Darktable Made Easy for Beginners | RAW Editing for GIMP | Chris P. | Skillshare

Darktable Made Easy for Beginners | RAW Editing for GIMP

Chris P., GIMP, Photoshop, Photography + Lightroom

Darktable Made Easy for Beginners | RAW Editing for GIMP

Chris P., GIMP, Photoshop, Photography + Lightroom

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29 Lessons (3h 49m)
    • 1. Getting Started With Darktable

      1:30
    • 2. Darktable Overview

      9:07
    • 3. How To Import Your Photos

      11:35
    • 4. How To Export Your Photos

      10:07
    • 5. Edit RAW Photos In GIMP

      4:41
    • 6. Discover the lighttable Interface

      17:28
    • 7. How To Organize Your Photos

      8:13
    • 8. Discover the darkroom Interface

      10:08
    • 9. Where Does Editing Start?

      1:38
    • 10. First Editing Challenge

      5:58
    • 11. How To Use the Histogram

      9:16
    • 12. Fix Lens Distortion

      6:25
    • 13. Basic Edit Adjustments

      10:30
    • 14. Fix the White Balance

      10:21
    • 15. How To Crop + Rotate

      8:12
    • 16. Recover Highlight + Shadow Details

      5:32
    • 17. How To Use the Tone Curve

      5:20
    • 18. How To Edit With Masks

      14:38
    • 19. How To Retouch In darkroom

      7:45
    • 20. How To Remove Digital Noise

      4:44
    • 21. How To Sharpen Your Photos

      5:21
    • 22. How To Create a Vignette

      3:34
    • 23. How To Create Presets + Styles

      6:35
    • 24. How To Batch Edit

      2:30
    • 25. How To Create Watermarks

      7:12
    • 26. Butterfly Transformation Edit

      5:09
    • 27. Portrait Retouching

      16:18
    • 28. "Multi-Light" White Balance Challenge

      6:49
    • 29. Epic Yosemite Edit

      12:34
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About This Class

Darktable Made Easy For Beginners! 

This darktable class was created for darktable beginners! Discover how to edit photos like a pro, including how to re-touch, use masks, fix "multi-light" white balance issues, and more.

This class will get you started with editing your RAW files in darktable. Everything from importing to organizing and exporting.

Oh, and we can’t forget about the dozen+ editing tools you’ll use on a regular basis to achieve your creative vision.

Plus, you’ll learn how to retouch directly in darktable. And how to use the most powerful tool in all of darktable… Masks!

How to install darktable...

First, you’ll start off by learning how to install darktable… it’s quick and easy.

Quick start guide

Next, you’ll discover four essential skills all darktable users want to know:

  • How to import your photos

  • Quick editing tips

  • How to export your photos

  • How to edit your RAW files with GIMP

Discover the lighttable view

Next, you’ll discover how to work with your photos in darktable…

  • Discover the lighttable view interface

  • How to organize your photos

Discover how to edit your photos in darkroom

You’ll learn the 12+ most used tools in darkroom for editing your photos. Plus, advanced tools for retouching your photos are included. Oh, and you’ll discover the most powerful tool in darkroom; Masks.

  • Learn where editing starts

  • Learn how darkroom creates an editing challenge and how to overcome

  • Learn about the Histogram + Tonal Ranges

  • How to fix lens distortion

  • Make quick basic edit adjustments

  • How to fix the white balance

  • How to crop, straighten, + rotate your images

  • How to add contrast to your photos

  • How to recover details in your highlights and shadows

  • How to use Masks for precise edits

  • How to retouch your photos in darkroom

  • How to remove digital noise

  • How to sharpen your photos

  • How to add a vignette

  • How to create presets + styles

  • How to batch edit your photos

  • How to create a watermark

Editing challenges...

You’ll now see everything put together as I share how I edit images from start to finish!

  • Butterfly Transformation

  • Portrait Retouching

  • "Multi-Light" White Balance Challenge

  • Epic Yosemite Edit

If you're ready to cut the Adobe cord and their monthly subscription sign-up and I'll see you in the inside!

Meet Your Teacher

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Chris P.

