Design Trap Sounds with Massive | Dylan Bowes | Skillshare
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42 Lessons (4h 56m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:08
    • 2. Subbass

      5:26
    • 3. Cone Destroyer Bass

      5:49
    • 4. Sine Shaper Bass

      7:52
    • 5. Slow Attack Subbass

      3:30
    • 6. Robot Siren Bass

      10:05
    • 7. YaYa Bass

      8:13
    • 8. Formant Bass

      8:22
    • 9. Dirty Sawtooth Lead

      8:23
    • 10. Distorted Guitar Stab

      4:32
    • 11. Arpeggiator Notch Lead

      16:24
    • 12. Gregorian Choir

      17:19
    • 13. Detroit Sync Lead

      8:18
    • 14. Pitchy Square Saw Lead

      4:15
    • 15. Crunk Lead

      8:19
    • 16. Snakecharmer Lead

      6:38
    • 17. Verbed Sawtooth Lead

      12:38
    • 18. Square Saw Pluck Lead

      8:22
    • 19. Chiptune Pluck

      5:54
    • 20. Vibey Pulse Saw Pluck

      9:57
    • 21. Reverse Delay Pluck

      15:43
    • 22. Variable Pitch Pluck

      8:30
    • 23. White Noise Sweep FX

      3:47
    • 24. Propeller FX

      5:36
    • 25. Ghost FX

      5:31
    • 26. Amp Noise Swoosh FX

      2:36
    • 27. Digital Siren Pitch Drop FX

      7:08
    • 28. 808 Kick Drum

      6:30
    • 29. Snare Drum

      10:30
    • 30. Hi Hat Pattern

      4:44
    • 31. Chime

      5:16
    • 32. Keys N Krates "I Just Can't Deny" Sax Lead

      3:17
    • 33. Paper Diamond & Loudpvck "Wylin"

      4:32
    • 34. Flosstradamus "Pillz" Hover Pad

      3:15
    • 35. Bro Safari & UFO! "Burn the Block (Gent & Jawns Remix) Lead

      4:09
    • 36. DJ Fresh & Diplo "Earthquake" Lead

      4:13
    • 37. Bro Safari "Avalon" Lead

      3:02
    • 38. RL Grime "Core" Lead

      4:40
    • 39. Flosstradamus & DJ Slink "Crowd Ctrl 2

      4:33
    • 40. DJ Snake & Lil' Jon "Bend Ova" Sawtooth Lead

      2:45
    • 41. Bonus: Automation

      10:20
    • 42. Bonus: Sampling

      13:31
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About This Class

In this course, I will teach you how to design Trap sounds from the ground up using Native Instruments' Massive virtual analog synthesizer. In the process, you will become a master of this powerful software synthesizer.

Using 41 video lectures (that's 5 hours of content), I will show you exactly how producers and DJs build Trap patches using Massive.

I will teach you how to design dirty basses, huge leads, powerful plucks, trap drums, crazy FX patches, and much more.

Meet Your Teacher

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Dylan Bowes

Producer/Sound Designer/Instructor

Teacher

Dylan is a producer & sound designer in Los Angeles. He has taught music production and mixing techniques for more than six years.

