Create your own font with affinity designer and glyphs | Jenny Veguilla-Lezan | Skillshare

Playback Speed


  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x

Create your own font with affinity designer and glyphs

teacher avatar Jenny Veguilla-Lezan, Latinx Designer & Illustrator

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

15 Lessons (2h 7m)
    • 1. Course Intro

      4:02
    • 2. Tools Needed

      2:07
    • 3. Course Project

      1:29
    • 4. Finding Inspiration

      3:46
    • 5. The Anatomy of Typography

      9:51
    • 6. Tips for Sketching Letterforms

      3:57
    • 7. Sketching in Affinity Designer on the iPad

      17:24
    • 8. Sketching in Affinity Designer on the Desktop

      12:52
    • 9. Digitizing in Affinity Designer

      18:23
    • 10. Scaling in Affinity Designer

      20:04
    • 11. Working in Glyphs

      5:34
    • 12. Spacing and Kerning

      14:34
    • 13. Exporting and Installing Final Font

      4:02
    • 14. Class Project Process

      7:42
    • 15. Course Outro

      1:15
  • --
  • Beginner level
  • Intermediate level
  • Advanced level
  • All levels
  • Beg/Int level
  • Int/Adv level

Community Generated

The level is determined by a majority opinion of students who have reviewed this class. The teacher's recommendation is shown until at least 5 student responses are collected.

156

Students

2

Projects

About This Class

Class Description

Hello everyone welcome to my latest class. If this your first class with me, welcome! I am Jen and I will be guiding you through this creative course. I’m a freelance graphic designer, illustrator and educator based out of the midwest and I run Bella + Sophia Creative studio. If you want to learn more about me, check out my youtube channel: The Freelance Life. You will get a behind the scenes view of the work I do as a creative freelancer and the work that goes into making classes like this one. I am a huge advocate for sharing knowledge in accessible ways and I have found online courses and places like Youtube are great places for this and help me to connect to a diverse group of people looking to learn and grow. 

70166352.jpg

In today’s class, I wanted to tap into our graphic design skills and have an adventure creating fonts using Affinity designer and Glyphs. I will take you through my whole process of creating a hand drawn font from ideation, sketching, digitizing in Affinity Designer and then getting your letterforms into the Glyphs software (Mac version). I am sharing my process as I find that often, courses relating to font/typeface design are almost exclusively done in Adobe software and I wanted to highlight that there are other options and I have found that the Affinity software can be used to do similar things. 

If this is your first time taking one of my classes relating to graphic design I highly suggest you check out my previous design courses - I have a variety that cover topics like design for good, logo design, packaging design, layout design and more. I also have some helpful marketing related videos too if you are trying to grow your creative business.  

What the class is about

In this class, I will walk you through my process on how to create a simple hand drawn font. I will take you through my whole process of creating a hand drawn font from ideation, sketching, digitizing in Affinity Designer and then getting your letterforms into the Glyphs software (Mac version). Before we jump right into the font making process though, I wanted to share a quick mini overview on designing type. These tips are not exhaustive as I could do multiple courses on the intricacies of designing typefaces, but they will outline some of the most important things beginners should know. 

We will cover things like typography anatomy basics, the difference between serif fonts and san serif fonts, the different parts of a latter and variables to keep in mind when it comes to type design.

Then, we will talk more about where to find font inspiration, 2 of my favorite type design books, ideation when it comes to building out your letter style. Then, as we begin to create our font, we will apply those typography basic so we can create a cohesive font.

As we create our fonts, I will highlight some helpful tips to keep in mind for sketching and inking your hand lettering if you chose to start analog. I will also highlight how you can skip the scanning phase and use the pixel persona in Affinity designer to sketch out your concepts if you have access to a drawing tablet. Then, we will digitize our letters in Affinity designer. If this is your first time using Affinity, no worries - I will go at a comfortable pace and highlight important tools so you can keep up.

Finally, we will go over how to use Glyphs Mini, create your hand drawn font and export it for use on your desktop! 