GIMP, Photoshop, Photography + Lightroom

Teacher

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Transcripts

1. Getting Started With Darktable: Do you want to learn how to edit your raw files in a free program like dark table. Would you like to discover how to edit your photos from ordinary, too spectacular photos that will make your family and friends be amazed by your photographic skills. Perfect. This is the class for you. This course was created for all levels of photographers, from amateurs to aspiring pros and prose like raw files are included with this class so you can follow the step-by-step tutorials and practice what you learn. You will learn how to import and export your final edits. Plus, you'll discover where your editing should start, how to properly adjust your white balance, crop and straighten your photos. How did we cover shadow and highlight details? How to remove digital noise, how to retouch your images and dark table and more. And we can't forget about the most powerful editing tool and dark table, which is masks. You will learn everything you need to use them to achieve your creative vision. So why take this course for me? Well, I've spent the last 30 years as a pro photographer and editor. So not only will you learn how to use dark table, but I also share pro tips I've learned over the years that can be applied to any editing software. If you're ready to cut the Adobe cord and their monthly fee, click that Enroll button and I look forward to seeing you on the inside. Thanks for listening and have an awesome day. 2. Darktable Overview: Today I want to show you how to get started with our table. My name is Chris Parker, and this series of tutorials is going to give you a tour around this awesome raw photo editor. So if you're ready, let's do it. For those of you new to dark table. It was created for the purpose of editing your raw files and managing them. Plus, it works seamlessly with gap. Dark table is comparable to Lightroom, but it has a lot of advantages over it. One being that it's free and it doesn't require a catalog. And it has a lot of editing tools and features that are better than Lightroom, yes, better than Lightroom. To install dark table, it's real easy to do find the link in the description below or in the resources folder of your class. And then once you navigate to the site, locate your operating system, download the file, and then you can go ahead and install it like you do any other software. So if you're on a Mac, you're going to drag this to your applications folder and it will automatically install it. If you're on a PC, you're going to double-click this file here that you downloaded, and then you'll follow the on-screen prompts to install it like you do any other software. Once you have it installed, you can then go ahead and open up dark table. And I am using the Mac version, but don't worry, the Mac and the PC and the Linux version are all exactly the same. Also for transparency, I have two images in here that our mind. This one right here and this butterfly here. And then all the other images are stock images that I'm using to show you how to use dark table. So once you open up dark table for the first time that you will be in what is known as the light TableView minus these photos, of course. So this is going to be blank in the middle here. And then to begin working with your images, you have to actually import them. But like I mentioned, you don't have to create a catalog like you do with Lightroom. So to import your images, you're gonna come up here to the left panel. And then you can import either a single or multiple images, a folder of images, or if your camera is connected to your computer, dark table is going to recognize that and then you can import from the media card here. Now there used to be a button here that says scan for devices which would scan for your camera and other media cards that were connected to your computer. But for some reason I don't have it in this version. We're going to go into great detail about all the different options for importing your images in part two of this series. So make sure you check that out after you finish this one. Now, some of the things that you can do in light table, other than just importing your images, is organizing your images by adding star ratings to them, adding labels, tags, keywords, things like that to help you organize your images. And you can see here on the thumbnails, some of the images have stars. This one has one star, this one has none. Some have colored labels. And that's how you manage your images so you can find the images you need when you need them versus going through thousands and thousands of images like I have installed or imported into dark table already I have over a 100 thousand images. And even though these aren't my images, all my other images are organized and you can see under tagging hair, I have a lot of different tags that I've used for those images. So it's important to manage your images from the beginning so you can locate the images you need when you need them. Over here on the right, we have some options to help you organize your images here as well. And then we have our options down here to rate our images either with star ratings are labels or both. And then down here we have a timeline that shows the year for all the images and your library or your database. Now if you look up here in the top right, we have an item called dark room, which is another view in dark table. So if we click on dark room, it will then navigate to that new view. And it's going to show the image that you had selected in the middle screen here. And then we have a thumbnail of all our images down here that we can navigate to and begin working on as needed. Over here on the left, we have options to help us manage our workflow, like snapshots and history, which is going to record every type of edit that you apply to an image. And you can go back in time by clicking on one of these items to narrow down a specific point and the editing workflow and case, you're not happy with the direction of the current edit. And then you can begin reediting from here versus starting over. And then over here on the right, we have three different groups by default that includes over 60 different editing tools. So this first group right here is going to include things like adjustments for your white balance, exposure, Lens Correction, getting rid of digital noise, things like that. Next we have color grading, which is going to have things like color balance, shadows and highlights, tone, curves, levels, and other editing tools for color grading or color correcting your images. And then we have effects. And the final group here, which is going to include things like vignetting, adding grain, sharpening your images, maybe adding a watermark, things like that. Now, this first group right here is going to actually show you all the active tools for that particular image. So you can see all the different editing panels here. I used to edit this image right here. Now the thing that I love about Dart table is you can come in here and you can customize these group of tools based on your own preference or your own needs as far as editing goes and your editing workflow out of 60 plus 20 is I only use about 15 to 20. So I've created my own group of tools based on my editing workflow. And it makes it easier to concentrate just on the tools I need to use versus going through this entire list to find the tools that I need. So if you click on this hamburger icon right here, you can click on Manage Presets. And then from here you can either duplicates a default group and then customize it, or click on this icon here. And then you can add a module group. You can rename it, click on this icon, and then add the editing tools you want to put inside of that particular group. Make sure you give your group a new name. And then once you're done, you can come over here again and then click on your personal preset or grouping of editing tools. I have my three-step workflow right here, which includes the tools that I use 99% of the time, you can always come back and click on the default options to get the other modules. Or you can just type in something right here to get one of the other tools, not in your group. How cool is that? I love it. Now as far as editing in dark table, it works exactly the same like any other Raw editor. You apply the edit and it doesn't apply directly to the pixels in the image file. The edits are stored in the database in dark table and it creates an XMP file that stores that data. Now the other cool thing is you can actually customize your interface to give your images more room to make them larger, to make it easier to edit those images. So if you take a look here on the right side and left side, those are two panels. And then at the top and the bottom we have two additional panels. And they each have an arrow right here. So if you click on that, you can condense that panel. We can do that for every side. If you hit your tab key, it will remove all the panels. If you hit your tab key again, it will reshow the panels that were visible at the time you hit your tab key. If you want to bring these panels back, you're just going to click on these arrows again. Now down here, we have our thumbnails and if we hover our mouse right about there, we're going to get that icon there. And then we can increase the size of those thumbnails, taller or shorter. Now in addition to that tab key, there are a ton of keyboard shortcuts and dark table which you can find by pressing the letter H. And you'll get a list of all the different keyboard shortcuts you can use to help speed up your editing workflow. 3. How To Import Your Photos: Today I want to share with you everything you need to know about importing images into dark table, whether it's importing from your media card camera or a hard drive if you're ready, odds to do it. So before you can start editing your images with dark table, you must first import them. I also want to point out that your image files are not actually being imported. Instead, what you see is a preview of your original file. Therefore, do not use dark table as a way to backup your file since that's not what it was designed for. Alright, now that we have that out of the way, let's go ahead and jump into dark table and get started. All right, make sure you're in the light TableView. Navigate to the left panel and click on the import option here to see all the different options for importing into dark table. So I have four options right now. And that's because I have my Nikon camera connected to my computer. And once upon a time, dark table hand another button under here called scan for devices, which was used to scan your computer to locate a media card or a camera if dark table did not automatically recognize it when it was plugged in. So right now, it automatically recognizes my camera, but it doesn't automatically recognize a media card that is plugged in by itself. So hopefully they bring that button back or hopefully you already have it. And hopefully dark table it is also recognizing your devices automatically and then you'll see those options to import accordingly. So the first two options up here, we can import a single image or multiple images that we select, or we can import a folder of images. And both of these are for when you want to import from a hard drive. When you import from a camera, it's going to import, of course, from the media card in that camera. Tethered shoot. When you click on it, it's going to go to a new view called tethering. And we can see down here it says new session initiated. And what that allows you to do is I'm gonna go ahead and take a picture here, outside my window or through my window here. And then once the camera finches writing that to the media card, dark table will recognize that and import the image automatically, which is pretty cool. If you have a client that wants to see images as you're taking photos, go back to light table here. And the other thing I want to mention is when you import from your hard drive or an external device like a media card or a camera. The options are going to be different because we need to tell dark table what we wanna do with those images if they're not already on our hard drive. So for example, when you import from immediate card, it's going to automatically copy those images from the media card to your hard drive. And a default location, which is your pictures folder. But you can actually change that and I'm going to show you how to do that in just a second. So let's go ahead and start with import from a camera or a media card. So you can see all the different options. We have to set up in order to import them the way we want them. So once you start the process, you'll see this import images from camera dialog window. You'll see a preview of all the images and then you can select the images that you want to import. So you have to select the ones that you want to import before you can actually import. If you hold down your control key or your Command key, if you're on a Mac, you can then select images randomly like this. Or if I click on the top and hold down my shift key and then click on another image, say down here, and we'll select all those images and between. And then if you hold down your control key and press the letter a, that will select all the images to be important. Now if you take a look up here, it says job code and then no name underneath it. So job code is a fancy term or a developer's name for basically renaming your files. So the way it's set up right now with no name, it's not going to rename my files, but if I want to rename the files, I can type in something right here. So if I want to put in import images, that would be the name of my files instead of this DSC 1590 one it would be import images, but it's also going to add additional information based on the preferences I have set up, which is the year, the day, and the month. And I also have a sequential number being appended to the file name as well. So let's go into the preferences so I can show you how to set all that up as well as changing the directory location where the images are imported. We're going to click on this icon right here to get into Preferences. Click on your import tab and then come down here to Session options. And this will allow you to change the file naming structure for your images and your folders. And then this first option here is the base directory, which is the location where your images are going to be imported to. Now, yours is going to say your pictures folder. Mine is different. It says desktop inside of a folder called photos. Now the one thing you're going to notice here, there is no Browse button to locate the folder you want to designate for importing images too. So instead you have to actually type in the actual directory. So you can do this whether you're on a Windows, Linux, or a Mac computer, you just have to navigate via your operating system window. And then take note, which is right here for Mac users, the location where you want to place those images. So here's my photos folder with a couple of folders that I've used recently to import some images. And you just need to take note of this user's username, desktop, and then photos, and then type it in right here to designate that as the new location. Right under that we have our subdirectory naming pattern. So if you're going to place your images and a subdirectory, it's going to add this information which is year, month, day. And then we have job code which is going to take the file name that you designated like I showed you previously and added or appended to that. And then down here we have file naming pattern, which is going to be the filename that it's going to be renamed to. So we have year, month, day sequence, which is a sequential number, 123, et cetera. And if you want to add the filename to that, he had to type in this information or this code right here. So just click here and then type that out. Make sure you do an underscore at the end to separate it from the sequential number here. And now my chosen filename will be added to this as well. But the thing is, do you really need the year and the date here in the filename and the folder, that's entirely up to you. If you don't want that information, go ahead and select and delete it. The other thing you can do if you want to keep the filename of your image as it is in your media cart. Select this option right here. All right, let's go ahead and close this out and go back to the import window because I have one more thing I want to show you. And that's this Settings tab right here. Now if you shoot in raw and captured JPEG files at the same time and you want to exclude the JPEG files from being imported. You can select this option right here. Under that we have apply metadata port. You can add a title and description. You can add some copyright information here as well, some notes and some tags or keywords. So I would use descriptive words to describe what those photos are to help you find them later on. Now, under that, we have an option called override today's day. And this is pretty important to know and understand because if you don't set this, then your images may not be as organized as you think they are or you may have trouble finding something if you're doing a search based on a date. So what do I mean by that? Well, when we were in that preferences window, I showed you you could set the year, the month and the day for the folder and the file name. So if you're using those, it's going to add the day of import, not the day of the actual shoot. So if you're importing a photo that you shot last week, it's going to be labeled with today's date, not last week's date. So override today's date with the day of the shoot. And then the other thing I want to point out is the format for adding the dates. So we're going to do year, we're going to do month, and then the day of the shoot. Once you have everything set up, you can go back in here, select your images, click on Import, and your images will be imported into dark table. All right, let's take a look at the options for importing from a hard drive. And like I mentioned before, there's a lot less options and that's because we're not copying from a media card to a hard drive. And the other thing to note is you can rename your files during import, and we cannot rename files in dark table itself after import. So you're going to have to find a way to do it on your operating system or another piece of software for renaming your files. Now luckily, and Windows and Mac computers, we have options for renaming our files within those operating systems. You'll just have to do a Google search to learn how to do that. So all you have to do is navigate to the location where your images are, select that folder or individual images as needed. And then these are all the options that we have right here. We can ignore JPEG files just like before. We can also apply metadata on Import. And then our last option here, import folders recursively allows you to tell dark table to import images from multiple folders. So for example, let's take a look at my folder structure here. And I have a master file. And then I have three different folders or subfolders within it labeled by the category. So my weddings folder here includes images from different years. I have 2008 through 2015, and then within those, I have additional folders by client name, and then inside of that, I have additional subfolders. So by default, dark table is going to look inside of the folder for any images if it doesn't see any, because they're all in sub folders, it's not going to import those images. You need to drill down until you find the folder of images that you want to import. Or if you select Import folders recursively, then dark table is going to go through each one of these folders and subfolders. And any images inside of them will then be imported and organized by the file name or the fuller name, I should say. So that's an important one if you have a deep structure of folders, like I do. 4. How To Export Your Photos: Now that you've completed editing and dark room, you're ready to share your images with the world. But how? Well, the answer lies within this tutorial. So if you're ready, let's do it. All right, in dark table here, make sure you're in the light tableview. Select an image or images that you want to export and click on Export Selected and you have a ton of options to choose from. Before you export your images, we're going to go over each one of these items so you know what they do and which ones you should select. But keep in mind, some of these are very advanced options and are beyond the scope of this tutorial because entire books have been written about them and we can't cover everything in this tutorial. But once you're done with this video, you will know how to export your images and which option I recommend using. So the first thing you need to do is tell dark table where to export the file. So click on this icon here and choose the destination. Under that we have an item here called create unique filename, which is going to append a number at the end of that filename. If you click here, you also have overwrite, which will overwrite the original file. And you also have Skip, which will skip renaming the file. But if your original file is in that same folder location, it will over write it. So I don't recommend either one of these. It's nice to have a number appended to the file name so that you can keep them together if you decide to put them in the same folder. And then under that we have to set the format or the file type of the image when export it. By default, we have JPEG selected. If you click on it, you get this menu here with additional file formats. None of these look familiar to you, then you won't need to use them. In fact, I would think 99% of the time JPEG will be sufficient for most of your projects, especially if you're posting online, JPEG is sufficient, even when I do print enlargements, I still use JPEG 8-bit and I find my prints are perfect with that file format. Next, you need to set the quality of that JPEG file. So you can set this between 0 to one hundred. One hundred is the highest quality, and I set mine to 80 for the quality just means a smaller file and it may not be as good as 100. But I can't see the difference unless I'm pixel peeping. In other words, I'm zooming in real close and putting that print enlargement right up against my face. I'm not gonna see the difference when it's hanging on the wall or sitting on my desk. All right, So under that we have an option to set the size of the file on export. By default, it's going to set the size to be the same as your raw file. If you want to change it, you can adjust the width and the height accordingly. You can set it in pixels, centimeters or inches, or by scale. So if you want to create an 8 by 12 print, you would type in eight for the width, 12 for the height, and then the DPI, or what is known as dots per inch. So that's the resolution here, eight by 12 by 300. If you're going to be using the images for online use, then you would use pixels. So now that same 8 by 10 print as now 2400 by 3600 pixels per inch. The other thing you can do is you can leave the width or the height set to 0. And then you can adjust the width or the height accordingly to whatever you need, let's say 800 pixels wide. And then dark table will adjust the height automatically to keep your image in proportion. And this is useful when you're sending images to a social media site that requires a specific width. All right, so this next option allow upscaling. I recommend using when you set the size of the dimensions be larger than the original raw file. And what this option is going to do when you set it ts is it's going to improve the quality of the image because you're making it larger than the original. And oftentimes, images will become jagged or pixelated due to the extra pixels that have to be created when making it larger since they were not there originally. So long story short, use upscaling when the dimensions are larger than your original. The next option, high-quality resampling, is another way to improve the quality of your images because it's going to process that image or the export in a different order in order to create a higher quality image. But the downside is it's going to take a lot longer when you have this set to yes versus to know. But if a high-quality file is of importance to you, I would recommend using this option here. The next option is grayed out for JPEG file formats. And it's not until you select something that can store masks like an SCF file, which is a gimp file format. Will you be able to store masks with that file? Under that, we have the color profile that you want to export to. If you're only putting images on line, sRGB is the way to go. I even use this sometimes for prints. If I'm sending to my home printer, I will choose one of these other options that closely relates to the color profile of my printer. So again, like I mentioned before, color profiles are something you're going to need to spend a little bit more time learning about. But for now, for 99% of your images, sRGB should be sufficient until you have. Understanding of these other ones and know when to use them and when not to use them. The next option here, intent, is another advanced type of setting that you're going to need to learn more about. And what this does is dark table is going to render your images that have out of gamut colors based on the option that you have selected here. So if you don't know what a color gamut is, that's something else you need to learn about if you want to take advantage of this option here and have higher-quality images on export. The next option called style is like presets, and it will allow you to apply specific edits that you've saved and you can apply those on Export. It's something that I usually do during the editing process and that's something that I do on export. But you do have that option to apply them during the export process. Now if you decide to use a style on export, you can choose to have that style appended to or overwrite the history stack of that image. I would recommend appending it, but not overriding it because you may want to go back at a certain point and take a look at the different editing steps he took for a particular image. So the last decision to make is right inside of here. If you click right here, you get a new window called Edit Metadata exportation. So from here you can tell dark table what metadata you would like applied or included in the image. And these are all the default settings and you may or may not want to turn these off. One you may want to consider turning off is geotags. Let's say you're taking some pictures at home and your camera or your smartphone is adding geo-information. Well, with that information, somebody can find out where you live if you're posting these online. So if you don't want people to know where you live, go ahead and uncheck geotags. And maybe you don't want tags either maybe you're using the names of your kids or your spouse or other family members and you don't want to include the names because you want to give them some privacy. You might want to turn off the tags option as well. And then once you save that, it's going to be sticky. So the next time you export, those same settings will still be there. All right, Now that you've spent all this time going through and setting this up, you may want to save this as a preset so you don't have to come back and do this every single time. Now that being said, this is sticky information. In other words, when you come back tomorrow and next week, whatever, these settings are still going to be there. But maybe you're exporting images to Facebook one day. And then the next day you want to export images for Instagram. And the file size or the dimensions of that file are different for both platforms. Well, you can come up here and click right here and click on store new preset and give this preset a name. You can call it Facebook. And then you can select that preset from here. And then those export options that you set for Facebook will repopulate according to that preset. Now, the moment you've been waiting for, you can click on export and dark table will begin exporting your image. 