See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: In this course, I'll teach you how to design trap sounds using Native Instruments, Massive. This course is suited for all skill levels, even if you feel intimidated by sound design, I will teach you the fundamental principles. Don't worry, it's not hard. We will walk through the process of crafting sounds from oscillators to filters, to modulation to effects. We will explore all different kinds of sounds. Powerful plucks, dirty bases, huge leans, trap drums, and much more. Then we will recreate sounds from some popular traps ions in one more thing, I'll also include all of the presets that we designed in the course for you to download for your reference. At the end of this course, you will become a sound designer, not just a preset. It's a lot of fun. And I hope to see you there. Thanks. 2. Subbass: Alright, in this lecture we're going to design a sub base patch. This is super common and trap music, and it's really simple. So we're gonna start there. And I'll show you some ways to make it a little bit more interesting, but let's start with the basics. So first we're gonna go up here and choose File New Sound to initialize a new patch. And then we're gonna go over to the oscillator and choose from the wave tables here. And we're going to choose either sine squared or sine triangle. Because remember that with massive it gives you wave tables. So if I choose sine square, then this knob, the wave table position, will determine which slice of that wave table we're choosing. So if I pull it all the way to the left here, then we're on peer sinewave and it sounds like this. Alright? It would be the same if I chose sine triangle. So you can choose either one because we're going to just do a pure sine wave. Now. That's their sinewave. If I drop this pitch down in octave, 12 semitones is an octave like that. You can hear that pure, that nice peer sub bass sound. I mean, our patches basically there already, but it's a little bit flat. So the thing that I would do, there are a few things that I would do to just sort of get your standard sub base template ready. And the first thing that I would do is tiny, tidy up the patch a little bit. And what I mean by that is just getting the settings right for making a base patch. So the first thing that we'll do is go over to voicing and will choose monophonic like this. Because we don't want polyphonic, which is o, which allows you to play more than one note at a time. Otherwise, you know, like a chord. We wanna choose monophonic since we're doing a base patch. And then the second thing I would do to tidy up the patch is go over to our envelope number four, which is our global or envelope. Because remember that in massive the default here in the amplitude modulations section, the, this box here has a four in it, which means that the overall amplitude of the patch is being modulated by this envelope, envelope number four. So you just want to make sure here that you're the, the level, the sustain level of the envelope is up all the way because we want it to hold out and stay there like that. And you also wanna make sure that you have a little bit of a release. And here's why. If the release is set down all the way to the bottom at 0, it's too fast and you'll hear a little bit of a click when you release the key. So here, see if you can hear this. Mean here that just a little bit. If I pull this release up a little bit. And the sort of teams that click, the same thing is true with the attack, but I don't find that to be as big of a deal for me. So if I, if I pull out this attack time a little bit, you'll hear that click away, but it also loses some of the attack of the punch for me with the attack. So try to fine tune that, find it, find it where it feels good to you. So after tidying up the Patch, One thing that I like to do to give this sound just a little bit more character is I'll take an envelope, so we'll choose envelope number one and we'll drop it into the pitch modulation box here. And we will raise this up 12 semitones or an octave. And what we wanna do is just have a quick drop in that pitch. So we're going to use this envelope to do that. To shape this envelope will pull down the attack probably too, there is fine and pull down the sustain level. And then we can choose the right setting for the decay because we just want that pitch to drop a little bit right at the beginning of the note. So you can hear that little blue like that. And I might, I might pull this down a little bit more just like that. And that just gives the sound a little bit more character in the beginning there. So if I, if I mute this modulation here and go back to what we had before, it's a little boring. But if I, if I unmute that now I have this envelope modulating that pitch there. That just gives me a little bit more. I don't know, I find it to be a bit more interesting. Now you can make this more extreme if you want, you can maybe raise it up to octaves. You know, it's up to you. But for just a nice foundation will just keep it at 12 for now, like that. So that's a really simple sub base patch. And in the following lectures will play with this a little bit. So save this preset. This will be our sort of foundational sub base patch. And then in the next few lectures, we're going to do some fun stuff with it and make it a little bit dirtier. Alright, see you there. 3. Cone Destroyer Bass: Alright, so now that we have a really basic Sub Base patch all saved and ready to go. It's time to have some fun with this and make it a little bit more interesting. And a really common sound and trap music is like a really dirty base. Just kinda sounds like messed up. So with this one, I'm going to show you how to apply some distortion to it to make what we could maybe call like a cone destroyer sub bass. And by the way, I'm, I'm, I'm just terrible at coming up with names for these patches. So if in the, in the discussion area, if you have a better idea for a cool name for the patches, please let me know and we can, we can call it that, but we'll just call this one cone destroyer for now. Alright, so we have our simple sub base patch. Just like that. It's beautiful. I would love it already. But now, let's, let's have some fun with this. So what I will try here to experiment is choose the voicing tab in the global page. And you'll see here that our Yunus sauna is on one. Yunus Sono is the amount of voices that are played when you strike a note or when you program a node n For each note played, how many voices, how many duplicates of that sound are coming up? So right now it's on one. Now with, with sinewaves, we can create some really, really nasty stuff by increasing the unison. Oh, so if I just bring this up, let's not destroy anything here. So just yet. So we're going to turn up unison o to four. And if I play note, it might be a bit louder. Bu, not hearing much of a difference there. Now if I, if I go over here to the right, to the unison of spread, and I turn the pitch cutoff on, and I move this just a tiny bit. What I'm doing here is varying the pitch of each of those voices just a little bit. And I have centered chosen around one unit here, this is one semitone. And so moving this up and down, if I move it all the way to the right, all of those voices will be varied by at most one semitone around the center frequency of the actual node itself. But that will sound very, very detune. So we don't want that, we just want it a little bit. And if I move this, you'll hear a little bit of movement here that increase human Asana even a little bit more. So why is this happening? Will, without getting too much into the physics of sound. Remember that sine waves are just one fundamental frequency. So when you have these different voices with subtly different pitches, all right, on top of each other. It's like the waves, the sound waves of the sine wave are just sort of crashing into each other and kinda mess in each other up. And there's sort of like fighting to, fighting to come out. You can sort of think about it that way. So that's why you get a little bit of this sort of weird modulation sound coming out. And when we apply some distortion to this, it gets really, really gnarly and cool. So we have just a little bit of that movement. And now we'll go over two effects. One, and we'll add a classic tube to this. He can sort of fine tune these. You can add more drive. I like just a little bit because too much drive is going to add to many other, too much other harmonic content which I didn't really want from my base patch. So just a little bit as cool right there. And I can mess with this pitch spread here. And that just gives me a nice dirty sub basin like that. So that's kind of something fun that you can do is add some, some voices, de-tune them just a little bit. And then with that distortion, it really gets moving. And if I bring this back to one just so we can hear what it sounds like, just the distortion and without those other voices. Sounds like that. It's cool, you know, but, but it doesn't have the same movement. If I have six voices with that pitch Spread does. And that's why we can call this one's sort of like a cone Destroyer. Or I don't even remember what I said. So if you think of a cool, cool name, then we'll just call it cone destroy for now. But it sort of sounds with that distortion and that pitch spread. It sort of sounds like it's just busting out the speaker and just sounds really dirty and cool. And so I really like that one. Alright, so save that one. And in the next lecture will try out a few other things to make our sub base a little bit different. 4. Sine Shaper Bass: Alright, welcome back. In this lecture we're gonna go even dirtier if r sub bass sound. So pull up your sub base patch that you saved from the first sub based lecture. You can just go, you know, open recent files or choose Open and pull it up from wherever you've saved it. And what we're gonna do in this lecture is we're going to add some distortion and use another envelope to modulate the sign shaper insert effect. Okay? Now one thing to mention that one, once we start doing a bunch of different modulation that you should know about. If we go to the voicing and go back to the voicing page in the center window here. And we have this trigger section at the bottom. This, this, this will determine when or under what circumstances the different modulation sources are applied to the sound. So if, if it's set to always, if I have it selected as always, then even when I'm holding a note and playing a new one, you will, the modulation will kick in on that new note. If it's on legato, then if I play note, hold down and play another note, it will not trigger that modulation. The legato chiller functions the same way when we're talking about restarting the modulation. But this one is used for, you know, if you hold a note and then you maybe like holding a lower note and playing other nodes high rep on the keyboard. It will, you can maintain that lower note. It will not pull that note off the way a legato does. Okay? But for our purposes we can just self select Always for right now because for this patch, we want this modulation that we're about to setup to occur every time and new midi note is played. Alright. So the first thing that we'll do is set up a classic tube distortion here. Okay? And so without this are normal sub bass sounds like this. Okay? And we're going to add a classic tube distortion. Maybe just about like that is kinda cool. And learn a little bit of drive like that. Maybe not too much bool find too that in just a second. And then we're going to set up the insert effect, the insert effect number one as assign shaper. The sign cheaper adds a sine, a sine wave, and an inaudible sine wave to your sound and it modulates the sound with that, in effect creates a type of distortion. Okay? And we'll play with this here. I'm going to pull this drive knob down just a little bit. And then I'm gonna take all envelope to and route that on envelope to the desk. This destination, the knob that Dr. knob on the sign shaper. We're going to pull this up to maybe about like 33 o'clock like that. And then we're going to shape this envelope. I want a bit of an attack like this and bring the sustain level down and maybe pull out the decay a little bit too like that. And we'll choose linear here because we want this to have sort of a like a symmetrical kinda movement. So we'll see here how this sounds. Row, Row, Row, Row, Row, row, row, row. Wanted to sort of have that vocal sound almost. You know, it's, this drive knob is in effect being modulated by this envelope. So it's in effect sweeping up and the amount of drive and then back down because that's what our envelope is doing. It's going up and then down. Row, Row, Row, Row, Row, Row, Row, Row, Row, Row. Kinda cool. And we can do a few things here. Will go back up to oscillator one. And instead of the spectrum mode here, we're gonna choose bend minus and plus. Now, what this, this setting does here is it compresses the, depending on where you set this intensity knob, it will compress that wave form at the beginning of beginning or the end depending on where you set, set it of the cycle and it will stretch it out in the middle sort of. So we can play with this in some, really just what the thing to know with the bend Ben settings here is that you can just really mess with the wave form and make it sound really wacky. So we're going to play with this intensity knob to see what sounds good for this batch, where rho, rho file, file, File, Row, Row, Row. I kinda like it right in the middle, like that. Row, row, row, row, row, row, just like that. Now, you may notice that we've lost a little bit of the, the low frequencies. Adding the distort, the different distortions is going to add a new harmonic content which will sort of dilute that really basi sub based on that we had. What we can do is add some feedback to it. So I'm going to select the feed feedback button here. And we can just bring in a little bit of the amplitude of the feedback too. Restore some of those low frequencies. So I'm just going to sweep this up and find the right spot, row, row, row, row, row. So that sounds pretty cool to me. I like that one. And you can obviously you can play with some of these. Like maybe we have a little bit too much of that drive movement. But sub d, we get sort of figure out what you like there. And of course, feedback's not cutting it for you there. You can shape the EQ a little bit. Over here and the master Effects section, we can select EQ and you can play with the equalizer there. So that's what shall we call this one. Mil, we'll just call it the sine shape. Sine shape or base. So we've got the sub base as a, as a template. And we've added some distortion and a little envelope modulating the drive of that sign shaper. And then we've also got the classic tube distortion in the master effects. And then we brought back in a little bit of the low-end using feedback routing. And then to increase the growl there, we've set the intensity knob to the center on the bend mode, which determines the curve readout of the wave form, whether it's compressed and the beginning or the middle or the end. And you can just sort of mess with the sound that way. Alright, great work. See you in the next lecture. 5. Slow Attack Subbass: Alright, welcome back. In this lecture we're going to do another sub base patch, but I'm gonna show you how to shape the number four on envelope, which is modulating our global patch here to create a sort of swelling fade in a different kind of attack than what we have, what we have set up before. So with our patriot now we have a nice attack, which is cool. But if we want to do a swelling in attack, we can change the shape of the number four on envelope. And we'll do a couple other things just to make it a little more interesting. But first, we'll go to envelope number four. And you can see this is our envelope as it's set up right now. But we're gonna change this here to rather than having a fast attack. And you know, it just immediately the note comes in, we're going to swell it in a little bit. So what we're gonna do is bring the attack level down. And what that allows us to do is use this algorithmic curve rather than a linear, linear curve. You can choose linear by selecting this box here. And now we have a straight line, but we want this nice curve here. And we're going to shorten the delay, I'm sorry, the decay time a little bit. And bring this down a little bit too. In this decay time will now determine how fast that each note swells in. So let's hear that. Maybe a little slower. So you can sort of fine tune that. Get it where you like it. And I think this sounds really cool when you're working with a sort of drum machine type, type B. And since our sine wave itself is so rich with those low frequencies, it can be a little bit overpowering in the context of the track to have a nice kick drum that has, you know, has its own low frequencies. And doing this, just giving it a little bit of delay decay will help that kick drum and your base, your sub base patch sit in nicely together. It works as if the, you know, the kick drum is hitting right on the beat. And the base patch is coming in just a few milliseconds after it. It's almost like a side chain, but you can just do it here in the context of your, of your patch. Just keep it nice and nice and clean. You don't have to worry about doing the side chaining with the kick drum. And then maybe we'll add a little bit of feedback here just to beef this patch up a little bit. Pull this decay down a little bit. And just like that, it gives you a little bit of room for your kick drum to sit in the mix. Alright, so that is our slow attack sub base patch. And let's keep going. See you in the next lecture. 6. Robot Siren Bass: Alright, in this lecture we're going to build what I will call a robot siren base. And as I mentioned before, if you think of cooler names for these patches, let me know. We can change the names. So for this one we're going to use a different oscillator wave tables, then the subspace, which is what we've been doing. And we're going to make it pretty dirty. We're going to use the performer to do some modulation. So we're gonna get a little bit more advanced here. So the first thing that we'll do opened up a new sound, initialize the patch, and just do a couple tidy, tidying up things like like we did before. I'm going to reduce the portmanteau time for this patch just a little bit. And use Monophonic like that always on the trigger because we want our modulation to trigger each timely it receive a new midi note. And that should be good on that front. Now let's set up our oscillators. So I'm gonna go over to oscillator one. And for this one will choose one of these digital cook wave tables like that. This one sounds like this. Okay, pretty cool. Then we're going to enable oscillator two. And for this one, we're going to choose them multiplex. It's got that sort of polyphonic kind of voicing on it. And for the oscillator mode drop-down menu. For this one oscillator one we're going to choose then plus or minus. And for the multiplexer gonna choose formant. And then we're going to apply a little bit of modulation to these intensity knobs in just a second. So right now we have this sound. Alright? That's what it should sound like at this point, I'm gonna drop oscillator two down 12 semitones or one octave. Just like that. And then I'm also going to set up a modulation oscillator here. Again, a drop the pitch of that down to 12. And maybe about right in the middle for the phase knob, because we're going to set, you have this selector matrix here. So we're gonna select oscillator one that we're going to modulate with the phase modulation. Alright, it's getting kinda close. Now we're gonna setup as we will often, either assign shape or a parabolic shaper. The parabolic shape or is a little bit softer if a distortion. So you can sort of do it, do which one, whichever one you want. But we'll do parabolic shape or for this one, you can fine tune your distortion there. I'll add a little bit of feedback just to make it a tiny bit less digital. Just like that's getting pretty cool. And now we're going to use a new technique here. We're going to use a performer. The axe is sort of like a looping on envelope. You can and will probably do this in later lectures. You can create some looping on envelopes in the envelope section, but I find this to be just a bit more efficient and quick to do. So we'll go to LFO number eight, and we'll choose here, instead of LFO, will choose the performer. And now what we have is a 16 step sequencer basically. And what I like to do just to make my life easier is I'll just only use the top row for this. And so I can just click and drag in, just get that out of my site. And I'm gonna do the same thing here. But we're going to set up, we just want one step basically. So if you go over here to number 16, and if you click and drag, you can see that you can change the length of the sequence. So you can make it eight, for example, eight steps, but we just want one. And now I'm going to choose load curve to pull up my different curves. And you can choose one that you like. But for this, I'm going to choose this sort of algorithmic ramp here like that. And you can drop it in and then you can adjust the velocity of that of that curve by pulling it up and down. So obviously at the top it would be all the way. Maximum velocity on that modulation. Select load curve again to get that grid out of there. And so now we have this, this, this nice curve, and it's just going to loop only this step of the sequence. So for example, if we just hear if I mute oscillator two, and if I drop this performer into the amplitude like this, and then you'll be able to really see what's going on here. I'll pull up the crossfade here. So we're only working on the top-level. We don't want to work on the bottom level. So now you'll hear this sort of looping swell, right? Okay, so we don't want that in the amplitude for this patch. But that gives you the idea. So what we can do instead is pulled this onto the intensity knob here. So our first oscillator being modulated by this performer step sequencer, just this one step, sound like this. That's pretty cool. And then we can also apply the same thing here too, the parabolic shaper and just create a little more drive like that. Cool. And now if we bring back in our oscillator two to this is what it sounds like. Just like that. Now you can change the rate of this modulation here and this knob here. So right now it's a pretty slow kind of swell, coming faster. And you can sync it to the tempo of your project and br divisions like this. But I'm not gonna do that right now because we're not even working inside a project. So you can just sort of change the rate, you know, if you want it but slower. I like it right about there from this one. And obviously, you can use more than one step here if you'd like, right? Well, the way we have it set up now it's sort of like a looping on below. But if you want to maybe have step two, go here, load curve, and then choose this curve for the second one. So you sort of have a symmetrical thing where it will go, it will sweep up and then sweep right back down. And that would sound like this. Just like that. But for our purposes, keep it simple. We'll just do one like that. And so that's kinda cool. And now for a little extra credit, just to reinforce this principle, let's do this again. We'll choose LFO number seven, Create a performer and do the same thing. We will flatten out that bottom level, flatten out the top-level, choose load curve, and maybe create just a straight linear curve here for this step. Reduce the step length to one like that. So now we have a linear curve here. And I'm going to take this performer and then pull it into the feedback knob here, the amplitude of the feedback. And I'm just going to increase this a little bit. And I may have a slow rate on this one. What that will do is just slowly bring in a little more feedback as I hold down the note. And I'll just kind of beef it up and give it some movement. So you can hear that like that even though the, the performer number eight is modulating the intensity in the drive of this patch with this curve. And it's a little bit of a faster rate that feedback is kind of slowly ramping up as I hold down my note and that's kind of cool. You can fine tune the timing of that. So too where you know, you have your baseline and it's just sort of builds once you hold a note, just gives a little bit more feedback to it. Alright, so that's our robotic siren base patch. See you in the next lecture. 7. YaYa Bass: Hey guys and gals, welcome back. In this lecture, we're going to design another base patch that we can maybe call a base. It uses some, some different modulation to create sort of a vocal forming artifact sound. And it's very industrial and robotic and pretty cool. So let's choose a new sound. And once again, I'll just mention this one more time, but just get the, the sort of typical base setup going. So I'm gonna reduce the Parliament, oh, just a little bit. Voicing, put it on monophonic and triggers always. And then we want a nice thick envelope. Like that would be fine. Okay, and so now to set up our oscillators, oscillator one, we'll leave as square saw. And the oscillator mode spectrum. That's just fine like that, but we will drop the pitch down. 12 semi-tones in will enable oscillator two. And for this one, we will choose, did you green Number Two, Digital Green number two, and leave the oscillator mode as spectrum, full intensity, full amplitudes fine like that, will drop this down an octave as well. And we're gonna send both of these to filter one gives this as our filter spread fader. So we filter two in the bottom, filter, one on the top, there's the F1. So we'll send these both to filter one and then filter one. We will choose the scream filter. In communist set this cut-off frequency, just write about in the middle. And we want to have some nice scream in resonance in there as well. And then make sure that your a filter output mix is on set to filter one because we don't have anything going into filter to, that will be just fine. So this is what we've got so far. Alright. Now we're going to use an LFO to modulate this cut-off frequency. So I'm gonna take LFO number five and I'm going to drop it into the cut-off frequency like this. Spread this out just about all of the way. So we're modulating this entire range of the cut-off frequency because pulling this up or down will determine the range of the modulation. And then if we go down to LFO number five, we will pull this crossfade curve up because we just want this nice sine wave like this. We want it to be a smooth transition across this range. Increase three just a little bit. Just about like that. And so now we're getting a little bit of movement in the filter, which is sounding cool. But to really bring out the format vocal thing. And we'll set up in insert number one, the sample and hold. The effect. And then we're going to find just the right pitch of this sample and hold because what this is doing is it's grabbing a part of the wave tables sample and just holding that, that one isolated part of the sample. So we'll fine tune this here. And you can adjust the Dry Wet to, to maintain some of the, you know, the normal harmonics of the waveform. If you want it very extreme, you can increase the try wet all the way or you can pull it back. I like it just maybe right about there. Just want to find the right spot there. And then we're going to enable the modulation oscillator. And we'll do some phase modulation on oscillator number two. Now you can leave the pitch here at 0.5, the phase in the center. It sounds pretty cool, but you can also bring this up seven semitones, which is like a fifth interval. And I'll create just a little bit different harmonic content. I like that, that sounds pretty cool. We can choose an effect like the flanger positive to widen up the sound a little bit and pull the feed back down and see how that sounds. That sounds pretty neat. I like that. And you can obviously increase the dry wet. The voice is the processed or unprocessed perimeter here to just kind of find the, find the right tone that you like. So that's with full flanger, that's only the wet what signal. So that's already sending really cool. And we're pretty much there. But if you want some extra credit, we can do some internal envelope modulation on this LFO. So in, in each of these LFOs, you have on the right side this internal, internal envelope. And what this allows you to do is to change the attack and decay of a certain parameter in here using this internal on envelope. So you know, you can set up a regular envelope and pull it into the LFO, but it's just a little easier. And since there's less options, it just makes it a little bit quicker and more efficient. You can drop this, for example, into the rate box here. And what we can do is just do a little bit of speed modulation on this rate. So I can use this envelope to have the rate start here and get a little bit faster. And then, you know, and then just stay at that faster speed depending on how I've shaped this envelope. So this might be a little extreme bullets here it. So pull back this attack a little bit. Change the range because that's telling too fast to me. So that's kinda cool that the rate of that LFO, which is giving us that vowel, yeah, yeah, kind of sound. We can just change that a little bit. And you can bring this decay out too back as well, so that it will go back down to the rate that we have set at the static level here. Just like that. And you can fine tune that internal envelope to your liking. But that allows us to change the rate over time, which gives it a little bit of life and it's pretty cool. So that's, that's it for this preset. Save that one. And we'll see you in the next lecture. 