Make sure to check out the class resources for some helpful tools you can utilize while working on your class project like a letter grid, tip sheet and you can check out some font/type inspiration over on my typeface Pinterest board: https://pin.it/7jF4S9i

If you want to check out some of my design and illustration work - make sure you check out my website at: www.bellasophiacreative.com or you can also find me over on creative market: https://creativemarket.com/JenniferLezan

Who the class is geared toward 

This class is geared towards anyone interested in learning how to create font using Affinity designer and glyphs mini. I will make sure to  I am sharing my process as I find that often, courses relating to font/typeface design are almost exclusively done in Adobe software and I wanted to highlight that there are other options and I have found that the Affinity software can be used to do similar things. 

Take my Past Classes

Design and Marketing 

Design for Good - Design and Visual Communications as a Tool for Social Change: https://skl.sh/2P6Cipx

Elevate Your Business Social Media: Design an Aesthetic Instastory Template in Affinity Designer: https://skl.sh/3h5BLOh

Elevate Your Brand or Etsy Shop Through Packaging Design Using Affinity Designer
https://skl.sh/3iR9lrn

The Basics of Branding - Using Open Source Assets + Affinity Designer to Design a Logo for Business
https://skl.sh/3j0z6VM

Developing a Marketing Plan for Creative Entrepreneurs
https://skl.sh/3eS7gZt

Design Bullet Journal Style Printables in Affinity Publisher + Learn the Principles of Design
https://skl.sh/3m2BgGk

Hope you find the course helpful!

-Jenny

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Jenny Veguilla-Lezan

Latinx Designer & Illustrator

Teacher

 I am a Chicago-born Latinxer (I'm a proud Puerto Rican and Mexican American) millennial, an educator, and a freelance creative with experience in graphic design, digital media, illustration and surface pattern design. I am also a mother of two  who is in on a mission to reach all the creative goals I've set for myself while trying my best to be a positive influence on the world.

I have 10+ years of experience in the fashion and creative marketing industry in both the corporate world and teaching as a professor in Higher Education. I am working on building course offerings that bring people a new perspective and opportunity to take your design and art to a new level.  I am pushing for continued growth, running my indi... See full profile

Class Ratings

Expectations Met?
  • Exceeded!
    0%
  • Yes
    0%
  • Somewhat
    0%
  • Not really
    0%
Reviews Archive

In October 2018, we updated our review system to improve the way we collect feedback. Below are the reviews written before that update.

Why Join Skillshare?

Take award-winning Skillshare Original Classes

Each class has short lessons, hands-on projects

Your membership supports Skillshare teachers

Learn From Anywhere

Take classes on the go with the Skillshare app. Stream or download to watch on the plane, the subway, or wherever you learn best.