5. Edit RAW Photos In GIMP: Today I'm going to show you how to open and edit your raw files with yep, So if you're ready, all ads do it. So the first thing you need to do is you need to download and install an application that can edit RAW files. So in this case, I'm using dark table because it works seamlessly with Gimp. So make sure you download and install dark table and make sure the application is closed. So I have a couple of raw files here. Then I'm going to try and open up in GIMP. So I'm gonna click and drag these over the interface. Once I release, GIMP will begin opening up the files, but not in the GIMP interface. Instead, what it's doing is it's automatically opening up the dark table application. Once it's open, it's going to show, well, only one image. So it's only going to open up one image at a time if you are trying to open multiple images. So from here, I can go ahead and edit the image that is open in dark table. And then once I come up here and go to dark table and click on quit dark table. Gimp is going to automatically open that file in the GIMP interface so I can continue editing the image as needed. But something else is going on as well in the background that you can't see. And that is our second image is now automatically opening up in dark table. So now I can go ahead and continue editing my second image. Then I can go ahead and quit dark table to have that file opened in GIMP. Alright, so here is my second image in a new tab. And this workflow is going to be very slow and it's going to take up a lot of your resources, CPU, RAM, et cetera. And the more images you try and open in this manner, the slower it's going to be. And you may find that GIMP crashes at some point if you run out of resources. So I don't recommend opening up multiple images in this way. Instead, I would work on one image at a time, two or three maybe at the max. If you have more than that, I would recommend opening up all your raw files and dark table first and then exporting them as a JPEG file and then opening them up in Gimp to do your additional editing. Now, that brings us to something else that you need to understand about editing raw files with GIMP. And that is, you're not actually working with a raw file in GIMP. So at any edits you do here will not be reflected in that raw file. Instead, you have to export it as a JPEG or tiff or whatever file format you need. And this is no different than Photoshop. When you open up a raw file in Photoshop, It's not opening up the raw file in the Photoshop interface. Instead, Photoshop has a plugin called Adobe Camera Raw, where you edit the raw files. And then once you're done just like this, you can open it in Photoshop. So if I do my edits on this, I'm just going to go ahead and crop this. And if I come up here and click on those to close it, It's going to say save the changes to et cetera, et cetera. So I'm gonna click on Save as. And I have a file format of x c, f, which is glimpse file format for saving multiple layers. I don't want this file format. Maybe I just want to post this on Facebook. Well, I can't save it as a JPEG file from here. We actually have to go up to file export as and then choose the JPEG format. But you may notice right here, I have a file extension of N E, F, which is the file format for my Nikon camera. If you're shooting with Canon, It's going to say CR2. If you're on Sony, it's going to say a RW. And those are all the file formats for your specific cameras, raw files. So if I go ahead and try and save this and click Export, I get this message from Gimp that the given filename does not have any known file extension. So therefore, we cannot save this as a raw file. You have to save it in a different file format that is compatible with Gimp, like a JPEG file. 6. Discover the lighttable Interface: Next up, I'm going to show you all the different ways you can interact with your images in the light TableView. So let's dive into light table here and take a closer look at all the different options. We've already gone over import in a previous tutorial. Let's talk about collect images a little bit. Anytime you import a folder of images, you will see the folder name here, followed by the number of images in that folder. And as you can see, I have hundreds of folders in dark table. And it would be pretty hard to find exact photo. I want just scrolling through these since the folder names are not really telling me what kind of photos are inside of there. That's why we have a search option within this to find the files we need based on the options that we select via this drop-down window. Right here are the struck down menu. If you click here you see all the different items you can search your photos from. So we have metadata here, we have dates and timestamps. We have capture details like camera lens, aperture, ISO, et cetera, and other options related to dark table itself. What I like to start with is a tag and then I can type in something like Detroit. And that will show me I have 1170 images and dark table from Detroit. So if I double-click on this, the window here, the interface in the middle will update and show me all the images from Detroit, which are actually weddings. And then if I want to narrow down my search even further, I can click here and select narrowed down search. And then I can select another item from this list. Let's say I want to find specific images with a specific camera. Let's say my Nikon D3 a 100 here I have 2701 images so I can double-click. And again, it narrows down the images to just those two options that I selected here, Detroit and camera. And you can continue doing this until you find the exact photo you want. Maybe I want to find all the images based on a specific ones. So if I go with my 12 to 24 here, I now narrow down my search to 328 images. You can then come up here and save that search query by coming up here and clicking on this hamburger icon and selecting store new preset. Now for this class, I've created one and removed all the other ones that I had just to make this a little bit easier to follow. So if I click on getting started with the T or dark table When show all the images that is being used throughout this class. So that's how you search for your images and dark table and why I recommend using tags. So you can further define and describe the images and dark table and then use this option to narrow down your search to find the images you need within seconds. All right, let's go ahead and close this right below that we have recently used collections, which is basically. The search options that you applied up here. And then below that we have metadata that's been stored when you took your photo. So the type of camera, shutter speed, aperture, ISO, et cetera, the date it was taken, and then any copyright information is included as well. So I think what I wanna do next is I want to go ahead and increase the size of these preview so we can see them just a little bit better. And we have a slider down here that will allow us to do that. So left to make them larger, right? To make them smaller. And we have a number 25 here. And that basically tells you how many images across are going to be in that roast. So 25 images across is the smallest. So right now we have four images across, 1, 2, 3, 4. It's a little bit too large. I'm gonna go ahead and zoom back out a little bit here. All right, and then over here in the bottom left, we have our options for reading our images with stars or labeling them with a color label. We also have an option here to reject the loose. And we're gonna talk more about rating and cooling your images in the next tutorial, Let's go ahead and continue navigating around late table here, actually elicit. Take a look right here. We can see different timelines down here with different bars. And this shows how many photos were taken in that year and not by number, but by a graph basically or bars. So we can see some years I have more photos than others. I don't have my personal photos inherits mostly wedding photos from 2007 and on, although I don't have all of the wedding photos imported, but they also have years in here that I know up to 2015, but it stops at 2013. So if I navigate to the right here, it will begin showing those other years. And it looks like I actually have images up to 2020. I actually stopped shooting weddings back in 2015. So these are probably just some personal photos that I imported for some reason. I don't remember why, but anyways, that's a timeline of all your photos. Now the other cool thing is you can narrow down the images that you can see by targeting a specific year. First, we need to come up to collect images and click on this icon to reset the parameters. So you have access to all those images. So if I come over here to 2007 and click and drag over to the right, it will then narrow down the images for that month and year. So this is another way of searching for images based on a year. Alright, I'm gonna go ahead and bring up my DTA files here again. And then up here we have some options to sort our images by. So if we click right here, we can sort by the number of stars rejected only, all accepted, rejected. And of course, if you click on five-stars, it's only going to show the images with five stars. We also have some options here for equal to, equal to or greater than, greater than or less than, et cetera. If you want to include three stars or higher, you can use these options here to get that information for you or to narrow down your search that way. We can also sort by filename, timing, rating, and these other options here as well. I'm gonna go ahead and put this back to all. Now if you take a look over here, we have a few other options to help us with managing and viewing our images, the previews that is within the interface here. So the first option here is for grouped images. Now, the images you've imported as part of this class are not grouped. I'll show you how to group them in just a second. So if you take a look at this icon here, you'll notice that this preview has that icon. So does this one and this one down here. So you can group multiple images together. And the reason why I like to group images is when I create different editing versions, I like to group them together. So if we take a look at the previews a little closer, you'll also notice when you hover over them, they have this yellow outline. That's just another visual cue to let you know that that image has been grouped with other images. If we come over here, we don't have that outline because it's not been grouped together. So if I click on this image and hold down my shift key and click this one. I can then group them together with command or control plus the letter G. And then we can see that icon as being applied to it. And then we have an outline around both images. So we can't see these other images yet until we click on this icon. And then those images that were grouped with it will expand so you can see those images. So I group these two images even though they're not the same and they're not different versions of the same image. I just did that for demonstration purposes. So if we take a look at this image here, we can see when I hover over it, both previews it, that yellow outline showing us that they are grouped together. And we can see two different versions of that image, the same with this one. I have three images grouped together here, and that's three different editing version. So it's actually a before and after. So to condense this so that you don't see the images. You're just going to click on this icon again, and then everything is hidden, or at least the duplicates are hidden. And then you just see the main image for that group. Now to ungroup days, you're going to use Control Shift plus the letter G. And then that ungroup the images. I'm gonna go ahead and do that for this one as well, Control Shift plus g. Now the other thing you're probably seeing on my overlays that you're not seeing on yours are all these different overlays. So I have stars down here. I have red dots, which are labels. I have metadata, and then I have some other information up here as well. You can customize the information that is shown on your thumbnails to help you see what that image contains as far as metadata, ratings and labels, and then the file type as well. So if we come up here and click on this Start icon, I believe overlays on mouse hover is set by default. So once I do that, all that content disappears. But when I hover over an image, it will then show me the ratings and the labels for that particular image. And the icons that were above there as well, the grouping icons are gone. So it's kinda hard to see which images are part of a group unless you hover over it to see that yellow outline. So that's why I'd like to have everything on there. That's my own personal preference. So each one of these is pretty self-explanatory. So I'll let you go ahead and go through each one of these on your own and then you can decide which one you like for your own setup. Now real quick, this other icon right here, we can see it has a plus and a minus. It's not visible on all the images. This is only showing up when you edit an image and when I hover over it, you can see the edits that I applied to that particular image. This next icon here is for the help manual, which will take you to the online documentation for dark table. This icon here we've used previously. I do not want to access the dark table doc, so I'm gonna go ahead and click no. And this is for accessing Dark table preferences. And then over here on the right, we have some additional options for managing our images. Some of them are pretty self-explanatory. So let's just go through these real quick. Select will allow you to select all your images, select none, invert the selection. So for example, if I have one image selected and I click on invert selection, it will select all the other images, select the film row. It's going to select all the images in that film, Rowe, et cetera. This other one here is select untouched. If I click on that, it's only going to select the images that have not been edited yet. Which is a great way to find out which images you need to work on. And then you can create a collection of those images and then begin working on those only. So you're not seeing the other ones as you work. Ra. So the next option here is selected images, and we have a few different options here. The first one, remove will remove the file from dark table, but it will not remove it from your hard drive. If you're calling your images and you reject a photo that you know you never want to see again, you can click the Trash button here and it will send it to the trash can and will be deleted for ever. And then move will allow you to move the images to another directory or another folder. Or you can copy those images and then move them to another folder. And then this one here will allow you to create an HDR image which will require two or more images at different exposures. That will then stitch those images together to create an HDR for you. This will allow you to duplicate an image including its history stack. These options down here will allow you to rotate the image. So if we take a look here, this image should be vertical, not horizontal. So we can use these to rotate the image. And then you can copy your images locally and re-sync them to the local copy. And then if you don't want to use those keyboard shortcuts to group and ungroup your images. You can use these buttons here instead. Next we have history stack, which will allow you to. Batch, edit your images. So if you have an edit that you like and you have multiple images shot at the same time. You can come in here and select, you need to actually ungroup these first, need to select one of the images, and then we can select copy parts. And it's going to show you all the different edits that were done for that particular image. And all the ones that are checked are going to be copied, which you can then paste to another image. So once I click, Paste parts, click okay, that image is updated. Now it doesn't look exactly the same because I didn't copy all the edits that were done. So if you want it to look exactly the same, or at least have all the same at it's applied. Make sure you select all the edits that were done for that particular image. Next, we have styles which are similar to presets and Lightroom. And from here, you can create a style based on all the edits applied to a specific image. And then you can apply that style to other images without having to come into the history stack here. Next we have the metadata editor. If you're not applying metadata during import, you can come in and do it here. And then we have tagging, which is going to be the keywords that you want to use to describe what's included in that image so we can search for them later on. Geotagging is for when your smart phone or your camera does not automatically add the geo-location because it doesn't have that feature built-in. It can come in here and type in that information for each one of your files. This next feature is pretty cool. If you take a look right here, this is going to enable focus peaking mode. And when you click on it, it's going to update your previews with this overlay. And we have different colors. And basically what it's doing is it's showing you what parts of the image are in sharp focus. Now, right now I think I have a bug because I can't zoom in any further and see the overlay. And it's lot more helpful when you're zoomed in to the image or showing one image at a time that's filling up the interface to see where the sharpness is within your image. So go ahead and try that out and hopefully it's working better for you. And the last thing I want to share with you is right here we have a drop-down menu. If you click on File Manager, you're going to see a cooling and zoomable light table file manager is set by default, but if you select zoomable light table, you can then use your scroll wheel on your mouse to scroll in or out. You can also click and drag the previews around as needed. So that's pretty cool. Next we have cooling, which will take two or more images and place them side-by-side. So you can see which one you want to keep. Because sometimes you may have multiple images from the same shoot that are almost identical. And this way, you can take a look at them a little bit closer side-by-side to see which one you want to keep. If you want to add additional images to compare two, you can use the slider right here to add additional images. All right, I'm gonna go ahead and put that back to File Manager. And one more quick tip. If you hold down your control key and you have a scroll wheel, you can go ahead and increase the size of the previews this way as well. In the next tutorial, we're going to cover rating, labeling, and tagging your images. Own mods going to be a lot of fun and I'm going to share some more tips for getting organized. So if you already laws do it. 7. How To Organize Your Photos: Hello and welcome back. All right, so in this tutorial, I want to share some additional tips for managing your images in dark table with tags and labels and stars. And I want to give you a lot more information than what I've given you so far. So if you're ready, let's do it. All right, so we're in the light table view here and we're going to expand our tagging module. And we have a box up here which is going to be a list of all the tags for the image or images that you have selected. So if you want to add new tags or see the tags for that image, make sure the image is selected or select multiple images if you want to add tags that are going to be used for all of them. So if you hold down your control key, you can click on another preview to select it. This way you can select images randomly like this versus if you were to, let's say, click on this image, hold down your shift key and click on another image where all the images and between our selected. So make sure you select the images you want to add tags to before you start here. Otherwise, if you have multiple and you have one selected, then you have to do that one at a time. Alright, so this imagery hair currently has no tags. So if I want to add a tag that I've used previously, I can either scroll through the list here or I can type in a word here, and then it will search this list and narrow it down for me. So if I type in art, I now have three tags that I can add to it. And I can either click on the attached tag here or double-click on the word here to add that keyword to it. Now if I add a tagged by mistake, I can select it and right-click and select detached tag from here or click on detach from here, and then the tag is removed. Now if you want to add multiple tags or keywords at the same time, you can do so by separating them with a comma. And again, what I like to do for tagging my images is use descriptive words that describe the image. And I like to place key words that represent the place or the location of that image as well. So I'm gonna go ahead and type in a few keywords here to get us started. And then when I click Enter or Return, all those tags will be added in here. And then I can scroll through the list to make sure that those are the correct tags for that image or images. Now the other cool thing is check this out. If you hold down your control key and use the scroll wheel on your mouse, you can actually make this box larger so you don't have to scroll through them. The other thing I want to mention and point out for you is in this list here you're gonna see all these tags, but next to it, we have a number and that represents how many times that keyword has been used in your database. And then next to the tags, you're going to see some icons. So anything that has a solid circle like this means that tag has not been used for that image. A checkmark represents, yes, you've used that tag for that particular image. Then if I select multiple images here, this is going to change from a checkmark to a minus sign, letting you know that some of those images have that keyword. Alright, I'm gonna go ahead and scroll all the way back up here. And I want to show you something else. That's pretty cool. I'm going to type in Florida here. And we can see the tag Florida, but we also have Florida listed many more times separated by additional tags. So this is nesting inside of dark table. So if you want to nest your keywords by, let's say location, so country, state, or province, and city. You can do that. The other thing is, you can change the view of how the nesting looks in this list. If we come down here and click on this icon right here, it will switch it from line items to something like this. So I have all these different tags nested inside of the word or the tag, Florida. So I have 636 images from Florida, but I also can see that 629 are from Fort Myers. This is another way to help you organize your tags, to help you manage your images. So let me show you how to do this. I'm gonna go ahead and type in Ontario. So I have 724 images from Ontario, but they're not nested. So what I would like to do is Nest Ontario with Canada and the city or a city. So to do that, I'm going to start off by typing out Canada, because I went Canada, the country to be at the top of the hierarchy. I'm going to follow that up with a pipe which is just above your Return key or your Enter key. And then I'm going to type in Ontario, another pipe here, and then a city. So I'm going to do leaning 10, click, Enter or Return. Now the only problem is I have limited showing one image in the database, which is true. But if we take a look at Ontario, it's showing none. Even though I just showed you previously that there are 700 plus images with the tag Ontario. So if I want to add all those images into the nested group here, I have to find these images here, which is easy to do. I've shown you how to do that already. I need to remove that tag from all those images and then add that tag in again, and then it will show up as 724 images here. You can also right-click on a tag and get this menu of options for managing those tags. I'm gonna go ahead and close this. And if we take a look at my image previews here, we can see a lot of OEM have a star and some of them have labels. So the add your stars. You want to make sure you have your image selected or hover over the image you're going to work on. If you're going to use the keyboard shortcuts for adding stars, which is your number one key for one-star. Or if you have one star already selected, it will remove and give you 0 star. So two stars will be the number 2 key. Three for three stars, 45. You can also add your stars down here. You just want to make sure that the image is selected, that you want to add the stars too. I find it's easier and faster to hover over the images that I want to add stars two. And then I can quickly go through each of the different images to rate them accordingly. When it comes to labels, again, you want to make sure that the preview of the image you want to add the label 2 is selected. So I'm gonna go ahead and select this one at the top again. If I click the red label, it will then show that label right here. If I hover over the preview, I can use keyboard shortcuts as well, which is the F1 key for red, which will also remove it. F2 for yellow, F3 for green, for, for blue, and F5 for purple. And then if you want to reject an image because you no longer needed or wanted, you can press the R key and then that will update this x right here. Or you can just click right here to undo that or to add it as rejected. So that's it for the light table view. In the next module, we're going to take a look at the dark room view and begin looking at all the different options for editing your images. So if you're ready for that, all adds up to it. 8. Discover the darkroom Interface: Hello and welcome back. All right, Before we begin learning the editing tools and the darker view, I'd like to share some more information about the different modules first. So we've covered some of the basics in previous tutorials. However, there are a few more things we should cover also, if you haven't done so already, I'd recommend importing the images included with this class so you can follow along. So if you're ready, let's do it. Make sure you're in the dark room view and any image you select as fine. We're just gonna go over some of the other features we haven't covered in the dark room view yet. So one of the things we did talk about previously, and light table is the ability to zoom into your images and it caps out at 100%. So if you want to zoom in more, you can click right here and select a different percentage to zoom in. By that amount, you can then zoom out, but you can't zoom back to that 400%. It's going to cap it at a lower level. Not sure why, but that's the case. If you need to zoom in more, go ahead and select one of these options from here. Snapshots is going to create a snapshot based on what you've edited so far. And then if you make multiple snapshots as you're editing, you can go back to one of those snapshots in order to see what the progression of the edit was. You can also use it for seeing the before and after. So I'm going to select this image here. If we take a look at the history, we can see all the different edits that I've done. I'm going to go ahead and click right here. And I'm going to create a snapshot. I'm going to come back up and click on the top and create another snapshot. And now I can see the before and after by clicking on the first snapshot. And then I get this vertical line here that I can use to see the before and after. I can also click in the center here to rotate that and then review the image this way. So that's entirely up to you. And we can also flip so that the before on the other side as well. So whatever works for you. So I had to get out of that. We just need to click on the snapshot that we clicked on to start the before and after in the snapshots module here, and then that disappears. So again, the history is going to record all the editing steps that you've taken to create your final edit. So you can go back in time to see just like