8. Formant Bass: Hey there and welcome back. We're going to design here another base patch. And we're going to introduce a few new concepts here that have to do with modulation routing, few different new wave tables. And it's a lot of fun, so we'll get right into it here. The first thing that we'll do is set up our oscillators like normal. So the first one that we're going to choose, the foreman saw right here in for the oscillator mode, we're gonna choose form it. In this way. We're gonna, we're gonna do some modulation on this intensity knob and just a second. But just so you can hear this, this oscillator in isolation here. So we can have a lot of fun with that. Oscillator. Two, we're going to choose the hard sink and I'm going to solo this one. So you can hear this when you change the wave table position, which we will modulate in just a second. You can hear the, the, the sort of character of this waveform. That's a lot of fun to play with as well. And then oscillator three, we'll just keep a normal sawtooth wave like that. And we'll set up some envelopes to modulate these amplitudes. The reason that I do that, because, well, I want to more plucky based Sam for this one. So the reason that I would choose using the on envelopes here to modulate the amplitude of each oscillator independently rather than just changing the global envelope here on envelope number four is just that I can have a little variation in the different oscillators and how they appear. So I can use maybe envelope one on these two and envelope two on this one. If I want to change that, that way, I'm not just globally affecting the, the envelope of the patch. You can do that. Of course, it's not wrong or anything. But just so I can leave myself a little bit more room for experimentation, I'll do that sometimes. So we're gonna take envelope one for our purposes here, we'll just keep on envelope one, drop it into each of these amplitude boxes, will pull all of these down and then increase this modulation range all the way. That way at the top of this envelope is full on amplitude and the bottom of the envelope is no amp amplitude. So we're gonna create a plucky sound like this. Maybe just bad luck, that is cool for what we're doing here. And now we're going to use some LFO modulation on this intensity knob in oscillator number one. So if you have enrolled in my full massive course, which goes into every aspect of the software in great detail. Then you'll know that the LFO stands for low frequency oscillator. And what that does is it provides a modulation source as a, an inaudible oscillator that operates at a low frequency, which is applied to any parameter that you set it too. And we can set it by dragging these modulations sources to different parameter boxes here, as we've been doing with the other envelopes and stuff like that. So we're gonna do some cool LFOs stuff to this intensity knob. So I'm gonna take LFO number five here and drop it in this first box of the intensity knob. But this about in the middle and create a little spread modulation range, maybe about like that. And so we'll now we're applying this LFO to that intensity knob. And right now it should sound like this. And now inside this LFO, we can see that we have two different shapes here. We have a sine wave on top and a sawtooth wave on the bottom. And this crossfade curve fader allows you to determine the balance between these two waveforms for your LFO. So you can have it fully at the top, which would be just the sine wave, fully at the bottom would be just a sawtooth wave. We want to have a square wave here. So I'm gonna choose this form and have this fader all the way at the bottom. And now we're going to increase the rate to create some really wacky movement here on this intensity knob. That's probably good. We'll leave that right about there. And now we're gonna take another LFO and we're going to drop it into the second slot. So this applies additional modulation to this knob. And we're going to create an even bigger range like that and maybe reduce this inside one and a little bit more. And this, this, this bigger range for LFO number six, we're going to do the reverse polarity. So as you can see here on number five, the green goes to the right and the grey to the left. So it's positive here and negative here. And on this one we're gonna do the opposite. So you can see the green goes to the left, Greg goes to the right. And for this one we're going to use a sinewave. And we're gonna make the rate much slower. So what we've caused this to do now is the number six LFO will be going back and forth like this little bit slowly because we're using this sign wave here. I'm just kinda go back and forth. And then the inside route here, this number five LFO will do this really fast. The square wave, which is just off and on, it'll be just going back really quickly, back and forth really quickly. Sounds like this for right now. Just like that. Now we also know that we have that set up. We also wanna take envelope number one and apply it to this sink knob, the wave table position at the sink oscillator and create a range maybe about like that. And so if we solo this one, we just want to have that little barrel, barrel sound like that. Like that sounds good. And then maybe you will take the page of oscillator three down one octave or 12 semitones. Now would just need to add a few more effects and we'll be all set here. So I'm gonna choose the insert effect number one and apply sign shaper. Just a little bit of Dr. give it some meat like that. And then in Fx1 and we'll choose the tele tube. And f x2 will choose the dimension expander, which widens the patch. Okay? So there you go. That's pretty much the patch. We used an envelope to control the amplitude of the oscillators, including the wave table position of the sinc oscillator here. And then we use two different LFO modulation sources to play with this intensity knob on the formant oscillator mode of this, of this oscillator here, oscillator number one. And just a little bit of distortion and the tube FX. And then that didn't dimension expander, which you can obviously, you know, you can adjust these to your own taste. But now we have this cool wide based base patch that has some really interesting stuff going on. And it's a lot of fun. So save that one and we'll see you in the next lecture. 9. Dirty Sawtooth Lead: Hey students, welcome back. In this lecture we're going to build a dirty sawtooth lead. And we're going to set up a bunch of sawtooth oscillators with a little bit of a pitch spread to different types of filters that we'll give it some nice grit and a bunch of distortion. And we're also going to use an envelope to modulate the pitch. So let's get right into it. Let's start a new sound, Choose File New Sound to initialize your patch. And then over here we're going to enable all three oscillators like this. And you can keep them all on square saw like that because we're gonna choose the sawtooth waves for all three of these. And you can leave the oscillator modes on spectrum right here. And so oscillator one will leave at this root pitch 0. And then oscillator two, we'll take it down one octave, oscillator three, we'll take it down to octaves to negative 24 semitones. So it sounds like this so far. Alright, just the plain old sawtooth waves. And let's get some of these oscillators settings just right. So I'm gonna go to the voicing tab here in the center page. And I'm going to choose unison O2. And I'm going to also choose the Monophonic because I just want to be able to have the notes play alternatively, not, not more than one at a time. So we'll choose monophonic like that. And we'll choose the select on here. And just give a little bit of a spread like this. You just want a little bit of that Detune sound, not too much. This would maybe be too much here. We don't want that much detail in just a little bit. Just like that. And leave trigger on always because we are going to be doing this pitch modulation with an envelope. And we want, even when we play legato notes, we want it to always trigger. Okay. So we'll go to envelope one here and we're going to drop this into the pitch box of oscillator one. I'm bringing this up on one octave to 12 like that. And do the same thing for oscillator two. And the same thing for oscillator three. And now will shape our envelope here. Very short attack, bringing the sustain level down and the decay maybe right about there. Just want a little bit of that pitch drops sort of like we did with the sub based lecture. If you remember that one. That just gives it a nice little drop there in the beginning. When I like to do too, is rather than having these be purely at the exact octave, maybe take this down a few cents. Maybe pull this up a few cents just to create a little bit of a pitch spread there within the oscillators. Just flattens it up little bit. It makes it a bit more interesting. Okay, now let's go to our filter section. Here. In this, with this fader, we have the choice of series or parallel. Series would mean that the sound goes into filter one and then the output of filter one goes into filter to an output filter two goes to the mix stage we want in parallel. And that means that the sound from the oscillators is going through both filters simultaneously and then being summed together. So it makes the difference if you have, if it's in series, then what's going into Filter2 is already, has already been processed by filter one. So that's the difference there. Parallel just means the sound goes into both at the same time and then sum together. So that means for our mics here, for a filter mix, we're going to have this right at the center. And you can double-click this fader to bring it right to the center. So if I double-click and it'll bring it right to the center there. And then make sure that the output of filter two is up all the way and so is Filter1. So parallel got both of our filter outputs at full volume. And then the mixed stage here we have it centered. So it's a 50-50 blend between the two filters. Ok, so if I filter one, we're gonna set up a scream filter. And we will bring the cutoff to maybe just about halfway. And I'm also going to drop this envelope that was modulating our pitch here. I'm going to drop this into the cut off frequency and bring it up a little bit. So that way the cutoff frequency is modulated by that same envelope. Maybe just about like that. And then filter number two, we're going to choose the Daft filter. And on this one we're going to bring them resonance all the way up. And we might want the cutoff all the way up or maybe just right about here. The other thing that you can do is choose this velocity macro control, select that and bring it into this cutoff box here. In that way, you can control the amount of the cutoff of this filter based on the velocity that you strike the key with. So a very light stroke b like this. In a more harder stroke would be like this. It just gives you a little bit more playability, but I don't like too much variation there. Maybe like that is pretty cool. Alright, for our modulation oscillator, we can try adding some phase modulation to this third oscillator because this is our lowest one. So if we add the FSM phase modulation oscillation to that third oscillator. And that'll just sort of hollow out the sound little bit and make it, it reduces some of that harmonic content in the like low mids and sounds pretty cool. So now let's add some distortion. In certain number one will choose the hard clipper, clip distortion. And we'll just boost this all the way. Am I to turn down the master volume a little bit? Alright, and then insert number two. We'll do assign shape or to just add a little bit more distortion there. Ok. Maybe just about like that. And then to just pile on here, we can also set up a classic tube here. So I might want to bring this cut-off frequency up a bit on this screen filter here. My question range down a tiny bit. So just like that, you know, you've got a cool sort of mechanical sounding dirty saw tooth lead. Create work. See, in the next lecture. 10. Distorted Guitar Stab: Hey students, welcome back once again. In this lecture we're going to build a guitar stab pluck patch. And this one is pretty simple, but it's cool and dirty. So let's get right into it. Oscillator number one, we'll leave as square saw, and we'll pull this all the way to the left to make a square, square wave. And we'll bring the pitch down 24 semitones, which is two octaves. Oscillator number two, we will enable that one. And you can leave it as sawtooth wave. It will bring this down five semi-tones, which is a fifth harmony below the root note. Okay, so right now we have this, right? Okay? We'll go to the voicing tab here, and we'll choose mono rotate unit Asana you can make for leave the trigger on always enable the unison of spread and just create a little bit. Sorry if that's super-duper loud, right? Just like that. We have this sort of thick sounding Square saw cord thing going on. Now what we're gonna do is turn on the modulation oscillator, bring the pitch here up seven semitones right there, and then turn phase modulation on oscillator number two. Alright, so that gives us a little bit of that phase II sound on that second oscillator, which is our harmony oscillator, has the negative five semi-tones. Okay? Now, or this one gets pretty interesting because when we go to FAX number one and choose reverb, I'm going to bring the density up and the color down and the size. We're going to bring all the way down like this. And we're gonna go to on envelope number one. And what we're gonna do is bring this decay level down, bring the attack down just probably to right there is fine. And we'll fine tune this in just a second, but we're gonna put it in the size parameter of the reverb. So this is something we haven't done before. So when you play with the size in the middle of a note, it does a really weird effect. It's kinda like a weird sweeping distance effect. Sounds like this. Okay, without the reverb. And then with it here. And it just creates this kind of weird sound coming out of the reverb that's unexpected. And if we increase this dry wet balance a little bit, you really bring that out more because you're hearing more of that reverb sound than the unprocessed dry sound. Now we can go to our fourth envelope, which is modulating the amplitude of the entire patch. And we can make this more of a plucky sound if we want. Right now we'll want to go to Insert number one and use a sine shape or this kind of gives us the more guitar sounding tone when we add some sign shaper. And just like that pretty simple patch as well. But it sounds cool. It brings in a little bit of a guitar sound into your mixes. And it's simple, but we introduced the concept of using an envelope to modulate the size parameter of the rebirth reverb master effects. So that's sort of interesting. So you can go ahead and save that one. And we will see you in the next lecture. 11. Arpeggiator Notch Lead: Hey students, welcome back. In this lecture we're going to design an arpeggiator notched lead. And in this patch we're going to use the stepper to modulate the pitch of an oscillator. We're also going to use a double notch filter to create some movement there and some squealing, which will be sort of brought out and amplified by a little feedback and hard clip distortion. And then I'm also gonna show you how to set up a macro control with the modulation oscillator to, to either emphasize or de-emphasize the melody of our little arpeggiator thing. Plus with some delay and reverb, it's gonna be nice like cracked out kinda patch here. So let's get right into it. Oscillator number one, we will leave as square saw and we're going to turn it over to Square on the wave table position here. Sounds like this, right? And the intensity knob, we're going to turn down all the way to the left as well because we're going to modulate that one in just a second and seeing with the amplitude. So why don't we set those up first. We'll go over to LFO number seven and click on this here. And then right below this over here on the right side. And this is the same with all of these LFO modulation sources. You can choose the type of modulation source between an LFO, a performer and stepper. The performer in stepper R2, sort of unique things to massive, or at least in this, in the way that there implemented. And we're going to choose a performer here for number seven. And then you can see here changes do seven perf. So that means we're using this performer here as, as the modulation source, which, which we're going to apply it to our oscillator. And here you have two rows, two different rows of different wave forms that you can choose and you can choose load curve and add these in. But for this one, we'll just leave it as the default. And depending on what you prefer, you can choose between the top and the bottom for this patch. I kinda like this more curved cascading thing here. So I'm gonna choose that. I'm going to drop it into the intensity knob as well as the amplitude knob. And then I'm going to create a positive range here for the amplitude will bring it all the way up. And for the intensity, I don't know, maybe about there, something like that. And I'm also going to choose sink over here on the time controls. That way I can sink this up with my other modulations sources. So everything's moving in time because we're doing an arpeggiator sound. So we want things to have a sort of rhythm to it. And we'll choose eighth notes here. So right now this should sound like this. Just like that. Now, since we're just repeating this, you know, to sort of save yourself some brain space. You can just create one or two or even one steps here because it's the same thing. Or whatever for, I mean, doesn't, doesn't matter because each step is doing the same thing essentially. And obviously you can sort of change these view on a little bit of movement with it. Whatever you'd like but will just from this, just to keep it simple, we'll keep them all at full velocity there. The next thing that we'll do is set up filter number one to be a double Notch filter. And we'll leave the cutoff frequency right about in the middle there. And we're going to have to turn this resonance down because with some feedback and distortion, it's gonna get really squelch you really fast. So just something to be aware of and make sure your volumes down sort of lower when you're playing with this one. And then we're going to drop LFO number five and to the cutoff frequency here, create a range, maybe about like that. And bring this crossfade curve for the sine wave selector all the way up to the top, which is a plain sine wave. And that rate should probably be okay. This one doesn't need to be sync it up necessarily because we just wanted to sort of go back and forth on this cut-off frequency knob. So right now we're standing like this, slower, like that. And then I forgot this. But let's make sure that we send oscillator one completely to filter one like that. Now that we have that in order, let's set up the the arpeggiator part of this patch. So we'll go to LFO number eight. Instead of LFO will choose the stepper. Now the stepper has 16 steps, and depending on which destination you send this step or two, the steps here will determine the amplitude of the modulation. So since we want to do an arpeggiator patch, we can drop this into the pitch and then raise this up 12 semitones. 12 semitones is an octave, which means in our sequencer here in the stepper, the very bottom here is at 0 would be pitched 0. And at the very top here, 12 would be 12 semitones up. And so each note here in between the 012 is essentially one semitone up in that scale. Now, you want to make sure that you have snap to grid selected here. When it is not selected. Then as you can see when I click here, it will give you 10.31 and it's kinda tough to get it like right on ten. But if you choose snap to grid, then every time you click it will snap to exactly one semitone like that. So we're gonna create a little melody here. I'm going to just bring these all down for ease of looking at it. So we're gonna create a, an eight step sequence here. And we're going to just program in a little arpeggio scale by setting the notes of each step. So what we'll do is first step one, step two, step three will be for. Now it's a little confusing because four semitones is actually a third. And a major third interval. Four semitones, because you start at the root is 0 and then one is half step up to, there's another half step. Three is another half step. Four is another half step, which makes a major third interval like a C and then an E. And then step four, we'll have at 0, maybe 56 will be up an octave, 127, we'll do 1.5 step. And then eight will leap back at 0. So this creates sort of a weird like harmonic major. Harmonic minor. I don't know what the scale is technically called. A sort of a weird sounding scale. And then the other thing that I would like to do, well, why don't we listen to that first? Actually. You can hear that sort of just a weird scale, their mode really. And then what I'll also do is enable the glide mode for each of these. And you can see here there's these two rows of buttons, like here and here. And if you click on those, then you're enabling the glide function for each step. If you only want certain steps to have the glide, you can obviously choose which one you want to have glide. And then the glide modulation fader here determines the amount of glide. So all the way at the top would be a very strong glide. And you can hear that here. If I enable all of these, then you can hear that a little bit better. But maybe halfway is alright. Just like that. So now we have this cool gliding kind of weird scale going, but we're just getting started, so let's keep moving. I will also set up an insert effect, the hard clipper. And if we increase the drive, maybe about like that a little bit, increase the dry wet a little bit. That adds, that'll add some harmonic content that's gonna be really cool once we add the modulation oscillator. And you'll see that we'll be able to sort of switch back and forth between a stronger melody and then just like a really dirty distorted kind of sound. One thing that I don't think I've mentioned so far is just to be aware in your routing page here. But you can choose where your insert effects are found in the signal chain here by clicking these boxes. So insert to insert one. And you can obviously have insert one only in one place and insert two only in one place. You can't have, you can't have it in multiple places. And that's just something to be aware of. Do you want your insert effects to come before the filter? To happen after the feedback chain over here. Just something to be aware of. But this one, we want insert one to happen after filter one, okay? And insert two doesn't matter because we're not going to use this one. Okay, so that's where we are now. Let's listen to that. It's pretty cool. And I'm, I increase this modulation range on this filter to make it a little bit weirder. Now we're going to set up two master effects. The first one will be a sink delay. So choose delay succinct here. And on the left side we'll do 16th notes, and on the right side will do eighth notes. And you might want to reduce the dry wet a little bit here. Maybe like that is good. And then it Master effect number two will be a reverb in definitely want to decrease the Dry Wet balance and maybe take the color down because we're gonna get some pretty high, pretty strong high-frequency content. So we'll just take the color down so we don't have as much brightness in the reverb. They're cool just like that. Now if you want to add in a little feedback, you can have some fun with that. And depending on where you place it in the routing page, we'll, we'll mess around with that in a second. Now I'm going to set up a modulation oscillator to do phase modulation on oscillator one. And the reason that this, well, let's listen here. So the reason that that gets super gnarly, especially since we're using this double notch filter is this phase modulation is altering the phase position of that, that square wave and the square wave Sci-Fi go do LFO number six. The square wave looks like this. It has just this sort of often on thing. And when we're messing with the phase on that, plus this double notch filter, which is creating two notches in the filter. Cutting out in two different places, just gets really wacky and really distorted. Okay? And so when I play with this modulation oscillation, modulation oscillator phase knob here. You can really hear the strength of that melody coming out when the phase knob is down to the left. And then when it's all the way over to the right, you just sort of getting that rhythmic distortion. Okay, so let's listen to that. Cool. So what we can do is set up a macro control to sort of control this. So I'll take macro control number to drop it in over here. And we'll keep this phase knob all the way to the right and then make the macro modulation range go all the way to the left here. So that means over here and macro control will write to melody. And then we can add in that melody here. So in play and I increase this macro control, you can hear the melody come in. Just like that. And so we sort of did this backwards because it's easier to just say melody and then have the positive value on this macro control, control that melody thing and have this go backwards rather than saying like non melody. And then am I increasing the melody or, or not? To make this even more obvious, you can take this macro control, drop it into the hard clipper drive parameter here and create a little bit more of a negative range. So you can pull off some of that drive, which will also bring out that Melody Moore. All right, so that's pretty much the sound. You can play with some of these to your own liking, like just hear what it sounds like if you increase the resonance on the filter. Obviously it gets pretty intense there. So just be careful that. And then also, if we go over to the routing page just to sort of illustrate this, determining where your insert effects and your feedback land in your signal chain here can make a really big difference. So right now we have insert effect one, which is our hard clipper coming right after this double notch filter. And you can hear what it'll sound like if I change the insert effect to occurring for the filter. So having that distortion after this filter and what the filter is doing to the sound has a very different sound than putting the insert effect before the filter. Similarly, if we put the insert effect after the feedback. So like right here. So this is our, this blue is our feedback chains. So from wherever we sit the feedback, this blue line will go back into the oscillator section of the virtual synthesizer. So if we have the insert effect after the feedback, it just gets really gnarly. So just something to be aware of that you can, you can kinda go crazy with that and make some really, really weird sounds. But for this, we want that, that cool arpeggiator pattern using some delay and reverb and setting up this modulation oscillate or to emphasize or de-emphasize that Melody and kind of creating a blend in between there. So we've introduced quite a few new concepts here and we've ended up with a pretty cool arpeggiator nacho lead. So save that one, keep that in your pocket and we will see you in the next lecture. 