Transcripts

1. Course Intro: Hi everyone. Welcome to my latest class. If this is your first class with me, I'm Jan and I will be the one guiding you through this creative course. I'm a freelance graphic designer, illustrator, and educators based out of the Midwest and I run Bella and Sophia creative studio. If you want to learn more about me, check out my YouTube channel, the freelance life. You will get a behind the scenes view of the work that I do as a creative freelancer and the work that goes into making classes like this one. I'm a huge advocate for sharing knowledge in accessible ways. And it found that online courses in places like YouTube are great places for this and helped me to connect to a diverse group of people looking to learn and grow. In today's class, I wanted to tap into our graphic design skills and have an adventure creating fonts using Affinity Designer and Glyphs Mini. I will take you through my whole process of creating a hand-drawn font from ideation, sketching, digitizing, and Affinity Designer, and then getting your letter forms into the Glyphs Mini software for the Mac I'm sharing, my process is I find that often courses relating to font and typeface design are almost exclusively done in Adobe software. And I wanted to highlight there are other options out there. And then I found that affinity designer can be used to do really similar things. If this is your first time taking one of my classes relating to graphic design, I highly suggest you check out my previous design courses. I have a variety that cover topics like designed for good logo design, packaging design, layout design and so much more. I have also some really helpful marketing related videos to fear looking to grow your creative business. So what is this class about? In this class, I will walk you through my process on how to create a simple hand-drawn font. I will take you through my whole process of creating a hand-drawn font from ideation, sketching, digitizing, and Affinity Designer, and then getting your letter forms into the Glyphs Mini software. Before we jump right into the font making process though, I wanted to share a quick mini overview on designing type. These tips are not exhaustive as I could do multiple courses on the intricacies of designing typefaces, but they will outline some of the most important things that beginner should know. We will cover things like typography, anatomy basics, the difference between serif fonts and sans-serif fonts. The different parts of a letter and variables to keep in mind when it comes to designing type. Then we're gonna talk more about where to find font inspiration. We'll look at three of my favorite type design and font related design books. Ideation when it comes to building out your letter styles. And then as we begin to create our font, we will apply those typography basics so that we can create a really cohesive and strong font. As we create our fonts, I will highlight some helpful tips to keep in mind for sketching and inking your hand lettering if you choose to start analog. I will also highlight though, how you can skip the host scanning phase and use the pixel persona in Affinity Designer to sketch out your concepts. If you have access to something like a drawing tablet, then we will digitize your letters in Affinity Designer. And if this is your first time using Affinity, no worries, Don't stress. I will go at a comfortable pace and highlight important tools so that you can keep up. Finally, we will go over how to use Glyphs Mini, and basically how to create your hand-drawn font and export it for use on your desktop. Make sure to check out the class resources for some helpful tools that you can utilize while working on your class project like a letter grid, tip sheet. And you can check out some font and type inspiration over on my typeface Pinterest board that I'll leave linked in the description box. If you want to check out some of my design and illustration work, make sure you check out my website at www dot bellows Sophia creative.com, or you can also find me over on Creative Market. Just look up my name. Jennifer Luzon. 2. Tools Needed: So when it comes to tools that you'll need for this class, I've divided it up into two categories. One is must-haves and the other is nice to haves. So when it comes to must-haves, a computer with Affinity Designer and Glyphs Mini installed is necessary to create your font. Then also paper pencils and a black fine liner or any type of black dark on marker that you can utilize to outline your pencil sketches if you're choosing to go the analog route. Now for the nice to haves, these are absolutely necessary to complete the project, but I find them to be really helpful. So a scanner or something to photograph your hand-drawn letter forms in order to get them into your computer to digitize them. A lot of people have phones. If you have some sort of digital camera, you can do that if you don't have a scanner. Another nice to have is a drawing tablet and a stylus. Personally, I will be using a Helion and the stylus that comes with it. We could also potentially use like stamps on tablet with a stylus or even an iPad with an Apple pencil. And you can just sketch in something like Procreate. Or if you have access to it, something like Affinity Designer, the iPad app. You can utilize that as well. And then you can export that digital sketch to your bigger computer of that you'll then work with on Glyphs Mini, and just the affinity desktop. So who is this class geared towards? This class is geared towards anyone interested in learning how to create a font using Affinity Designer and Glyphs Mini, I will make sure to go at a comfortable pace. As I know, it can be tricky getting used to working in these pieces of software. But I'm sharing my process is I find that often courses relating to font and typeface design are usually exclusively done in Adobe software like Illustrator. And I wanted to highlight that there are other options out there. And I found that the affinity software can be used to do really similar things and is a really great competitor when it comes to design software on the market. 