snapshots, where or what the image looked like at certain points. And this way, if you wanted to, you could start retouching again or editing again from a specific point by clicking on this button here to compress the history stack. And then all those edits above it are removed. I'm gonna go ahead and undo that with command or control plus the letter Z. And then this option here, we'll reset it back to what your camera captured and the settings in the edits that were applied by your camera and dark table. And then you'll get this message here confirming that that's what you actually want to do. If I click Yes, then it removes all the edits I applied, and then it keeps the other edits that were done by the camera and dark table again, I'm going to undo that with Control plus z. And then when cyclic on the top one here, it will go back to my final edit. So you wanna make sure that if you are clicking on these different points in time that you're not leaving it on one of these lower levels. Because once you start editing, It's also going to remove everything above it. So that's a great way to mess up your workflow if you didn't intend to remove those edits, just remember the keyboard shortcut to undo it. Control plus z. Alright, let's go ahead and close that. And then the other thing we can do is create different versions of an edit for one particular image. So for example, this image here, I have three different versions and two copies. So keep in mind when you duplicate, It's not duplicating the original raw file. It's duplicating the preview file, which is only a couple of kilobytes in size. It's worth it to make duplicates of your image in this manner, if you want to try out different editing styles saw you have to do is just click on Duplicate right here. If you want to delete one, you would click right here. Next we have a color picker, which you can use to pick out different colors in your images. And this has some advantages based on the type of editing modules that you use. Tagging will allow you to add tags to your image just like he did in light table view. And then of course we have the image information or the metadata of the file, exactly the same in light table. And then we have the mask Manager, which will show a list of masks that you've created during the editing workflow. And we'll talk about this in an upcoming module when we get into editing with masks and then appear just like enlight table, we have options for sorting our images in the thumbnail view down here at the bottom, we have options here as well to group or ungroup images. We also can apply overlays to our thumbnail previews down there at the bottom, it's kinda hard to see them because they're so small. But if you click right here just above the thumbnails, you can increase the size of that. So you can see any previews that you want to visible as you're editing. I'm gonna go ahead and make this Laura. So I have some more room for my image here. And then of course we have our option for going to Preferences. And then over here we have all the different groups for the different types of editing modules. Down here at the bottom, we talked about this option and light table view, which will enable focus picking mode, which shows you what parts of the image are in sharp focus. Again, just like with light table, it doesn't seem to be working that well for me. So hopefully this is something that will be fixed in a future version. But for this image, we can see the parts of the image that are in sharp focus based on the different color overlays. Next to that, we have a tool that will toggle how we view our image in the main interface here, once I click on it, it's going to add a white border around the image. And this is so that the color of your background here doesn't interfere with the colors in your image because sometimes it's easier to see the colors and color casts when you have a white border versus a gray or dark border. So for those of you that are having a hard time seeing the color cast in an image. You may want to try this option in order to add that white border to see if that helps you. Now this next tool is pretty cool. I'm going to turn that one off. And this is an indicator to let you know what parts of your image we're overexposed at the time of capture. So once I click on it, we should see a red overlay if it was overexposed at the time of capture. And as you can see, the red overlay is tiny, teeny tiny. So I really then overexposed the image in any area where detail is important. If we take a look at some of these other images here, Let's take a look at this one. We can see a red overlay here and here, and then on our forehead and your nose. So those parts of the image we're overexposed at the time of capture. And it's going to be difficult to fix it because there's no pixel value or detail in those areas. So you're going to have a hard time editing and fixing these types of images that have overexposure like this image does. The next indicator is to show you where your image has been over or underexposed based on the edits that you applied. So now you can see that a lot more of the image has been damaged due to the editing workflow. So red indicates overexposure for the highlights. Blue represents underexposure of the shadows. Alright, I'm gonna go ahead and turn off this indicator. And then this one here is going to toggle for soft proofing. So this is a more advanced type of tool and you'll only need to use this when you are sending your image out to be printed by a professional lab. For example, if you're doing brochures or flyers or something like that, you want to make sure that this image is going to print all the colors based on the edit that you have applied. Sometimes colors that you see on your monitor will not transfer the ink because more colors are visible on your monitor versus when printed on paper. This next option is going to toggle the gamut colors to let you know if the color gamut is in check or out of check. In other words, if those colors exceed what your monitor or a printer can display. So again, another advanced type of editing tool. And then this last option will set the different colors of the lines in your image when you're using lines like a grid or a overlay for composition, the lines that you see can be gray by default, but you can change the colors to help you see those lines if you're having a difficult time seeing them because maybe you're editing a black and white image and the gray color is hard to see. You can change it to red or green or any other color to help you see the color of those lines. In the next tutorial, you'll discover where editing starts. So if you're ready for that, let's get started. 9. Where Does Editing Start?: Hello and welcome back. All right, Before we get into the editing tools, I'd first like to share where you're editing starts. There are a lot of tools to edit width and the darker module. And you might be wondering, where do you start your editing? Well, first, editing does not start and dark table or GIMP or any other editing software. Editing starts in camera. You have the ability to get the exposure right in camera, which will eliminate the need for fixing it in dark table. Plus you can also now the white balance, depth of field composition as far as the crop goes, controlling the amount of digital noise and more all of this at the time of capture. Doing so means you'll have less editing work to fix that could have been done at the time of capture and you'll end up with a higher-quality image. Now I know from experience, it's not always possible to get everything perfect and camera. This could be due to the limitations of the dynamic range of your camera. Fast-moving subjects not able to control the light as you wish and many other variables. However, if you make a conscious effort to nail the exposure and white balance in camera as much as possible. Your photography will improve and you'll spend less time editing. Now that we have that out of the way, the question is, where do you start your editing and dark table? And the answer is at the top. So in dark room, the first editing panel on the right displays the histogram. Knowing how to read your histogram will help you edit your images and guide you so you don't over edit. So in the next tutorial, we're going to cover your histogram for spectacular at it. So if you're ready, let's do it. 10. First Editing Challenge: All right, real quick, before we get into working with the histogram, there's something else you need to know about dark table that can cause issues with your editing. And that is as soon as you've imported your images into dark table, it's already started the editing process of those images. Now don't be alarmed. This happens in all editing software. It's just that the other software, it isn't being as transparent about it as dark table. So in this tutorial, I just want to show you what happens after import and how it can cause problems for your editing. So let's dive into dark room and pull up this image so you can follow along. All right, now that you have this image up, There's something interesting going on with this particular image. But it actually happens with every image when you import, and that is specific type of edits are automatically being applied during import. And what dark room is doing is it's trying to give you a preview of what the image looked like in camera. And in order to do that, it has to apply certain types of edits. And again, this happens for all software, Lightroom, adobe Camera Raw, one and others. But the thing with darkroom is, it's going to show you the type of edits that are being applied. And then you can turn off those edits. So you can start with the barebone minimum of your raw file based on the information captured in camera. So if we take a look at the history, we can actually see ten different types of edits. And one of these edits is causing our image to be overexposed. So if we take a look at this indicator here that we talked about previously, once we click on it to turn it on, we can see that parts of the image is extremely overexposed. We're losing a lot of detail in the image, but yet we've done absolutely no editing. So what we need to do is determine which edit is being applied that's causing this overexposure. And then turning it off so we can begin our editing process from that point forward. And I recommend leaving this indicator on because it's going to help you see where the image has been over or underexposed based on the edits that you've applied. Now, check this out. If we turn this indicator off, we go to this indicator that tells us what has been overexposed in the raw file or at the time of capture. Once we turn it on, we can see very little, There's little dots here and there where over or under exposure occurred during the time of capture. So this is another conformation that something was applied during import that cause the image to be overexposed in her sweater. So I'm gonna go ahead and turn this off and turn this one back on. So now we need to go to our panels over here or modules, and click on this icon right here. This is only going to show the active modules or the edits being applied. So we have some different types of indicators here. We have this circle here, and then we have this icon here. This icon here. If you hover over it, it's going to tell you the output color profile is switched on and you can't turn it off. This is a mandatory type of edit that these would be applied because it's reading the metadata in your camera and it's applying it this color profile to your image based on what you said in camera. This next one, however, though, shows sharpen, is switched on. And unlike this one, we can't click and turn it off. But if we click on this one, it turns it off. And then you can see in the history panel here that was applied or that step was saved in the history. So I'm gonna go ahead and undo that with Control plus Z to turn it back on and to get the history stack back the way it was. So now what we need to do to determine which one caused the overexposure is just to simply go through each one and turn them on or off. And the culprit is the base curve. Once we click on that bone, they overexposure is removed based on that particular edit that was applied during import. So sometimes dark room is going to cause problems like this. And now you know how to go through your history stack in order to determine what's causing the issue. And in most cases it's going to be the base curve. Because the base curve, if we take a look right here, is increasing the highlights and the midpoints or increasing the exposure of your image automatically. And sometimes it's fine for particular types of images like this image here, it's not really affecting it. If we go ahead and turn this off, we can see that it's adding contrast to the image and making the image pop a little bit by adding that base curve. And this is typically what you'll see in the LCD. Your camera as you're taking a photo or some type of adjustment like this as being applied at the time you shoot based on the settings, the camera settings, the color profile, and other settings that you set up in camera. If you want to start with a bare raw image file, then just click on Original to remove everything. And then you can start from scratch and this will give you more creative control. All these other types of edits are a starting point. All right, now that we got that out of the way, we'll go ahead and jump into the histogram tutorial next so you can learn how to read the histogram so you'll know where to start your editing in a dark room. 11. How To Use the Histogram: Have you ever thought to yourself, Where should I start my editing? Also? Wouldn't it be nice to discover hidden details and a photo not visible at first glance? Well, the histogram is a tool you'll need to learn to answer those questions and more. So the histogram is an often overlooked tool that can help you improve your editing by not over editing and improving your productivity as well. Because it's a histogram is going to show hidden detail, improve your editing speed, like I mentioned, accuracy and more. So this tutorial is all about the magical powers of the histogram. And I'll show you everything you need to know to ensure you're not over editing. So let's jump into dark table and get started. So our histogram is a visual representation of the different tonal ranges in our image. The tonal ranges in your image include the black points, the shadows, the mid points, the highlights, and the white points. The peaks and valleys represents how much data is in each part of that tonal range. So based on this peak here, we can assume that there is more detail in the shadows than other parts of the tonal range. The other thing you're going to notice is that the peaks and valleys are different colors. We have red, green, blue, yellow, cyan, and magenta. We also have a light gray in front of those peaks as well. So the red, green, and blue are the colors in your image. And the gray part is the luminosity or the brightness of those pixels in that part of the tonal range. So one of the things you want to see, what they well exposed image is detail from the far left to the far right. And that will indicate that you captured detail in the shadows through the highlights. Achieving this is going to be dependent on several factors. The dynamic range of your camera. And in other words, how well is it able to capture extreme differences between light and dark? And then of course, the lighting in the scene itself. If you have a very bright sun, let's say from a sunset, and that's sunset is peaking or going behind the mountain, then the shadows are going to be very dark, if not black. And those cases, your peaks and valleys and the width of the histogram are going to be different. And based on that, you can then read the histogram to see what parts of the image are over or underexposed. And then that will tell you where to start your editing. If we take a look at this image here, we can see three major spikes right here in the exposure. And I have my over-under indicator turned on here and we can see a lot of the image is overexposed in the face and on our arm hair. And that's what these three spikes are, as well as this spike right here at the end. It's kinda hard to see, but that's the white point. So the white point is the part of the image where the pixels that are pure white, the black point is the opposite. It's the pixels that are pure black. They don't contain any data. So we can see a little spike here. It's kinda hard to see. But that's part of the indication that part of the image is overexposed. This gap here is showing that there's no detail in the shadows or the black point. So we need a set of black point in order to increase the amount of the tonal range in the image so we can create texture. And that's what we're actually doing when you're stretching the histogram to close this gap, dark room has to create pixels or fill it in with other pixels in order to create that full tonal range. And if it's too extreme, then you're going to end up with a lower quality image, which is why it's necessary to try and get your exposure as close to perfect and cameras possible so you end up with a higher-quality image. Now the other thing is, like we talked about previously, if we take a look at the history here and we click on orientation to turn off the space curve. Well, the image really wasn't overexposed and camera, it's just darker him again applying this base curve that's creating that overexposure. And if you take a look at the histogram Before and After, we can see that the tonal range at the time of capture was actually much better than what dark room is giving us with this base curve turned on, so the gap is much smaller. Now, the other thing is based on your creative vision. You don't necessarily have to fill the gaps every time you may want to reduce the gap. But it's not always necessary to close that gap because you may be shooting a low or high key type of image. In that case, you're going to have a gap on either side depending on the lighting situation that you're shooting for. Now, if we take a look at this image here, which I've already edited and we can see I've underexposed a lot of the image, but based on my creative vision for the image, I wanted parts of the image to be darker to help her face stand out more. And we can see all the different edits that I applied to it. If we go back to the original, we can see there's a huge gap on the right side here. So this means the image is underexposed. So a gap on the right is underexposed. A gap on the left is overexposed in most cases. And then the spike here, anytime you see a spike going up to the top like this, that means you're beginning to lose detail in that part of tonal range. Now if that peak exceeds the top of the histogram here and begins to flatten out. Then you've completely lost all detail and that part of the tonal range, and you should undo the edits that caused that or dial them back in order to keep the detail in all the different parts of the tonal range. When you hover over the histogram, you're going to notice that it lights up based on where you hover your mouse. This is different from Lightroom. In Lightroom, it's going to highlight each of the five parts of the tonal range and dark room. It's only highlighting the exposure, which is this section here and the black point. So we can click and drag this to the left to increase the exposure of the image versus going to an editing module. You can do the same with the black point. You're going to click and drag it to the left if you want to close the gap, I don't necessarily want to do it on this image. So I'm gonna go back in time here with command or control plus z. Actually it's Control Z. There's no command for undoing in dark rooms. So I'm gonna go ahead and keep on doing this until I get back to my original edit. And I had talked about selecting a point in the history stack and then start editing. And as you can see, I lost all my edits. But thankfully, we have an undo option that will take us back to that point. You just want to make sure you do that before you navigate to a different image because you will not be able to undo. Once you do go to another image or change views from dark room to light table, Let's say. The other thing I want to point out about the histogram is when you hover over it, if you hold down your control key and use your scroll wheel on your mouse, you can make it taller or shorter. We also have an option here to change it to waveform, which is an advanced type of histogram. And then by default we have a linear type of histogram. If you want to use a logarithmic type of histogram, click on this here. But linear is going to be more precise or it's going to match what you saw in your camera, or at least the histogram in your camera. I'm gonna go back to another image here. So the other thing we can do is we can turn off the individual color channels. So if I turn off the red, the red channel is removed, same with the green, and then blue will remove everything. So reading your histogram is an essential skill that will help you start your editing workflow. If you have part of the histogram that has a gap, you know, it's over or underexposed. And if you have huge spikes, you know that you've begun to lose detail in the image and you can correct the edits based on what the histogram is telling you. All right, so now that we've demystified the histogram and you know how to not over edit and where to start your editing. It's time to take the first step in editing with one editing tool that should be applied to every raw file you shoot. So you're going to discover what that is in the next tutorial. 12. Fix Lens Distortion: Hello and welcome back. All right, so one of the first type of edits you should do on all your images as a lens correction. And the reason why is all lenses regardless of the quality, create some type of lens distortion. This distortion can cause vignetting around the corners of your photos and can even warped the images to how much vignetting and warping is different for all lenses, but it's there and you're going to learn how to fix it in this tutorial. So let's go ahead and get started. In order to fix the lens correction, we're gonna go into the technical group here and scroll down to access Lens Correction. From here you're going to see the make and model of the camera used to take the image and the lens used. This information is stored in the metadata of your file when you take a photo. So once you turn on the lens correction module, that will automatically adjust and correct for the vignetting and the distortion in your image, as well as any Chromatic Aberration, which is a color shift that occurs when you have a lower-quality lens that doesn't have the same type of coating as higher-end lenses. So I'm going to zoom in here so we can actually see the vignetting and the distortion being corrected with the lens correction module. Sorry, here we have a big black spot which is a dust spot on my lands or my camera sensor that was captured at the time I took the photo. And we can see that the corner here is a little bit darker, are much darker than the other part of the image over here on the right. So once I click right here, that will turn on the lens correction. And then dark room is going to take the information here about your camera and your lens and apply a specific algorithm based on that information to correct the image or to correct it and remove the vignette and fix the distortion. And then when I turn on the lens correction by clicking right here, we can see that the shape of that dust spot changes and the corners are not as dark as they were before. It's lot more even with the rest of the sky. So here's the before and the after. So it corrects the vignette or removes it and fixes the distortion, which is the warping around the corners. Now the thing is, you don't necessarily have to apply the lens correction because maybe you like the natural vignetting of your lens, which I do. But I do want to get rid of the distortion or the warping. Instead of both the vignette and the distortion, we have that option under corrections right here. If we click on All which is the default, you'll see some different options here. And I can apply only distortion. So that removes the distortion but keeps the vignette. And of course, there's other options here as well in TCA is in regards to the chromatic aberration or the color shifts that may occur with particular types of lenses. I'm gonna go ahead and put this on all for now. And the other thing is if for some reason your camera didn't record the camera or the lens. You can come in here and click on this button and locate your camera to select it manually from here. And you can do the same thing for your lens. And then under that we have geometry which will apply additional types of corrections based on a specific type of lens, a specialty lens, things like that. So this module can change the projection type of your image. So if you use a fish islands, you may want to come in and do a correction for the geometry of the fisheye lens to further enhance the image by tweaking or fixing the warping that is caused by fisheye lenses. Now another thing that may occur with some lenses, like a wide-angle lens is the corners, even though you correct for the vignetting, the corners are going to be so dark that they're almost black. So sometimes you can't fix it with the options that you have here that are built-in for that particular lens. So what you can do is you can increase the size or scale the image larger to remove those black corners. Sometimes that's the only way to fix that type of vignetting. And then under that we have mode which is for the TCA read and TCA blue corrections for chromatic aberration. So if you see some type of color in your image that you don't think should be there. It's either like a magenta or a cyan color. Then you can use these sliders here to correct for that chromatic aberration. And then the last bit of information we have for doing our lens correction is our corrections done option right here, it says, All right Now so what this is telling us is the corrections that were done for this particular image. And sometimes you may come across a camera and lens combination where a profile hasn't been created for that combination. And in that case, it's going to list the corrections that were done. So instead of all at may only say TCA read or fisheye or whatever settings you try to set. If you try to do all, then it's going to tell you what it did versus everything. So setting your lens correction is real simple. Now that you know all of the different options inside of here for all your raw images, I recommend turning this on for best results. All right, so that's how you fix lens distortion and your images. It's one of those types of edits that I would put in step 1 of your workflow. In fact, I'd recommend creating a style that ADL pies that edit during import, which you're going to learn how to do later in this module. For now, we're going to go ahead and start editing images and with some basic types of edits like exposure, wine black points, saturation plus Byron's and more. In the next tutorial. 