12. Gregorian Choir: Hey guys and gals. In this lecture, we are going to design a Gregorian choir patch. So we're gonna stray from the beaten path just a little bit here. But I find this one to be pretty cool. And for some extra credit, it's designing this patch and then sampling it into, recording it into audio and, and sampling it with a sampler. You can have tons of fun with it, which I can't get into really in this course, I might do a lecture at the end about sampling. But anyway, so will, in this course we'll design a Gregorian acquire patch. And OK, take two, Hey guys and gals. In this lecture we're going to design a Gregorian choir patch. So we're gonna stray from the beaten path a little bit. This one's a little bit interesting and creative, but I think it sounds really, really cool. And if you want some extra credit, build this patch recorded into audio and then use the sampler to play as slices back. I might do a lecture at the end about doing that because I think that's super common and trap music. But for now let's get into the patch. So the first thing we'll do is set up the oscillators. So oscillator number one will choose Modern talking. And we'll switch the oscillator mode to form it. And then oscillator two, we will enable and set this one to gentle speech. Change the oscillator mode to form it as well. Oscillator number three will leave as square saw, and we'll just make sure this one's enabled. Now, I'm going to drop the first oscillator down 12 semitones or an octave. And then oscillator two, I'm going to drop down five semi-tones. And what that does is it creates a fifth harmony below the root note. And then oscillator number three will take down two octaves to negative 24. Then with oscillators to in three, I'll probably changed the cent value a little bit here. Sensor, there's a $0.100 in between each semitone. So maybe bring that one down, bring this one up a little bit, something like that. So that way you just have a little bit of pitch difference. Now we're gonna bring the intensity knobs here down quite a bit. Maybe it's right here and here on those two talking sort of vocal oscillators like that. So let's listen to what we've got so far. Alright, that's what we've got so far. It's a good place to start. Now we go to our voicing page, and I'll probably leave this one on monophonic. Just because I'm already creating a sort of chord in my note here by having these pitch differentiations. And it can get a little sticky when you're trying to play two different notes at the same time, but you already have these interval setup. So that's up to you, but you know, that's, that's what I'll do here. And then I'll also set Yunus Sono up to eight and create a little bit of pitch spread just to give ourselves some multiple voices. Which is where we're going for acquire. So we want acquires. Obviously, a group of people singing the same thing with smart money's, but their voices are slightly different, different timbres on their voices and they're not exactly in tune. So that's how we sort of emulate that side, those super loud, turn it down. But I want to turn that pitch split down a little bit. And then that way, alright, now we're going to drop in some pretty simple effects here. The first one we'll choose a dimension expander to sort of widen this out. And these settings are probably pretty good. You can increase the size little bit. Second one will be reverb. And here's where this gets pretty cool and gnarly. So we'll increase the size and the dry wet. It maybe increase the dry wet just a little bit. I'll maybe halfway is good too. But I want to turn the color down all the way. And I might want to turn the density down a little bit as well. So let's hear that. So you have that nice fat reverb. I'm actually going to turn this dry wet down a little bit. Now it's time to set up a few envelopes. Will use envelope one to do a quick, a quick raise in pitch as if the singer is sort of sweeping up into the note. Okay, so we'll take envelope number one, drop it into the pitch here, and we'll take this down. Maybe like batter Note 88 steps or something like that. And let's find tune this envelope here. So I'm just solving that one so I can hear it. That's pretty good. I want just a pretty short decay there. Just a little bit of modulation there. I'll do the same thing in oscillator number two. Now one thing to notice here, when I drop this down like negative eight, you'll notice, well, negative eight is less is more than negative 12 and negative eight is less than negative four. But what this does is it takes you down eight semitones below the note that you've set it at. So that confuse me a lot at first. So if I have this set to 0, if I've pitched set to 0, the modulation starts at negative eight. If I have it set to an octave down negative 12, then this starts at negative 20. That makes sense. And the same thing will drop thumb envelope and here, eight. That over here. Okay, now that we have that pitch modulation at the beginning of the note, where it's sweeping up into our note. For each of the oscillators. I'm also gonna do a little bit of fade in with the amplitude. So I'm gonna choose envelope too, and I'm going to drop it into the amplitude of oscillator one. I'll turn this knob down and turn this up. And now I can set up my envelope number two here. I'm going to reduce the attack level like that. Reduce the attack time. And we'll turn this decay level up. And then now we have this sort of sweeping motion. So if I solo oscillator one, just get that right. Okay, cool. So that's what we've got for envelope number two, and we'll do the same thing on these other oscillators, drop it in the same envelope, right there, the amplitude, and then you can change the modulation range for these if you want to, once this envelope finishes its cycle and reaches to the top here. If you want a certain notes here to be loud, certain oscillators to be louder than the others. You can decrease the range a little bit. So maybe I want this bottom octave, nice and loud. I don't want this harmony note here as loud. I can reduce that amplitude range so that when the envelope, when the oscillator goes through the envelope, my note at its high point doesn't is not as loud as the other two. Something like that. Like maybe a little bit more about 1a. And we're doing okay. So I'm just playing with this envelope a little bit. I think I want to bring that release time down. And then maybe about like that sounds pretty good to me. And now we're going to set up this filter here, filter number one to be a daft filter. And I'm going to send each of these oscillators to filter one fully like that. And I'm going to bring the cut-off frequency all the way down. Now if I play this, you'll probably barely hear anything at all. So if those super low frequencies. So what I'm gonna do, and this is introducing a new concept here. Take the key tracking macro control and add it to this cutoff frequency. And bringing it up maybe about to there. So what the key tracking does. Is it allows the filter or whatever parameter that you're setting it to. In this case, the cutoff frequency of Filter1. It allows us to have this cutoff frequency respond to the note that you're playing. So that way if I have kI tracking set, my lower nodes are not going to be completely, you're not going to completely disappear with this low-pass filter, which is kind of what the Daft does. And my higher notes are not going to completely bypass the filter. And it's going to filter those in a different way because they're higher notes. So it's going to sort of maintain the filter ea sound, even no matter where you play it on the keyboard. So that can be really helpful for that. And then we have this key tracking filter page that you can you can change how that responses implemented here. I don't, I can't get into that here in this course. But if you want to hop over to the massive tutorial that I have, you can learn all about every aspect of massive, including this key tracking filter page. But for this, this will suffice. So that way when we play, we can have the filter respond to the note that we're playing. You increase that a little bit. All right, so that's getting pretty close. I'm gonna try something. I maybe want to increase the dry wet balance of the reverb. And I could turn this master fader up a little bit, increase that Dry Wet balance of the reverb for them getting only the reverb signal. And let's hear how that sounds. There. I really like that. That's already sounds a lot like a Gregorian chant choir thing. But there are a few other little things that we can do to just bring this out and make it come to life a little bit. So I'm gonna take elephant number five and set it to the intensity knob of oscillator one and just create a really small range, just about like that. And let's solo this. And I'll turn off the reverb so we can hear this a little bit better. Why? Now we're gonna change this crossfade curve to justice sinewave, cuz we wanna really smooth transition when you reduce the rate. Unless reduce that range even more than just brings out those vowel sounds a little bit more. Which is pretty cool. And we could do the same thing in the intensity knob of this oscillator, oscillator number two, and maybe create an, an opposite range like that with the polarity is reversed to that one. So you can hear that it just gives it that vowel sound a little bit more, more color. And then finally, we'll turn this revert back on. Finally, the last thing that I'm going to do is take another LFO and apply it to an envelope number fours Sustain Level. And so by doing this, I'm going to take a telephone number six, sorry. Take elephant number six, put it right in there. Will reduce this sustain level just a little bit, and then create a nice small range, just about like that. And what we're doing by doing this is it's almost like a very subtle tremolo effect. Because remember that envelope number four is controlling the global amplitude of the patch. And by doing a little variation like this in this level knob, we're just creating a little bit of tremolo in the patch. So we can just fine tune this LFO again, I want the sinewave. So during this crossfade curve up and the rate, that's probably okay or at their notes here that so if I increase this, you'll be able to hear too fast obviously. Now if I make that really extreme, you'll be able to tell the difference there. Just a little something like that gives it sort of a more natural kind of movement to it. And then if we want to set up a few macro controls just to, just to keep building and complexity here. We can set macro control number two to the amplitude of LFO number six, which is modulating. It gets a little complicated. So we have an envelope number four and we have the sustain level here being modulated by LFO number six. If we go to LFO number six, this amplitude knob controls the amount of that modulation source. So if this knob is all the way at the bottom, that's not applying any modulation to that sustain level parameter in the envelope. So that means if we'd set this macro control to this amplitude knob and just call it trim. Like that. Then we can control if we want that tremolo in there or not. So if I play a note and this is all the way down at the bottom, we have no tremolo and we can increase this. So now we have a key tracking macro control set to our filter cutoff. We have a tremolo macro control that we've sort of created in this complex way by having LFO modulate on book number four. And we have some vocal oscillators with a subtle LFO modulation on the intensity knobs, which just brings out that sort of vowel sound in this choir, got a dimension expander to increase the stereo image and some reverb that's full dry wet to give it that sound like it's in a big hall. And so that's our Gregorian choir patch. Go ahead and save that one, and we will see you in the next lecture. 13. Detroit Sync Lead: Hello again, welcome back. In this lecture we're going to design a Detroit sink lead. What we're gonna do is use one oscillator is a sink and create a sort of Detroit style chord formation using some different pitch variations with the different oscillators. And then we'll set up some macro controls to give us some further control of it later on. So we'll get right into this for oscillator number one, we're going to choose hard sink and we're going to choose for the oscillator mode bend positive. And we will take the wave table position of this sink knob all the way down to the left and also the intensity all the way down to the left. And then we're going to use envelope number one here. We'll set it up in the wave table position knob and bring the range up, maybe right about there. So and for envelope number one, we're going to want to bring these decay level down. Probably bring out this decay a little bit, reduced the attack all the way. And so now we have something like this. Okay, that's our sync portion of the patch. And then for oscillating or number two, we're going to raise the pitch by three. And that gives us a Minor Third, three semitones up is a minor third. Oscillating a number three, we're going to bring up 22 semitones. And that's a site, I guess you could think of it as a minor seventh above the root note. It gives us that sort of Detroit cord kind of thing. Just like that. So now we have our oscillators setup. And I'm going to go to the voicing page here and I'm gonna increase Yunus Sono to eight. And I'm also gonna put it on monophonic. And I'm going to give a little bit of a pitch spread here. Probably turn that volume down. You probably want to turn that portmanteau time down a little bit. And you can adjust that Detune fader here. And depending on what you'd like for that. And I'm, now I'm going to go up to the Master effects in for f x2. I will put on a course. And the course will that does is it adds a delayed signal. And d tunes that delayed signal a little bit. So it sort of flattens up the sound a little bit, gives it a richer, fuller sound. You probably want to turn the dry wet down so you don't have too much of that wobble leanness there. And for Fx1, I'm gonna set up a sink delay. But I'm going to turn the Dry Wet balance all the way down. And that's because I want to use macro control to, to bring in that delay. So I can type delay here and that way I can have it or not have it and just easily adjust it down here. So if I turn this up. And that just sort of brings it in like that. The other thing I wanna do is add some noise. I mentioned before that we have these different noise selectors. For this one, I want to create a nice bright, fuzzy noise tone. So I'll choose the bright noise and keep color all the way up and then just find the right amplitude for it. Maybe bell like that. We don't want it to wash out the sound entirely, but just want to bring in a little bit of that noise is really cool. The other thing I'd like to do for my macro controls is to choose insert one here, a high-pass, low-pass filter. So this way I have two simple controls for a high pass, which allows high frequencies to go through in a low-pass, which conversely allows the low frequencies to go through. So now my, my technique here to be able to control the, both of these at once is I'm going to use another macro control to control these. And I'm going to turn the low-pass filter down just to where it's a little too quiet like that and same with the high-pass. Turn it up. And because when I turn this up, I'm telling it to raise the cutoff frequency of the high pass. So only the very high frequencies are going through there, and only the very low frequencies are going through here on this lowpass filter is turning this down, takes that cutoff frequency down. So it's only allowing the frequencies that are below this cutoff to go through. Now what I can do is take the macro control number three, drop it in here, and create arranged this way. And then take that same macro control, drop it into the high-pass and create the range that way. So this way, my macro control number three, I'll just put filter. It controls the, both the low and the high pass. So when this macro controls all the way at the bottom, maybe you want to increase that a little bit at its root. There. It's a really filtered out. It's almost like a band pass is only letting just a certain portion of the frequencies through. And then as I increase this macro control, I'm allowing more low frequency to go through because it's raising up this cut-off frequency on the low-pass filter. And I'm also allowing more high frequencies to go through because I'm essentially lowering the cutoff frequency on the high-pass filter. So just like that, it allows you to adjust that filter in a very simple way and you can do some cool automation with this inside your DAW. So now I've, I've set up macro controls for this high-pass, low-pass filter and also for this delay time. So I can add in the delay if I want it. The other thing that I could do is change the envelope character of this. So I can go to envelope number four. So instead of having this thick full sustain, I'm really tight, open and close attack and release on envelope. I can change this up a little bit. I can reduce this Sustain Level and maybe the decay a little bit, reduced the attack. Maybe just to bat like that. And then I can put macro control number four in both the decay time in the sustain level like this, and increase the range here. Like that. That way I can use macro control number four, and I could just call it decay. And that way I can have this plucky Chord Thing. And I can increase this macro control to make it more of a full sustain envelope. Just like that. So there you go. There is our sync it up, Detroit cord, lead patch, and save that one and we'll see you in the next lecture. 14. Pitchy Square Saw Lead: All right, welcome back. In this lecture we are going to create a peachy Square saw lead sound. And we're gonna do this by using the same envelope to do a little pitch drop at the beginning of the note. And then also that envelope will modulate the wave table positions sweeping between the Square and saw wave. And will also create a macro control to adjust the pitch spread of the two voices that will set up. So this is a pretty simple one. It should go quickly. So we'll leave oscillator number one as a square saw wave. And we'll go to our envelope number one here, and we're going to drop this into the pitch box and create a positive 12 semitones here. And then we're also dropping into the wave table position and will create a negative range like this. So now let's shaped this envelope. We can reduce the decay level like this and reduce the attack, reduced the decay. And just to get fine tune those a little bit, a little shorter. So what this is doing is it's dropping the pitch an octave very quickly because this envelope is shaping that pitch drop. And it's also switching the wave form from a square wave to a sawtooth wave. That's what this envelope is modulating here at the wave table position. So it starts off with that sort of more belly pure square wave. Sounds like this. But then it ends up as a sawtooth wave like that. Now a very common thing that we would do in the trap music is to set up a reverb here and keep the size belt like that. Maybe reduce the density in the color and the dry wet. So just you have that nice reverb in the background there. Just like that. But now to beef it up a little bit, we can go to the voicing tab here and create a unit Sono if two will switch it to mono rotate and we will add the pitch cutoff and just give it, I mean, you can leave it right here at the very bottom where you can give it just a little bit. So that way with those sawtooth waves, even, even though our pitch spread is down here at the bottom at 0, you have those two waves sort of creating some phase issues which actually has a cool sounds almost like a phasor. But then what I would do is take the macro control number two and drop it into this box right here. This allows us to set a macro control for the pitch spread and bring it to right about the middle there. And just call this macro control detune. That way, I can adjust the detuned between those two voices because they're unison snows onto. And I can make it really gnarly here. So if I turn this all the way up, sounds like this. Or I can bring this back down just like that. And then you can also play with this glide time if you want to have it a little bit more. That's led too much to me. Just like that. That's a simple one. We're all done with that. And we will see you in the next lecture. 15. Crunk Lead: Hey there, welcome back. We're going to design a crank lead in this lecture, what I'll call a trunk lead. It's similar to the base that we've done already. But we can pull out a few new tricks to apply to this patch and have some fun with it. So let's get right into it, start a new sound, and we'll go to the oscillator section. Oscillator number one, we will choose. But the Deci grain number one, like this, leave the oscillator mode on spectrum. Oscillator two will enable and leave it on a sawtooth wave oscillator mode spectrum. It will drop this one down, an octave, 12 semitones like that. And then while we're over here, let's set up the modulation oscillator. And we will do a phase modulation on oscillate or to this one here, the saw tooth wave. And I'm actually going to do for the pitch box here. I'm gonna put it on ten. And now we'll create just a little bit of dissonance. Let's hear that here. Right? Okay, because if this is on 0, it sounds like this. But with ten, we have a little bit of dissonance there and we can maybe turn this down if it's too dissonant. Just like that. And it sounds pretty cool. And now we're going to set up a FIR filter. Number one, we're going to set up a scream filter. And I'm gonna put it in series, but I'm not going to use anything FIR filter too, so I can disable it like that. And the settings are probably, okay, maybe a little less scream, a little less resonance will have to fine tune that in a second. And we're going to apply the fifth LFO to this cut-off frequency here and create a range just like that. Now let's go down to our LFO. Switch it over to just fully the sine wave, and then we can find the right rate here. Something like that sounds pretty good. And now we can have some fun down here with the insert effects, choosing the sample and hold. And I'm actually going to just solo this grain oscillator so I can get this sample and the whole effect right. Alright, so it's sometimes it takes a while, they just kind of fine tune that, get it just right at that. Dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot. There we go. Okay? So I'm just sort of playing with this modulation oscillator, which the dissonance on this sort of throws off that vocal sound that we're grabbing from the sample and hold insert effects. So you kinda have to just balance these at the same time and get the right sound there. For insert number two, I want to set up hard clipper and just probably those default settings are all right, just a little fuzzy. Dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot. All right, just like that. Now let's go to our voicing page here. I'm going to put it on unison O2 and choose Mano rotate. And that'll just beef it up just a tiny bit. And it also creates some subtle variations in the notes that you're playing. Because when we have two voices playing exactly on top of each other, it causes just a little bit of phase differentiation. And we want Mano rotate because we want to have those cool glide things happening in between the nodes. And now where I think the sound really comes to life is appearing to insert effect, choosing the dimension expander, and just going full wet on there and a full size. I'm gonna go to the routing page and play around with the placement of my insert effects here. Then dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot. So I think that sounds pretty cool. So just sort of playing around here at the different parameters, will PUT insert number two before the filter, the screen filter, and then insert number one after it. And I think that's kind of the best combination there that I tried. I also increase the resonance of this screen filter a little bit, just brings out that vocal thing a little bit more. And I tried to meeting the modulation oscillator because it just wasn't working for me at the moment. But we can sort of play with this a little bit and get it tweet just right. Well, that sounds pretty cool. It's kinda dissonant and you can choose if you want that in there not. But I really like with this dimension expander, just setting it on the full Dry Wet at widens this out and sort of delays the signal just a little bit. And it gives you this sort of weird kind of jarring, like outside of time feel. And when our envelope is nice and tight like this. Plus we have the Monophonic with the glide time just makes for a really kind of interesting, interesting sort of disconcerting kind of sound. So there you go. That's sort of a cool crinkly. And we will see you in the next lecture. 16. Snakecharmer Lead: Hello again, welcome back. In this lecture we are going to design something that I'm calling the snake charmer lead. It's a pretty simple one. Just uses one oscillator with a bandpass filter and some vibrato to create this kinda cool almost Middle Eastern sounding reed instrument. Alright, so let's get right into it. You can initialize a new patch and we'll go set up our oscillators. So oscillator number one will use the pulsar pulse width oscillator here. And we're going to bring this pulse opposition right to about the middle there. And we're going to bring the pulse width all the way to the left. Now we're gonna take our envelope number one, drop it into the pitch, and bring it down. I don't know, maybe about six or so semitones will want to have as little pitch sweep up here with each time a new notice is struck. So we'll bring the attack time down of this envelope. And this is the decay level and maybe the decay a little bit just like that. So we've just little bit of bend up like that. And the other thing that I might do is add this on envelope to this pulse opposition and just create a little bit of arranged like that. Just like that. Now let's go to our filter number one, and we will set up a band-pass filter. A band-pass filter allows, it basically cuts off the low in highs and just allows us certain frequency band in the middle of the spectrum to pass through. That's why it's called band-pass. And this bandwidth knob allows you to adjust the width of that group of frequencies. So a very small bandwidth would be just a little peek basically. And a larger one, you know, a fully to the right here, allows a larger set of frequencies to pass through. But for this one we want just like a really kind of squeaky little small sound. So we're gonna take this band bandwidth all the way to the left, and then we'll find the right cut-off frequency. In just a second. I'm gonna move this series Remove filter to because we're not using it and this is down all the way anyway. And then the filter mixes on one. Just like that sounds pretty good to me. Now you'll notice down here in the macro controls that in the default initialize patch, it already routes a vibrato effect. So if we go to our oscillator page, you'll see here that we have this macro control setup for the vibrato and her rate and a depth knob. And it already has some ranges set. So that's probably fine for what we want in this patch. And so we can just increase this vibrato here. And let's listen to that. Cool. And now I would add in effects to reverb and probably bring this down quite a bit. Now I'm gonna go back to my voicing page and choose mono rotate. Because I want to have some glide in between my notes here. Pull that down a little bit. And now I can't just adjust some of the parameters here on my filter to get just the right sound that I want. I want sort of this weird ducky kind of read sounds. So I'm gonna try playing with the bandwidth and the resonance a little bit. Oh, yeah. Alright, so we're pretty close there. So obviously there are a few other things you can do to just make this a bit more interesting. You can apply that on flip to this cutoff frequency and just create a little bit arranged so that you have a little bit of drop in that cutoff frequency, or the opposite way. So it sweeps up something like that. And you could even add a dimension expander here in effects number one, just a little bit of that. Now if you want a sort of bigger sound, you can go to the voicing tab here and increase the une Asana. It's up to you what you wanna do there. But I really like this sounds a lot of fun to play with it, especially if you tweak some of these parameters. You can have some fun with that one. So, alright, great work. See you in the next lecture. 