is going to be to continue on. We're just going to add some more details in using the same brush at down to about 20 or 15 pixels in Photoshop. We're just going to add in the rest of the details for our leaves and everything. So, I'm going to go ahead and speed things up and do that. Then as usual, and I'll see you guys on the other side of the music. All right guys. We're all done with this particular technique. Now, I've used just my hard pastel brush through this entire thing and have just layered on color and some of this awesome texture from the brush. Then I've gone in with a smaller version of that brush and I've just added in some chunky details to the fully edge. I've added some chunky grass details in front of the snail here. Then of course we added some little chunky details on his shell and to his body. I hope you guys are having fun so far looking at how we can tackle the same sketch in a bunch of different ways. I hope you're learning and I hope that you're thinking about how you can apply these techniques and these lessons to your own style and your own work that you are creating. Go ahead and head to the next video. In that video we're going to be talking about doing a rough colored pencil style and we're going to be doing that in Procreate. I'll see you in just a minute. 8. Colored Pencil: [MUSIC] All right guys, welcome to our fourth technique, exploration for this class. In this one we're going to be doing a rough colored pencil style. I'm calling it a rough colored pencil style just because I prefer that sort of like scribbly textural sort of colored pencil look over that really gorgeous blended look. That's just a personal preference. You can tackle this from whatever direction you want to. We're just going to be doing a rough one for the video at least because I think that's fun. Back in procreate now I've got my snail sketch set up on its own layer set to multiply. I'm going to make a new layer and pull it down below so I can color on it. Then I've still got my color palette set up here. We're going to start with the shell. Now, procreate actually has a pretty good pencil brush that's native to the app. You're going to find that under sketching, and it's going to be the 6B pencil. It's just really buttery and smooth and has a really awesome texture. You can use that, or I've got some brushes that I've downloaded. This is from the Vivi brush tool set. If you look under the resources for this class, you're going to find a list of different procreate and Photoshop brushes that I've used in like and this will be on there. She's got these really great colored pencil brushes. I'm going to go ahead and use her colored pencil basic brush, which you can see has just got a really nice natural colored pencil look to it. What I'm going to do is I'm just going to go ahead and resize my brush down here I think. Yeah, I want to make sure I'm getting some really awesome colored pencil texture in there. I'm just going to go ahead and start filling in the shell of our snail here. Because I'm using like a scribbling texture, I'm actually just going to follow the shape of the shell, so we get an extra a layer of definition here. I'm going to spiral around here as I work on this. All right guys. I'm going to go ahead and speed things up at this point. I'm just going to be building in all of the flat colors for all of the elements. For the snail, for the foliage, for the background. Just like in our last video with the soft pastel brush, this is the only brush that I'm going to use. I've said it before, I really love the simplicity of just having one or two or maybe just a little handful of brushes that you are using. It takes the guesswork out of it, and the stress of feeling like you need to select the most perfect brush for everything. If it's not the best brush ever then your work isn't good enough. You really don't need anything fancy. You just need some basic brushes. You don't need to spend a lot of money on brushes if you don't want to, like I said, I bought this brush pack. I really enjoy it, but you don't need it. Procreate has a really awesome, 6B pencil brush that you might make if you're using Affinity Designer or you're using Photoshop or anything like that Just test different pencil brushes or like hard pastel brushes, charcoal brushes, anything that is going to give you that really nice, pencily sort of texture. Yeah, just give it a test, see what works best for you, and then get started blocking in some flat colors, whatever you're illustrating right now. I'm going to go ahead and speed this up and I'll be back with you on the other side of the music. [MUSIC] I've got my snail blocked in and I've got the different, foliage blocked in everything is on its own layer. At this point I'm just going to keep using my colored pencil and I just want to go in and add some color variation which you guys know is like my favorite thing. I'm not super into just like these flat colors. I like to add a lot of layering on it, say it build some interests. So no matter what brush I'm using him pretty much going to be layering and some color and some texture somehow. I can do a couple of things. Just like in our last video, I can do a clipping mask if I want to make sure that I'm not going to go outside the bounds that I've sat for like the snail shell or like whatever I'm working on. To do that I can just add a new layer, top clipping mask, and now anything that I color is just going to be inside the show. Another thing that I can do is I can just tap on this and choose Alpha lock. That's going to do the same thing. Whatever I color is going to be on the shape of the shell. Now the difference between Alpha lock and clipping mask is that clipping mask is non-destructive. That means that if I make some layers of