3. Course Project: So for your class project, we will be creating an all caps hand-drawn font. You will take your hand drawings and translated into a desktop font. We will start with sketches. You can opt to do analog pencil, pen and paper, like I said. Or we can use a tablet and say, Listen, sketch right on your computer. But if you do go the analog route, just note you have to find a way to get that drawing into your computer. So either a scanner or even using something like your phone's camera will work as well. And then you can just send that file over to your computer. And then once you complete your project though, you can submit the following to the course project gallery to share with your fellow classmates and myself. So for the deliverables, when you're ready, upload the following to the project gallery. A photo of your inspiration, some rough sketches of your letter forms, then the finalized vectorized digitized letter forms, and then your fool, a disease sample and glyphs. And then optional if you'd like to, to kinda like showcase what this is going to look like and how would say you might sell it on a market like Creative Market or something like that. Basically an image of a stylized use of your font. You can, you can either create something like a hero shot or you can even showcase it in a layout. I'm really looking forward to grading with you today. Let's get started. 4. Finding Inspiration : Before we jump into the whole process of creating and sketching our letter forms, I think it's really important to find inspiration. Inspiration for type is literally all around you. A great thing to do is setup a folder on your computer to save photos and then to head outside and snap photos of signs and posters that you see that grab your attention. Pay attention to things around you, from street signs to window displays, to fliers being handed out on the street. Topography is literally the core of communication in the world around us. The more you pay attention, the more you will be surprised at how many type related visual communication items you will actually see each day. Use your phone camera to snap photos and bring that back home to add to your inspiration folder, you can even grab any physical items you might see like newspapers, magazines and flyers, and add those to an actual physical folder to reference or scan them in and save them to your digital folder on your computer. If you don't have the opportunity to head out into your environment. Another good option is the Internet. I utilize Pinterest often to create a catalog of interesting type or items with type on them that I find inspiring. This is such a simple way to create a visual inspiration board that can organize all of your images in one place. Finally, last but not least, I'm absolutely obsessed with design and typography books. I collect them and I referenced them often for work. These are fantastic tools that can showcase inspiration or the actual reference books that explain concepts and offer design direction and guidance. Some of my favorites that relate directly to typography include designing type by Karen Chang. This is like a holy grail book that is part of a series n is incredibly in-depth when it comes to the whole design process of typography. Another book that I like is 22 tips and typography that some designers will never reveal by unrecorded. This isn't so much about designing tight as it is about utilizing typing communication design, and layout. But it is helpful to reference and utilize it better understand how type is often used in design work and how that can influence the overall design of type. Another book that I like isn't so much about typeface as it is about lettering. And that is creative lettering and beyond inspiring tips, techniques and ideas for hand-lettering your way to beautiful works of art. This is a fantastic book for looking at inspiring hand-write in calligraphic and just overall lettering inspired visuals. Om, I really like this just when I'm looking for something that is a little bit more organic. I'm inspired by calligraphy. I also really like vintage type catalogs from printers and tight boundaries. These are beautiful relics of an era pass, but that can bring inspiration to modern type design. After 500 years, the movable type revolution give way to photo composition and then to digital typefaces in various programming incarnations like what we're exploring today with affinity and glyphs. And this all reduce the need for factory foundries, which we will talk a bit about in the following lesson. Basically, the only remaining pieces of an American foundry are essentially they're worn type catalogs. And sometimes if you are lucky, you can find some of the actual metal plates are wooden plates of all of the letters. Historically, the rise of industry and spread of commerce created a need for an entire printing loam. And of course, distinctive type designs played a large role in articulating the importance of business and the joys of consumption. Type itself became a competitive business. And the majority of late 19th and early 20th century catalogs were designed to sell the new and old styles. Personally, I like to collect these beautiful items and I refer to them often for inspiration. 