17. Verbed Sawtooth Lead: A boys and girls. In this lecture we're going to design a nice verb, doubt sawtooth lead. Now, this is the sound that you will hear a lot in trance music. It's sort of a common, you know, just detuned sawtooth, translated, but it found, it, found it a lot and subtract music. And really a lot of what makes trap music. Trap music is the way these patches are played and performed rather than the sound itself. So, but you'll see as we play some different melodies, that this is a pretty common trap thing. So we're going to layer together bunch of sawtooth waves, you some reverb and do that little bit of hard clipper distortion on it to sort of bring out the harmonic frequencies here. So the first thing that we'll do is set up our oscillators. We're gonna pile on three sawtooth wave. So I have square saw selected here in these, these knobs or all the way on the right loops like that, choosing sawtooth waves, the oscillator modes will leave as spectrum. And then what I'm gonna do just to make this nice and fat is detune oscillators Two and Three, maybe oscillator two down something like negative 24 and oscillator three up, up a little bit too, right, just like that. And then we're also gonna go to the voicing page here. Increase Yunus Sono to, I don't know, 46, something like that. Choose monophonic. And we're also going to choose legato Schiller, and we'll see why we're going to do that in just a second. And then while we're here, we'll enable the pitch spread, a little bit of pitch spread like that and be like this. Sorry, that was probably superlattice. Ok, let's get in pretty close, pretty cool. Now what we'll do is go down here to insert effect number one, enable it, and we'll choose the hard clipper. And you can hear that when we increase the Dry Wet balance and the dr on this hard clipper insert effect. It really brings out that fifth harmony to the note. So I'll, I'll play that for you here. You can hear that route frequency and I'll disable this one playing a G there. And then when I enable this, You can hear that D above it. You can hear that, that harmonic content being added in with this distortion. And that's kinda cool for what we wanna do. Now the other thing that I will do is go up to f x2 and choose reverb. And we want to be careful with this because too much reverb, we'll sort of flub our attack a little bit. So we'll have the Dry Wet balanced down quite far. Because remember that dry, dry wet balance is the amount of unprocessed signal against the process signals. So unprocessed is dry and wet is processed. You can sort of fine tune these here. I'll probably bring the color down a little bit, which is sort of like the high frequencies. And the size is like the size of the emulated room that you're in. It's basically the tail of the reverb, how long it is. Cool. So that's a pretty good start. It already sounds sort of like what we want, but there's a few things that we can do to tidy this up a little bit and make it a little bit more interesting. What I would maybe do is add some bright noise. So you have this noise selector box down here at the bottom left. And this adds in a certain type of noise and you can choose the type of noise here. There's a bunch of different types. White, bright brown tape hiss, metallic. And they all have sort of a different noise character. The bright noise is, as its name implies, quite bright. And so, especially when the color is all the way up. And again here, just like in reverb, The color is sort of the, this sort of acts as like a high-pass filter. So when it's down really low, then the color, quote unquote will be very quote unquote dark and will have mainly the lower frequencies. But if it's up here at the top, then you have those high frequencies coming through the noise oscillator. And if I just bring in a little bit of bright noise, it'll just add to that fuzz. And we don't want too much because that is being distorted by this insert effect, which we can't get around by changing the routing. But for this one, since it's pretty simple, we'll just, we'll just, we'll just keep the noise level to a minimum here. Just a little bit adds to that fuzziness of the patch. And then I'll probably throw on a modulation oscillator on one of these three, because these are basically all the same. They just have a little bit of pitch variance. So you can do that as well. Now the reason we chose in the voicing page, The reason we chose legato trillion is so that we can do something like this. And when I let go of those upper notes, it will drop back down to that lower one. If it's on legato, it won't do that. So I'm still holding that lower note, but it didn't drop back down to it. So that's something that in this kind of style we might wanna do. And then I'll also maybe increase this portmanteau time a little bit and change this trends traversal mode to rate. Now what's the difference between these? If you took my math, my other massive course, I, my other course on massive is what I mean by that. I've, I've explained here that this determines the rate of the portmanteau between notes. So if it's all equal. Then it will take the same amount of time to bend between notes that are played legato, regardless of how far apart they are in the keyboard or on the piano. Roll rate, however, adjusts the glide time between notes depending on how far apart they are. So notes that are one whole step apart, like a C and a D, will glide in a much faster way because they're right next to each other on the keyboard. But if I played something two octaves down, it would take, it would take much longer time when it's set to rate mode. Equal means that you will have the same amount of the same amount of time the on your glide between nodes no matter how far apart they are. So you can sort of adjust that to your TAs depending on the kind of melody that you want to play. So from a place, something like that. And I'm not going to learn that I might want something that's rate because I like that bending. If I want, if I want it to be a little bit tighter on those upper notes that I'm playing. The Ben to be a little bit tighter. I can choose equal. So you can, you can sort of up to you, you could do that however you like. Now just to introduce a few other concepts as we sort of walk through these patches, we can sort of tackle the different parts of massive. We'll do two other things here to just sort of dive in a little bit deeper to the synth. The one thing that I like to do a lot is to change this Pitch Bend amount on the downrange to really low, like maybe 24. I think that's yeah, that's as far as it goes. And that way I can use my, my pitch bend wheel on my mini keyboard to make this really cool, gnarly drop at the end of a line. So if I played something like, you know, that's kind of fun to do and you can. So this determines how far the range is of your pitch bend. We'll set, I think default to two to two, which means if I play a note and pull my pitch bend wheel all the way down, it will go down two semitones like that. But if I set this to 24 minus 24, then it will pull that pitch down to octave, so 24 semitones. And it's the same with up. The default is two, so that would move it obviously up to semitones. But if I increase this, just like that. So that's just a concept to keep in mind in playing a melody. And maybe at the end of your little melody line, you just drop that pitch down using your mod wheel. And it's kind of fun because you can really perform it and have fun bending in between the notes like that. And then the other thing that I'll introduce is using some macro controls. So when you're using effects, this is a good, a good thing to do. So I can take, for example, macro control number two, and I can drop this into the dry wet here. Now what I would want to do because I want to be able to control how much reverb is coming out so I can pull this dry wet knock down all the way and then click on this number two and pull this up to just about where it was. That means I can control the amount of reverb using this macro control down here. So in innocence, when this macro controls down all the way at the bottom, then this knob is at the bottom of this yellow range that's delineated here. If this number two knob is all the way up at the top, that sets this dry wet knob to right here at the top of my yellow range so that if if this knob is engaged fully, then that brings us back to where we had set our Dry Wet balanced before. And if you want to increase the size a little bit as you do that, you can apply that there. Then I can click here where it says too. And I can either take that tool out completely and just type something here, verb or. But what I like to do is keep that number two and then write the word verb. Because inside your DAW, when you're doing automation, which I do a lot with these macro controls, you, then it will just be at the top of the list when you choose massive and your, your automation selector. And maybe we'll get into that later. But just, just so you know, I typically keep the number and it just keeps it nice and clean and easy to read because we wanna make this easier on ourselves. So we can do a couple more of these. We can maybe add noise here for number three. Take this number three macro control, put it over here in this amplitude knob here, and then create a range like that. And that way we can control the amount of noise here. And then maybe Leslie will do the clip desorption. So I'll put distortion. Dist is fine. Just like that. Take number four and put it over here in our Dry Wet parameter, and then just pull that all the way up. This way you just have, you just know, OK, these are the things that I'm controlling here. And then you can set up your mini controller to use the knobs there to control these rather than controlling like multiple things. And it sort of gets a little confusing when you have pretty complex patches. You can just use these to tidy that up a little bit. All right, there you go. Verb doubt saw tooth patch and we introduced some other concepts, the pitch bend and also the macro controls. See you in the next lecture. 18. Square Saw Pluck Lead: Hello again and welcome back. In this lecture we are going to design a pretty simple square saw pluck lead. It's quite a simple one, just using one oscillator, a couple on envelopes and a few effects to create a cool pluck sound. And I call it square saw because we're using the wave table position of the square saw wave. And we're going to land this wave table position knob right in the middle between those two. So what that does is it creates a blend of the two waveforms. If you imagine combining the two together and the resultant wave cycle, that would occur from sort of combining the two waves. So we'll get right into this will leave oscillator one on square saw and put the wave table position right in the middle. So just to sort of reinforce some of these principles, here's the square wave. Here's a sawtooth wave. And you can hear that in the middle. It sounds like a combination of the two. It's got the rich bussiness of the square wave, I'm sorry, of the sawtooth wave. And a little bit more of the roundness of the square wave. Okay, we'll leave that read about there. I, and now we're going to set up a couple of our envelope. So I'm gonna take envelope number one. I am going to put it in the amplitude box right here. Take this amplitude all the way down and create a full positive range like that. And then for this envelope, since we're going to be doing this pluck sound, Let's shape this on envelope. Now, I'm going to change the decay algorithm to linear rather than curved. And we'll take this decay level down. And so what we want to have is like a little swell in and then a pluck. So finite bout right there Sounds good. And now once, once we add some distortion a little bit later, we'll hear that the decay time we can maybe take down just a little bit. But for right now that works. And I want to have a little bit of a pitch drop in the beginning of the sound as well. So what I'm gonna do is copy this envelope by choosing Select envelope preset here. And then there's a dropdown menu. I can copy it and I can go to envelope to choose that same and click paste. So now I have the same envelope, which we're going to bring into the pitch box and just raise it up. I don't know, maybe 12, maybe 1110 semitones, something like that. Now you may be asking, why didn't I just use envelope number one for the same thing? Because we copied and pasted the envelope. Well, I want to have on envelope to be a little bit shorter in its attack and decay time. That's because I want it to do this pitch drop faster than the time it takes to do the amplitude modulation. So if I just leave it like this, all you're gonna hear as the pitch drop. And we don't really get any root note there. But if I shorten this quite a bit. Then we just get a tiny bit of that pitch drop, but we don't, we don't lose the root note there. Okay. Now we're gonna go to Filter number one and set up a low-pass for pole filter and the four and the two. I mentioned this in my massive, massive tutorial course. This has to do with the slope of the cutoff frequency. A four pole low-pass filter having a steeper slope, then a two tuple, low-pass and high-pass filters. So will have a steeper cutoff frequency here with a low-pass filter. And then we're gonna do, we're gonna put envelope one here in our cut-off frequency. So we have a sweep and the cut-off frequency of this low pass filter, it's maybe about like that. Just like that's pretty cool. And then we will have to fine tune this resonance once we add some distortion, which why don't we go and do that now. So will go to f x number one and put in a classic tube. Just full Dry Wet, full wet balance, Full Drive. So you'll hear that if this resonance is too high with this distortion, it'll bring in too much of those low frequencies here, that there, but we want this right about here. And I'm gonna go to my envelope number one, I'm going to increase that decay time a little bit. That sounds about right. Now. I'm also going to add some bit crushed distortion and insert number one. The big crusher is like a digital distortion that just reduces the, the, simulates the reduction of the sample rate and the resolution of the waveform. So we can fine tune this here. Right about halfway on the Dry Wet balances, pretty good. Then we can go to voicing and tidy this up a little bit. I might create a couple of voices like that. Choose Mano rotate and leave the trigger on always because we want those envelopes to the modulation envelopes that we have. We want those to occur every time we strike a new note. Semi glide times little too slow here. Alright, cool. We're getting pretty close. And the other thing that I might do is turn on this pan position. And if we take this slider all the way over to full, you can hear that this adds a painting effect between the different wave tables. So in the middle is mano. Here that their eye and to the left is panned left and right as well, but it's inverted. Right? So now when we add some reverb here, and we're gonna want to push the density up and the color down because otherwise, those high frequencies, it'll just come, become a little too much delay or echo. And with a plucky sound, well, let's here that a actually, so we'll turn these the opposite way and you can just hear it sort of floods our attack. I mean, obviously if you like that, that's cool. But for what I want, I want that reverb sound without flooding that attack. And I might shorten that pitch drop decay time a little bit as well. There you go. That's a square soft pluck. We've got a little bit of pitch modulation. We've got an envelope controlling the amplitude as well as the cutoff. In the voicing section, we added some panning to the different voices, which was cool. Added a little bit of classic tube distortion, Well, a lot of it, and a bit creche distortion as well, plus a little reverb. And now we've got a pretty cool pluck sound. Alright, see you in the next lecture. 19. Chiptune Pluck: And hello again. In this lecture we're going to design a chip tune pluck patch. This is a pretty weird sound, but you can use it to cool effects in your productions if you use it moderately. So it's very simple and so it'll just take a second. But I thought I would show you how to do it because it's, it introduces one new technique here that you can have some fun with. So we'll start initialize a new patch. And we'll leave this on square saw. And we're going to switch this wave table position all the way to this square wave. We're going to take elephant number five and bring it into the pitch box here. And you can create, depending on the strength of this modulation that you want, you can create a range maybe about 12 positive semitones like that. And now we're gonna go down to LFO number five. And we'll move this up to the top here to our sine wave, but we're not going to choose the sine wave. We're gonna choose a different form of a different waveform for the modulation source. Now you'll see here that to the right we have sine, sawtooth square and triangle waves. These are like the four common analog Oscillator wave forms. However, we also have this entire different wave form selector drop-down menu. And you have tons of different options here you have an exponential down curve, a 100% just at the top. Fall it's sort of like a, like a crest and then it falls. And you can change the phase here by moving these and just a quick aside as well, these, this grid here. So just to, just to give you a little bit better of an idea of this, you have four boxes here from left to right. Those are your phase positions. So this far left side is 0 degrees. First one here, 90 degrees, a hundred and eighty two seventy and three hundred sixty and three hundred sixty. This last, like the end of our little grid here, would be the same position. And you can see here if you look closely, it ends right about there. The wave does. And so that is the same place here at 0 degrees. I'd seen the same thing with your geometry, that 0 degrees is the same position as the 360. Alright, so, but for this patch, we're going to choose one of these random steps. So you can see random steps. One has these like sort of wacky randomized steps. Just like why it's called random steps. So what this will do when we apply it to the pitch of the oscillator. It's basically jumping in and out of these pitches really quickly. And we can set the rate to be very, very fast. So it has this weird computery sound. So let's hear it with the rate as it is now. Alright, so it's super annoying and weird. But if we increase this rate like that, then we can use an envelope to control the amplitude of this oscillator and make it sound like a chip tuned patch. So will take on flip number one, put it in the amplitude, and we will reduce the amplitude knob and create a range like this. Just gonna do simple pluck again here, since we are talking about plucks will reduce the decay and the decay level. They don't write like that. Now we can go back to our LFO and get that rate, just right. All right, so just like that, and I'm gonna go to the voicing page and I'm going to turn on US, Sono, beef it up a little bit, maybe fours fine. 5-6, whatever you want. That just creates a little bit more beef to the sound. I don't know if B is the right word, but it adds those voices. And so it makes it louder and kind of Fuller because we have this pitch modulation going on. So when you add those voices, that kind of brings that out. I get a little lab. And we'll choose mono rotate. And now if you want to have no glide time, you can choose that. You can have some glide down. So it does that sort of port, a mental thing that's sort of up to you. And the other thing that I like to do when playing with this patch is changed the pitch bend to 24 up and 24 down. So I can, since it's sort of a tunnel anyway, I can have some fun with this patch by playing notes and then playing with the Pitch Bend. We all my midi keyboard kinda like this. You know, just something like that. So It's sort of an interesting effect. But it's, I wanted to show it to you because it introduces these other options that we have in the LFO. And you can set this up with the Pitch. Obviously you can set it up to other parameters as well to create this sort of randomized stepping. But you can have some fun with this one. So go ahead and save that chip tune pluck, and we will see you in the next lecture. 20. Vibey Pulse Saw Pluck: Hey there, welcome back. In this lecture we're going to design a really cool patch. It's like a delayed verb doubt pulse-width, pluck sound. And it introduces a couple of new concepts and different ways to use the performer and the stepper and some sort of piggy backed modulation. So it'll, it'll get us moving forward quite a bit here. So let's get rolling with our first oscillator here. We're going to set up a poll saw wave like this. And now what we're going to go over here and take LFO number eight and drop it into the amplitude. And we'll take the amplitude all the way down and create the modulation range like that. But instead of using an LFO, we're going to use a performer here. And what we wanna do is have sort of like, we're gonna sort of fake like a multi-staged on envelope here using the both rows of the performers sequencer here. So let's take both of these rose all the way down. I like to do that just, just easier for me to work with. So just click and drag across like that. And now we're going to set up two different curves here. So I'll choose load curve, and we'll take this downward curve for step number one and then an upward curve for step number three. And we want the remaining steps to just be at the bottom velocity like that. Click load curve again to, to get that curve Select menu out. And we're going to choose sink and sink it up 2 16th notes right here. So, but now what we need to do is we need to have this sequencers selector, like row selector, fader, go from the top to the bottom because we, if we just have the top, then we'll just here this top curve, which sounds like this. If just the bottom then it'll sound like this, right? But we want to have it go from the top to the bottom. So we're gonna take on envelope number two and put it into this box here. Drop that modulation range down. And now we'll set up our envelope to do the right thing here. And I'm gonna take attack level down like that and bring that up. And I'm going to switch this to linear like that. And now I just need to create enough of a delay so that this envelope will engage that fader in the performer after this first step. So right now it's probably not far enough delayed. Yeah. All right. Now it's dropping this down too quickly, so we're not hearing this top row in the, in the beginning when I strike the node. And you can see this box moving along here as the sequence goes through. So let's play with this delay time here. Try it about here. Now if we go too far, like over here, you'll only hear the top row and it won't go to the bottom row until the next cycle. So watch this box move down as I press the key. We'll hear that top row, this curve here. But it won't catch that bottom row because the envelope is delayed too long. So you can see it passes by that second, second curve. We don't want that. So will reduce this again. That's right about the right spot right there. So we're getting that top curve. And then the envelope is kicking in, moving this crossfade sequencer, fader down to the bottom row. And we're getting both. Now if I hold it long enough, you'll see that this sequence goes around and back to the beginning. If I hold the note long enough, will hear this pluck again. Like that. It's not the worst thing in the world is republic not going to be holding the note for too long anyway? And we'll see that it's going to be kind of a cool effect anyway. So now we have this sort of amplitude, sort of double stage on envelope going that we've sort of built with this performer. And that sounds really cool. And now we're gonna do a Multi tonal thing with LFO number seven. We'll drop it into the pitch box and we'll raise this up seven semitones, which is a fifth harmony. Now on this one, we're not gonna use an LFO either. We're going to use instead the stepper. And in this case, since we have the modulation range going up seven semitones, then that means that the bottom here of, of each step is 0 CMEs semitones, that's the root node. And at the top, even though we're at 12 here, 12 is actually seven semitones because this 12 just corresponds to the very top of the modulation range that we've set. And we've said it's a seven semitones. Now I could, what I could do is set this 12, click, snap to grid and then bring this note to seven. I could do that as well. Especially if I wanted to create maybe multiple steps here with different notes. But for the sake of simplicity, I just want this fifth harmony. So I'll set that to seven. Bringing this all the way to the top, and that was an accident. And just like that. So now we need to sync this one up, also, 2 eighth notes, because our performers at 16th notes, so it's gonna go 12, like that, are 10x. And, and so when this third step happens, then we're going to bump up the pitch seven semitones using the stepper. So let's listen to that. Now you may have asked, you may ask, well, why didn't we in the performer here, why didn't we set this to eighth notes and instead have, have the second step B, that curve like this. Well, I don't like that as much because that makes these plucks or these steps take too long. And that just doesn't sound as good to me. I want it to be a little bit quicker. So I can change this to 16th notes. Take this down, choose load curve again. And now I can make my third step ups chosen wrong curve. Just like that. To me, that sounds just a little bit cooler. Alright, so now we have, not only do we have this stepper changing the pitch of the note, but it's lining up with what's happening in the performer when we set this sort of faked multistage on envelope thing with the pluck down and then a sweep up. So we have this kind of cool complex sound just by striking one note. We're doing this like little pitch thing. But now we can have a lot of fun with this and created really phi B VB patch here. So I'm gonna go to FX number one, I'm going to choose delay, succinct, and I'm probably leave Dry Wet about halfway. These are probably fine. And we'll do the left side at eighth notes and the right side at 3 eighth notes, which is kinda like a dotted eighth notes. So let's listen to that. So now we have this stereo delay where the left side is doing eighth notes, the right side is doing 3 eighth notes. And that sounded pretty cool so far. Now I'm going to set up a reverb for Fx number two, and we're gonna go full size, maybe not full, but very high size. And we'll take the density down. And sorry, I put the density all the way to the right and the color down just to create this sort of thick reverb. Maybe you wanna take that try went down a little bit. Now to add to the Venus of this, I can go to Insert number one and choose a simple delay. And I can increase this delay time just a little bit to get, to get these going in 16th notes. Just like that. And I want to take that dry wet down a little bit, so right. Okay, and that's cool. And now I'm going to set up a filter. I'll do low-pass filter, probably going to reduce the resonance a little bit m and take the cutoff way down. And now I'm gonna take macro control number two and put it in here. And so now I have cut off. And so I can control that filter cutoff just with my Makkot control. So already we have a really cool via the thing. If you want to increase the Yunus Sono and just create a little bit of pitch spread to beef it up a bit, might turn the volume down. You can do that as well. And then if I want to have control over that, I can take macro control number three and call this one T2. And that way I can create a modulation range, maybe not all the way, but maybe halfway like that because we don't want too much detune there. And at the end of that all we have a pretty cool patch. So go ahead and save that one. Could work. We will see you in the next lecture. 