color on here and I don't like them, I can delete my clipping mask and it's no big deal, Alpha lock is permanent. This color is literally on top of the other color that I used for the shell. I can get rid of it if I just use my undo option. But if I get far enough into my illustration, then doing the undo option isn't a good option because they're going to have to do undo everything else, and maybe I'm going to be undoing some stuff that I actually like. You have to be thoughtful in how you sought this out. Basically what I'm going to do, I'm just going to turn off my Alpha lock layer. I'm just going make a layer on its own, and that's where I'm going go ahead and put in all of my textural details. I'm not going to bother doing a clipping mask for all of this. You just have to get used to having a sense of when you need a clipping mask, when you don't. When you need to make sure that everything is meticulously on its own layer, and when it might be easy to add an otherwise. So this way, I am just keeping my colorful layering on this one particular layer. I think if I need to edit it at some point down the road, it's still going to be easy to do because I have these details that we are going to be adding separate from all of our main colors that we've got here. Okay, I'm just going to get started with the shell again. I'm just going to go ahead and speed things up. Again, I'm still using my colored pencil brush. I'm basically going to go in here now. I'm going to add some depth maybe and some more interests by adding in some darker and some lighter colors. Remember this is on it's own layer, so I can go in and change this if I need to. I've got my sketch off right now, but I can always turn it back on if I want to see what is going on under there, but I want to it play it by ear right now. We'll see how that works outs. All right guys, I'm going to keep on going here and I'm going to speed things up a little bit. I'll see you on the other side of the music. All right, I have got most of my illustration colored and at this point I've got my added details. What I've done now is, I've made a new layer in the background. I still need to color in some of these background grasses. I'm just going to choose a light color, make my brush a little bit bigger, then I'm just going to go through here. I think I'm going to do something a little bit different this time. I think instead of just coloring these shapes in, I think I'm just going to roughly brush in the grass shapes. So they'll just be like single lines instead of colored shapes. We'll see how that works out. This is part of the fun of learning new styles and experimenting with different brushes and different techniques. So you can just try different things and see if you like them or not, and if you do, you can incorporate that into the style that you work in. Let's turn off our sketch layer. I like that, that's kind of fun. Then I'm going to go in here on the bottom. I'm rubbing along on the side of my Apple Pencil so I can get that really nice shaded effect. I'm going to add in a little bit of shadowing here on the bottom. Because right now it looks like my snail is floating and I definitely don't like that. So just go in and add some darker shadow colors. Then ground them a little bit. Okay, that looks better. All right, so what we need to do now is we need to go in and add our final details. So let's turn our sketch back on. I'm going to go in on our sketch. Let's just go ahead and bump it down to about 15 percent, just so we can see it for reference, but it's not getting in the way of anything. We get another new layer here as the place for all my final details. Again, just makes things a little bit easier. If I decide I need to edit things in the future. Even if everything isn't on its own specific layer, every single piece of the illustration isn't on its own layer. It's still nice to have some layering options. So I'm going in here again, I'm still using my vivid brush to pencil brush. I'll have a link to that in the resources section of the class, along with all of my other brush resources for Photoshop and Procreates. I'm going to go ahead and add in some pencilly details. Going to add it to the shell, to the snail, and to the foliage in the background. So I'm going to go ahead and speed things up a little bit, and I will see you on the other side of the music. All right guys, so that's it. In this technique, I've just used a pencil brush and Procreate, and have just layered in different colors so I can get a lot of texture and variation. Then at the interior, I've just gone in with darker versions of all the colors that I've used, and I've added in my details. If I want to be a stickler, I can go in here and rename my layers at this point, so I'll know what's going on. I'm not super great at remembering to name my layers, but it's definitely something I should get better at. All right, so that takes care of our rough colored pencil style. Now, go ahead and head on to the next video and we're going to look at technique number five. 9. Folk Art Details: [MUSIC]. Guys, this is going to be our fifth technique for this class and I'm going to do something a little bit different with this one. In that, I'm going to do a style that is more decorative than anything else. This is going to be a folk art inspired style where we're going to be painting with flat colors and then we're just going to be going in and adding some fun details. Maybe just some floral details and some fines, dots, lines, things like that. If you need some inspiration for this style, just do a search on Pinterest for folk art and just look at all of the amazing inspiration that you'll find and use it to inform your attempts at the style if you want to give it a go. What I'm going to do