5. The Anatomy of Typography: Now that we've found our inspiration, what I suggest we do before we even begin the whole sketching process is go into a little bit more detail on the anatomy of type, some of the basics. So the first thing I like to go over is the difference between the words typeface versus font. So a typeface is a particular set of glyphs or sorts, which is basically an alphabet and its corresponding accessories such as numerals and punctuation. The chair common design. So for example, Helvetica is a really well-known typeface, and a font is a particular set of glyphs within that typeface. So 12 Helvetica is a font and 10 point Helvetica is a separate font. Same goes for different weights like 14 Helvetica bold is a different font than a 14 point Helvetica light. They are different fonts, but they are part of the same type face. So I like to look at typefaces almost like a family. I also like to share more information on the history behind some of this because it kind of relates to some of the words and themes and ideas that you hear when we talk about these concepts. So the reason these are different is because historically when a page of tax was laid out by hand before printing the organization of the thousands of small pieces of metal letters and sometimes would letters as well. It was really essential. So for centuries, a printer or a typesetter, what set type, letter by letter from a type case. The type was stored in a shallow would endure, and these were called job cases. And then these were all divided into small compartments for each letter, for each numeral, for each ligature, punctuation, market and Eve ring widths of spacing. In the United States, the most popular style of type case was the California JOB case. And this, the layout of glyphs was organized so that a typesetter could really quickly find the correct lift from memory. And it's almost similar to typing on a keyboard only it's a little bit slower. Older styles of type cases organize the capital letters and a separate case from the miniscule. So the smaller letters, lowercase letters, and the capital letter case was placed above the door of the miniscule is, which is where we get the terms uppercase and lowercase. Now the next kinda helpful thing to keep in mind is the difference between types of fonts and classifications. So Serif and Sans Serif are two of the most popular type classifications. And serifs are semi structural details are really small decorative flourishes on the ends of some of the strokes that make up letters and symbols. An example of this would be the Times New Roman font, sans serif, on the other hand, does not have these details are flourishes are a bit more linear, more modern, and you don't see those additional decorative elements on the line. A display font is a broad category of fonts that are designed for short form and often large format applications such as billboards or posters, logo types, headlines or headings in magazines or websites and book covers. Display fonts transcend style. So they can be a serif font, Slab Serif Script san-serif, and so on. A handwritten font on the other hand are fonts that look like they were written by hand, usually with a pen or a marker. Within the broad category, you'll find a range of different styles that kind of reflects the variations and subtle differences that you'll find an actual handwriting. The difference between script in hand-written fonts though, is based on the fact that script fonts are decorative or very calligraphic in nature. So they look like calligraphy. While true hand-written fonts reflect the penmanship, one might see in a letter, a monospace font, which is also known as a fixed pitch or fixed width or non-proportional font. A font whose letters and characters each occupied the same amount of horizontal space. This contrasts the variable with fonts for the letters and spacing might have different widths, monospaced fonts or customary and things like typewriters and for typesetting computer code, script fonts are fonts that are created to capture the flourish and artistry of traditional hand lettering and calligraphy. Script fonts are usually really decorative in nature and most should be used like one would use a display font, which is to make a statement rather than set tech. Typically, it's really difficult to read a script fonts when they are set in paragraph form. So usually you want to use them for callout and specific areas. You want to make a statement with these types of fonts are really popular with stationary logo types, branding and poster design. And they can be paired really nicely with a range of other font styles. So now that we understand the different classification of fonts and we understand a bit of the history of fonts. I want to talk more about kind of the nuances within the letters of your typefaces and fonts. So the weight of a particular font is the thickness of the character, and how those character outlines are relative to their height. A typeface may come in many different weights from ultralight, which are really, really thin, to extra bold or black, which are really thick. 