21. Reverse Delay Pluck: Hello and welcome back. In this lecture we're going to do another pluck sound. But in this one we're going to create sort of an arpeggiated reverse delay. So I'm going to show you some new tricks with modulation in piling on multiple modulation sources on the same destination in order to create kind of a cool reverse delay plucky sound. Alright, so let's get right into it. We're going to use only one oscillator. We're gonna choose the dirty PWM pulse width here. And for right now we're going to leave the oscillator mode as spectrum, and we're going to pull the intensity knob all the way down. We're also going to put the amplitude knob right in the center. And I'm going to show you why we're going to do that in just a second. We're also going to set up a filter. In filter number one will do a low-pass for pole filter. And we'll just leave these settings right here for now. And just make sure that oscillator one is being sent to that low-pass filter. Okay, so let's play with this oscillator a little bit. We'll take elephant number eight and we'll put it in the pitch box destination here and raise this 12 semitones or one octave. Now instead of LFO, we're gonna choose the stepper and we're going to create an eight-step arpeggiator pattern. So I'm reducing the sequence length here from 16 to eight because I only want the six, the eight steps if you want more, that's fine. But for simplicity sake, we'll leave it at a will choose sink. And we'll shrink this up to, I think 16th notes for now should we get I'm going to turn glide mod down for right now. But I'm, I'm going to enable the glide modulation for these eight steps because we might want to add some glide later. And so let's build a little arpeggiator pattern here. We'll choose snap to grid, make sure that's selected so that we get these each at whole notes here. I'm sorry, at whole semitones will take step number three and put it on 12. Step number five can be seven, and then maybe step seven can be 108, can be 12. And it might be a bit quiet. And that's because we have this filter going and we haven't fine tune those filter parameters just yet. But we will get to that in a second for now if you just want to pull the cutoff all the way up on the filter so we can hear it but better. That's fine. Now we're gonna take LFO number seven. And we're gonna put it into this amplitude knob and we're gonna bring the range all the way down. It's creating a negative and positive range here. That's because it's set to LFO. But we're gonna change that right now to the performer. And we're gonna bring the crossfade sequencer down to this bottom row because this is the default, has this curved downward curve here. So we're going to bring that down, will sync it up to 16th notes as well. By creating a negative range here, we're sort of inverting this, this wave form. To be backwards because the range is telling it that at this point here at the bottom of this amplitude knob is actually the top of the, the, the is actually the top of this row here. So we're sweeping up in volume. Let's hear that. So you can hear that each of those steps is sweeping the amplitude knob up. Now, we can add this stepper. We set up to be the arpeggiator. We can add this to the amplitude in this other box. So you have two different boxes here and you can combine the two. And we'll create a positive value there. That little tiny extra box there is just showing that it's clipping its gut trying to go beyond where it can go. So just leave it right about there. Having this stepper modulation source in the amplitude as well. It's creating a little bump in volume during those in those steps that we have set up here. So whereas in the pitch box, step three being at 12 means we're going up an octave because that's the destination. We can also use that stepper on the amplitude knob. And now 12 just means full amplitude across this range. So we're combining this sort of reversed sweep up in the amplitude with the performer here, with the stepper, which is creating a little bit of accents on those arpeggiator notes. I'm going to set up a sink delay here. In the first effects like this, left, we can leave it as quarter notes. And the right, we can do three-eighths, which is a dotted eighth note. And we'll probably leave these settings like this for right now. And then I'm going to show you in a second that having full wet balance can sound pretty cool. But first, let's go to the reverb, set that up, bringing this down, and you bring the size up a little bit if you want. And maybe bring the color down. Ok. Now let's fine tune this filter here. So I'm going to turn this cut-off frequency all the way down. And I'm gonna take macro control in and put it right there and create a full range like that. And I'm also going to put it on the intensity knob. This way I can use macro control number two and just call it cut-off. And I can control both the intensity knob and the cutoff frequency knob of the filter. So the intensity knob sort of with this oscillator will act a little bit like. It just reduces the harmonic content of the waveform. So when this intensity knob is full left, it's a much darker sound than when it's fully to the right. So combining that with the low-pass filter will really create a cool cut off effect. And we can turn the resonance down a bit. And then maybe that's a little too quiet when the cut-off is all the way down, maybe you don't want it all the way down like that. So I can bring this up a little bit. And I can also bring the cutoff frequency up a little bit at the bottom of its range. That way when we bring this macro control two all the way down, the sound isn't completely disappear. Now just one other note to mention. I don't think we've mentioned this in the course so far. This restart button in the time settings for for the stepper. Since we're are voicing is on polyphonic right now. So I can play two notes. Okay, so I can have the arpeggiator going for each of the notes. But if we go to the stepper and restart is not selected, then if I play note and then I strike and new one, that new note will join the arpeggiator and the same at the same step that it's already on. So see if you can hear the difference there. I'm going to add a new note. No matter when I strike the node, it's gonna join the arpeggiator. If I have a down restart, each new note will begin at the beginning of the sequence. So let's hear the difference there. So as you can see, if I don't get it in time just right, it gets a little messy, but it's kinda cool. You can create a sort of poly rhythmic arpeggiator pattern by playing the notes in time. But, you know, on the upbeat or something like that, like this. So that's just something to be aware of, that restart button. Now if we go to this delay parameter, we can play with this a little bit and have some fun if we pull it to full Dry Wet and creates a kind of a different vibe because you lose the attack of the, of each strike and you're just getting the delay artifacts. So you can play with that and see what you like. We can also just put delay as a macro control, bringing this in and create a macro control like that. And that way we can control that on the fly. And that's pretty cool. The other thing I might like to do is add a little bit of Brighton noise down here and the noise section. And we can bring that step sequencer in to the amplitude to just create accents on those high points with a little bit of noise. Just like that. The difference would be if this was Meet this and the amplitude is fully there. You can hear that this just noise the entire time, so we don't want that. So I'm going to unmute that and just have it like this. Now, let's say you want to control the amount of noise or bring the noise in or take it out. And you want to do that with a macro control will introduce a new concept here. So I'm going to not nosy noise, this noise, not nosy, although it can be quite nosy noise. We're going to pull this into this second box here. And you'll notice that right below the box it says SC. That stands for side chain. If I click the SC, I can click this line underneath the, this box and turns into a triangle and it points up at the eight. That means that my number for modulation source, and it doesn't have to be macro controller can be another modulation source is now modulating the amount of the modulation, which is number eight. So if I have this down at 0, you won't hear the noise. And I can bring it in. That way. You can have a modulation source controlling a certain parameter. But you can also have another modulation source. Or a lot of times what you'll do is use the macro control to do that, to control the, what's happening with that parameter. And we can go just a bit further here. I'm going to call modulate macro control number five, glide. And I'm gonna take this macro control and I'm gonna put it into the glide MOD. Remember that I said I wanted to enable these boxes down here so that I can have some glide and we'll create a range probably about halfway is fine. And now we can create a little bit of porn pimento between the steps of our sequence here by, by adjusting this macro control. And that's basically the patch. But for if you want a little extra credit, I'm gonna show you kind of a cool thing here. So we'll go back to our performer number seven here. And remember that we have just this bottom row enabled. We're not using the top row at all. And since we have these downward curves, but we have a negative modulation range here, the polarity is going downward. These are causing the amplitude of this oscillator to sweep up. Well, we can do something kind of cool with this. We can change that modulation range to positive like that. So now it's just doing a plucked down or sounds like this, right? But we can, in the top row, we can do something different here. We can choose load curve and do the opposite of the bottom row. So I'll just clicking that waveform and drag them all the way across the top. And I can click load curve again. So now I have these opposite things here going. And I can put this crossfade sequencer right in the middle, right about there. And I can take another LFO and put it in this box here and create a range. That means I'm going to use this LFO to slide this fader up and down going in between the two. And what that will do is create a varied modulation on that, on that amplitude knob. In the sense that sometimes when the, when this faders up at the top it will be a reverse sweep up in amplitude. And when it's at the bottom, it will be a plucky pluck down kind of thing. And we can just create a slow rate on this, on this LFO to have that fader move in-between slowly. And we'll put the crossfade curve here up at the top. So we just have the sine wave. Let's hear that. So you can hear there, it's sort of going back and forth between the more plucky bottom row and the more reversed sweeping up top row. And if we play with some of our macro controls here, now let's have some fun with this patch. So great job on that one is a little complicated, but we introduce some new concepts. If you have any questions, leave a comment, and we will see you in the next lecture. 22. Variable Pitch Pluck: Hey students, welcome back. In this lecture we're going to design a variable pitch pluck. And we're going to introduce a few new concepts here. One of them being using an envelope on the pitch, but then modulating the decay level of that envelope using an LFO. So why don't we get right into this. We're going to choose for oscillator one sine triangle wave. And we're gonna put the wave table position just about in the middle. So we get a little blend of that sine wave and the triangle wave. Just like that. Now let's take our envelope number one and let's just get our plucks setup right away. So will drop on envelope one into the amplitude, bring that amplitude down and create a range up like that. And then we can fine tune this envelope to get a pluck. Just like that. That should be good for now. Now we're gonna go to envelope number two. And what we can do is actually copy on envelope number one, pasted it into an envelope to like that because we're going to want something sort of similar. But let's increase the attack just a little bit. And let's bring this attack level down. Just about halfway like that. Now will take envelope number five and drop it into this box below the level and we can create a range like this. What this does is it adjusts the attack level up and down based on the sign wave inside our LFO. So let's make sure we go to LFO number five and make sure that our crossfade curve here is fully on the sine wave. And this rate should probably be okay for now. Maybe slow it down just a tiny bit. And we'll go back to our envelope number two. So again, we're using elephant number five to modulate the attack level. This knob here, what this is essentially doing, sort of moving this up and down like this. That's what that LFOs doing. Now, when we assign this envelope to the pitch of oscillator one, what we're going to get is a little pitch movement going up and down like this. So we'll leave that right about halfway. Take envelope number two, put it into the first pitch box here, and do two octaves or 24 semitones. So now what we should get is a variable pitch plucking this. Now when we play note well here little bit of that pitch movement. But each time we strike a new note, it's staying at doing the same exact movement. But what we wanna do is have this LFO number five move independently of whether we're striking a node or not. And that will create this pitch movement over time, over the course of the song as we're playing. So we'll go to elephant number five and make sure we deselect restart. If restart is selected, then every time I strike a new note, it goes, starts right here at the beginning of the wave cycle. If I deselect it, then this LFO wave's gonna move up and down independent of whether or not I'm striking enough. And that'll create that pitch movement. You could slow this down a little bit. Just sort of fine-tuning is, and I don't want a little more attack on that amplitude envelope. And will speed up the LFO spin. So that I'm getting some striking multiple times and it creates this sort of a tonal pitch movement there. Now I probably want to go to the voicing tab, choose mono, rotate, leave the trigger to always because we want those envelopes to move. And Rossano is fine at one, will go to f x number one and will choose the dimension expander. And I'll probably bring the size up and the dry wet like way down like that. We just want a little bit of that echo in the background in it to widen out a little bit. We can put on a little bit of reverb as well if we want. Bring those, bring density up, color down. But maybe what I'll do is put a macro control in here. Call this reverb just in case I want it and, or if I don't want it, I can control it easily from down here and the macro controls. Now we can have a little bit more fun with this moving on envelope that we have here. So let's take our envelope number two, put it in the wave table position box here. Take this all the way down to sine, and then move this all the way up to the other side, which is a triangle wave. So what that does is as this envelope is moving up and down and its attack level at which is causing the pitch movement. On the higher pitches. This wave table position knob will be more on the triangle side and on the lower position there'll be more on the sine wave side. It just brings out a little bit more of that plucky NUS on those higher notes because the triangle wave has a little bit sharper than, well, it's a lot sharper than the sine wave. And we can do the same thing on the intensity knob here, just to enforce that movement that we're doing. Now what we can also do is set up low-pass for pole filter here. And in our cut-off frequency will bring this all the way down or close to all the way down. And will choose velocity down here from the macro controls and put it in the cutoff frequency and increase this range like that. That means that my midi keyboard will read the velocity with which I strike the keyboard and apply that to this cut-off frequency. When it set like this with a positive range up. That means that a note with a lighter velocity, if I strike it lighter, it will be more filtered. It will be down. The cut-off frequency will be down towards the bottom. If I strike it harder than higher, more high frequencies will come through. So I'm just striking it very lightly now. If I make increase it a little bit more, just like that, so we can have some fun with that. And this one's a lot of fun if you use like a note repeat, or an arpeggiator or something in a track, you can do kinda cool things like just like that, just creates kind of a cool little pattern. You can increase this range here if we wanted to make it even crazier. And then almost becomes like a sound effect. So it's pretty simple patch, but it introduces a few new concepts. The velocity macro control applied to the cutoff frequency. And then using an LFO to modulate one of the parameters inside the envelope and the LFO's cycle is running independent of me striking to note, because restart is not selected. And that will create a variation on the attack level of this envelope, which we've set to the pitch of oscillator one. We've also set it to the wave table position in the intensity of net knob as well. So that's your variable pitch pluck, save that one, and we will see you in the next lecture. 23. White Noise Sweep FX: Okay, now it's time to move on to FX patches. And we're gonna start off here with a really simple noise sweep patch. This one's really fun and it's really simple. So what we're gonna do is disable all of the oscillators so that when we strike a note, no sounds coming out. We don't have any of the oscillators moving, but we are going to use the noise generator down here, so enable that noise generator. And we'll bring the color and the amplitude all the way down to the bottom. Instead of white noise, I like to choose bright noise. And you can experiment with these different noise generator types if you want on your own. But for simplicity sake, let's stick with bright noise for this one. And we're going to take macro control number two and call it, you can call it noise or sweep or whatever you want. It's really all we're working with. We're gonna drop it into the color perimeter, bring the range all the way up, bring it into the amplitude perimeter, and bringing all the way up as well. Now what we have so far is just a really simple sweep that's going to, when we move this macro control, it's going to move the color from dark to light and the amplitude from nothing to full volume. So just like that, it's already pretty cool, but we can beef this up just a little bit. So for Fx1, I'm gonna choose delay sink and just change these a little bit. I mean, it's really up to you. What you want. The delay settings to be dry wet is probably good. And yeah, and then for f x2 will choose a reverb and we're gonna bring the size all the way up. And we'll bring the density up and the color down and Dry Wet balance right about at the middle. So now we have a little bit of dimension to it with some delay and some reverb. Let's hear that again. Just like that. I'm also gonna put on insert number one, choose a parabolic shaper. And it's probably actually good right here with half and half dry wet in the drive about halfway. Let's hear that one more time. So now you have a really fat verb, doubt, white noise sweep. Well actually it's a bright noise sweep. If you want to have some extra credit, you can send this noise generator all the way to filter one and then go up to filter one and choose a low-pass for pole filter. And we can add that sweep to this cut-off frequency as well. And probably wanna bring the resonance down. It might get a little too squeaky, will disable filter to, and the mixes all the way on filter one. So it doesn't really matter if we are in series or parallel. And let's hear that now with this sweep macro control, controlling the cutoff frequency as well. It just makes the sweep a bit more drastic when this cut-off frequency is being modulated as well. There you go, white noise sweep. And we'll see you in the next lecture. 24. Propeller FX: Hey students, welcome back. Once again, we're going to design another FX patch here. This one is a propeller patch. And I'm going to show you how to do this. We're going to use a new oscillator that we haven't used yet. And we're going to use an envelope on the pitch or really long envelope on the pitch. And then we're going to use an LFO on the amplitude of the oscillator. And then use the internal envelope inside that LFO to modulate the rate and speed it up. But you'll give us sort of a starting propeller sound. And we'll throw on a couple other things here. So let's get right into it. Oscillator number one will go to over here the cam chord. And now you can see over here that the last row is Fx chords. So these are good ones to choose when you're trying to just make weird almost a tonal sounds. So what we're going to choose the camcorder for this one. Sounds like this. It's not that interesting. And we're going to drop the pitch down 24 semitones or two octaves. And we're also going to bring the amplitude just to the center like that. Now let's take envelope number one and we'll put it in the pitch box here, and we'll raise this up 36, which is three octaves, three octaves above negative 24. So it actually just gets us to one octave above the root note. And it doesn't matter. What we wanna do is have it start low and go up 36 semitones. And so for this envelope that we're using here, we're going to pull the sustain level up all the way and then just bring the attack like all the way to the right. This gives us a nice slow ramp up. So that should sound like this. And it's nice because this wave table, the cam chord, has a little bit of this like Wab leanness in those low notes anyway, so kinda already gives us that wobble. But now we're gonna take LFO number five and put it in the amplitude and just create a full range like that. Make sure this crossfade curve is set to fully the sine wave because that's what we want. And I'm going to bring the rate down just a little bit here. And now we're gonna take the internal envelope, put it in the rate parameter, and increase the rate all the way. Here in this internal envelope we have two controls, attack and decay. So you can shape your envelope here, this, the length of the attack like this, and you can see that slope get steeper when I reduce the attack. We want this to be all the way on the right like that. And we don't need a decay because we're just going to have it slowly go up to the top. So what this is doing is it's telling this rate knob to start here. And then over time, slowly go towards the right, which will make this sine wave LFO move faster. So right now it should sound like this, right? Just like that, you might want to have that starting rate just be a little bit faster and faster. In the wobble of that LFO makes this patch sound like a propeller starting because it has a slower rate at first, wobbling on the amplitude knob, it's wobbling, wobbling, and then it gets faster and faster, faster, faster like that. And I'll probably go to fx to put on a reverb. And the fun thing that you can do here is make this size maybe all, almost all the way to the top. Bring the the density up in the color down and bring the Dry Wet balance all the way down. And now since we have this envelope number one doing this ramp, we can take that and put it in the dry wet and increase the range like that. What that will do is as this pitch is moving up, this dry wet balance will move up at the same time. So the beginning of the sound does not have the reverb. And the end of the sound does almost as if the listeners like moving away from the source. Just like that. And you might not want it to be fully dry, wet at the end and a ticket size down just a tiny bit. Now if we put on a parabolic shape or here, give it some distortion that'll just make it sound a little bit more choppy. Just like that. So now you have your propeller FX patch. Pretty cool. And obviously there's a lot more to explore at that. Changing the wave table, changing some of the distortion, insert effects, anything you want, but save that and you can build off that and make it your own. All right, see you in the next lecture. 25. Ghost FX: Hi, Students will come back again. We're going to design another FX patch here, one that I will call ghost effects. It's a spooky one. And it just has sort of like a ghostly sound. Okay, it's cool to just throw in there once in your mix and maybe, you know, a breakdown or something like that. And so we're just going to use a couple oscillators and just create some really simple modulation on some of the effects to make this sort of ghostly sound. So for oscillator number one, we're going to choose melancholia. Sounds like this. Okay? And we're going to leave the pitch as it is for this, and we'll come back to this in a second. Will enable oscillators 23, which we can leave as sawtooth waves and bring the intensity down and also the amplitude because we're going to create a macro control there in just a second. But just get those setup for right now. Now, let's go to envelope number one and will create a plug like this, bringing the attack down and the decay level and maybe just pull this decay time out just a little bit. And we'll bring this into the pitch box and you can just raise this up like six semitones, something like that. You say good. Okay? And then we're also going to bring this into the intensity node and pull this down. This way, our intensity is decaying down as, as well. So that way this intensity knob is effectively starting at the bottom here, like this, and then decaying up quickly like that. Okay? Now we're going to put reverb on FX number one. And we're also going to put this on envelope in the dry wet balance like that. And probably bring the size of quite a bit, bring the density up and the color down. Just like that. And it will go to envelope for which is modulating the amplitude. That reverb is way too big, which is modulating the amplitude of the global patch. And we'll just bring this down to about the same. You can if you want. Just take envelope one, put it in the amplitude modulator here. But I like to keep its just, I'll just keep it as it is. Just, you know, unless I need that other envelope for something else. So just keep it there. That reverb size is still just a little too big. And we're good at FX number two and put a dimension expander in there and create full Dry Wet. And that'll just make it even more like reverb doubt and VB. Okay, just like that, now, we set up these two oscillators, 23 on sawtooth waves with the intensity knob down and the amplitude down. So we can raise the pitch of this one up, maybe like 75 semi-tones and bringing this one down like, I don't know, 371 or something. All we want is a very dissonant chord here. And you can sort of create a little variation of the intensity here. And then we will take this second macro control cord and pull it into the amplitude. That creative positive range. So that way we can introduce that chord if we want it, we can have just the go sound that, but if we want to bring in that core just a little bit and it's maybe too much intensity there. And almost creates like a belly sound going through that reverb. Sounds pretty eerie. And in the voicing tab, we can create some usando, maybe four if you want it. And a little dissonance between, between the voices do just like that. So you have an eerie, ghostly sound and you can bring in that chord and just create almost like a graveyard bell sound, something like that. So it's kinda fun and introduces a few new ideas. Uses, using some different Oscillator wave tables. That's your ghost effects. See you in the next lecture. 26. Amp Noise Swoosh FX: Hey students, another FX patch here, really simple amp noise sweep. So let's get right into it. Disable oscillator one. And we'll go down to the noise section. We'll choose the amp noise. And if we turn this up, Sounds like that. And we're gonna use envelope number one to create a sweep here in the color. So we want to bring the attack out a little bit. We just want that Swoosh. It's almost as if something is, a baseball is flying faster, head like that. And if we increase the unison out, create a couple of extra voices. Choose mono rotate. That's good. We like that. Now I'm going to change the global envelope because if you notice with this, it when the color is all the way down but the amplitudes still out. We get that little hover that's super low frequency hover at the, at the, at the end of the note. I'm going to just take the sustain level down but increase the decay because we don't want this envelope to cut short are on envelope here on the color of the noise generator. Just like that. Now you can add some effects here. If you want to add a dimension expander is kinda widens out stereo image. You can do that. You can also add some reverb. It makes it sound like it's, you know, has a place in space. But that dimension expanded back on. But that's sort of up to you. And what you can do is just add effects here. Put this in the dry wet balance, bringing it up to about where it was. And same thing here. Just like that. So that way you can have it without effects. You can add that in there. You can maybe change this name to dimension, which maybe makes a little bit more sense. So there you go. Just like that, you've gotta really cool amp noise, Swoosh, sound, effects patch, and save that one. We will see you in the next lecture. 27. Digital Siren Pitch Drop FX: Hey, students will come back. We're going to make another FX patch here. I'm not quite sure what to call this. Maybe like a computer FX down lift, something like that, but you'll, you'll help me name it. So we're gonna set up just one oscillator and we're going to use two stages of pitch modulation on that oscillator. And we're gonna use some internal envelope controls as well, plus a chorus ensemble effect. Alright, so let's go to oscillate are number one and we're going to choose pull sauce sink. And we're going to the, we're going to take down the pulse opposition all the way to the left in sync position all the way to the left. Sounds like this. Alright? And we're going to bring the pitch down 12. Now we're gonna go to envelope number one. And we're going to pull the attack time down, change this algorithm to linear, and bring the level down like that. And we don't just want a nice long decay probably like that is just fine. We're going to bring it into the first pitch box here and bring this up, I don't know, maybe 36 or so. That gives us that long pitch drop like that. Now what we're gonna do is add another modulation source to this pitch destination. So we'll go to LFO number five, and we're going to bring the crossfade curve down to the sawtooth wave right here. So you can tell it's a sawtooth wave. If you move the phase around a little bit, and if you get off track, you can double-click it and that just brings it right to the 0 degrees like that. Okay? So we're gonna take a telephone number five, or I'm going to put it in here and we'll create a range again, maybe about 36 or something. It's going to be a tunnel, so it doesn't really matter how high your range is, just sort of to your own taste. And now we're going to bring the rate to about nine o'clock like that. Yeah, the sign o'clock, right? Yeah. And then we'll bring the amplitude down as well. And the reason we're gonna do that is we're going to use this internal envelope to modulate the rate in the amplitude of this LFO. Ok? So actually if we just bring the amplitude backup, This is what we have now. Right? Okay, so that's what's happening. You're doing this long pitch drop with the envelope. And then this LFO is doing, is using this sawtooth wave to modulate the pitch at the same time. So it's doing supplying both modulations sources to the pitch of this oscillator. So we're going to bring this rate, like I said, right about nine o'clock like that and amplitude down. And we're gonna take the internal envelope here, put it in, and create a range probably about three o'clock for the rate. Same thing for the amplitude, but we'll just bring this all the way up. Now for the internal envelope, we're going to bring the attack all the way down and bring the decay to write about where it hits that corner, like that. You can see it says IN F here that's infinite. So if you have it all the way to the right, there's no decay at all. And that kind of negates the purpose unless you're using an attack like this, right? So, but we want it read about it the corner like that. So what this is gonna do is gonna start the rate off fast at about three o'clock. And this internal envelope is going to sweep this rate knob down to here. At the same time, the amplitude itself of the modulation is going to be at the top when, when we're at the fastest rate here, it's going to be at the top and then it's just going to slowly reduce an amplitude so that as it gets down to the bottom of that speed, at this rate, not the, this modulation source is essentially turning off because the amplitude controls how much modulation is being applied to the strength of the modulation being applied. So let's hear that now. And then finally at the end there, just get that root node. Now, just to illustrate here, if I meet this first modulation, meet that, you'll hear the difference there is. Before we were, we were sweeping down in pitch using that envelope. Meanwhile, this LFOs doing a buh buh buh buh buh buh. If I just have the fifth LFO going, you're just gonna get that sawtooth movement. Right? So I'll unmute that, bring it back. Just like that. Now what I like to do is add some chorus ensemble, bringing the right dry wet down. And maybe the depth down just a little bit just to give a little bit of a wider sort of fat or sound makes it sound a little bit less digital if that's what you want, you know. But I like to do that. So the chorus effect adds a delayed signal and varies the pitch of that delayed signal using an internal LFO. I like that. It sounds kinda cool. It makes a little more analog rather than digital. So I kinda like that, but you can choose to have your course or not. And in fact, we can just add a macro control here, put that in the Dry Wet, do that, and then we can have cores are no course if we want. Now, if on the other hand, you want it to sound even more digital, you can add a big pressure distortion. And we can call this bit crush. Bringing that into the dry wet and probably wanted to end up at about halfway like that. So let's have it with a big crush on and just increase this macro control. I like that for the big crush. But we can turn this macro control down and go without, and we can increase the chorus or both. And that just creates this weird site irony. We'll just call it a computer's siren pitch drop. Alright? And that's it for this one, save this patch. And we will see you in the next lecture. 