first is I am going to just block in my flat color. I've got my snail sketch. I'm going to make a new layer on top while I'm doing this part and then I might move the sketch layer back to the top when I'm done, we'll see how that works out. For my brush, I'm going to use one of Joe Wellington's brushes. It's the thick gouache streaky brush. You don't need this brush. Of course it's a great brush and I love it. But as I've said in this class and all my other classes, Procreate has really awesome native brushes. What you're looking for here is just a brush that is just going to give you just a nice, buttery, sort of flat, painterly texture. You're not really looking for anything too grungy, I guess is the word that I want to look for here. I'm just going to go ahead. I've got my gouache brush selected. I'm just going to go ahead and start blocking in my flat colors here. I'm just going to start with the shell and I'm just going to do a basic outline here. Now once you've got your outline done on this, you can actually go in and just do a color drop for the rest of it. You just want to make sure that all of your shape is enclosed. Then you can just pull your color, drop it in here. Then I like to just go in with my brush, touch up those edges a little bit and make sure that you can't see the line where I had everything filled. That makes everything go a lot quicker since you can do color drops on this one. I am for right now just going to go ahead and keep everything on its own layer just in case I decide I need to change any colors or anything. I want to have that option as it goes through here. I'm going to go ahead and speed things up and I'm going to finish laying in these flat colors. I'll see you on the other side of the music and then we'll get started adding some details. [MUSIC] Guys, I have got my flat colors blocked in. Now, what I'm going to do is, let's just pull our sketch layer back on top of everything just in case we need it for reference. Okay, there we go. Now what I'm going to do is make a new layer on top of this. I'm going to go into my native Procreate brushes and I'm going to select "Inking". Then I'm going to go with the dry ink brush, which we've used before in this class and I use all the time in my illustration work. I really love it. I've got a few different things that I want to do first with my dry ink brush. I've got everything on a separate layer here. I think that one of the first things that I want to do is, I just want to go in and maybe add a little bit of color variation. Let's start with the shell. Just make this a little bit darker. I'm going to make my brush a little bit bigger. Now, I can stick with my gouache brush that I was using before for this or I can switch to my dry inking brush which I'm going to use for all of my details, either one is fine. I'm just basically going to go in here and just block in some color and do some color fills. Like I said, this style is really decorative more than it is anything else. You can really have a lot of fun making these designs and shapes. [MUSIC] I have layered some more color and again, just using a dry ink flat brush. You can use any sort of flat brush that you want to. Now, at this point what I'm going to do is I'm just going to start drawing in some really nice little floral and greenery details that are sort of inspired by folk art shapes.Then I'm also going to add just maybe some little like dots and other fun details on the greenery and everything. I'm going to speed the video up again and I'll see you guys on the other side of the music once I get my details worked out. [MUSIC] Guys, this is my finished illustration in a style that is inspired by folk art. Basically all I've done is, I've just blocked in my flat colors. I haven't added any texture, or done a whole lot of color layering or anything like that. This is just really simple it's a really decorative sort of style. Then I've gone in with my dry ink brush, which is a brush that's native to Procreate and I've added a bunch of little like line details, some foliage and flower details that are all just really decorative and fun. Now, I've done these details just in white, but you can do them in any color. You can do colorful flowers and whatever you desire. I was just thinking that if I was painting this for real, that probably what I would do would be go in with white gouache and add the details there. That's why I've just gone with white here and plus I think it just gives it a really fun, crisp sort of look. Now, because we're doing a simplified, decorative sort of style, I left out some of the elements that are in the background of the sketch. I left out like the grassy details on the bottom and the grassy details in the background. Just because I think with a style like this, it would be really easy to get too cluttered. It cluttered if you have too many layers of things going on. I think it's super important to keep that in mind. Guys, let's head on over to the next video and we're going to take a look at how to do a simple watercolor style. 