13. Basic Edit Adjustments: Hello and welcome back. Next up you're going to discover how to apply a variety of basic edits from one module. So these types of edits are the foundation for the rest of your edit. So if you're ready, let's do it. So based on what you've read in the histogram, you know what parts of the image needs to be fixed. Either you need to set the white or the black point are both. Maybe need to fill the gaps to extend the tonal range. Maybe you need to tone down the highlights because they are being overexposed and parts of the image, or maybe the shadows are underexposed and you need to increase the shadows. So there's a lot of things to consider once you read that histogram. So now you have to decide, okay, which editing modules am I going to use? So for this particular image, the image is overexposed, so we need a tone down the exposure. While there is an exposure module that will allow you to fix the exposure, There's also a way to set the black point in the exposure as well. And I've already shown you how to do it in the histogram and then highlight recovery is another editing module that you can use to recover the highlights in this image. So those are two different tools right there. We also have some contrast that we may want to add to the image because it's a little flat. That would be a third editing module. Well, instead of going and finding all these different modules, there's one basic adjustment module that includes all of those different editing modules plus a few others. So if we take a look inside our grading tab here and scroll down, you will find basic adjustments right here, or you can just come up here and type in basic to get the basics adjustment module. So the first option we have is setting the black level correction. So the black point of the image or the part of the image that is pure black. So based on the histogram, that's not something that we really need to do. And if we look at the clipping information that we have available, we can see that the blacks are already being clipped down here and in her hair. And then we have the red overlay indicating overexposure in that part of the image. So the highlights, so exposure will increase or decrease the brightness level of your image. And it's an EV value or exposure value. So this is equivalent to stops in photography. So if you increase or decrease the exposure by one EV, That's equivalent to one stop. So what does that mean? Well, if you're shooting at a shutter speed of 150th of a second and you want to decrease the exposure. You have to double the shutter speed to allow less light into the camera sensor. So that would be 1 500th of a second or one stop, one-stop. And ISO would be going from 100 to 200, that's one stop. And then an amateur one-stop would be say, f 5.6 to F8. To reset a value, all you have to do is double-click on the word to reset it back to the default. Highlight compression is going to. Give you the opportunity to recover detail and highlights that have been overexposed like in this image. So I'm gonna go ahead and turn on our clipping indicators here again. And as I increase the Highlight, compression, dark room is going to do its magic and begin fixing those highlights. How cool is that? So I'm going to go all the way up here to around 50. I'm going to turn this off and then I'm going to zoom in. And let's turn this on and off so you can see the before and after. So it does a pretty good job. There is a color hue or color shift and this area where it tried to fix that overexposure of her skin, it's not perfect. So you'll need to use another editing module, like the healing tool to fix it either in dark room or in GIMP in order to fix the skin so that it's consistent on one side versus the other where the exposure is pretty good over here. And then we try to fix it here. We need a blend all of that together and heal the skin so that it's more natural looking right now, we still have some spots in here that are overexposed and need to be fixed. Yes, we can increase the Highlight compression, but the color shifts are more extreme the higher you go. So it's not a perfect fix. It's just a partial fix. I'll go ahead and decrease that. Let's go ahead and zoom out. Next we have a contrast lighter. So this will increase or decrease the contrast based on the amount of contrast you apply and the direction you go. So to the right, we'll add more contrast to the left, will remove contrast. Preserved colors offers a few different options and a drop-down menu here. And you're going to use this when you apply a nonlinear tone curve in different RGB channels. If those adjustments create a color shift in your image, you want to come in here and select one of these options to preserve those colors. So luminance is based on the brightness levels. Rgb would be different variations and intensities to preserve those colors based on the option that you select. Middle gray is correlated with contrast. The middle gray by default is set to 18.42%. And not to get all technical Hanyu. The higher the middle grade, the more it's going to preserve the image based on the contrast level. So if I do something insane and increase the contrast to something like that, if I increase the middle gray, it's going to begin adjusting the image to factor in the amount of contrast that you're adding. And it's going to try and preserve some of those colors. Now that's way too intense. I wouldn't do something like that. So I'm gonna go ahead and reset this and what I would recommend instead of contrast and your middle grays and playing around with these two settings, as I would recommend, using the tone curve to increase or decrease your contrast. And we'll talk about that in an upcoming. Tutorial. And then we have the brightness slider here, which is similar to the exposure slider up here. And that it's going to make your image brighter or darker depending on the direction you slide it. But it's going to target a different part of your tonal range versus exposure. The exposure setting is adjusting the entire tonal range of your image. More so in the midpoints, but it's also shifting that histogram to the left or to the right, which is affecting the highlights and the shadows as well. The brightness level has only going to target the mid tones. So you're going to lose contrast as you increase the brightness. And then when you lower it, the contrast becomes more intense. Again, not something I would use. I would use the tone curve instead, that's my own personal preference. Next, you can adjust the saturation and the vibrance for the colors in your image. And the saturation is going to target the entire tonal range or the entire image. So if I drop the saturation slider down, it removes all the color. If I slide it to the right, it will increase the intensity or the saturation of your colors. Vibrance does something similar. It's going to increase the saturation of the colors, but it's going to target a specific tonal range of your image, in this case, the mid-tones. It's not just the mid-tones. It can affect the highlights and the shadows as well, but it's more concentrated in the mid-tones. So to the right, we can see that it's not as intense as saturation was. And then when I take this all the way down to minus one or 0 or whatever the case may be, we can still see there's color in the image, unlike saturation. And that's because those colors are in the mid tones and the highlights. If you want to give creative power to dark room, you can click on this auto button to automatically adjust the exposure. If you want to do the auto exposure plus target a specific point in the image or area in the image. You can use this eyedropper tool to click and drag out an area where the auto exposure should be read from. So in other words, I'm going to expose or auto expose for this part of the image, her face. Once I release, it will update with the auto exposure based on what dark room thanks. The face should be exposed to are the values that should be used for exposing the face properly. And it actually does a pretty good job. Then just below that we have an item called clip. This is going to affect the number of pixels that will be clipped to black or white during the auto exposure calculation. So this is another way to tweak the auto exposure setting. And then the last item here for basic adjustments is an advanced adjustment type or which are the masks that you can apply and dark room. So a mask is going to allow you to target a specific area of the image versus applying the edit to the entire image. We did with all these sliders up here. And we're going to cover masks in more detail in an upcoming lesson. Alright, now that your basic edits are completed, where do you go from here? Well, my suggestion is adjusting an often overlooked at it that I think all your images should get extra special attention from. If you're ready to discover this tool, let's get started. 14. Fix the White Balance: This next type of Aedes should be captured in camera. However, it's not always possible to nail it perfectly while shooting. This can be due to the light source changing as you shoot. Or if he used a pre-programmed option and camera, then the computer in your camera may not have gotten it right at the time of capture. So what am I referring to? Well, the camera setting I'm referring to is the white balance. But before we get into making the white balance adjustment and darker, and let's first make sure we are on the same page and discover exactly what the white balance is. White balance in photography is about altering the color of the light source to match the white color you see in person. So it's rendered pure white, otherwise, the white or grays and the highlights and the shadows will have a color cast. This color casts can be detrimental to your image or it can be pleasing to the eye and even artistic. If the whites in your scene appear yellow or blue, they will be pure white after properly white balancing the image. Now, even though you can do this in post-processing and still best to do your white balance editing camera as much as possible. And this will mean one less thing to edit and you'll finish editing your, all your images faster. The white balance itself is not a specific color choice. Instead, it's a tool to capture the color of light. You have three options when it comes to adjusting the white balance at the time you're shooting. The first option is to let your camera made the creative decisions for you by using auto white balance. Another option is to use pre-made white balance presets based on the lighting conditions. For example, if you're shooting on a cloudy day, most modern digital cameras will have a white balance option for those lighting conditions. The third option is to set the exact white balance for a specific light source by dialing in the Kelvin temperature. To find out more information on white balance, Kelvin and settings for your camera. Check for a link below this video or in the resources folder you downloaded previously. All right, now that you have a foundation for what white balance is, let's dive into dark room and explore how to adjust the white balance as part of your editing workflow. All right, let's navigate to the technical group here and scroll down to the bottom and activate the white balance module. And inside we have a couple of sliders for adjusting the white balance and some options down here. The other thing I want to point out is as soon as you import your images, dark room is automatically applying the white balance. And you can see that in my history stack right here, It's number six. Now it's not really doing anything to your white balance. It's only reading the information provided in the file from your camera. So when you set your white balance in camera, that data is saved to the metadata. And then dark room reads that information and applies it to your image accordingly. So it's not really editing your white balanced, only applying the information it receives. So if we adjust the temperature slider to the right, it will make our image warmer. If we slide it to the left, it will make it cooler. We'll go ahead and double-click here to reset that. And then if we adjust the tint to the right. Add more green to the left, more red. And if you go far enough, it will add blue or magenta. There is the blue. Alright, double-click here to reset that. Now the way that the white balance settings are currently set up, it's helpful, but we can actually do some adjustments to the settings to make this visually easier to apply our white balance. So let me show you what I mean. This is pretty cool. We're gonna go up here and click on this icon to access preferences. Go inside the dark room tab and scroll down to the bottom. And we have a white balanced slider Colors option. Right now it's set to no colors. So there's two options. There's illuminate color and there's affect. Emulation. Illuminate is a little bit harder to understand, but I don't want to show you what this is going to look like once you select that option. And then we'll come back and set effect emulation. So once you select that close out Preferences and then the sliders update with some colors. How cool is that? So it makes it a little bit easier to visually see what's going to happen when you apply the temperature slider in one direction or the other? Or is it well, let's slide this to the right where you would think you would be adding more blue. Instead, it's adding yellow. So in this mode, the illuminate temp is based on the color temperature of the light source. So for this image, I'm using daylight to illuminate the scene. And they light is more white to blue. So if I want to correct the image because it's not white to blue, then I would adjust this to the white and that will warm it up or make the white balance more neutral or the white colors more neutral. If I go to the left, I'm doing just the opposite. I'm adding blue. It's becoming cooler. So let's go back to Preferences and compare that to our other option here Is effect emulation. Go ahead and close that out. And now the color temperature slider has been adjusted so that it's the opposite of what it was previously. And this is going to match what you have in camera closer than the previous option. So now we have warmer on the right, and that's what we're going to get when we slide it to the right, cooler to the left. And then of course our tent is green to white, to red to blue, and there's magenta in there somewhere. Now if you have a specific Kelvin temperature that you want to dial in, for example, 5400 Kelvin is a Kelvin temperature I like to use when I'm shooting daylight. Images. Are images shot during daylight, especially mid afternoon. What we can do is right-click and then we get this new graph or pop-up window here. And then I can type in 5400, click, Enter or Return, and then the temperature slider updates accordingly. Personally for this image, I would like it to be even warmer. So I'm gonna go ahead and slide this over to the right to right about there. And I light my images to be a little bit more red. So I'm going to adjust. The 10 slider as well. Now in addition to those two sliders, we have an option down here to set the white balance to as shot or as it was in camera. So if I'm unhappy with these results, I can just click here. And it will go back to the settings at the time of capture. Now if your goal is to remove a color cast so that the whites, the blacks, and the grays are a neutral color or pure white or pure black. Then you're going to use this eyedropper tool here, which will allow you to select a part of the image to remove that color cast from. So soon as I click on this, the white balance temperature is going to change. And then I need to set a working area, which I have right here, because I clicked on this area earlier. So now I can zoom in and adjust this to just cover or sample an area that is pure black. So every time I change this at sampling new colors inside of this frame to use as a reference to remove the color cast. So right there is pure black and now I have a neutral or corrected white balance. But again, even though it's corrected, I don't like it. I like my temperatures to be warmer. So white balance again, as a personal preference, if you do need to remove a color cast because you're shooting portraits and the skin tones look on natural, then I would use the eyedropper tool here to select a point to remove that color cast from. Now as soon as you make these adjustments manually, this icon here is going to light up and let you know that the white balance has been set to your preferences based on your manual actions. Then right next to that we have another button that will set the white balance to a reference point based on a different type of camera that it thinks it should be using versus the one that he actually used under that we have this user modified listing here, again telling you that the updates were User modified. But if you click on it, you get this little menu here with additional options. So I shot this with my Nikon D 500 and these are pre-programmed white balance settings I have and camera that I can automatically select from here. And 5000 K is the actual Kelvin temperature that I dialed in while I was shooting. So I can choose from any one of these if I think that the white balance should be adjusted based on these pre-programmed presets. Now, keep in mind, these are not definitive. They're not going to be perfect because these are pre-programmed based on specific types of lighting situations. So if I'm using shade, that means I'm shooting the image under the cover of shade, but the color of light in the shade could be different depending on the intensity of the sun at that point time. So for example, it could be a partly cloudy day, not cloudy. And therefore, the shade could actually be warmer versus one that is completely cloudy. So all of these are just a starting point. So just keep that in mind when you're editing your white balance. All right, Now that you've made your adjustments for your white balance and the next tutorial, you'll discover everything you need to know about cropping and rotating your images and dark room. 15. How To Crop + Rotate: Hello and welcome back. All right, so at this stage of your editing workflow, I'd suggest cropping and rotating your image. However, this is not set in stone and you should decide for yourself when to apply this type of edit. When it comes to an editing workflow, It's ideal to apply the same edits in the same order every time. This one, sure you're not skipping any editing modules, provides consistency and helps you edit faster. So next up you'll discover everything you need to know about cropping and rotating and dark room. If you're ready, let's do it. All right, let's go to the technical tab here and locate crop and rotate inside you'll find several different tools to help you crop rotate and fixed perspective issues. So let's go over each one of these items so you know how to use them for your images. This first option here called flip, will well flip your image on the horizontal or vertical axis or both. Under that we have angle. So this is fixing cricket images. So if the horizon is obviously a cricket, you can use your angle slider here to adjust it. Or what I like to do is right-click on my image, hold down my mouse button, and then drag out a line that coincides with the horizon. So right now, my horizon is straight, but if I let go of my mouse button right now, it's going to rotate based on that angle. All right, Now that as cricket, I'm going go ahead and click and drag out the line again along the horizon to fix it. Now that's not perfect. So I'm gonna come up here to angle and double-click on angle to reset it back to 0. All right, our next option here is called keystone and I have another image I just imported and it's in your resources as well. So if you want to practice the keystone tool, go ahead and grab this image here. And what Keystone does is it fixes perspective issues. So I used a wide angle lens on this image and I was real close to the building. So we can see that the building is leaning to the right on this side and leaning to the left on the side. So Keystone will help us fix that so that the vertical lines of the building are vertical and not leaning. So if we come over here to none and click on it, you'll get this popup window with three options, vertical, horizontal and full. For this image, I want to choose vertical because the vertical lines and the image are the ones that are leaning to the right and to the left, and they need to be corrected for the proper perspective. So I'm gonna go ahead and click on vertical. And when I do, you're going to get these two vertical lines right here. They're kinda hard to see, which is why we have this option down here to set the color of the lines. So right now it's gray, but if I choose red, it's updated to that color and it's easier to see. The other thing to note about these vertical lines is you probably saw these little circles here. We have one here, one here, and then 20 over on the side as well. And then when I come over and I hover near where these two circles meet, at least on the horizon. I then get this horizontal line here so I can move those circles up and down if I need to. So at this point, these vertical lines are independent of each other. So I can click on a circle and drag over. To this vertical line here, but I also need to take this circle and a line, this guide with the way the line is in the image. So I want to match the vertical lines in the image, the same with this side. So I'm going to click and drag this one over to this corner, and then drag this one over here. So this is telling dark room. This is the angle in the image or the angles and the image. And do your magic to straighten it out. Now before we do that, I just want to point out that there is a couple of squares here as well. If you click on it, they're going to be highlighted. And then those vertical lines that you adjust will do so together. Now, to finalize the correction, you're going to click on this little OK button. It's teeny tiny, so click on that. And once you do, dark room will do its magic and fix the perspective issues. So as you can see, the vertical lines are now perfectly vertical, top to bottom and there's no more perspective issues. Pretty cool. All right, I'm gonna go back to this image now. And the next option here is automatic cropping. So we have two options, yes or no. So if you have this turned on, it's going to automatically crop the image to avoid black edges on the image borders. So this is useful when you're rotating your images so it doesn't create a black edge. So let me show you what happens when I turn this off. And there's the black part of the image after rotation. Okay, I'm gonna go ahead and undo that. So this next one is pretty important aspect. So you wanna make sure that you're cropping your image with the same aspect ratio that you shot with, unless you are creative vision requires a different aspect ratio. So right now I have original image selected for the aspect ratio. So this is how the crop tool works. Hover near a side or a corner. You're going to see this outline. You can then click and drag it to read, crop or recompose the image. And then you can click on the inside and move it around as well. So when you have the aspect ratio set to the original image, well, the crop is going to match the original image. But if you want something more creative, maybe you want a square. You would select the square. And then the aspect ratio for the crop tool changes to square. You'll also have a freehand option, which is one that I like to use as well. And that will allow you to adjust the aspect ratio based on your creative vision. So maybe something like that. And as you can see, there's a ton of different options in here as well. Based on the aspect ratio you need for cropping your image. I'm gonna go ahead and put this back to original image for now. And then guides is pretty cool too. So if we click on this, you'll see some different options here. So we have a grid option which will add a grid. And this can be helpful for aligning your image or fixing the horizon if it's cricket, although I liked the other option better where he right-click and drag out, but that's one option. You also have options in here for composition rules. So the rule of thirds is a popular one, and it's going to apply an overlay based on that photography rule. And of course there's other ones inside of here as well. We do have another tab here called margins, which will adjust the side based on a percentage. So if you want to adjust the composition or the cropping of the image, you can do so from here. But that's the exact same thing that we did previously by dragging a side or a corner, is just giving you another option for fine tuning your crop. One more quick tip here. I'm gonna go ahead and make this a little bit smaller. If you hold down your control key and then click on the inside, it's going to lock in the horizontal position so you can't move it up or down. If I release my control key, I can then move it freely. If I hold down my Shift key, then it's going to lock it to the vertical axis and I can't move it left or right. Alright, in the next tutorial, you're going to discover three different ways to add contrast to your image, including my favorite tool, I'm all time. So if you're ready to discover these tools, Let's get started. 