Creative Self-Care: Drawing as a Meditation | Jennifer Patterson | Skillshare

Creative Self-Care: Drawing as a Meditation

Jennifer Patterson, Therapist/Art Therapist/Colorer/Drawer

Creative Self-Care: Drawing as a Meditation

Jennifer Patterson, Therapist/Art Therapist/Colorer/Drawer

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12 Lessons (12m)
    • 1. Creative Self Care: Drawing as a Meditation

      0:04
    • 2. Introduction

      1:09
    • 3. Class Rules

      0:49
    • 4. Suggested Materials

      1:01
    • 5. Before We Begin

      0:27
    • 6. Exercise 1

      1:00
    • 7. Exercise 2

      1:09
    • 8. Exercise 3

      0:49
    • 9. Project: Where Should I Put This?

      0:53
    • 10. How Did It Make You Feel?

      2:57
    • 11. Share (please) and Other Thoughts

      1:33
    • 12. Projects

      0:28
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3

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About This Class

Hello, my name is Jennifer Patterson, and this class is Creative Self-Care: Drawing as a Meditation. I am a psychotherapist and art therapist, and I believe that we can all benefit from adding a little creative self-care into our lives. It doesn’t matter if you already make art or haven’t picked up a crayon since you were a kid. We all have a little spark of creativity inside of each of us, sometimes we just need a little push in that direction.

Art making can sound intimidating, and I am here to help you start putting your pen to paper. Creative self-care is good for you because it can get you out of your head and into the present moment, helping to ground you and so that you forget everything else for a few minutes. Playing with creativity can allow us the space to release the events of our day.

Please join me in playing with three simple drawing exercises, and then feel free to create your own drawing combining all of the exercises. 

I’d love to see what you come up with, so please share in the projects section!

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Meet Your Teacher

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Jennifer Patterson

Therapist/Art Therapist/Colorer/Drawer

Teacher

Hello, I'm Jennifer. I am an American psychotherapist and Art Therapist and adult coloring book designer living abroad in beautiful light-filled Lisbon, Portugal. I am a doodler, drawer, painter, picture-maker and all around crafty person. I like to eat, drink and explore with my husband and big furry dog. 