10. Simple Watercolor & Ink: Here we are in our very last Style video for this class. In this last style, we are going to be just doing a simple watercolor wash and then we're going to be adding some line details, some darker ink details. Now, for this one I'm going to start illustrating in procreate and then I'm going to pass it back over to Photoshop to add the final line details. The reason I'm doing this is because I do this a lot in my own work. There are brushes and techniques that I prefer and procreate and their brushes and techniques that I prefer in Photoshop. Generally my final art is done in Photoshop, but I will very often start in procreates, especially if I'm doing a project that involves lettering or anything like that I tend to do that work and procreate and then handed over to Photoshop for final art. I thought it would be really awesome in this last technique video to show you guys a technique where you just pass it back and forth. I'm going to be using Lisa Bardot wash and dry brushes to lay down my watercolor washes. She just released these recently and I'm not a watercolor is sky. If you are in watercolor artist, you're going to be like, 'you're doing it wrong it hurts my brain." Would just fine like we don't all have to agree. But the cool thing about these brushes is that they've got just a really nice texture to them and you can really layer them like you would be able to layer watercolor if you were actually painting, I think that's really nice. I know that if you're a watercolor is, it's tough to find brushes that mimic the watercolor techniques that you're used to doing digitally. These are really good option and just like all the other brushes that I talk about in the class, I'll be sure to link to these in the resources section so you'll have access to all the brushes that I'm using. Basically I'm just going to take this brush. I'm going to go in on my snail. I'm going to do the same thing that I've been doing the entire class, which is I'm just going to go in and block in some flat colors and I'm going to add a little bit of layering in texture as I go just because these brushes, since we're emulating a watercolor style here, we're just going to have to weigh it. Do some layering of some colors and then I'll see where we go from there. All right guys, I'm going to see you on the other side of the music, after I got on my flat color Stockton. All right guys. I have got my flat colors sort of loosely painted and with watercolor. Now, a color that cool thing about doing a digital watercolor style is that you don't have to obey the rules of watercolors that you might have noticed that in this area right here, the paint out a darker color underneath a lighter colors. It's one of the advantages of digital art. Although when I am working digitally, I still like to keep in mind how like actual paints would work or how the media that I am using will, apply in real life and that helps me, I don't know get my hair style under control a little bit while I'm working digitally and instead of feeling like that, unless options, which is a little bit intimidating. All right guys. What I'm going to do now is I am going to send this file over to photoshops. Here we are in Photoshop and I've already opens my layered file that I had saved in my Dropbox, and you can see I've got my sketch on its own layer and then I've got my little watercolor illustration here. What I'm going to do this time is I'm basically just going to go in and add some ink details. I'm just imagining that I laid down some base colors with some watercolor and then I'm just going to go back in with probably this warm brownish color. I am going to select an inking brush and this is another one of Kyle Webster's brushes from the Winter 2019 update. It's called Golden Age tilt. He has a lot of really awesome ink brushes. If ink is your jam, I definitely suggest trying some of those out. Let's see which one of these we want to use. I think I'm going to use Golden Age inker and then we'll just go ahead and turn our sketch back on. I'm just going to turn the opacity prefer down on this. I'm going to make a new layer on top of this. Then let's just go ahead and start adding in our liner details. I might go back and make this so darker black color at some point, we'll see how that works out. That's the cool thing about working digitally as you can just go in and test things out. If I work on this for a little bit and I decide that the stark brownish block isn't going to be bold enough for me, then I can go in and change the color because I haven't elemental layer and it's making my life a little bit easier and actually I think I'm going to go ahead and do that anyway, Sue color overlay, and we'll pick a darker color there, and then basically I'm just going to go through here and just add some more details with my ink brush. I could have finished this entire thing in procreate but I really prefer this brush for this thing that's why I switched it back and forth. Like I said, in my own professional work, I very often pass things back and forth between Photoshop and procreate because there are things that I like about both apps and it's just easier for me instead of struggling to figure out how to do a certain thing in Photoshop or how to do a certain thing and procreate, I just pop it in my Dropbox, open it up in the other app, do the thing I need to do, and then send it back over so that's making life a whole lot easier for me. All right guys, I'm going to go ahead and speed things up and I'm going to keep working on adding these inky details. I will see you on the other side of the music. We're all finished now with our sixth and final technique in this class. All we've done this time because we've just done some simple watercolor washes and then I've gone in with sort of textured anchor brush and I've just added some darker in key details. We have a really simple watercolor and ink technique here. You notice again that I removed some of the details from the background that we're in this sketch just because of the way that we were working and thought it made more sense to just add some little like grass details here on the bottom of the illustration instead of distracting too much with things in the background, and it's just a personal choice, you could have finished the background if you were working on this illustration or if you're doing something similar and it's whatever you want. All right guys heading over to the next video and we're going to look at all six illustrations side by side and just talk about what, basically just do an overview of the techniques that we've done for this class and then we're going to talk about your project for the class, which is going to be trying out at least a couple of these techniques. I'll see you in the next video. 