16. Recover Highlight + Shadow Details: Hello and welcome back. All right, so in this tutorial, you're going to learn how to target the shadows or the highlights to recover detail that might not be apparent the first time you look at an image or if that detail had been over or underexposed during editing, you'll learn how to recover it too. So if you're ready, let's jump into dark room and get started. All right, So to recover detail in the shadows and the highlights, we're going to use this editing module right here, which is in the grading group. So in essence, the shadows and highlights tool is going to enhance the local contrast in order to make the detail become more apparent by increasing the contrast. And this can cause some problems depending on how severe the over or under exposure is for that particular image that you're working on. Especially when you work with an image that has over underexposure at the time of capture. Because there's not really any detail value or pixels in those areas that are over underexposed and you can't recreate detail that's not there in the original file. So you're going to have to use some other tools and I'll show you what I mean in just a second. So basically what we do is we come in here shadows and highlights and we turn it on. And it automatically applies default settings to bring back detail in the shadows and the highlights. And the other thing it's doing is if you take a look at your shadow and highlights sliders here, the shadows are increased by plus 50 and minus 50 for the highlights by default. And that's basically brightening up the shadows and darkening the highlights. So one of the problems with this is it lowers the contrast of the image. When you do this. You may remember back to the tone curve where we did the S curve where we darken the shadows and brighten the highlights. Well, this is doing the opposite and it's flattening that curve and reducing contrast. So you have to play with this along with other contrast tools in order to get the amount of contrasts you want. But at the same time, getting the detail back in the shadows and the highlights based on your creative vision. So for this particular image, What's the most important part of the image? Well, if we go back, actually it's turned this off. If we go back to our history stack here and click on Original, we can see that the sky is much darker based on all the edits that were applied. So the base curve is actually making the sky brighter. So technically, you may want to start from this position and then try and bring more detail back in the shadows and the highlights like this. So we have even more detail in the sky now than we did previously. But again, the image is a lot flatter, has less contrast. So you may want to decrease the shadows because maybe the detail in that part of the image is not as important as other parts. So these are decisions you're going to have to make and decide what part of the image is most important. If we take a look at this image again, we talked about this one a couple of times. And as you know, it was overexposed and camera. So let's go ahead and zoom in here. And let's go ahead and turn on the shadows and highlights and see what happens. So instantly. Here's the before and the after. We have more detail in that area. But basically what it's doing is it's increasing the contrast like I mentioned. And it's kind of Blache and doesn't look all that great. And the color is kind of shifted to its more red and more yellow than it was before. And if we turn on our overexposure indicator here and take a look at the before and after. We can see around the edges, it improved the image, but we still have some problems on the inside here. So what we can do is we can adjust the highlights here, maybe lower to try and tone down that color shift a little bit or increase it. But if you increase it, that contrast is making the skin look really unnatural. So I will probably bring this down a little bit lower than the default value. We also have some color adjustments here for the shadows and the highlights. And this will try and tone down that color shift that occurs when the contrast is increased. So if I increase it to 94%, it's not really helping for this particular image, but sometimes it does. You can also soften up the contrast that is being added with the slider here. So if you're finding that the detail is too sharp, you may want to increase the radius to apply a Gaussian blur. So if you click right here, you also have a bilateral filter which will apply that softening to the detail differently versus a Gaussian blur. So you may find this option works better. But again, it lowers the contrast a little bit. So it all depends on the image and the amount of detail that you're trying to recover. All right, now that your highlights and shadows have been recovered, it's time to discover the most powerful tool and all of our table. If you are ready to find out what that is, I'll have to do it. 17. How To Use the Tone Curve: Hello and welcome back. All right, next up is discovering three tools for adding contrast here images. And you'll discover how a couple of these are redundant and you may decide not to use them as part of your editing workflow. So let's dive into dark room and look at each tool. So when it comes to adding contrast to your images, there's actually more than three tools to do it. So let's take a look here at each of the different contrast tools in darkroom. So I want to type in contrast here. And there's a total of six different tools for adding contrast. So which one to use? Well, some of these are more specific to, let's say, color. So we have color balance. So if we click inside, we can see a contrast Slider here. We also have a color contrast slider up here for green, magenta contrast or blue yellow contrast. And then we have filmic RGB, which is a more complex and advanced type of way to add contrast. And our basic contrast tool is this one right here, local contrast. Now the other thing I want to note is there's two other tools we can use for contrast, but they're not part of the contrast modules based on searching for them under the word contrast because the word contrast in those modules is not listed, but you can still add contrast with those two tools, which we'll cover in just a second. I just want to go over local contrast here because this one's pretty cool because you can target it. The contrast in different parts of the tonal range of your image or via the detail. Okay? And then we also have the highlights here, of course. So we'll add contrast only to the highlights, or we can add contrast only to the shadows or the mid-tone range. So all of those provide you with some control over adding contrast to your images. The other one I want to talk about is called levels, which is an old school type of tool for adding contrast. And what it does is when you increase the black and the white points, it automatically adds contrast. So if I change the black point by moving it to the right and the white point to the left. I add contrast to the image. It's one that a lot of photographers used to use and it's not one that I typically use anymore. One that I prefer is called curves or tone curve. So let's type in curves here and find it. So here it is, tone curve. So you can see I've applied a tone curve already. So I'm gonna go ahead and click on this icon right here to create a new instance of this module, or in other words, duplicate it. So once you click here, click on new instance, and then you'll get this right here. It says Tone Curve. Once I actually have a tone curve with no adjustment and a tone curve with an adjustment. Just for demonstration purposes, I'm just going to show you this real quick. So we have a histogram behind our grid and our linear line here that goes from bottom-left to top-right. And this histogram is basically a visual representation of the histogram up here. It's not necessary since you already have the histogram viewable or visible up here. So the way it works is you alter the linear line by bending it and that creates a curve. And depending on how you curve, that line will add or remove contrast. So if I click and drag up, the image gets brighter. If I click and drag down, it will make the image darker. Then once I release my mouse button, I'm gonna go ahead and move this up to the right here. I'm left with this node or anchor point. So the way it works is the right side, just like in our histogram here, contains the highlights and the white points. Midtones are in the middle, shadows and the black points on the left. So by placing my anchor point here, I'm increasing the brightness of the highlights more so than the shadows. It is affecting the shadows a little bit as you can see that the line has separated from here. If I want to add contrast, what I need to do is I need to darken up the shadows. So I can click this part of the line and drag down and alter the curve in a way that it creates what is known as an S curve. So I've darken the shadows, brighten the highlights. And if I turn this off, you can see I've added more contrast to the image. How cool is that? Now the reason why I like to tone curve versus the other options is because I can continue adding additional anchor points to target specific parts of the tonal range of my image so I can add the contrast exactly where I want it. All right, So far the type of edits you've learned about as known as global edits. In other words, the edits are applied to the entire image. And the next tutorial, you'll begin exploring how to target specific parts of your images to help you achieve your creative vision. 18. How To Edit With Masks: Hello and welcome back. All right, so this is the moment you've been waiting for, it's time to discover the power of using masks and dark room. If you're familiar with layer mask and Gamma are photoshopped the concept of masks and darker in my seminar. First, you're going to make a selection with one of several shaped tools and the shape you create becomes the mask. So the mask is in effect going to hide or show edits exactly where you want them in your image. And that sense, mask give you the precision to target specific areas in your image that will contain any edits you apply. In fact, once you create a mask, same mask can be used with multiple editing modules. This comes in handy when you want to, let's say, brighten the eyes of your subject and change the color at the same time. This is something you're going to learn how to do in the next module. For now, let's dive back into darkroom and discover how to create and use masks. All right, I'm going to demonstrate how to use masks with this image here. And then one thing I want to point out is if we take a look at a couple of these different editing modules here, you're going to notice something in common with all of them. So if you take a look down here, we had this little box and we have that on these other ones as well. So this is the panel for accessing masks, and I'm going to demonstrate how to use masks with the monochrome editing module. I'm gonna go ahead and turn this on to convert it to monochrome or black and white. So down here we have an option right here called uniformly. So if we click on that, we're gonna get additional tools for that particular type of mask. So this mask is pretty straightforward. You can apply a blending mode, which is very similar to the blending modes in Photoshop or GIMP or whatever other software you've used. If you use blending modes before, then you're pretty familiar with how they work already. Now the opacity slider, pretty straight forward. It's going to apply 100% of that editing module, in this case black and white to the image. If you find that the type of application or the edit being applied is too intense, you can lower the opacity of that editing module. Next we have drawn masks, which is pretty straight forward. You're going to use different shapes for targeting specific points in your image to apply that editing module 2. And then we have parametric masks, which are a more advanced type of mask. And then you can do both drawn and parametric masks with this option here. So for this tutorial, we're just going to go over drawn masks so you can get an idea of how to use the different shapes and apply the masks to target specific points in your images. So again, we have our blend mode and our opacity slider here, which will confine that edit or those applications to the shape that you create. So down here we have different shapes. We have a brush, circle, oval, a path, and a gradient. So let's start with a circle here and go over some of the basics. So by applying a shape, I'm just going to click once we can find that edit. Within that circle. Now, over here to the right we have this little icon with these dashed lines and an arrow. If I click on it, it's going to deactivate that shape. If I want to see the shape, I can go ahead and click on this icon again to show it. This icon here it says negative. But if I click on it, it will convert to a plus sign, which is basically an inversion of that application. Down here at the bottom, we have a Layer Mask icon, which is similar to what you may have seen in Photoshop or GIMP. If we click on it, it will show the entirety of that layer mask and where it's being applied and where it's not being applied. So the solid color is not applying that edit in that area. But as you can see, the mask inside the circle is being applied. And then if you want to turn off the effect entirely, just click on this icon here to temporarily switch off blend Mask Mode. Or I'm gonna go ahead and turn this off. And let's take a look at some of the ways that you can interact with your shapes. So when I hover over it, we see two circles. We see a solid circle and a dashed circle. In between. We can see that the color is bleeding on the outside of this solid circle here. And that's because between these two points, it's feathering, the masking based on the size of that feather. So we can increase the size of the feathering by holding down the Shift key and then using the scroll wheel on our mouse to increase it or decrease it based on what you need for the feathering. If you come in real tight, that means the feathering will be a harder edge. And if you want a completely hard edge, then you would resize this outer circle to match the inner circle. Now to re-size the circle or any shape, once you've applied it, hover on the inside of the circle and use your mouse wheel to increase or decrease the size of that shape. To get rid of a shape, you're going to right-click on it and it will disappear. All right, let's take a look at the ellipse shape here because it does have some additional options for interacting with it. So once you click and apply it, you can use your Shift key again to increase or decrease the feathering as needed. But the other thing you may have noticed is it has four anchor points or four nodes, which you can click on to reshape the oval based on whatever you need for that particular path or that shape. You can also hold down your control key and click on one of these to rotate the oval as well. The other thing you can do is hold down your control key and then scroll your wheel on the inside to decrease the opacity of the mask. The other thing I want to point out is there's a lot of different ways to interact with these. Different shapes. And I'm giving you a lot of information and it's going to be hard to remember everything unless you're diligent on taking notes and you're good at remembering everything. But if you're like me and you need to listen to things a couple of times. Well, there's actually some tips inside of dark room that are showing you exactly how to interact with your specific shape. And if you take a look up here at the top, once you're hovered inside the shape, you will then see those options available to you to interact with that particular shape. So don't worry if you're not remembering all of this at this time. No worries. So let's go ahead and continue learning more about these different shapes. I'm going to go ahead and right-click to get rid of this one. And then we're going to take a look at the brush shape. So this one, as its name implies, will allow you to brush on the mask. So I can just paint over her like this. And then once I release, I get this line here with different nodes. And of course, our feathering is here on the outside just like before. And then you can interact with this shape, just like you did before with the Control key or the shift key, where the mouse wheel to resize, et cetera. We also have the nodes here that we can click on and reposition. But the other thing we have for this particular shape is this little handle right here. So every time you click on a node, you're going to get this handle that will allow you to reshape that particular brush stroke or that portion of the brush stroke. Now the other thing you can do is you can increase or decrease the number of nodes that are being applied to this shape. So to do that, we have to go into Preferences, go to smoothing of brushstrokes. And by default, it's set to medium. If you have low set, it's going to add more nodes. Hi, we'll add fewer nodes. So if you need more precision and control, you can set that before you apply your brush so you can get the amount of nodes that you need. Now the other thing you can do is hold down your control key and click on that line to add additional nodes that way. So that may be a little bit faster versus the other option. It's entirely up to you and whatever works best based on your workflow. Okay, I'm going to right-click to get rid of that one. All right, let's take a look at the gradient option next. And as you would imagine, this will adjust the effect being applied gradually from 100% to 0%. So once I left-click, it will apply that mask on the image here. And we can see, just like with some of the other tools, we have the solid line and some dashed lines. We also have an arrow here and a circle at the top. So here's how the gradient works. From this top dashed line. We have 100% of the edit being applied and above it is also 100%. As you move down to the bottom line here, this is 0% of the edit being applied. And of course down here also 0%. So in between the solid line is 50 percent, so it's gradually removing the edit from 100% to 0%. You can increase the size of this transition from 100 to 0 by holding down your shift key and then using the scroll wheel on your mouse to increase or decrease the transition. The tighter it is, the harsher that transition is going to be from 100 to 0. So the feathering is not going to be as smooth. If you click on the circle here, you can then rotate that gradient. Now, check this out. This is really cool. We don't need a linear gradient. We can actually curve the gradient to wrap around something that doesn't have a straight edge. And that can be done by hovering over the middle line and then using the scroll wheel to bend that gradient. How cool is that? That's pretty awesome. Okay, I'm gonna go ahead and remove that by right-clicking on it. And now let's take a look at the path option. So the path option will allow you to draw around a shape, object, or person or element, or whatever you need to precisely select. So I can click here to begin the process and then I get this line here. When it come down here to her waist, I can click and then I get this here, which will allow me to continue clicking around her until I close that path. Now to close out the path, all you have to do is right-click and then it will close that path and apply the edit accordingly. Okay, let's go ahead and remove that by right-clicking on it. The other thing I want to mention real quick is down here, we have some options for feathering and blurring the edge of the mask. That way if the feathering option built-in isn't working for you and you need to blur it out a little bit more. You can use these options here. You can also lower the opacity and the contrast for the mask as well to make it a little easier to see. Now the next thing I want to show you is really cool because any masks that you create for a particular image are saved as part of that image or in the metadata of the file. And you can see that by coming over to the mask manager here. And you can see all the different shapes that I just created. So if I need to go back to a particular shape, I can click on it and it will become visible on the image, but it's not applying that mask until I activate it. So we're gonna come over here and we're going to click right here where it says no mask used. And then you can select the Ellipse 1 to activate and apply that mask. The other cool thing is you can take this particular mask and share it with another editing module. So you can place multiple types of edits within that mask. So I'm gonna go ahead and pull up the curve editing module here. And I'm going to apply this S curve right here. And then we need to go into drawn mask, click on no mask used, and then select the mask that we want to apply that particular edit to. And as you can see, it's being applied inside of that ellipse, just like the monochromatic edit. Pretty cool. If you ask me, Let's take a look at the mask manager here again, and you'll see I now have a monochrome and a tone curve option here, which is going to group the different paths within that editing module, which makes things a little bit easier when you have multiple paths or masks that you're working with. All right, so we've covered a lot of information about interacting with your masks and it's going to take some time and practice to learn everything. So feel free to come back to this tutorial until you're comfortable working with them. And don't forget the tooltips at the top of the interface to help you out. All right, so in the next tutorial, you're going to discover some more pro tips on retouching your images and dark room if you're ready. Let's do it. 19. How To Retouch In darkroom: In the QuickStart guide, you've got a taste of the retouching module. Now, I want to share a whole lot more about how to retouch your images and dark room if you're ready. Let's get started. All right, and the effects panel, you'll find your retouching module. So go ahead and activate that. And let's take a look at all the different options we have inside of here. So the first thing we have, our shapes. The shapes work and are applied exactly the same way that you learned in the masks tutorial. Under that we have some algorithms and this is going to apply what you're retouching differently based on the algorithm that you choose. The first one is a healing tool, and the second is a clone tool. And these work exactly the same as with other editing software like GIMP or Lightroom or Photoshop. Then we have an option here that will fill in your shape with a solid color. Not quite sure what that would be used for, but you have that option. And then next to that we have a blur tool. So you can apply a Gaussian blur or a bilateral blur. So if you take a look down here, you can change your blur type right here. And then you can increase or decrease the amount of blur based on the radius here. Now, this section here in the middle is a very powerful aspect of retouching your images that is beyond anything I've ever seen in Lightroom. This will allow you to precisely target detail and different types of detail in your image by separating your image into different layers of detail. So it's referred to as a scale because you have different scales here. And each one of these scales will either show a fine minute amount of detail or course the tail. And as you go further to the right, that detail would become less apparent and more softer versus course. And you can target each one of these different scales are, think of them like layers to retouch certain parts of your image. So let's take a look at how this works. First, you need to tell dark room how many scales or layers you want to separate your image into. So you're going to start with this bottom triangle here and you're going to click and drag it to the right. And each time you do, the image is separated into those different scales or layers. I'm going to set it to 10 for now. And then on the inside here, you're going to tell darker him, okay, this is the scale or the layer that I want to work on. Now. We can't see anything right now because we don't have it activated yet. What we need to do is we need to activate this icon to display it in a wavelet scale. And then as you target these different scales or layers, the detail will become more apparent and the different levels of detail will be separated into those different scales. So let me show you what I mean here. Once you click on it, we can see that the image has changed into a darker level. So this is one level of the image being divided up into these different scales. So if I come over here and click right here, it updates. And we can see the detail in the image differently versus other scales. So here, the detail is not as crisp and sharp and it's harder to determine what needs to be retouched as far as the detail. So again, the left side will show finer, more coarse detail. To the right, it will be less apparent. So doing this allows you to work on this level of detail. And it creates a much smoother, more natural type of retouch versus working on the original image layer. So let's take a look at how this works. I'm gonna go ahead and click here and turn it back on. And the other thing you can do here is if it's kinda hard to see because maybe it's too bright or too dark. You can come over here to this scale here, and click on this icon to automatically adjust the brightness level. Or you can grab these triangles and adjust them. And this is going to help make it easier to see that detail if the default settings are not working for you. So for example, if I click on this one, I may want to brighten this up just a little bit and we can see all the imperfections on her skin and these dark black spots. So that's what you want to use this for to make those blemishes much more apparent or it doesn't have to be blemishes. It could be a landscape photo with dust spots. You may not be able to see the dust spots by looking at the original image. But when you turn this on, it does make it easier to see those blemishes in your image. So once you decide on, Okay, I want to target this particular scale. You can then use your shape tools and your algorithm of choice to retouch those blemishes. I'm gonna go ahead and turn this off because I want to zoom into the image hair so I can see the blemishes on her face. Looks like we have a little pimple right here. So I'm gonna go ahead and use this. And then I can click. And instead of Clicking and releasing like we did in a previous tutorial in the QuickStart guide, we can actually click and drag to the area that we want to use as the sample point for retouching that blemish. Once I release it will then update accordingly. Now if we go over to another scale, Let's go to the one to the right. That pimple is still there and that's because the detail is still visible in that layer. So now we need to retouch this layer. So I'm going to click and drag over here to another point of her face to mix it up to a blends together a little bit better. We come back over here and click on the second scale. We can see it's still there. So you can go through each one of these levels and pick a different point from which to sample. And it will blend in and remove that pimple or blemish better than working on the original layer by itself. Or you can just work on a couple of layers. And then let's go back to the original image here and turn it off. We can see a faint amount of that blemish right here still. So if you want to keep some of the detail on the texture still, you may want to work on just a couple of layers. If you want to completely remove it, then go through each of the different scales available and again, use different points of her face or their face or different parts of the image to sample from. And it will create a much more natural type of edit. This is an awesome and powerful way to create natural retouching. In the next section, you're going to see the retouching tools and action when I guide you through a full edit and retouch. But first, in the next tutorial, I'd like to share some more tips for reducing the dreaded digital noise in your images. If you're ready, let's do it. 20. How To Remove Digital Noise: Hello and welcome back. In the QuickStart guide, we went over some tools for removing digital noise. In this tutorial, I want to share some additional information to help you understand how the rod denoise tool works and how to achieve better noise reduction for a higher quality image. This is going to require some technical information about your camera sensors. No worries. I'll make this brief and to the point. So the sensor cells of your digital camera are not color sensitive. Your camera is only able to record different levels of lightness. In order to convert that light to color, each cell is covered by a color filter of either red, green, or blue that passes the light of that color. This means each pixel of your raw file only contains information about a single color channel. These color filters are arranged in a mosaic pattern known as a Bayer filter. The D mosaic algorithm and dark room reconstructs the missing color channels by interpolating the data with pixels next to it. This can often lead to digital artifacts that will lower the quality of your image. So what does this have to do with digital noise? Well, the rod denoise tool by itself is very good at removing noise. However, it cannot remove digital artifacts that will require the D mosaic module. So let's jump back into dark room and take a look at these tools. So we're going to use this image here because it does have a lot of digital noise in, and this particular image we can see right here was shot at ISO 2500. So if we zoom in here, actually I'm gonna go to 400%. Let's navigate over to her face here. And we can see there's a lot of digital noise, but there's also some digital artifacts which are the longer lines here. It's kinda hard to see because they are mixed in with the digital noise. Come over here to our technical module and click on Rhonda noise right here to turn it on, we can see it does a pretty good job of removing that digital noise. In fact, it did a really good job. The only problem is you can see that there's a lot of digital artifacts still in the image. And that's because the rod denoise tool does not remove these digital artifacts and it's all these little specs of colors that are the digital artifacts. It's not noise, it's digital artifacts created by the Bayer filter. So to eliminate those digital artifacts, we're going to use a tool right above it called D mosaic. Now it's turned on by default and you can't turn it off. But what you can do if you go inside them here, you can increase the intensity of that tool being applied right now it's set at 0, so it's not really the mosaic king, if you will, removing those digital artifacts from the image. So what we have to do is we need to increase the edge threshold to begin eliminating or removing those digital artifacts. How cool is that? So you can increase this to your liking until you remove as many of the digital artifacts as you want. But I wouldn't go too far because just like with Rod annoys, we can actually come up here and increase these settings here. It's going to smooth it out to a point where it looks unnatural. Now, another thing in the D mosaic module here, you have some different methods for applying the D mosaic king. So if you click right here, you can see Fast and Slow and VNG four. And then we have some experimental ones here. And these are just different methods for applying the removal of the digital artifacts. When you select this one here, you then get the color smoothing option, which will allow you to go through and smooth out the color or the digital artifacts based on the number of times you want that filter to pass through it. Vng, you also had the same thing, but again, it's a different algorithm that's going to target those digital artifacts differently. So if you're not getting the result you want with the default option here, you can try one of these other options here. Alright, so removing digital noise requires a balancing act of removing the noise and trying to retain sharpness and the details and textures. In the next tutorial, you'll discover a method of sharpening those textures that will give your images the impression that they are sharper. So if you're ready to learn some sharpening secrets, Let's get started. 