46 weights are not unusual when it comes to family of typefaces. And a few typefaces have as many as a dozen different weights. The most common weights and cells are regular, bold and italics. The style of a font is usually connected to an angle, so it's either upright or slanted. So the normal style is usually upright or Roman as we call it, and it will display by default, many font families have in italics version of the font and the italic font style. The typeface has been slanted to the right and has had other changes made to the letter glyphs to make them slightly different, it approaches a more handwritten cursive style. And sometimes the characters may even connect oblique font faces, on the other hand, are found in many sans serif typefaces and their characters are also slanted, but unlike italics, the glyphs themselves are not changed. Oblique fonts are not true italics because they lack the change in letter shapes, which is part of that whole definition of Italic. Now, let's talk more about anatomy. Our letters and type will work creating them. So we're going to look at this in more detail. One we're working with in Affinity Designer right before we jump into pulling all of our letters and glyphs. But I just want to kind of give you a highlight and I don't include everything in here, just some of them more key important things that we're going to need for this particular class. So the baseline is where the letters sit. We utilize that within our guideline. These first three areas, the baseline, the cap plight, and the x-height. We utilize these in this guideline that it gave you guys for your sketches. The cap height is the distance from the baseline to the top of the capital letter. The x-height, on the other hand, is located in between the baseline and the cap light, and it is the height of the body of the lowercase letters. Then there is the bowl, which is the curved part of a character that encloses the circular or curved parts of some letters like D and B and an uppercase B. And then as we highlighted, there's Sir serifs. These are the slight projections finishing off a stroke of a letter in certain typefaces. Then there's the descender, which is the longest point on a letter that falls beyond the baseline. This stem is the base of a letter similar to the stem of a flower. This spine is the curvy body of the letter S and only the letter S, it gets its own term because the spine can be vertical or mostly horizontal depending on the typeface. And then there's the ascender. This is the portion of a letter that extends above the mean line of a font. Basically it's taller than the fonts, x-height, like in the lowercase letter B. So these are some additional parts of a letter that you might want to keep in mind. Since we are working in uppercase format. If we look at this as we see the beak, which is the top point of the letter as that spine is that curve that we talked about earlier. And then if we look at the uppercase B, we'll see, we'll see both of those curvatures in the letter, can call them also the upper lobe and the lower lobe. And then the space in between them is the waste. And then if we look at the g here, this is called the throat. And then if we look at our queue, we have the counter, which is that center space and then the tail. And then if we look at the letter E, similar with the letter F as well, and the little elements coming out other side of the letter R arms. And then the center element to create the h is called the crossbar. So in addition to the variables like cap height, x-height, and baseline, when it comes to your type. In overall design work, there are three additional variables that I want you to keep in mind. We'll talk more about this when we're working in glyphs. So the first I want to look at is tracking. This is the horizontal spacing between your letters. And then there is Letting, which is the vertical space between the lines of letters. So if you look at your letter forms in sentence format, it's the lines between your sentences. And then there's kerning, which is the spacing between the pairs of letters. And we're going to work a lot with the spacing between these letters when we're in lifts. So these are just some additional elements that you should keep in mind. So now that we have a better idea of the anatomy of type and different elements that keep in mind. Let's get started on sketching. 6. Tips for Sketching Letterforms: So the next step in this whole process, after you find your inspiration, you pull together some imagery and visuals that you like. Then we can begin the sketching process. I want to share some tips for when it comes to sketching that can help you as you work through this whole process. I think it's really important to think of your letter forms as shapes and masses instead of just outlines. When it comes to sketching, a lot of designers tend to draw letters without lines, even though this is not the best way to evaluate things like contrasts and negative spaces. So to find the best kind of equilibrium between black and white surfaces within our ladders, we need to draw masses. So that's kinda why you see me sketching out and kind of like filling space as I draw it rather than creating outlines. So here are three helpful tips when sketching. Start by drawing a skeleton, basically just your thin strokes for your letters. And then you can trace your lettering skeleton with a single line, thinking about space and mass. So I like to kind of like color it in and fill a whole space for the letter shape. You could also use a light table or transparent paper to hatch and look at the thick and thin strokes with a new sheet guided by that skeleton. You'll get a better sense of the contrast and spaces that you need. And then on a third sheet of paper on top of that, you can draw your outlines