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Transcripts

1. Creative Self Care: Drawing as a Meditation: this is creative self care, drawing as a meditation. 2. Introduction: welcome to creative self care, drawing as a meditation. Hello, my name is Jennifer Patterson, and this classes creative self carrot drawing as a meditation. I'm a psychotherapist and art therapist, and I believe that we can all benefit from outing a little creative self care into our lives. It doesn't matter if you already make art or haven't picked up a crown since you were a kid . We all have a little spark of creativity inside of each of us, and sometimes we just need a little push in that direction. Aren't making consumed intimidating. And I am here to help you start putting your pen to paper. Creative self care is good for you because it can get you out of your head and into the present moment, helping to ground you and so that you forget everything else for a few minutes. Playing with creativity can also allow space for us to release the events of our day. So please join me and playing with three simple drawing exercises and then, for your project, feel free to create your own drawing, combining all of the exercises. I'd love to see what you come up with, so please share in the project section. Thanks 3. Class Rules: in this class there are five simple class rules. Rule number one. There is no right or wrong. Just have fun. Rule number two Focus on doing not thinking I e Try to get out of your head. Rule number three This is your time. So don't let anybody bother you if that's possible. Rule number four If you get stressed out, no big deal, just take a break. Rule number five If you feel like adding color, go ahead and play. Have fun and to recap. Here are five rules of the class. 4. Suggested Materials: are drawn practically any surface available to me. Note pads, grocery lists, napkins, printer paper sketchbooks, notes for meetings, anything for this class. You can use whatever you have around the house or treat yourself to a new sketchbook, preferably one that you can carry with you, because once you get into this, you'll want to draw instead of zone out on your phone. You can use pens, pencils or markers. Sharpies were my favorite thing to draw with, but if you use anything other than a ballpoint pen, please make sure that it doesn't bleed through your paper and make a mess. Try not to use an eraser, because this is about being in the moment and in the process. Remember, Rule number one. There's really no right or wrong way to practice creative self care. Meet yourself where you're at, and if the little voice inside your head tries to tell you that you made a mistake, try to say whatever and keep on going 5. Before We Begin: before I start drawing. I like to draw border on inter educated paper. For me, this creates a boundary to contain space and also helps with blank page itis. Pages no longer blank, so it could be a lot easier to start. You can draw either a circle or square. It's really just about personal preference, and you can always go outside the lines. 6. Exercise 1: In this first exercise, all I want you to do is fill your page with circles. Big circles, little circles, swirls, loops, circles that over laugh circles that hold each other in circles that fill up the space. Make circles until the pages full or until you feel finished. You can try closing your eyes. You can try drawing in different directions, and you can even switch hands. Pay attention to how you're holding. Your pen is your grip. It really tight isn't really loose. Is it comfortable? Do you need to adjust it in any way? Think about what would happen if you loosened or tightened it up with it. And if you have multiple pens, pencils or markers, feel free to switch to a different one. Think about what it's like to use a different pen that's a different thickness. 7. Exercise 2: for the second exercise, go ahead and build the paper with parallel lines. You can make vertical, horizontal or diagonal lines. The lines can overlap and maybe even fill in the spaces between the hash marks. Turn your paper combined the marks and directions. Try closing your eyes and drawing in different directions and maybe even switch hands. You can do this in whatever way you like. Once again, as you're working, pay attention to how you're holding your pen. Is your grip really tight? What happens when you loosen it up a bit? If you have multiple pens, pencils or markers, remember that you can switch to a different one. Have you noticed your breathing? Think about if it's changed at all since you started doing these exercises claws and see if you notice any differences. 8. Exercise 3: Now it's time for the third exercise. You can draw rectangles, squares, triangles, circles and any other types of geometric shapes you can think of. You can even try drawing cubes to make them look three dimensional. Make shapes of all sizes, stack them or leave them in their own space. Like before you can turn the paper and combine shapes and directions. Once again, try closing your eyes, drawing in different directions and even switch hands. And remember to check in with yourself about how you're holding your pen. Is your grip really tight? What happens when you loosen it up a bit? Now is the perfect time to use all of your different colored pencils, pens or markers. 9. Project: Where Should I Put This?: so you've practiced wrong circles, hash lines and other geometric shapes. Now it is time to think about composition. Composition is what helps you to tell a story or creative feeling in the drawing. Make two or three different drawings. Whatever says you want. Using similar objects, you can start off by drawing bars from any side of the border than adding other shapes like circles and triangles. Use the shapes we practiced to draw a group of trees or just keep doodling. The drawing doesn't need to be realistic. You can create whatever feels good to you. Be playful and have fun. Remember, there's no wrong way to do this. Do your best to notice when you get a little too much in the thinking and not just doing space otherwise known as in your head. 10. How Did It Make You Feel?: So now you're done with the three exercises and you're thinking about your project, and I'm sure you want to know what was the meditation part. Well, as a therapist, I am obligated to ask you, How did it make you feel? So the meditation part, you already did it. Think about how you felt when you sat down to do the first exercise. Were you nervous? Were you anxious? Were you worried that you wouldn't do it right at the end of the first exercise? Did you notice if you felt any different? Did anything change for you as we progressed through the exercise? If you didn't notice anything, it's not a big deal at all. Everyone is different, and maybe now that I've said something about it, the next time you do it, you might notice. It's a really interesting thing to take a moment and pause and connect to your body and connect to your breath and set your intention just for doing some doodles. Even something that simple can have a really profound effect on your nervous system. For many people, the process of drawing repetitive shapes and lines can be very, very soothing, and they're able to forget about doing it right to get out of their head, to stop thinking so hard about where and why they're going to draw something or put something in a particular place. Sometimes they no longer noticed that they're even thinking about anything, and they're just in the moment of drawing. That's the part that is the meditation. This is the way in which drawing and coloring is good for stress reduction, for dealing with anxiety, for grounding yourself to helping Teoh focus and pause and be present. Drawing, especially when done mindfully can offer a sense of comfort, peace and relax ation. The repetitive movement movements are often self soothing in rhythmic and can mimic the physical sensations we connect to during meditation and yoga practices. There are studies that show that people who draw and doodle while listening to a lecture are more able to concentrate because the active doodling helps you to stay present and in the moment. And there's also evidence that shows that knitting and crashing can do the same thing as long as you're not working on anything too complicated. Um, drawing like coloring is a great stress reduction tool, an excellent excellent self care, but a doodle takes you beyond merely coloring. It takes you to a place of creating from scratch, which helps to build creativity and boost your self confidence. So I hope that you are able to think about what the process is like for you and most importantly, how did it make you feel? 11. Share (please) and Other Thoughts: I'm flying this section. Share your project and other thoughts. I'd love to see all of your projects if you want to share and any other drawings you were inspired to create. Sometimes it's also nice to add a little bit of writing to the drawing and doodling process . If you feel comfortable, you can share what you write as well. Some writing prompts for you to consider are how did the process feel? How did you feel at the beginning and at the end, did you notice any changes in your body? Are your tents places lighter or heavier? Did your breathing change it all during the process? Did you connect with the exercises, or did you connect with yourself in any way? If you feel more grounded than before, where in your body do you feel it? And lastly, were you drawn to a certain color palette? If you were, why do you think so? Thanks again for taking in my class and playing withdrawing. I hope that you enjoyed it. Please feel free to contact me if you have any thoughts, questions or feedback. Thanks a lot 12. Projects: Here are some project ideas in case you get stuck or need a little inspiration.