28. 808 Kick Drum: Alright students, we are onto drums Now, so we're going to first do a very simple kick drum. It's a lot like the sub bass patch that we designed in the bass section a while ago. But it basically just has a shorter decay. And I'm going to introduce a few new concepts in this one as well. So we'll keep it simple, but we're going to learn something new as well. Oscillator one we're going to set up as sine square or sine triangle doesn't matter because we're going to bring the wave table position all the way to the left. So it's fully a sine wave here. And we'll bring the pitch down about 50 semitones, something like that. We're gonna take envelope one, put it in the pitch box and bring this up somewhere around here is fine. And you can, well, I'll show you how changing that makes a difference in the tone in this envelope will bring the attack all the way down. And we'll bring the stick, hey, level down as well. And then we'll fine tune this decay time here. So if you want just a real clicky, fast decaying kick drum me could bring this down. Sounds nice. Or if you want a little bit of that tonality in there and the pitch drops, you can bring this decay out. It's too much. I like it. I like it nice and tight right about there. If you increase this, you can just hear a little bit more of that pitch movement. It makes it a little bit. Click here. If I reduce this, I'm getting just those lows coming in. So it's sort of up to you at you like, right about there Sounds good to me. So that's basically the kick drum. However, let's make it a little bit more playable. So you'll notice that no matter what velocity I strike the note width as it is now. I get the SAM hitting it hard, hitting it really softly. I'm getting the same output here. And actually I'm gonna turn the volume up just a little bit. What I want to do is to be able to play different velocities by striking the key at different with different strengths. And there's two ways to do this. One of them is to set up the velocity modulation macro control here and the amplitude and just create this range all the way. Now I'm hitting the note really lightly and strengthening. Now many hitting it as hard as I can and what I would do in this case, hit as hard as you can and get this master level up pretty high. Like that. Now, I can do very subtle, subtle differences in the velocity. Just like that, that's one way to do it. The other thing we can do is we can copy on envelope one, pasted into envelope to put this in the amplitude knob here and create a range like this, then we can use the velocity is slider here. And what this does is it interprets the velocity that you strike the key with. And then it will read that into this envelope. So a lighter velocity will not have as much of a, as high of a peak. It's almost like you're taking the attack level down depending on how hard you hit the key, like this. So just very lightly. I'm hitting hard. You can have the velocity read it like that. Now you may have asked why didn't I just take envelope one since it's the same envelope and put it in amplitude. Well, if I did that and if I use this velocity slider, that means that my velocity is now affecting the pitch drop as well. And I don't want that, I want this to be independent of the overall amplitude of that oscillator. So that's why I created a second envelope. So we'll take that down. So I have that here now I have my velocity slider up. So now I could play different velocities. Just like that. Now when I go to the voicing tab and I want to choose mono rotate, I don't want to play more than one kick at the same time. And I want sugar to be on always. If you want to beef it up a little bit, add some unison. Oh, you can do that. But I think this creates some phase issues. And I just like that sort of simple, like one voice Mano, kick drum, right like that. What I would also do in this case is do some EQ. Most of the time, I will do equalization inside my DAW rather than in massive just because I have more controls. But since we're learning about massive, We might as well take a look at the EQ here. So you have a low shelf, a boost, the frequency for that boost and a high shelf. So I can increase the base frequencies by turning this up and it's going to start to clip because the master's up too high. Then I can just really bring out that Bassianus here, turn that down if I want to. And I can also boost a certain frequency using this knob here. So I can set my frequency to round the low mids and boost those, or up here, high at some high mids. And you can control that, that way. Maybe do that right about there. Just a little bit less. And then you can have the high frequencies going with the high shelf, so on. And that just accent, accentuates the stickiness of the attack. Or I can take this down. If I want a more filtered out, if I'm at those high frequencies, filtered out a little bit more. All right, so that's how the EQ works. And there's a kick drum. Pretty simple. Save that one and we'll move on to some more jumps sounds. See you there. 29. Snare Drum: Hey students, welcome back. In this lecture, we are going to design a snare drum. It's a pretty simple patch, but it requires us thinking outside of the box a little bit. Just because massive is, we predominantly use massive to make synth sounds. Leads, basis things like that. Not so much drums, but you can use it to make drums and it's a great way to learn about some of the intricacies of the software. So let's get right into our snare sound. The first thing that we're gonna do is set up a noise generator. So I'm going to disable oscillator one. And we're just going to work with noise here. I'm gonna choose bright noise. And again, with this one, you can explore doing this snare sound with some of the other noise types. You know, maybe amp noise or high metallic or anything like that. But for this one we'll use bright noise and we're going to leave amplitude down at the bottom just for a second. And it would bring the color down to maybe write about ten o'clock, something like that. And then I'm going to send this to filter too, and I'll show you why in just a second. But let's get this noise generator just right. I want the color to have a very sharp sweep down. I could use an envelope to do that. But when you're working with Drum sounds, if you notice, if I pull this attack all the way down to the left, you still have some attack. It's not, you know, the sound doesn't start right at the beginning here at the top, it still has a very small ramp up, Same with the release. You always have a little release and little attack. It's not exactly on the dot. For most sounds, that's not really a big deal. Sometimes for drum sounds, it can be a big deal. And so I'm going to show you how to do is basically how to design an envelope using the performer. So what we're gonna do is go to envelope number five here. And instead of LFO, we're gonna choose performer. Now let's bring these rows down so we can just look at them clearly. And then for row number one, we're just going to choose a linear downward slope, choose load curve to get rid of that. Now we just have full velocity down to 0 velocity and put this fader at the top. And now we can apply this to the color of the noise generator. So we'll drag it in there, drop it in, and create a range like this. So what we're doing here now is we're starting at the top. Baby, maybe about 03:00 PM here on this color parameter sweeping down depending on the rate that we set for this. Now the amplitude is also, we need to set up something else for the amplitude. So what I'm gonna do is choose a telephone number six, bring it in here, create a full range like that. Instead of LFO for six, we'll choose the stepper. So now what we're building is basically a gate. Step one, we'll have it full velocity 12 step to live it down at 0. Now when this stepper, normally we will put the stepper in the pitch to create an arpeggio. But in this case we're sending it to the amplitude. And so what that does is it just creates a full amplitude signal for step one. And then once it gets to step two, which is down at 0, so it's like a gate, it's open and then it's closed. And I'll turn the glide mud down. We're not doing any gliding. So we'll get this and then this rate determines how fast that gate closes. Alright, so let's get this fine tuned. So that's about a good rate from the gate. But we want this LFO number five, which is a performer, to sweep down a little bit faster so we will increase the rate. Their oops, just like that. Alright, now we're gonna go to Insert number one and we're going to insert sample and hold like that. Bring the pitch up and the dry wet up. That brings out some of the high frequency harmonics. And that really helps a lot when we add some of these other things here. And then for insert number two, we'll choose a hard clipper and I just go full Dry Wet and full drive. Just gives it a nice kind of screaming sort of snare sound. Now I might close that gate a little bit faster. Just like that. And then maybe speed this up just like that. Alright, now we're gonna add another oscillator. We're gonna choose a triangle wave here. So I'm gonna choose sine triangle and then pull this all the way to the right. And we're going to use this same performer to modulate the pitch, drop it in, and bring this down to a or. So. This one is something like that. Alright, now we're gonna take that performer and put it in the amplitude as well. Bringing this down a bit more thing. That just gives you some of the body of the snare there. So remember that we put the noise generator to go to Filter number two. That's because we're going to send this oscillator one to filter two and put a screen filter on it. And you can have some fun with this. And I'll, I'll leave the filters in parallel here. Because I, I, I don't want the oscillator one to go into Filter to just wanted to go straight through, keep these filter outputs at the top, and then the mix written the middle. Now you can have some fun with the screen filter, and let's disable the noise generator so we can get this filter right here. Like a little bit of that resonance. It's kinda cool. Alright, now bring the noise back in. Now will you need to make sure that our insert effects are in the right place in the signal path. So let's go to routing. In certain number one comes after filter number one, but insert number two right here is coming after filter to, Well, we don't have anything going into filtered to accept this white noise, so it's only clipping. So the sample and hold is not really working on the noise generator Very much. So let's try playing with the position here. All right, so I like that. I like filter and filter one. I'm sorry, I like insert one into coming after the filter, but I want filter, I want to insert one, the hard clipper to come before the sample and hold. Now what you can do is throw on a little small reverb to give it a little bit of space like that. Okay, so that's a basic snare sound. Now what we can do is we can call this buzz, and we can adjust the simulated buzz sound of the snare by adding this second macro control to the amplitude knob. And then if we click this side chain button, we can modulate the amplitude using this macro control. So I can take the buzz out and bring it back in like that. And then I can also have verb here for number three and put that in the dry wet balance. Just an int. Is this a little bit? And also increase the size. Now, if I end up increasing the size of probably want this density and color to become down a little bit. Just like that. Pretty cool. So that's a good snare sound. We just used a triangle wave with some pitch modulation and a bright noise generator. And in, in this patch, we used the performer and the stepper to modulate different things rather than on envelopes, we use the performer to modulate the color of the noise generator, as well as the pitch and the amplitude of the oscillator is one. And and then we use the stepper as a gate to close this amplitude knob to just jump down from full velocity to 0 velocity immediately. And we applied some macro controls and some inserted effects. And we also double-check our routing on those insert effects to make sure they came in at the right place. Alright, there's your snare drum. Save that one. See you in the next lecture. 30. Hi Hat Pattern: Hey students, welcome back. We're going to do another hi-hat patch in this lecture. However, in this one I'm going to show you a little secret trick that I use to double the length of the performer. I'm gonna go over to my number eight LFO, and I'm already, I've already programmed in a little 16 Step two row performer pattern, just because it would take too long to do this. So anyway, it doesn't really matter what your performance is here. But I have these two rows here and they're doing two different things. And I have it linked up to 1 eighth notes. Now, if I take the performer and bring it into the white-noise generator and create a range upwards like that to the top of the amplitude knob. And I can change this to high metallic. It's a better hi-hat sound. Maybe bring the color down just a tiny bit. Now I've already disabled my oscillator because we're just working with this noise generator. Okay? So I have two rows, 16 steps. This is what the top row sounds like because my faders at the top here, right, that's the top row. If I keep playing it, it'll repeat it. Okay, and that's the top row, and this is the bottom row. Now, let's say I want to make this actually a 32 step sequence rather than just 16. Because when I get to 16, the sequencer is going to loop back to the beginning here. Well, what if I could combine these two rows and make us 32 steps sequence? We can do that actually. So I'm gonna go to the fifth LFO and change it to stepper here. Okay? And we're going to put that stepper right here in the crossfade fader here, and pull it up to the top row and then create a range down like this. Now we can use the stepper as just sort of a switch in, in, in, in principle that will switch between the top row and the bottom row. So instead of 16th notes, we need to sync this up to two over one, because since our performer is in eighth notes, this is actually two bars because it goes 12342334 and whatever. So our stepper needs to be in to one, okay? And then just two steps like this. The second step, full amplitude. When that is in the fader here of the performer, what's, what I'm telling it to do is start on the top row. And then right when it gets to this after the 16th step, which is at the end of B2, it will go straight down all the way to the bottom row and it'll do the same thing there. So let's hear that. And it goes back to the top row. Just like that. So that's pretty cool. You can extend the length of your performer that way. I guess theoretically you could do another, you could have another performer going. And you can use the same sort of principle here to turn on and off the amplitude of that performer with another stepper. So you could, you could actually put two performers after one another. Have it goes 16 steps here, then 17 to 32, then it would jump to the other performer and do another two rows. So you can relate, play around a lot with these modulation routing options here. So I just wanted to point that out is it's kind of cool. You know, sometimes it can feel a little limited when you just have the 16 steps. But this is a little secret trick that I use to double the length of that end. And in the meantime, we have this kinda cool trap pattern with these triplet and double time hi-hat things going. Alright, so I'm gonna save that one, and I hope you enjoyed that and you can use that trick in your own mixes. See you in the next lecture. 31. Chime: Hey students, welcome back. We're going to design a chime patch in this lecture. This one is pretty interesting and it sounds really pretty so. It's really cool and drum beats to just throw in a little chime and some upbeats. So we'll get right into it. Number one, oscillator, we're going to choose a lunacy. And we're going to actually increase the pitch of this up to 64, will take the wave table position in the intensity all the way down and the amplitude down as well. Actually, oscillator two will enable and we'll choose the iron and these ones will leave the wave table position in intensity will leave all the way up and bring the amplitude down. So the pitch for this one actually is probably going to be up around 40. And we're gonna do a little bit of pitch modulation on this in just a second. Actually on both of them. So, but let's set up this envelope first for the amplitude. So we'll put it in oscillator number one and bring this down just to pluck. So he just won't. Something like that. Okay. And we're going to copy this envelope, paste it into number two. Number two, go in oscillator number two. And then this one is just going to be a bit longer. So, well, let's do a little pitch modulation now. So we're gonna take LFO number five and put it in this first pitch destination here. And we just really want something, I don't know, maybe about five or six will have to fine tune that in just a second. And instead of the sine wave here, we're gonna choose curve select and do random steps one. And so what we're doing there is just creating a little bit of pitch, pitch modulation using this random wave, which gives it a sort of a Chinese sound. Let's try increasing this rate of bit. Right? Alright, so that's good for that one. And we're going to choose LFO number six, put it in pitch of oscillator one here. And on this one, we're going to use the stepper instead. Now, we've done this before. So there's two ways to do this. You can either set this modulation range to 12 or an octave up. So that way, you know, each step here is a semitone on the scale, in which case I would take step number two, make sure snap to grid is selected and go up seven like that and that will bump me up seven semitones like that. Or I can put this up to 12 and then make this seven. Alright, so that way, the top of my range here on my sequencer is at seven semitones. Reduce that amplitude just a little bit. Now I'm also going to add it dimension expander here and probably go full Dry Wet, full size. Let's reduce the decay time of that second envelope. It's carrying out just a little too much. And I might take down the amplitude of this LFO a bit too, just because it's giving me a little too much squeaking IS that maintains that nice pitch movement, but it's just not as strong. Just like that. I'll add in a little bit of bright noise. Whoops, keep this amplitude down really low. And I'll put envelope one in the amplitude here. Actually. So I have the same dynamics as oscillator one. Just as a little bit of noise and some nice reverb here as well. So there you go. There's a nice chime patch. We use some different wave tables that we haven't used before and use the LFO and the stepper to modulate the pitch of the two oscillators. Save that one, and we will see you in the next lecture. 32. Keys N Krates "I Just Can't Deny" Sax Lead: All right, welcome back once again in this lecture I'm going to show you how to create the lead line in keys and creates. I just can't deny. It's a pretty simple one, actually similar to what we've already done in the previous lectures. So let's get right into it. The first oscillator we will choose is the pull saw, PWM. And I can bring this down to right about here probably, and then find the right place for the pulse width as well. Now we're going to take on envelope one, put it in the pitch box and bring this down probably about 88 or so. And we'll create a little decay that's going to sweep up the pitch. Just something like that is perfect. And we can add this a little bit to this not as well. I'm going to reduce the portmanteau time. And we can also make sure this is on modeled rotate. Alright. Now we're going to send this to filter one. And we're going to choose band pass like that. And that's fine. Tune these here. Probably want the cutoff frequency about right there and the bandwidth, take it down a little bit, a little less resonance. Just like that. And for Fx number one will choose reverb, bring the density up and the color down, maybe a little more size, and reduce the Dry Wet balanced. Let's shorten that decay time a tiny bit. And actually what I'm gonna do here is change the Fx1 two classic tube. Fx two. We'll put on the reverb with the same settings like that. And we'll add some classic tube distortionary. Maybe take that size down a little bit on the reverb. So that gives us this sort of saxophone lead sound that they're using in that track. It's a pretty simple one, but that gets us really close and it just sort of shows you how you can build the foundation of that sound that's in keys and creates. I just can't deny. I write good work on that one. See you in the next lecture. 33. Paper Diamond & Loudpvck "Wylin": Hey, students will come back in this lecture, we are going to emulate the lead line from y Lynn by paper, diamond and loud puck. This is a sawtooth lead with a little bit of distortion and a lot of portmanteau. So it's pretty fun. So we'll get right into it will start a new patch. And for the first oscillator, we're gonna choose math ref, math number two. And the second oscillator will enable and we can leave it on square. So l one, this one, I'm gonna raise up 12 semitones like that. And this one just a couple of cents up, and then this one a couple of cents down. Now, we're gonna go to the voicing page here. Choose mono rotate and triggers always. And also want to increase the Yunus Sono to, to, just to beef it up a little bit. Now to the oscillator page here will have the glide time, the traversal mode on equal. And we're going to probably want to increase this a little bit. So the line is something like this, right? So too much fundamental, something like that. Ok. We can tune up these settings a little bit. We'll send both of these to filter one and we'll choose a bandpass and we just want to have a cut-off maybe right out there and a nice small bandwidth. Probably read about, there's fine. Okay? And now we need to apply for insert number one, assign cheaper and we can just add full distortion there. Okay? Just like that. And for Fx1, we'll also put a classic to Bonn, warm it up a little bit. And for f x2, a reverb, bringing this down a little bit, little more size, density and color probably relic that. Alright. I'm gonna change this to parabolic shape or because the sign shaper is little too dirty. I mean, you can't choose sign cheaper, something like that, a little less size on that reverb. Just fine tuning some of these parameters here a little bit. Alright, now, let's take envelope number one and put it on the pitch of our two oscillators. We can drop this and just about three. And we're just going to create that quick kind of sweep up. Alright, so just like that, pretty close, we just use two oscillators. And really the key is having that nice long porta mental time playing that line and little distortion with the sign cheaper in the classic tube and of course, all that reverb. Then we set up the filter number one to have this band-pass with very, very thin bandwidth and the cutoff frequency about right here. And that's basically the batch. So there you go. That is why Lynn by paper, diamond and loud puck. Save that one. See you in the next lecture. 34. Flosstradamus "Pillz" Hover Pad: Hey students, welcome back. In this lecture we're going to design the hover pad from philosopher domiciles pills. Alright, so this is a really simple one too. But it's a lot of fun. We're just gonna pile on a bunch of sawtooth waves. So let's enable all three oscillators. Leave them on sawtooth oscillator to move up one octave, 12 semitones oscillator three will move down once we have this nice range. And then I'll probably pull that up a little bit, pull that down a little bit. Alright, so that's our sawtooth wave there. And we'll go to the voicing page here and put Yunus Sono probably to eight is fine and Mano rotate and then create quite a bit of detuned here. Maybe a bit loud, a little less like that. Alright, now I'm going to enable the noise generator on bright noise and just add a little bit of that high frequency fuzz. And just like that. And what I'm gonna do is take elephant number five, put it into the amplitude, and just create a tiny range like that. Move this sine wave created increase the rate of bit. That just gives it that sort of distorted Hungary sound with this amplitude knob move in a little bit. And I'm also going to take elephant number six and put it onto the decay level or the sustain level of our envelope number four, which is our global envelope. So let's put that right there. Move this down just a tiny bit, and create a range like that. And we'll play with this rate a little bit. What that's gonna do is just create a little bit of tremolo and the overall patch. You speed it up. Turn, turn that on down a little bit, and then let's reduce that range just a little bit. So that's that hover sound. Oops. And of course, just a little bit of reverb is always nice for Trap music. Take that down. Something like that is the line. So that's the hover pads sound that comes right before the drop there. And that's, that's, that's our hover pad. So save that one. See you in the next lecture. 35. Bro Safari & UFO! "Burn the Block (Gent & Jawns Remix) Lead: He's students. Welcome back. In this lecture we're going to work on the lead line in the jet and John's remix of burn the block by bureau, Safari and UFO. It's a pretty simple one, but it's a lot of fun to play with, especially when you could program in line into your DAW and use some really, really fast triplets and things like that. So we'll get right into it. We're gonna leave oscillator number one on square saw. And we're going to reduce the wave table position to just about unfair. Alright, so we have a little blend of a square root of a square wave and a sawtooth wave. And we're gonna take all envelope one, put it into this pitch box and create a negative range. About four semitones is fine. And let's find two in this envelope here. Shorten the decay a little bit, a little shorter. Probably like that is fine. And we'll go to the voicing page here and just choose mono rotate, which just won a monophonic patch here. And I'll leave it on one voice. That's fine. Now let's send oscillator one to filter one. In FIR filter one will choose a screen filter. I'll bring that cutoff all the way up and probably the resonance down and maybe the screen up little bit. Just like that sounds good to me. Now for Fx1, we're gonna choose a sink delay. Delay sinks like this. Pull the Dry Wet balance down a little bit, dampen this mummy a little bit more. And Phil, left side we can do eighth notes and the right side we can do 3 16th notes. And that just creates a cool sink delay. Definitely less than, maybe a little lesser. And then some reverb on f x2. Just some of these parameters here. Now big part of this sound of course, is, like I said, going into your DOM programming in those really, really tight, like super fast kind of repeats on the note, which I can't just play physically. But that sort of gets you pretty close to that sound there. I'm gonna reduce that Puerto mental time. Just like that's a pretty simple patch. And that gets you really close to that sound with just blending the square and saw-tooth waves, adding that scream filter, which really brings out the square Venus actually of this wave table. And with a little delay and reverb and we have a cool lead line there. There you go. Hope you enjoyed that one. Play with that, make it your own. And we will see you in the next lecture. 