then and only then have a look at your letters and note modifications. I personally like to just start with the shapes isn't sketching and they don't worry if it's too messy as I can. Clean it up before I outline it and black for an easier transfer to digitizing. Also, I start in pencil so that I can erase it very easily. And then I utilize a dark black marker to outline my final letter forms so that it's easier to scan it in. You could also do this process and layers if you're working digitally, each piece of paper can be a layer, essentially. The next tip I want to share is align your letters to your grid. I suggest turning on the grid if you're working digitally or if you're sketching, use grid paper or paper with guide guidelines on them. Like a include in the class resources. The grid will allow us to kind of like define the rhythm of our composition and helps to guide us to make sure that we're following the right path in terms of the direction and flow of our letter forms. When letters are well balanced and aligned with the grid, the whole work seems to be a lot more consistent, legible, and visually appealing. The final tip I want to share is keep thin and thick strokes consistent. Since the Latin alphabet was born, letters were written by hand with nibs brushes. The primary technique consisted of increasing the pressure against the paper when tracing downstrokes and then decreasing it on the upstrokes. And as a result, this general well-developed downstroke SQL thick upstrokes equal thin, thick and thin strokes are the core of letter forms. They define their contrast and the overall aesthetic. And to guarantee the homogeny and legibility of your letters, we'd need to draw every thick and thin stroke, the same weight every time, respectively in terms of how they look on other letters. And by doing so, we will also bring rhythm to our load are formed, which will directly increase their overall visual appeal. Now once you've finished your sketches, outline in a dark pen so that you have clear contrast on your page and scan in your sketched letters into your computer, then you can load this scanned page into Affinity Designer. If you're sketching digitally, you can just set up a new layer on top of your sketch to begin the whole digitizing process. 7. Sketching in Affinity Designer on the iPad: Now I want to highlight some other ways that you can go about creating your sketches outside, the more analog way that we did originally. So if you don't wanna do something analogue and you prefer just to do things digitally. You can work on your iPad or you can just work in Affinity Designer on your desktop. I just wanted to show an additional kind of auction with the iPad. Affinity has iPad apps, so they're Affinity Designer program and their Affinity Photo Program both have iPad versions of the software in app form. But you could also use something like Procreate. If you wanted to sketch in Procreate and then export those sketches to your computer. You can do that. But I also like to highlight that there's apps for the Affinity software right on your iPad. So I'm just going to set up a new document by launching my Affinity Designer app. I'm going to select New Document. And then I, it's not really going to matter too much in terms of resolution because this is just a sketch. But what I'm gonna do is just change my document from device to print. And then I'm going to change it to from millimeters to inches. And then I'm just going to keep an A4 format. And then I'm going to change my orientation from portrait to landscape. And then I'm going to click transparent background just so that I have the option to have a transparency if needed and then hit Okay. And then this is what your software looks like when you are on the inside of affinity, right? On your app. And the nice thing about being able to work on the app versus the desktop is that you can go back and forth. I'm going to show how you can do this on the desktop as well. But for now I just wanted to highlight that you can do this on your iPad. You can do your sketching on your iPad. What's nice is with the Affinity software, you can change to different kinds of persona. So we're going to work in the pixel persona that's right in the upper left-hand menu bar here it's at second little blue option that looks like a lot of little pixels in a circular shape. And then next to that is designer persona. And then there's also the Export persona, but only want to worry about right now is the pixel persona. And this gives you access to some really great brushes. You could do this in vector format to start with if you wanted. But I just like the idea of kind of like having a sketch really feels sketching things out. And then going into the vectoring part of the process. So I'm going to select my brush tool here. It's on the left-hand side. It's the second option down. And then on the right-hand side, these are all of our studios. And what's nice is if you hit this little question mark at the bottom, you'll get a pop-up of all the names of the studios and the tools on each side and your menu options. So we're going to go to the Brushes studio really quick. And I want to highlight just the, the, the breadth of the amount of brushes that you have in terms of options. So what I want to do, you can access dry media based, basic brushes, acrylic squashes, inks. But what I wanna do is go down to the pencil brushes so that I can utilize it for kind of like just basic sketching. And I'm going to select the HB brush. I'm going to increase the size of it by going to my stroke studio here, kind