11. All Together Now: Now let's take a look at all six of these illustrations side-by-side before we move on to chatting about your project. Basically what I want you to do at this point is I want you to look at all six of these illustrations that we've done with our six different approaches and I want you to consider what you'd like or dislike about each one. Think about the approach for each illustration and how you might use that in your own work. That doesn't necessarily mean that you're going to use the exact approach that I used in each one of these illustrations, it might mean that you're only taking a piece of what I've taught in one of these illustrations and maybe you're mixing that up with pieces from other illustrations, and different techniques that you prefer to use on your own work. It's going to be a very process depending on where you are with your work, how developed your style is, there going to be a ton of factors here. What I really want you to do, other than looking at these six different illustrations and considering your likes and your dislikes is I really want you to make some notes about these approaches or about other approaches that you like to try. It's okay if you've tried one of these techniques and you didn't like it, learning what you don't like as just as important as learning what you do like when it comes to making art. I'm just going to go through these and just talk a little bit about what I like and don't like about each technique, and what I use in my own work, and then what I don't prefer to use my own work, so let's just take a look at these six illustrations real quick. We're going to start in the upper left-hand corner with our bold line and offset color snail, and that's going to be this guy right up here. I think that this guy is really adorable. I actually really like this particular style or this particular technique really, but I don't find that it merges very well with the style that I end up using in my own illustration work. I personally love a thick chunky dark outline. I think it looks so awesome, but I just don't use that in my own work. I don't prefer for my own work. I think that's something that you guys will see too, is that sometimes you'd like something, but it's not as something that can be melded into the kind of illustration work that you're doing and that's totally fine. I love the style, but it's not something that's going to work for the sort of work that I create. Now, the second technique that we did, which is going to be down here in the bottom right-hand corner is the digital collage style where I used bold textural shapes and it basically you just use the Lasso tool and I don't have any liner details or anything like that, and then it was layering a lot of color and texture, which is a lot more what I guided towards when I create my own work. This particular style is something that I definitely include in my own work and I definitely appreciate it.The next style that we worked on is the soft pastel style, which is going to be appear in our upper right-hand corner. You know what, I really loved this style as well. I love the juxtaposition of using the Lasso tool with some crisp edges and then using a softer edged brush to balance these back and forth in an illustration, I think that's really fun. I may not use this soft pastel technique in an entire illustration, but I will definitely find myself using it for particular parts of illustrations. Particularly if I have foliage or anything like that to color in, I like having these nice soft edges instead of these crisp edges I would have in the bold textural shapes style. Next up in the top center, we did a colored pencil style, which again, I really love this. This is something that I wish I incorporated more and in my illustration work. But again, it's one of those things where I think that I just really like it, but when it comes to incorporating it in my work it doesn't necessarily feel very much like me sometimes, so I'm pretty sparks about it, but I really love it. I love the scribbly pencil details, and I definitely try to add that in my work whenever I can and then I love the pencil line details on the show, that especially speaks to me for some reason. Next step, we did some folk art details. Now, I love this style. It's just decorative and it's really fun. Now this is a really great style if you're doing a lot of art licensing or a lot of more design led illustration work. This is fantastic. Again, I really love those. I love all of these little details in the shell and everything. But this isn't necessarily a style that merges well with my current style of illustration. Then last but not least, we have got our little simple watercolor and ink snail. He's so cute. Again, I super love this style and one thing that I really like about what I've done here is I haven't necessarily outlined everything. I love the leaves and the snail and it's shell don't have complete outlines. They just have little suggestions of outlines, maybe just on one side, or maybe just some line details in the center and I find that to be really satisfying, so that's definitely something that I will think about using in my work, even though I'm not necessarily going to be using a lot of watercolor textures very often. Although I don't know, I find this little center section right here to be super satisfying, so I might actually apply this to some of my work in the future and that kind of brings me to the end of