36. DJ Fresh & Diplo "Earthquake" Lead: Hello again, students. In this lecture, we are going to do an emulation of earthquake by DJ fresh and dip love. This sort of Honky lead line in there. So let's set up our oscillator here. We're just going to use one oscillator. And we're going to choose a rough math number two. And we're gonna put the oscillator mode on formant. And we'll bring the intensity knob all the way to the left and leave the wave table position to the right. And it'll take an envelope one and put it in the pitch destination here, and just raise this up one semitone. Now, we're going to shape this envelope to have some attack and some decay as well. So we can take the sustain level down. And that's probably OK there. And maybe just move this attack out. We want this to sweep up one semitone because we have that settles, arrange and then sweep back down. You can choose linear for the decay algorithm if you want, but that's sort of up to you. So here's the note. Just like that. You just want it to go up and down quickly like that. Alright, now let's go to our voicing page and do unison O2, Mano, rotate. And for the pitch cutoff, just wanna tiny spread. Because if too much pitch cutoff will make it to detune, we want it to be, we want those voices to be pretty close and pitch, which creates kind of a cool Phase II sound here. Alright. Now will go to effects one, and we will choose the classic tube, full wet, full derive. All right, we need to change that parliamentary time. But for f x2 will choose delay sync. And you can make this kinda depending on what you want here, maybe eighth notes and quarter notes to take the Dry Wet balance down. And maybe the feedback down a little bit too. Okay, so let's go over to the oscillator and will reduce the Porta mental time quite a bit. And want a little less delay on there as well. And maybe increase this pitch cut off a little bit. Alright, and we have vibratos setup as a default here. You can see here on the oscillator page in this global center window, you have depth and rate already set to macro control number one. So you can add a little vibrato if you want and maybe increase the rate just a bit. Just like that. And I think it's it sounds to me like there's a little bit more fuzziness in the patch. So you can experiment with adding in a little bit of these different noise generators. Maybe a little tape is just a little bit. And just kind of adds a little bit of almost distortion. But it's really just a noise generator being added. Plus one, you have it set to that classic tube. And the Fx1 really makes it nice and gritty and just kind of kinda crappy sounding actually. But in, in sort of a cool vibe way. So there you go. That's the little lead line from earthquake by DJ fresh and duplo. Save that one. We'll see you in the next lecture. 37. Bro Safari "Avalon" Lead: Take two, Hello and welcome back. In this lecture we're working on the lead sound from Avalon by bureau Safari. It's a really fun patch. It's pretty simple. But we use some envelope modulation on the screen filter and a little bit of distortion. So we'll get right into it, will enable all three oscillators and leave them on square saw oscillator one will be a sawtooth wave. Take this down one octave oscillator two will be a square wave. Take this down an octave as well. But we're gonna change the oscillator mode to form it and bring the intensity knockdown oscillating into three square wave, leaving on spectrum oscillator mode. And we're gonna drop this down two octaves, or negative 24 semitones. We're also going to enable the modulation oscillator, drop it down an octave like that, and put it on oscillator number one for the phase. Okay, now let's send all these three, these three oscillators to filter one. And we'll choose a scream filter. And we can set up an envelope here to modulate. This is probably something like this. We've got to fine tune that in a second. Use envelope number one and bring this down about like that. And now let's set up this envelope, something like this. You can sort of decide how much scream in resonance you want in there. Okay, now we're going to put a classic tube here. Full wet in full Dr. So just like that. So that gets us really, really close to the sound. We're just using this envelope to sweep up that cutoff frequency. And when you add that classic tube distortion with the modulation oscillator, you get this nice, sort of dirty multi, multi tonal. That might be, it might not be a word. But patch I right now, if you want to add, I think is kinda cool too, is just to throw in a little bit of a pitch sweep up for each of these. Just take these each down one and that just gives you a little bit of movement on each of the oscillators. Now probably you don't wanna take the portmanteau time and put it back to Mano rotate like that. Just like that. There you go. That's the lead line from Avalon by bureau Safari. Save that one. See you in the next lecture. 38. RL Grime "Core" Lead: Hey students, welcome back once again. In this lecture we're going to design the lead line from RL Grimes core. And I really like this patch. I think it's super cool and really fun to play. Alright, so, and then it's pretty simple, so that's good. So we'll go to oscillator one and we'll choose mellow semantic from this digital hybrid column, ok, romantic. And for the oscillator mode, we will choose form. And now we're going to bring the wave table position to the left all the way. And the intensity knob will be right about here for now. Now we're gonna take our envelope number one and bring it into the pitch here and just bring this down about five semi-tones, something like that. And we'll create a plucking off envelope sort of like this. It's going to raise our pitch here. Maybe a little bit longer of a decay. Okay, that's good for now. We're also going to put this in the intensity knob and pull it up to the right a little bit. And we want that intensity knob to crest down a tiny bit. Now let's send this to filter one and choose bandpass FIR filter one. And we'll find the right frequency and bandwidth here. All right, so that sounds good to me for right now, maybe reduce the resonance a little bit. Let's add some reverb here and f x2, pull the dry wet down a little bit bigger size, increased the density and reduce the color. And we'll go to the voicing tab and we'll put you in a Sono on for mono rotate. And now the trigger section, we're normally we're using always, but for this one we're going to use legato chiller. And that's because in that line in the song, he does a little Trill. And so if we don't, okay, so let me just show you. If we don't have legato thriller, we're not going to be able to maintain that lower nodes. So it sounds like this, right? We don't want that. We want on legato thriller. However, we need to take that parliamentary time all the way down. We don't want any glide. Alright. So make sure it's on legato driller. It has a little honking thing there with a trill on the, on the, just fine tuning these little bit. Take that cut off down the bandwidth up a little bit. We're going to bring the master volume up a little bit because it does get kind of quiet with that band pass filter. Okay? Now you'll notice that we want that pitch sweep which we have in oscillator one using this envelope. But scenes were using legato thriller. If I'm, if I did, the envelope is not being triggered. If I play legato notes. So if I just play all those new notes above the one that I'm holding down aren't being are triggering that envelope. So you just when you're playing it, it's good to know that you're going to want to be aware of whether your notes are overlapping or not because that will give you that. But pitch sweep up, which we like. Alright, so there you go. There's the foundation of the lead line from core by RL grime. Save that one and, you know, play with it and make it your own. And we'll see you in the next lecture. 39. Flosstradamus & DJ Slink "Crowd Ctrl 2: Hello students, welcome back once again. Today we're going to do the lead line from crowd control 2, which is performed by a flustered amiss and DJ slink. Alright, so we're gonna set up two sawtooth wave oscillators, and we're gonna do some pitch modulation on those. And it's a pretty simple patch so we can get right into it. So we're gonna take oscillator one, leave it on sawtooth like that will raise it up an octave. Oscillator number two, will you on sawtooth and just keep it where it is there. Now let's take the envelope number one and put it in the pitch and just raise it up. Maybe two semitones, maybe three, depending on what you, what you like. And we're going to reduce the attack and the sustain level like that and just a short decay times. Just like that. Alright, now we're going to copy this envelope and we're gonna paste it into an envelope. Number two, we're going to put that here. And we're gonna raise this up a little bit more and maybe for is fine. And we're just going to bring the decay out because we want to have these two different envelopes applied to the pitch. We want those sort of shorter pitch drop and then also just a little bit longer but drop happening at the same time. And we're going to go to oscillate or two, and we're going to do the same thing here. Raise it up three envelope to raise that up for just like that nel it's good or Voicing page and cruise Yunus Sono to four or five, something like that. Choose mono rotate. And we're going to create quite, quite a bit of detuned here. Going to turn this down is probably a little down. Alright, so for this envelope, we're gonna make that a shorter decay a little bit. And then envelope one will make that decay time little shorter too. And I want to shorten those a little bit more. And let's go back to the voicing page. Maybe increase that Detune just a little bit more. Alright, so that gets us our oscillators set up. Now let's go to Fx1 and we'll add a classic tube and probably have it. Let's just evaluate this. Maybe increase the wet balanced, right? And add a little bit of reverb just a little bit here. Size is probably good there and we'll do density and color like that. You know, something like that. So that gets us really close to the lead line. In crowd control 2. As always, you can change this up, make it your own. But it's pretty simple. All we did was have two sawtooth waves with a bunch of different voices and detuned quite a bit. So actually just to illustrate here, let's hear what it sounds like if the pitch cutoff is off, right? So that's just that one. The voices exactly in, exactly in unison. But when we create that pitch spread, it changes the sound drastically. Then we're detuning those different voices, flattens it up and it makes it sound a little more big and dirty. Just like that. Alright, great work. See you in the next lecture. 40. DJ Snake & Lil' Jon "Bend Ova" Sawtooth Lead: Hello again, students. In this lecture we're going to design the sawtooth lead from Ben Dover by DJ Snake and little john. Alright, so this is a really, really simple patch, but it's a lot of fun. So we will get right into it here. So we're going to use two oscillators, both on sawtooth waves. Oscillate or number two, we're going to take down an octave 12 and not, probably not exactly at 12, maybe just a couple of cents down, a couple of cents up on this. And let's go to the voicing page here. Put Yunus Sono on eight, Mano rotate. And we're gonna create a pitch spread probably right about there. Looks good to me. And we're gonna take our envelope one, put it into the pitch destination here, and just do negative one is fine. Just want a little bit of that sweep up side. Turn that down. I'm going to turn the portmanteau time down a little bit and let's speed up that envelopes and make that to Kate Don a little bit shorter. Right? I want to turn down the amplitude of that second oscillator, the octave lower, we want to end there, but we wanna hear mostly that upper octave here. And maybe increase that Puerto mental time, bring it back. To split the difference there. Now, add some, just a little bit of bright noise. Just like that. And as always, little bit of reverb, I probably have the Dry Wet balance right there at nine o'clock and sizes probably good there. Just like that. So it's very simple. And it's just some detuned sawtooth waves with some reverb and a little bit of pitch modulation using an envelope. There is simple but very cool. And save that one. And we'll see you in the next lecture. 41. Bonus: Automation: Hey students, welcome back. This is going to be a bonus lecture that's going to show you how to use automation inside your DAW. I talk a lot about setting up the macro controls when we're designing patches so that you can quickly and easily go inside your dot and do automation. Automation is really important. It just brings her tracks to life and makes them sound a lot more professional rather than just using like stagnant patches. Okay, so I'm going to bring up a new instance of massive choose Audio Unit instruments and massive stereo like this. And we will do this reverse delay pluck patch that we've designed previously. Alright, so now it's time to lay something down. I'm going to bring all of these macro controls down to the bottom. And just going to create an eight bar pattern here, something like this. And I'm going to lay something down and we'll quantize it in just a second. Alright, now I'm gonna go into my midi region here. And I'm just going to do Command a, select all quantize these 2 16th notes like that. And that looks pretty good to me. Ok, so now remember that I instructed you to leave that number in for each of these MAC our controls, one vibrato that was in there before to cutoff three delay for noise, and five glide. Now, when we go to our automation and in logic, you just hit the hot key k. And that brings up here your automation selector here. And this is the automation parameter that you can choose from. So if I click that, I have some main controls here which are just, you know, native to logic and pan, so alone, things like that. Or I can choose massive. And of course, if you're using another plugin, that would pop up here. Same thing is true if you added a compressor or something, it as an insert effect. Now that compressor is available, you can do some automation there, okay? But I will just turn that off for now. So when I click on massive, you can see here that the first, these are all alphabetical. And so the first eight slots here are our eight macro controls because they start with numbers which comes before the letters. So if we were to leave number two, cut off inside massive as just cut off and I'll just show you here. Alright, like that. Now when we go to our automation. That's no longer in number two and we'd have to go down to c here. I mean, it's not that bad, but few, like vibrato is a v. So you'd have to scroll all the way down through all the parameters. So it's way easier to just use. Keep these numbers here so that you can see are macro controls right at the top of this automation menu. Okay? So if we select cutoff like that. Now we can draw in some automation by just clicking and making some points here. Like maybe we can have this cutoff sweep up, little bit sweep down, like that, and back down. I can also press the letter T. And I can choose some different tool options here. One of them being the automation Curve tool. So if I have the curve tool selected and you could see my, my pointer here has this little curve and the bottom. Now I can change this from linear to more, some more curved. Even like an S curve like that. I mean, we're just kinda going a little crazy for what we're doing right now. But just to show you what you can kind of do is pretty cool actually. Alright, so we can create a little crazy thing on the cutoff like that. So let's listen to that. Let's try another one. We'll work on the delay and maybe we can just have hit t twice to bring me back to the just regular pointer tool. So maybe we can have the delay just come in for the second half of the bar. Now another trick here is to hold command. And I can, if I just want to have like full delay in one section, I can hold command and select that point. And that will allow me to create a little some border points here based on the ends of the region that I just selected so I can bring the delay in all the way for just those last points. And one thing to mention, if you right-click, you can choose snap automation and that will line that automation points up with the bar divisions. Ok, so now we have a cutoff frequency and you can sort of see it lightly under here, the cutoff frequency is moving like that. And now we have our delay on for just the second half of the line. And let's do one more. Let's have noise. Start at the bottom. And at the middle, it'll be at its peak and then it'll go back out against k. So we just have a nice rising and fall. And well, I might as well just use them all. We can just bring in maybe a little glide here at the end. We'll do this and maybe, maybe we actually will have it just sweep up like that. And then we can choose t w to bring up the automation Curve tool. And we can maybe do like a weird curve just to, just sort of illustrate. Let's listen to that with all these different automation is going on. Alright, so what I notice is that that delay parameter was up way too high, this automation delay. And so we need to go in and change that. When you have used recent automation parameters, they'll pop up here in the bottom of this list. So that way you can just sort of see what you've recently used. And so I can pull up this delay and I'm going to double hit t twice again. Did just bring up the normal pointer. And instead of full one, which would be our macro control all the way at the right for delay. What I can do is just reduce this a little bit. Maybe it's like right here, so just adds a little bit of that Dry Wet balance in. And let's listen to that. Maybe I can create another point here and here and have that delay go up like that and then back down maybe to just like that. Right. So we just sort of through these together. Obviously, I didn't think about what I want my automation to do in great detail, but just to show you how to use automation inside your DAW. And I understand that it might be a little different if you're using FL Studio or Cubase or something. But the principle is pretty much the same. And so it's just a way to make your track come to life. You know it, rather than just having the stagnant patch be the same the whole time, you can really play with these parameters. Now, just to illustrate, I can also go inside massive. And I can change basically every parameter inside massive, the attack level of envelope three, the cut-off frequency of filter too. You can have it digested Dry Wet balance of master effects to so literally everything inside massive, pretty much every parameter you can use automation for. So you don't have to set up a macro control to do that. But I, I usually do just this to many options, you know, and sometimes too many options can just slow you down in the studio and we don't want that we want to be, we wouldn't be working quickly, getting our creative ideas across as quickly as possible. So there you go. That's automation. If you have any questions about automation, especially for using logic, which I know quite a bit about. You can jump in and create a post a discussion. I'll try to answer it as quickly as possible. That's the same is true with all the lectures, by the way, posts as many discussions as you want. Great work. See you in the next lecture. 42. Bonus: Sampling: Hey students, welcome back once again. In this lecture, we're gonna do another bonus lecture about sampling because I found this to be really common in trap music and really any kind of urban genre. We use a lot of sampling. And in trap music, especially just taking a very small vocal performance, chopping it up and sampling it and playing some notes, playing some lines. Okay, take two, hey, students will come back. We're going to do now another bonus lecture that's all about sampling. This is something we do a lot and trap music and really all the urban sort of genres use a lot of sampling. But in trap music, especially taking a very small vocal sample, chopping it up and playing it as if it were a synth patch. Ok, so this has nothing to do with massive. But if you're learning about Trap music, it's, it'll get you really go in on the right, in the right direction using sampling. So I just want to show you how to do that and you can explore, you can explore this a lot further. So here I am in logic. I'm going to hit F to bring up my media library. And I'm gonna go to loops have already found this one Bailey melody that kind of has a nice vocal line and I'm gonna chop this up so this is what it sounds like. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So I'm going to drop this in to my projects. That's fine. We can import tempo, doesn't really matter. Alright, now I'm going to just take a small portion of this right here, and I'm just hitting command and dragging across the audio region. That's what that little cycle sounds like. Actually maybe try this here. Just want one note. I don't want her to drop down like that. And I'm going to right-click on this, which will cut it left and right where I've set my boundaries for this region and choose bounce in place. You can also, ok, so for bounce and bounce regions and place will choose a new track, leave the source material. And that's pretty much all you need to know. Okay, so now we have just that little section here and I can tidy this up like this. You can also click and drag like that and then do Control B as a hotkey and that will do the same thing. Okay? So here we have, I'm going to just mute this source file here. So now I have just this little UI. Just like that. That's all we need. Some small like that. Now it's time to create a new instrument track. So I'm just clicking this plus button. Choose a software instrument and we will bring up the sampler EX 24 sampler like that. Now we have just a default sampler settings here. Right here on the upper right you have an edit button, and if you click that, it opens up your instrument editor. And so right here you have a bunch of controls and options for adding, for adding audio to your sampler. So now our job is to take that little melt vocal melody that we have. And all you do is click and drag it right in here. So now we just have one zone down here on this keyboard, you can see this blue box that's going across the entire keyboard. And that is so we just have one zone. If you're taking a bunch of drum samples and dropping them in, you can have contiguous zones where each new note on the keyboard triggers a different sample. That's sort of a different use for sampling. For this one, we just want to have this one vocal and we want to be able to play it as if it were a midi instrument. Now make sure that this box right here pitch is selected and it brings you a little check. And we don't want one shot and we don't want reverse. So I'll show you why if pitches not selected. And now I'm walking up the keyboard. Every new Note that I strike on the keyboard is going to maintain the pitch of the original audio file. But when I select pitch, then it locks the pitch up to the key of the keyboard, right? That's what we want. So similarly one-shot we don't really want because this will sort of disable our envelope that we're going to set up. So if I have one shot selected everytime I strike a note, it will play the entire length of the audio file. I'm just hitting the note really quickly and still playing the whole thing. If one shot is de-selected, which is what we want, then I can play faster notes, right? I'm holding down the key. Obviously the audio file is only so long, so it's not going to just continue forever, but it will continue as long as the audio file is. And obviously reverse. You can choose if you want, that just reverses the file. Which when we're just taking one syllable, you know, it's not gonna make too much of a difference. So that's all we need to know for setting up this just one zone sampler patch here. Now we need to go to instrument and save as, and this will take you to your folder. So I'm just going to call this trap course sample excess. And that will save it like that. Now we can close out of our instrument editor and go back to our sampler. So I have this way, we can, we can title this instrument here, just sample for now. And so that is the track that's selected. So I can play it with my midi keyboard. Now we can, we can play align kinda like this. And some of you may recognize that little line and it sounds pretty cool already. You can have some fun with that just as it is, but we can make this a little bit happier by adjusting a few of the parameters here with our sampler. So we have an envelope to controlling the overall amplitude of the patch. And so our sustained as that foal. So and we have no attack noted K and no release. Well, we can do is just bring this attack up just a little bit. And that'll just give us a little bit of ramp up into the sound. Maybe a little less, maybe a little bit more than that. And honestly it sounds kind of weird to say it like this, but it sort of makes it sound a little more sampled. And I mean, like just having a little attack time in the beginning just gives it a little bit more of a sampler type feel, which is kinda cool. Now, what I like to do is in the middle of the sampler here we have this modulation routing matrix, and it's, it's very different from massive. It uses the same principles, but the whole like user interfaces really different from massive. So it'll be a little exercise in translating what you've been learning about massive into this sampler. But let's see if we can do it here. So each of these boxes is a different modulation routing box. So we have 12345678910. We have ten options here. Numbers 12 are already set up. The velocity is controlling the sample selector, and the LFO one is controlling the pitch based on the midi controller. So that's just automatically sets that up for you. So let's go to number three here and let's see what we can do to set our own. So you have on the very top, you have destination and you can click that, choose different destinations. So these are the parameters that you can modulate using a certain source. So for this one, we want to have pitch. So I'm gonna select pitch via, we'll come back to Source is the modulation source. So if we go back to massive, the way that the modulation routing works and massive is you grab a modulation source like, such as the LFO. We have that little target next to the LFO and you can drag it into a certain parameter in the user interface and then create a range by clicking and dragging that little number that you dropped into the box. Here with the sampler, that EX 24 sampler and logic. You instead just choose a destination from this drop-down menu, and then you choose a modulation source. So what we wanna do is choose an envelope one as the source for this. And we just want to have a little bit of an attack. So that's going to sweep up our pitch. When we create a range. So we want to create a positive range here. Probably not all the way to the top because that might be a little extreme, but we can hear that. That's just a little too much to me is and maybe about halfway up here. And maybe increase this attack time a little bit. Now we also need to bring the sustain up because otherwise it's going to drop back down. Right. So that sounds about right to me. We have a little bit of sweep up with the pitch. And we have a little bit of sweep up if the attack time as well. Now what I would also do is switch this from polyphonic to monophonic just because I probably don't want to play an E chords. Just wanna have a monophonic line. And if you'd like to add a little bit of glide, you can do that as well. Maybe a little less. Just about right there. Sounds good. Now, you can also, if you want to beef up the sound a little bit, it's a little quiet. You can choose unison and maybe not 16 voices, but maybe like eight. I don't know, eight or for something like that, six. And what that will do is it creates multiple voices being played at once. All right, so that's basically how it works. All we did was we chose Edit and we dropped in a little piece of a vocal sample. It's just an apple loops that comes with logic, just really plain vocal loop. And we dropped an N, we selected pitch and we just have the one zone and we saved it. And then we added a little bit of amplitude, I'm sorry. We've added a little bit of attack and on the amplitude of the patch. And then we added a little bit of attack and full sustain to sweep up the pitch. We put it on monophonic with little glide and unison. So we have eight voices playing the same, playing the same note. Obviously there are a lot of other parameters that you can choose here you have this filter section that you can do. You can have some pitch detuning. You can have the pitch bend go down 12 steps if you want to do that. Obviously all this other modulation routing, we can add some vibrato, lots of different things. So we just sort of scratched the surface, but I just wanted to get you started in that direction. If this is something that you're interested in and it's a lot of fun. It's brings out a lot of creativity. So, great job with that one. I'll include this sampler patch in the course files, in the, in the, in the lecture files as well as my project here, just so you can kinda see what's going on. So I write, Thanks so much. See you in the next lecture.