21. How To Sharpen Your Photos: When it comes to sharpening your images, I'd recommend applying the amount of sharpening based on your files intended output. For example, when exporting files to be used online, I'll tend to add more sharpening versus a file doesn't for a print enlargement. That being said, I'll also adjust the amount of sharpening differently, 44 by six print versus a 30 by 40 Wall enlargement. And the reason being is each intended output has a different purpose. We as photographers crave sharp images and how the image is being viewed, will require a different amount of sharpening to ensure your images look their best. So photos posted online tend to get more scrutiny versus a large wall print. Plus when posting to social media sites are images are being severely compressed and the quality of your photos suffers. As a result, sharpening can improve the quality to a certain extent. Now at the same time though, you wanna make sure you're not over sharpening. Otherwise, you'll end up with an even lower quality image during compression. And it's going to look unnatural if too much sharpening is applied. One thing you should be aware of is your image is already being sharpened when you import your images. So let's jump into dark room and take a look at the sharpening module and discover how it works and how not to overuse it. All right, let's take a look at the history stack here and we can see the sharpening is being applied right here, and this was applied during import. Let's go ahead and zoom in here a little bit so we can see how this sharpening is being applied. So what the sharpening module does is It's using a standard unsharp mask. Or in other words, if you're not familiar with unsharp mask is what it's doing is it's increasing the contrast around the edges of the detail or the textures in your image. And that creates the impression of sharpening. So if we go over to our active modules here, we can see that the sharpening module is turned on. If we turn it off, we can see how that affects the image in regards to sharpening when it's on or off. So inside of here, we have three different levels or sliders to adjust the amount of sharpening. So when the unsharp mask algorithm as applied, it's adding a certain amount of Gaussian blurred to the image as part of the sharpening process, which seems counterintuitive, but that's what it's doing. So with the radius does, is it's going to decrease the amount of Gaussian Blur and add more contrast to the edges. So when you adjust this to the right, the amount of sharpening or the contrast is being increased. So now it's a lot sharper than it was before, but it's beginning to look unnatural because the contrast levels are also making parts of the image look darker due to the increased contrast. The amount is going to intensify that effect even further. So the further we go to the right, the more contrast that is added and the sharper the image becomes. But again, the more unnatural it becomes. Next we have threshold which is going to target different levels of contrast. And it will begin removing lower ends of that contrast to reduce the effects that we've applied so far. So as we increase the threshold and begins lowering the contrast levels that are being used to sharpen the image. So in a way, threshold is like opacity and that it's going to decrease the intensity of the effects you applied and the radius and the amount. Now when it comes to sharpening portraits like this, what I would recommend doing is masking out different parts of the face so that the skin itself is not getting sharpen. Because as you can see, the pores and the blemishes and things are a lot more prominent now than they were before. So if you target the eyes, the lips, the eyelashes, the eyebrows, those are things you will probably want to sharpen more so than the skin. And with your mask options here, you can use the shape tools we've talked about previously to target those areas. All right, so when it comes to sharpening, I did bys being conservative and the amount of sharpening you apply, in my opinion, less is more, especially when it comes to applying sharpening to people. We are all self-aware of our flaws and over sharpening will make those features stand out even more. Unless of course, you target your sharpening with masks. And you'll see that being done with a full edit in the next section. Until then, you're going to discover the secrets to adding vignettes and dark room in the next tutorial. 22. How To Create a Vignette: Vignettes. You either hate them or love them. And I think why some photographers dislike them is due to them being overused or they're too intense. Just like with sharpening a subtle vignette as best. So let's jump into darkroom again and discover how to add vignettes to your images. To access the vignetting module, you're going to access it in the effects module, and it's right here. So once you expand it, it's going to add this circle. The outer part is where the vignetting is going to be. We can't see it right now because the feathering and the size of our vignette is larger than the image itself. So we need to resize it or reposition it or both. So we can interact with the vignette tool from our image here. If we click right here in the center, we can reposition the vignette. We have some nodes along the circle here, which will allow us to reshape our vignette. And now as I bring it in tighter, you can see the vignetting along the edges here. And we also have an outer circle here as well that we can resize as well. And this is for the feathering of the vignette. In the module itself, we do have some sliders that will adjust the settings or the adjustments we just did inside the image. So for example, the scale will change the size of the vignette. Fall off strength is the feathering of the vignette. And then our brightness will decrease or increase the brightness around it. Saturation will boost the saturation to the right or remove the saturation to the left. And now it's completely black and white. Horizontal center and vertical center will adjust the position of your vignette. And then we have a shape option. So this set to 0 will be square. And as you move it to the right, it will change to a circle, oval, and a diamond shape. This next option is one that I like to use. It's for automatic ratio adjustments. So in other words, it's going to adjust the vignette to match the aspect ratio of your image. So once you turn that on, it, adjust the vignette according to the aspect ratio of the image. This last option here, I'm actually going to darken this up a little bit so we can see how this works a little bit better. And let's zoom in. So sometimes when you add a vignette, banding may occur doesn't always happen, but sometimes it does. And that's what you're going to use dithering four. So right now it's turned off and we have two options. Once we click on an 8-bit and 16-bit output, I would recommend 16-bit output because it's going to be much more apparent that the banding has been removed because overall the vignette is going to be smoother. So once I click on that, you can see the difference between turning off and turning on the transition. And the overall vignette is much smoother with a turned on. All right, In the next section, I'm going to show you how I apply a vignette to add depth and make it subtle at the same time. Before we get into that though, I'd like to share with you a secret editing tip that will take your productivity to the next level. If you were ready to discover that, Let's do it. 23. How To Create Presets + Styles: All right, The tense you're going to learn in this tutorial are going to exceed everything you've learned so far. And that's because presets and styles will forever change how you edit and how long it takes you to edit if you're ready, let's do it. So when it comes into presets, you can save the edits that you applied in an editing module, so you can use those for future images. And you want to do this when you have similar images under the same lighting conditions where maybe the same camera settings. And you want to save your time from having to redo all the steps one by one, you can save a preset instead with those steps already saved as a preset. So if we take a look at our rod, the noise here, I removed the digital noise with these settings. So if I want to save this as a preset, we can come up here to the hamburger icon and click on it and click on store new preset. Let's give it a name. I'm going to call it ISO 2500, and then I can put a description down here. Let's say denoise. Now, this option right here is pretty powerful, It's awesome. So check this out. So when activated, it's going to auto apply this preset to matching images. So what does that mean? Well, let's take a look at all the options available. Just click right here. And then you get this menu of new options. So we can tell dark room for this preset. When I shoot with a specific camera, make and model, let's say an icon Z6 or Nikon D 500. And I'm using this lens, a 50 millimeter lens, let's say. And I'm shooting at an ISO of 2500 up to this insane number here. I'm actually narrow this down to ISO 3200. And that's because if I'm shooting at a higher ISO than 3200, the amount of noise removal will have to be increased because there will be more digital noise at a higher level. So we're going to narrow it down to these two. Now. You don't have to narrow it down to a specific make and model and lens. You can leave these set to the default, which will then apply a to it. Any image that has an ISO range of 2500, the 3200. Now that being said, you may want to at least create multiple presets for different types of cameras that you have. So for example, my Nikon Z6 produces better noise removal in camera versus my Nikon D 500. So I will create a de-noise preset based on the camera make and model. But I will leave the lens at the default, so it will apply it to any lens. Alright, so we have some other options here based on the exposure and the amateur. We also have these options down here. These are all set by default, so you can adjust these according to your own needs. And then when you click OK, those settings are saved. So if we click right here again, we will then see our preset. So if I come over to this image here, and I go back to the de-noise filter here and click on it. We then see the ISO 2500 preset that I can apply to this image. The only problem is this image was shot at ISO 400. So it will be too intense for this particular image and will make the image much smoother than what I would get if I did it manually for ISO 400. And we can actually see the settings I applied for this amount of noise. So it's a lot different than ISO 2500. Now the other thing you can do is let's go back to this image here. Let's go back in here and edit this preset. The other thing you can do is you can click on this item here, only show this preset for matching images. So once you click there and click Okay, Let's go back to this image again. That preset should not be visible. So let's see if that's the case. And there we go. So that preset is no longer available for this image because the image doesn't match the parameters. And regards to the settings that I applied, ISO 2500 to 3200. So this is a powerful way to speed up your workflow for images that are shot with specific camera settings. Now when it comes to a style, it's not limited to just one editing module. If we take a look at our history stack for this image, we can see all the edits that I applied. I can save all these edits as a style and then apply it to another image. So let's do that. I'm gonna go ahead and duplicate this image here. And I'll go back to the history stack and go back down to the base curve and compress the history stack. So I'm back to the original image. Now to create a style, we actually have to go into the light table. I'm going to select my image here that I want to copy the settings from or save the settings from. And then we have a Styles panel right here. Go ahead and click on Create. We're going to give it a name. I'll just call it style one. And then all of these items right here are all the different editing modules I applied to the image. So you're going to turn on or turn off any of the editing styles you want to save. Once you click Save, you'll then see that style name in this box here. And then to apply it, you're going to select your image and double-click on it to apply that edit or that style. How cool is that? I love it. All right, I hope you're now beginning to see the power of creating presets and styles. Imagine eliminating two or more types of edits automatically as your photos are being imported. For example, I believe the majority of your images can benefit from a lens correction. And in noise reduction and other types of edits you do on a regular basis. And you'll fly through your post-processing. That's exactly the power of presets and styles. 24. How To Batch Edit: Hello and welcome back. All right, so batch editing your images is another way to improve your post processing productivity. So let's jump into dark room and check it out. So just like creating a style, you need to be in the light table view in order to do some batch editing. I went ahead and duplicated this image a few times to demonstrate how this works. So first, make sure the image you want to use to copy the edits from is selected. Then go up here to this panel here called History stack and click on Copy parts. So just like with styles, it's going to list all the editing modules that you used. Now for some reason it didn't select a few of these edits that I applied. So if you want everything to be copied from, click on, Select All click Okay. Click on the image or images that you want to paste that information to. I'm going to hold down my shift key and click on this last image to select all the images. And then in the history stack panel, I can click on paste parts. Just verify that everything is selected or turn off anything that you don't want to copy and click. Okay, and boom, they are updated with those same edits. How cool is that? I love it. Now the last thing I want to mention is these options up here we have an option to compress the history stack, discard the history stack, and you can also append the history stack or overwrite it. So if these four images had some type of styling done to them already, I already did some different types of edits. Let's say, let's say a specific tone curve. Well, I can append the history stack to that versus overwriting it if I want to keep that part of the edit for those images. You can also save this information, the history stack that is in the XMP file as well by clicking on this button here. As a photographer, you may wish to protect your artwork by adding a copyright notice to your images. This is also known as the watermark. Once upon a time, you'd have to edit your image and darkroom and add the watermark in another app, not anymore. In the next tutorial, I'll show you how to add a simple text or your logo and dark room. 25. How To Create Watermarks: If you've stumbled upon the watermark module and darker and before you may have discovered, it's not that easy to use, or at least to add your logo. And that's due to a certain type of file format that dark room requires. I'm going to share a secret with you on how to convert your PNG file formats into a format that dark room can use. If you're ready to discover how to use watermarks and darker. Let's get started. All right, let's go to the Effects module here to find our watermark module. And from here we have a ton of options for creating a watermark. First thing we have to do is activate the module by clicking right here. And by default we have this dark table watermark with some metadata about our camera and settings, timestamp, et cetera. It's probably not something you want to use for your watermarks. So let's go over the different options here to customize your watermark. If we click on this drop-down menu here, we have a couple of other pre-made watermarks that you can check out and use or not. If you just want to add some simple text, select this option here. And then from this textbox here you can go ahead and type in whatever it is you want for your text. Now, some of these options are pretty self-explanatory. You can change your color to something else if you like. You can also change the font style based on the fonts you have installed in your computer. So you can pick one of these. I'll just go ahead and pick one of these randomly. I guess I'll just choose that one. And then the watermark updates accordingly based on that font. And then we have options to lower the opacity to make it smaller or larger. You can also rotate it if you wanted to. And then down here we have some options for alignment. I'm gonna go ahead and make this a little bit smaller here. And this little box right here. By default, your watermark is set to the center. And you can click on each one of these little options here to reposition your watermark as needed. Now right now it's cut off at the top, so I can use the Y offset to bring it down lower. And then I can use the X offset to adjust it along the x axis. Now if you want to use a Branding mark or a logo, you can do that as well. There's just a few extra steps we had to do to set up a dark room in order to use our own brands or logos. And that is to, first you need to create a file that is compatible with dark room. And the other is you need to install that file in a specific location on your computer. So the first thing you have to do is create the file in the proper file format. So this is the folder location where those dark table and other watermarks are residing on your operating system. And the file format is SVG. An SVG file can be created in programs like Adobe Illustrator or Inkscape. Now if you don't have either one of those or you don't know how to use it, you can actually convert a PNG file into an SVG file. To do that, you're going to navigate to this website right here. Convert io dot SEO. You're going to click on choose file to select your PNG file. And the other thing is you want to make sure that file is in a square format. Otherwise it's going to crop off part of your logo or your brand. So once you have that chosen, go ahead and click Open and then you want to tell it which file format. So we're going to click on this drop-down menu and choose SVG. Once you have that all set, just click on Convert. And this is free by the way. It will take a few minutes or a few seconds to process your file depending on how large your file is. And then you can download it. I've already done that. So if I go to my Downloads here, I can see my file has been converted to S V G. Now I need to copy this file and paste it in this file folder location. So I'm on a Mac. So let me show you the directory for Mac and Windows. So if you're on a PC, you're gonna go to Program Files, dark table, share, dark table, and click on and open up the watermarks folder. If it's not there by default, go ahead and create a new folder and then place that file inside of there. For Mac users, you're gonna go right here. So I'm going to go back to applications. And then on dark table, I'm going to right-click and select show package contents. Then we're going to go inside of contents, resources, share, dark table, and then watermark, and then go ahead and paste your file inside of there. Now that I have that installed, I need to go back to dark table. And I need to update the watermark module to read that new file. To do that, we're going to navigate away from dark room and then back in the dark room, which is going to refresh the module. And then when you click on your drop-down menu, you'll see your new branding or logo watermark. So that is pretty big. Someone go ahead and scale this down a little bit. I'm going to move this up here to the side, whichever. Let's go up. So right there. Now I can't change the color of this because I created a brand with a black color. If I wanted to use white, I need to create another file with the color of choice. For that particular watermark. I can lower the opacity though if I want to. Now the last thing you may wanna do is you may want to create a preset based on the watermark and the location. That way you can apply it without going through all these different settings in the future. And of course, he would just come up to the hamburger icon here, click on stored new preset, and then give your watermark a name. And of course you can apply this automatically on import with this option here, like we talked about previously. And of course you can narrow down where it's being applied or shown, I should say, with this option here. So far, we've covered a lot of the basic and some advanced editing tools for editing your images. In the next section, we're going to put everything together. As I show you three full edits and a huge editing challenge. Along the way, I'm going to share another editing tool or two that we haven't covered so far. So if you're ready to see how I approach and edit images and dark room, Let's do it. 26. Butterfly Transformation Edit: So our first image is a photo of a butterfly I took this past summer. The image is a little flat and the colors are bland. So we're going to fix that with some basic edits and with the use of masks. So let's jump in a darker room and get started. All right, The first thing I wanna do is I want to fix the lens distortion. So let's go ahead and turn on Lens Correction. And it looks like it picks a great camera and lens, so that's good. Let's go ahead and crop and rotate the image now because I want to focus more on the butterfly versus the rest of the background here. The composition is a little bit unbalanced, so let's go ahead and type in a little bit. Here it is right here. What I wanna do is I want to use the free hand aspect ratio so I can go ahead and customize the crop to exactly where I want it to be. So we want to focus on the butterfly and these two main flowers here. Let's go ahead and close that. Let's go ahead and create a snapshot so we can compare this to our final edit. All right, the next thing I wanna do is I want to focus on the white balance here and warm up the image a little bit. So I think right around there looks pretty good. Let's add some contrast to the image with a tone curve. I'm going to create an S curve like we've done previously. So I'm gonna go ahead and darken it up in the shadows just a little bit and add a little bit more brightness to the highlights. So something like that, that looks pretty good. All right, so far, I think the background and the flowers themselves are very bright. Which is okay. But I think the butterfly is too dark, so I want to increase the exposure, adjust the butterfly in mainly the wings. So let's go to our exposure module here. And let's increase the exposure by one-stop. And then we're going to use a drawn mask. I'm going to use my path tool to draw around the butterfly here on the inside. And then I can concentrate that edit inside of this path. Just like you've learned in previous tutorials. Okay, right-click. Once you're happy with your path to close it out. Let's go ahead and turn off the exposure module here. And we can see it's a lot brighter than it was before, might be a little bit too much, so I'm going to bring it down just a little bit. I think I want to add a little bit of contrast to the wings. So let's create another tone curve adjustment just for the wings. So I'm going to click right here and then click on new instance to get another tone curve values. So we can apply this directly to the wings. I'm gonna go ahead and do another S curve, maybe a little bit darker this time. And we're going to go down into the drawn mask here and select our exposure shape. And that will confine that tone curve to that shape. Let's go ahead and turn it on and off so we can see the before and after before we continue on. So that looks pretty good. So we have some added contrast. I think I just want to bring those colors out a little bit more and make them a little bit more vibrant. So we're going to grab a vibrant tool or the vibrance module here. And I'm going to increase this to around 85 or so. And then we're going to go back into our drawn mask here. And we're going to select that exposure shape again. So it's confined inside of there once again. All right, so those colors are popping a little bit more. So I'm liking that. The next thing I think we need to do is I think we need to tone down the brightness of the background. It's still overpowering the butterfly. And I want to bring our focus to our main subject and we can do that with a vignette. So let's go ahead and add even yet, go ahead and turn it on. And I think I'm gonna make it a little bit darker. And I'm going to bring this down a little bit more so it's a little bit tighter on the butterfly. So I think right there looks pretty good. So that brings our focus closer to the butterfly than it was before without the vignette. So that looks pretty good. I think we need to do one more thing just to make this pop a little bit more. And we're going to use a module called salvia, which is going to add some more vibrancy, but more so to the mid tones, then the entire image. So I'm gonna go ahead and bring the strength up here to around 60 or so. And let's take a look at the before and after. And that makes those greens in the background pop a little bit more and I'm liking that a lot better. So let's go ahead and create a new snapshot. And then we're going to click on crop and rotate here. So we can get our slider to look at the image before and after our edit. How cool is that? 27. Portrait Retouching: Our next edit is going to show some advanced retouching techniques for portraits, including how to change the color of eyes and dark room. It's going to be awesome. So if you're ready, let's dive in and get started. So here's the image we're going to be working on. And this is the before, and this is the after. To get this final edit, as you can see, I had to do a lot of editing. Most of it is retouching. So for this image, I brightened it up. I change the white balance a little bit, are removed some stray hairs and I removed blemishes. Now, you may think I did too much retouching, but that is my choice and your choice as well. So you can retouch your image as much or as little as you like based on your creative vision or based on what the client that you're working for requires. The other thing you may have noticed is the eyelashes, the eyebrows, and the lips are sharper. And check out the eyes. They were blue before and now they're more turquoise to greenish. So I'm going to show you how to change the colors and your images as well. So let's go ahead and get started. I'm gonna go ahead and go back to my original file here. So the first thing I want to do, of course, is adjust the lens distortion. And I'm gonna go ahead and turn this on. And it looks like, yeah, we had a little bit of distortion and the corners here, but not a lot of vignetting. It's kinda hard to see because it's dark anyways. So let's go ahead and bring up the image a little bit by increasing the exposure. And not a whole lot. I'm just going to increase it maybe half a stop or so. So that's a little bit too much. So I'm gonna bring that back down to right about there, so that looks pretty good. Next, let's adjust the white balance. I'm just want to warm it up a little bit. So maybe right around 5200 Kelvin, that looks pretty good. Now I'm going to start editing a little bit out of order than I normally do. And I'm going to explain why. So typically I like to sharpen my images