this video where I just want you guys to really try and experiment with a bunch of different techniques and just kind of see what works best for you. Because I would have never considered at the beginning of this class that I would really love this watercolor and ink sort of style. But now I'm finding myself saying, "Oh, I really enjoyed this. I wonder how I can incorporate this into the style that I already have. What points can I take from this illustration with the watercolor and ink style and how can I apply that to my layered textural style that I'm using all the time?" That's why I'm saying give these a try. Even if you're just going to try out one or two of these, Give it a try even if you don't think you're going to like the process. Because when it comes down to it, you never know what you're going to like or dislike until you give it a try and it's one of those things where you're never going to know until you try, so head on over to the next video and we're going to be talking about your project, which is going to involve, yes, trying out a couple of these techniques. I'll see you guys over in the next video. 12. Your Project: For this class project, I'd like you to work from your own Sketch and try at least two of the approaches that we went over in this class. I've made a PDF sheet for each approach so you can easily reference it for inspiration. You'll find it under the projects and resources section of this class. Or if you don't see it there, I'll include a download link as well, so you can just grab it from my websites. Let's just do a really quick review of each technique before you head off to do your own work. The first technique that we worked on was a bold line with offset color. Again, most of the techniques that I'm teaching in this class are interchangeable, so you can do these either in Photoshop or Procreate or any other app or a piece of software that you want to work in. For this particular style, you're going to be looking for a brush that's going to allow you to create a nice bold line, and then you're just going to be looking for a technique that's going to allow you to fill the colors and then either move them so they're offset, erase them so they're offset, or even just draw them, or lasso them so they're offset, so this is a pretty basic technique that you'll be using here. Next up we are going to be looking at this technique, which is our bold textured shapes. For this technique, what you're going to be using is the lasso selection tool, and then you want a brush that has a lot of texture to it. In this class I used a chalk brush, but you can use charcoal or pencils or any sort of painterly textural brush will work just fine, so that's what you're looking for when you're trying to decide what brush you're using. Now, of course, I'm going to give you guys a list of brush resources for Photoshop and for Procreate so you can reference that, but you don't necessarily have to use the exact same brushes that I used. I think it's really important that you experiment with a lot of brushes, and you try to figure out what is going to work best for the style that you already have or for the work that you imagine creating. I feel like that's super important. Next up is our soft pastel style. Now for this one, I just used a single brush that was just a pastel brush with a lot of texture and some soft edges, and that's what you're looking for in a brush no matter what app or software you're going to be using at this point. Next up is our colored pencil technique. That one's pretty easy because you're just looking for a pencil sort of brush. I would recommend getting one that has a really soft feel to it, so you don't have to press down really hard on your stylus or your Apple pencil. You want something that's going to have that soft, buttery colored pencil feel to it. You can get that. Our next to last style is this folk art detail style. You can do this with just one simple brush. I blocked in my flat colors with gouache brush and you can do the same. It doesn't have to be a gouache brush, but what you're looking for, is just something that has a nice buttery feel. It can have a little bit of texture to the edges, but it doesn't have to be too terribly textured. With this style because you're adding a lot of little details at the end, you don't have to worry about your flat colors being super duper textural. I mean, they can be, but they don't have to be. Then our last technique that we worked in was just a simple watercolor in ink. The brushes that you need to find here, are just a brush that's going to allow you to do some line art. I like a brush that has a lot of unevenness and texture in it for this. It replicates if you were using a nib pen or a brush pen or something like that. That's going to give that more natural look. Then I think the same thing for a watercolor brush, you're basically just going to be looking for some watercolor brush that's going to allow you to layer the colors so you get those nice natural effects that you would get if you were actually using watercolor. Like I said, I would love for you to try at least two of these approaches. You can do all six if you want to you. When you're done, I want you to share your work in the projects in resources section of the website. I do my best to comment on your projects within 24 hours, and if you're sharing on Instagram, be sure to tag STEPHFCSKILLSHARE so I can see your work there too. I share student work on my Instagram stories each Monday and choose projects to share from that hash tag. If you'd like a chance at having your work shared on my Instagram stories, be sure to use STEPHFCSKILLSHARE as your hashtag. Thanks so much for drawing along with me. I hope you've learned a lot and I will see you in my next class.