at the end, but I'm going to begin sharpening this image at this point. And what I wanna do is I want to target my sharpening to just her eyebrows, eyelashes, and her lips. And the main reason why is the more retouching you do and dark table and the more masks you apply, the more resources it's going to take, and the slower dark table is going to be Come. So these types of edits where I'm targeting specific edits and specific locations with masks. I like to do those first because those tend to take up more resources, a least based on my experience. So let's grab our sharpen tool. And let's increase the radius a lot too. Let's go all the way up to around five for the radius. And I'm going to increase the amount as well to right about there. So let's take a look at the before and after. So a lot of sharpening is going on in the image. If we go ahead and zoom in here and take a look at the before and after we can see the skin pores and the blemishes are just popping off her skin right now. And it's too intense. That's why I like to target my sharpening for these types of images exactly where I want to apply them, like the eyelashes and eyebrows and the lips. So let's click on drawn a mask here. So we can use our brush here to apply the sharpening exactly where we want it. I'm going to increase my brush size here a little bit with my scroll wheel. And then I'm going to paint over the eyebrow right here. Once I release, it's going to apply that edit directly to those eyebrows and remove it from everywhere else. And we can see that once we turn on our mask here. All right, I'm going to grab my brush again so I can apply some sharpening on this side. All right, Let's go ahead and turn off those brush strokes so we can see the ash or sharpening hair. Let's take a look at the before and after. So I'm liking the sharpening and the eyebrows. Let's go ahead and apply another brush to the eyelashes now. And one more for the other side. All right. I just want to double-check and make sure I didn't do too much here. So that's looking pretty good. I'm going to use my mouse here to click and drag up to take a look at her lips here, and then apply the brush and here as well. All right, Let's make sure that's not too much. All right, that's looking pretty good. I'm gonna go ahead and zoom out now. And let's take one more quick look here. I like to look several times just to make sure I'm not missing anything or making sure I'm not over sharpening or over editing depending on the application I'm applying to my image. All right, so I'm liking that, so we'll go ahead and keep it like that. Let's go ahead and zoom back in so we can work on her eyes next. So what I wanna do is I want to brighten them up, add some contrast, and then recolor them. So we're going to use three different editing modules for her eyes. The first thing I wanna do is I want to increase the brightness. So I'm gonna go to my exposure module here. Instance. We already used this once before. I'm going to click right here and create a new instance. So let's increase the exposure too. Let's try rate around a half a stop. And now we're going to draw a shape around the eyes so we can confine this edit to the eyes. Now we could use a circle or the oval, but I find that the path tool is easier to work with the eyes so we can re, size and reshape that path as needed. Otherwise, the edit will end up going on her eyelids and underneath and it's not going to look good. So let's go ahead and grab our pad tool here. And I'm just going to click around the eye, like so. Okay, I'm going to right-click now. Actually I want to zoom in a little bit here. All right, I'm gonna go ahead and readjust my shape here to get closer to the edge of her. I want to make sure it's confined to the inside of the eye there and not going on the whites of her eye or on her eyelashes. So that's looking pretty good. So let's take a look at the before and after. Let's go ahead and turn off the view of the path there so we can see it a little better. So that's looking pretty good. All right, What I wanna do now is go over to the mask manager and find that path that you created. Right-click on it and select duplicate this shape. We're going to click on it and drag it over here and add it to the other eye. Let's go ahead and reshape it to fit this I here. Okay, That's looking pretty good. I'm gonna go ahead and zoom out here. And now let's be sure we applied that edit to both eyes. It looks like it's only being applied to this eye here. So we need to go into our module here and make sure that both shapes are used. So we're going to click right here and click on Copy of path one. And that's going to select two shapes. And now it's saying two shapes used in. Let's take a look at the before and after. All right, so the eyes are now brighter. Let's go ahead and add a little bit of contrast to those eyes by going to our tone curve adjustment. And we're going to create an S curve. So something like that looks pretty good. Now we need to add those masks to the tone curve. So let's go in here and click on no mask used and select copy of path one and path one. Alright, let's take a look at the before and after. So we've added some contrast or eight now we're going to add some color with our color balance module. So we're going to target the mid tones of the tonal range. So let's increase the hue to around a 128%. Then we're going to increase the saturation to around 4%. So that's going to give the color that I want to use for her eyes. Let's go into drawn mask here and add our masks like we did before. So we're going to click on no mask used and select path one and then copy of path one. And now her eyes or green. Pretty cool if he asked me. All right. Let's take a look at the before and after. Perfect. All right, I'm gonna go ahead and zoom out here. And what I wanna do next is begin retouching the image. So let's grab our retouch module here. I'm gonna go ahead and zoom into this part of the image because I want to remove some of these stray hairs here and I'm going to use my brush. To do that. I'm going to increase my brush size a little bit with my mouse wheel. And then I'm just going to paint over. Each strand of hair that I want to remove, I'm gonna go ahead and turn that off so I can see how dark table did it looks like it copied it from this side. So I'm going to go ahead and click on this line here and move it over here. Did a pretty good job. Let's go ahead and clean it up if needed. And let's go ahead and remove this one as well. All right, let's take a look at some of these blemishes. And as we talked about previously, you can remove the blemishes on the image as it is now. Or if you want to work on a finer level of detail, you can use your scale options here. So for this image, I would do both. We have some beauty marks and you have to decide how many of the beauty marks are you going to keep? Or are you going to remove them altogether? Or are you going to tone them down? That's entirely up to you based on your creative vision and the desire of your client. All right, so let's go ahead and begin removing some of these blemishes. I'm going to use my brush tool again. And I'm going to increase the brush size a little bit larger than the blemish I want to remove. And I'm just going to paint in this area right here to remove that first one. And it looks like it did a pretty good job. Looks like we have a scar up here. So let's go ahead and grab our brush tool here and increase our brush size. And go ahead and paint over this area here. I'm going to click and drag this line over here to the right. So it blends in a little bit better. So that's looking pretty good. It looks like I missed a spot, so I'm gonna grab my brush again and take care of this right here. Okay, I need to move this line over. All right, That's much better. So I just have a couple more specs right here. And I have to zoom in, I think to get to this one. This line is kind of buried along the other ones. They're all right. There we go. That looks pretty good. All right, let's take a look at scaling this image a little bit to get into the finer details of this image for some of these beauty marks. So I'm going to increase the scales to eight. And let's go ahead and turn on our wavelength scale to take a look at the different levels, to see parts we want to use for retouching. So I think right there that level should be good because we can see these really dark spots. We turn this off, we can verify that and yes, we have some marks there. So if we want to remove them, we can do that from this level. I'm going to use my brush tool. Let's work on this one right here. I'm just going to paint over this area and move it over to the right a little bit. So like that. And I'm gonna go over one more level and applied this brush adjustment here. Again. I'm going to bring it over to the left to bring in some texture over on this side. So a blend together a little bit better. Let's go back to the original image layer and turn this off to see our final edit. And we can barely see where it was before. So it kind of leaves a little bit of that mark there still. So it's a little bit more natural in that regard. If you want to remove it completely, you would have to work on each scale layer over here, or work on the original image layer. So that's entirely up to you. So I'm not gonna sit here and go through editing and retouching all these blemishes because we would be here for awhile. I think you get the idea. I just want to share with you one more tip. Before we go. It's a little controversial. Some people may not like it, some people do. So I'm going to show you what it is. And it's actually just smoothing out the skin and adding a little bit of a glow to the skin. So this is an optional type of edit. It's entirely up to you. But we're going to use the scale here to smooth out part of the skin layer, not the entire image. That way we retain some of the detail in her skin. So I'm going to navigate over here to the right here until I find a layer that I want to work on. So I think I'm going to work on this second one here. And a has a lot of fine detail in here. And once we smooth that out, we should still get some detail from the other layers here as well. So it's not completely removing those textures and those details in our skin. Because if we do too much, then her skin's going to look plastic. So to smooth out her skin, we are going to use the brush tool again, but this time we're going to use the active blur tool algorithms. So we're going to click on that to activate it. Let's scroll down here because what I wanna do is I want to increase the Gaussian blur. The blur radius is set to ten as the default. So I'm going to increase this to around a 100. And we can always adjust this later on. If it's too much. I'm going to increase my brush size here. And what I wanna do is I just want to brush round her cheeks, her chin, and her forehead. I'm gonna go ahead and begin painting under her eye here like so. And continue around her face until I have it covered. I'm going to leave part of her nose alone there, the tip of her nose because I want that to be a little bit sharper than the rest of her face. Okay. Once we release dark table, we'll begin the blurring process. Might take a couple seconds here, a few seconds. And now we can see a solid gray where all those pixels on that detail was smooth out. All right, let's go ahead and go back to the original layer here and turn it off and take a look at our final edit here. And we can see that the skin is a lot smoother than it was before, but we retained some of the detail. Once it's done working here and updating, we can still see some of the skin detail, even though we did smooth that out sum. And the key is using the scale and working on a different layer versus the original image. 28. "Multi-Light" White Balance Challenge: When shooting images with multiple light sources, you can have a huge editing challenge on your hand if those light sources are emitting a different color of light. So in this tutorial, I'm going to show you how to color correct your images when faced with this challenge, if you're ready to elevate your editing skills, Let's do it. So here's the image we're going to be working with. And as you can see, it's really underexposed. But the thing that caught my eye more than that is the color of the light. It's not white balanced properly. Not only that, but I can see two different colors of light. So if we take a look at her upper torso here and our face, it's very blue. And then her legs here are not that same color, blue, they're warmer. So this can create a challenge when editing your white balance and trying to color correct your image. Because we have two different parts of the image that we need to adjust for white balance so we can't apply a Global Edit. We have to do what we've been doing in other editing tutorials. And that's creating a mask to target her legs separate from the rest of the image. But we're going to use a different tool to color correct her legs so that they match much more closely. They are now and here's my final edit hair. So colors above and below are much closer together than they were before. I think I could have done just a little bit better job, but I think it's much better than it was. So I'm going to show you how to do this and then you can spend a little bit more time creating a much more congruent color between her legs, her arms, and the rest of her body. Alright, I'm gonna go ahead and go back to my duplicate image here. And I'm gonna make sure my history state matches yours, which should right there. So let's go ahead and close out the snapshots here. I'm gonna go ahead and create a new snapshot so we can take a look at the before and after. So the first thing I wanna do is I want to fix the lens correction. So let's turn it on. And this is one of those images where I'm not sure the lens correction is really helping the image a whole lot. There's not a lot of distortion going on and the image itself, there might be some vignetting in the corner, but it's kinda hard to see. And I would probably leave the lens correction offer this kind of an image. And the reason why is because her head is already pretty close to the top edge and our elbows here are close to the sides. Once you correct the lens correction, she comes forward and she looks larger than she did originally, and it brings her head closer to the top, so I'll probably leave it off in this case. So the next thing I would do is I would adjust the exposure. So the exposure right now is really underexposed and we can see that in the histogram right there. So I want to increase this about a half a stop. So I think right there looks pretty good. Now let's work on the white balance for the entire image. Right now, it's too blue. So let's add some yellow to warm it up. And I'm going to slide this over to rate around 5400. Actually, I think I'm gonna go a little bit more, maybe right around 57, 56, something like that. I might tweak that a little bit more once we get her legs matching the rest of the image a little bit here. So let's work on that next. So let's go ahead and zoom into her legs here. So let's grab our color correction module first, which is a tool we're going to use for matching the colors and her legs and our arms here. So here it is. Let's go ahead and turn it on. So right now her legs are really orange and yellow to counter that and to get it to match with her arms and our hands here, we're going to target the blue colors in the color correction grid here. And that's going to remove the yellow and the orange and the image and get the legs to match closer to the rest of her body. Now it's kinda hard to see right now because I'm adjusting the entire image. So what we need to do next is click on drawn mask and grab our Path Tool so we can target just the leg. So I'm gonna go ahead and click around her legs here. All right, Remember to right-click to close out the path and that will confine that, edit the color correction to just her legs. And let's take a look at the before and after. So it's a lot closer. I think we can do a little bit better. So I'm gonna go ahead and click on this again and drag it down to the bottom left here and try and get it as close as possible. So now I'm adding too much blue. So I'm going to come back up a little bit to right about there. The other thing we could probably do to make this a little bit better is to make her legs a little bit darker because our arms and our hands here look darker than her legs. So let's go back to our exposure module here. I'm going to create a new instance. I'm going to increase or decrease, I should say, the exposure down. Let's try a half a stop right there. And let's grab our mask that we just created. So what's the color correction one? Let's take a look at the before and after, so it's looking much better. I may want to make this a little bit darker here. So worried about there, I'm gonna go ahead and close that out and zoom out. Let's go ahead and take a snapshot here and take another look. Now it looks like I created a snapshot at a different zoom levels. So I'm going to go ahead and reset that and start over. There we go. So there's the before and the after. So it's much better than it was before. The one thing I'm noticing now though, is it's little bit too green for my taste. So I think the white balance needs to be adjusted a little bit more. So I'm gonna go ahead and turn that off. I'm gonna go into my white balance slider here and add a little bit of red tent. That's too much. I want to bring this down just a little bit. And let's try making it a little bit warmer. Alright, I'm going to take another snapshot here. There we go. Much better. 29. Epic Yosemite Edit: Our next editing challenge will be a two-step edit process. So what do I mean by that? Well, let's dive in a dark room and find out our aid before we get started on editing this image, I just want to show you the before and after that we can get an idea of what we're going to create. And the reason why I'm showing you this before and after in GIMP is because one of the main steps for the final edit is done in GIMP. So this is the before image. And as you can see overall, the image is flat, the color isn't very vibrant. The shadows are dark and there's not a lot of detail in those shadows. It's kinda hard to see all these trees in here and what's going on in the sky is blown out and it's really bright. So once we're done editing and dark table, it's going to look like this. Legged out what a difference just from editing and dark table. And we can definitely see the trees a lot clearer now there's actually a road here that was kinda hard to see before. The colors are a lot more vibrant. The sky is darker and the blue sky is a lot more apparent and brighter and vibrance and all that good stuff. So again, before and after. Now, once we're done with this, we're going to export it and bring it into GIMP. And then we're going to make this foreground pop. So check this out. Here is the final edit. All you that, all those trees are now a lot brighter and vibrant and sharper. And there's more detail than what we will do in dark table. So that is pretty awesome if he asked me. So let's jump into dark table here and we'll go ahead and get started. So here's the image and yours should look exactly the same. You can see my history stack has 10 steps. These were all applied during import. So now we can begin editing our image. And the first thing I like to do for all my images is apply a lens correction. So let's go ahead and turn that on to fix the distortion and the vignetting. I'm gonna go ahead and zoom in here and take a look at the shadows here. Because I know this image, if I double-click here, was shot at an ISO of 640 and there's some digital noise in there. So I want to tone that down a little bit and try and keep some of the detail at the same time. It's going to be hard to do, but we can do it with the raw denoise module. So let's go ahead and access that and turn it on. And boom, that digital noise is gone. And as you can see, that detail has been smoothed out with this particular Edit way too much. So we need to bring back some of that detail and we can do that with this linear line right here. I want to target the fine detail. I'm going to bring this back down to noisy, which in effect is bringing back noise or digital noise. But I need some of that sharpness back in that detail. We've still removed some of that digital noise and the shadow there as you can see. And it's not as smooth as it was previously once you make this adjustment. All right, let's go ahead and work on the shadows and the highlights. I want to darken the highlights and brighten the shadows. So my tool of choice for that is the shadows and highlights tool. Let's go ahead and turn that on and boom. Highlights or darker shadows are brighter, but a little bit too much. So I'm going to tone down the shadows just a little bit. And actually I'm going to increase the highlights to the left here to make that sky even darker. So there's the before and the after. So much better than it was before. Let's go ahead and bring up our white balance module here, and let's warm it up a little bit. I think I'm gonna go to rate around 70000 case are right there looks pretty good. I think that image is still a little bit too flat, so I'm gonna go ahead and grab up my tone curve here and add a S curve. So let's go ahead and turn it on. Increase the highlights and decrease the shadows. I think I want to bring up the mid-tones as well. So I'm going to grab the middle here and brighten those up by dragging it up. Let's take a look at the before and after. Alright, I think we did a pretty good job there. I think what I want to work on now are the colors. The colors are a little flat, and I think I want to make them warmer and more vibrant. So let's go to our vibrance module here. And let's adjust this to around 80 percent. And you can adjust this to whatever setting you like based on your creative vision. All right, So I think that did a pretty good job of bringing out those colors, but I think we can do a little bit better with our Velveeta slider here. And I'm going to increase this to around 80 percent as well. And that's going to make those colors pop a lot more. So again, if it's too much for you at 80 percent, go ahead and dial it down based on what looks good to you. Now I want to bring out the reds little bit more because we have some trees here in the foreground and in the valley that have red in them, want those red colors to pop. So we're gonna do that with our color contrast module here. Let's go ahead and turn that on. And we're going to increase the green magenta contrast to the right to add red. And I'm going to set that to right around 1.25. So let's take a look at the before and after. And that red color is a lot more apparent in the hills right here and a little bit in those trees here. And it's going to be a lot more apparent once we get done with our final edit and GIMP. So I want to add a little bit of depth and dimension to our image now. So we're going to use our vignetting module here. To do that. Let's turn on automatic ratio to add a vignette that matches the aspect ratio of our image. Now I don't want it in the sky as much as it is right now. So I'm going to go ahead and move this circle up or this oval up to remove some of that in those corners. And that's going to add some more vignetting. And the bottom of the image and the bottom corners, which is what I want, That's going to add that depth. So I think it's a little too intense. So I'm gonna go ahead and click on uniformly right here and drop the opacity of that vignette to around 50% It's a subtle vignette, but I think it definitely helps focus our attention on our eyes towards the main element of the image here in the center. All right, so the last thing I wanna do is I want to sharpen up the image. I'm going to go ahead and zoom back in here with my scroll wheel. And I think we can bring out the details a lot more by sharpening this image. And because I'm going to use this image on my website to promote this class. I want to use a lot of sharpening so that it's still there when the JPEG file is compressed. So let's go ahead and crank up the radius two around. I think for might be too much. So I'm going to bring this back down just a little bit to around 3.5. And if we take a look at the before and after, those details are much sharper, more defined, more clarity in those details than before. So I think that's the final edit. What do you think? I think that looks pretty good. So let's go ahead and create a snapshot or two here so we can see the before and after. Since we didn't undo those in the beginning, we're going to come down here to base curve. And we're going to take a snapshot. We're going to click on the last edit we did here at the top. And we're going to create another snapshot. Now to see the before and after. Just click on base curve. My line is over here on the right. And then I can look at the before and after. I think that's a 100 times better than before. What do you think? All right, Let's go to the light table view now and let's export this and bring it into GIMP for the final adjustment. So for this image, I set the quality to 90, the file format as a JPEG 8-bit, I set the size to zeros. That way I have the same size file as the raw file. And because this is going to be posted online, I'm using sRGB and then everything else doesn't really matter. So I'm gonna go ahead and click Export. Let's go into GIMP. I don't need this image anymore, so I'm gonna go ahead and close this out. Locate the file that you export it. You're going to click on it and drag it over the GIMP interface. And once you release, it will open up as a new file. So I'll step number one is duplicating this layer. So we're going to click right here on this icon to duplicate it. Let's go up to colors and select our curves tool. I'm going to resize this a little bit so I can see the image. And I'm going to bring up the highlights and darken up the shadows thing. I'm gonna go to the extreme here on the highlights and make them really bright. Oh, there we go, right there, That's what I want. So before and after. So I'm focusing more on the foreground than the background because once we're done, we're going to remove this edit from the majority of the image. So I'm gonna go ahead and click Okay. So to do that, we're going to add a layer mask. So click on this funny clown icon here and select black. Once you click add, that edit will disappear. And that's because black removes white ads. So anything we do to this image as far as editing will be removed when you paint with black. Now to bring these edits back, we have to paint with white. So I'm going to grab my brush tool here. Make sure your foreground color is set to white. And then you can paint over your image. And when you do that, edit will begin revealing itself. How cool is that? So we can see where I applied the brush on the layer mask here because the white is where I painted and it reveals the edit in the image layer. So now I'm just going to go through here and with some individual strokes, I'm just going to click and drag down and different locations here randomly. Nothing perfect. Now the one thing I should have mentioned before you started doing this was make sure your hardness on your brush is set to 0. And this will give you a very soft edged brush. So if you have a lot of hardness, it's not going to look as natural. So I'd like to work at 0 for these types of edits. And I'm just gonna go ahead and continue painting across the valley here to add some of these details and the highlights from that tone curve adjustment. As you can see, those red colors in those trees are really popping now. So you can do this as much or as little as you like. If you do too much, you can always change your foreground color to black to remove that edit where you didn't want to apply it. So let's say, for example, and we'll go back to white here. Let's say you gotta into the mountain hare. Now when I press the letter X, that will switch the foreground color to black. And then I can paint over this area to remove that edit from here. How cool is that? So here is the before and dark table and the after.