of looks like a brush stroke. And then when you click on it, you have the options to adjust your width. And then you can also adjust the pressure sensitivity here as well. But we don't, we're not going to worry about that too much here. I just want to increase the width so it's easy to see. And then at the very bottom, once you selected this, you can adjust the width. You can adjust the opacity, you can adjust the flow, the hardness of your pencil, and other elements like that. So what I'm gonna do is just have my hardness at a 100 percent. I'm going to increase my width just a bit so it's easier to see. And then I'm gonna go into my layer studio here on the right-hand side, I'm gonna select the layer studio. Looks like a bunch of pieces of paper layered on top. And I'm going to select this little plus icon so I can add a pixel layer. And then what I'm gonna do is go back to my designer persona. And I'm going to add a background using the rectangle tool just so that it's easy for us to see what we're doing here. It doesn't have to be black. I'm going to change it to white just for visibility sake. And then I'm going to turn on Magnetics in the lower left-hand side here just so that I can make sure it's the full width of my screen here. I'm going to click on my color wheel here just so that it pulls recommend. What's nice with the magnetics is that you'll see these little green and red lines pop up so you know your, your elements are fine. And then I'm also going to go back to that rectangle. And I'm going to go in and I'm going to add a stroke so that it's easy for me to kind of see where everything is. Because if you have just a page created on Affinity Designer, you're likely to have a white background. You can change the background color if you wanted to in your settings. But I just haven't set up this way. So I find that it's just a little bit easier to add an outline sewing know the size of my page here. And then I'm going to click on that show studio again to pull it in. And then I'm gonna go back into my layers. And I'm going to select that rectangle layer. I'm going to go into my layer options and I'm going to hit the little lock button so that way it won't move. And then I'm going to go to that new pixel layer that I've created and that's where I'm going to sketch. So I'm just going to increase this a bit. And what's nice is that you can go into your pixel persona and you have access to all of these sketch really feeling pencils and brushes and things like that. So I'm going to update my color, my color wheel to just so like a grayish, dark grayish color just so that we can see what we're doing. I'm going to make sure I don't have a stroke on. And then I'm going to select my brush. I'm going to go to my brushes options. I'm going to go down two pencils. I'm going to select that mechanical for b. And then I'm going to adjust my size. I think this is a good size for us to kind of see what we're doing. I'm going to add some rulers just so that I have kinda of like a guide. So I'm gonna go back to my designer persona. And then I'm going to pull in everything from the studio pen. I'm just going to create some guides for myself and I'm going to go up to my upper menu. I'm going to select my document menu and I'm going to go to guides, and I'm going to select Show Guides. And I'm going to add a horizontal guide. And then I'm gonna add another one. And then I'm going to add another one. And you'll see in a moment that these are going to be different colors. I'm just going to select them. And I'm going to move them up and then move them down just so that I have something to see and look at in terms of the placement of my shapes. And I'll include guides for you all in your class, resources. And I notice there's a little hard to see, but what I'm gonna do is on top of this, add actual guidelines with my pen tool, just so that it's easy for you all to see on screen. So I have this red guy here at now. So I'm going to just hit that first end and then tap on the other end. And then I'm gonna go to my stroke and I'm going to update the color so that it's black. And then I'm going to go to my stroke studio and resize this width down a bit. And once I've made that first one, I'm going to go into my Edit menu. I'm going to select it and I'm just going to hit Duplicate. And then I'm going to duplicate it two times total. And then I'll select my move tool and then I'll just bump that duplicated line to where I put that original guide. And then I'm going to select the next duplicate and bring it down to where I duplicated that third line. So I have this nice clean area to work with. So now that I've done that, I'm going to go back to my persona or back to my pixel persona. And then I'm going to go into my layers once more. I'm going to hit a new, I'm going to select the plus and select new pixel layer. And this is where we're going to be doing our sketching. So I'm gonna go back to my brushes, make sure I select the brush that I want to be working with, which is that pencil brush, mechanical HB. And that I'm going to start sketching out some of these concepts. So I want to I don't, I don't need it to be perfect. I just kinda wanna play with line placement and, and just kind of keep in mind the overall shape that I want to create with this, uh, kinda wanted to have a bit of that hand-drawn feel as if I was using some sort of marker to draw some of these letters out and want them to feel rounded as well. So the whole purpose for creating these lines is to kind of give you guidelines for the placement of your letters. This top line is your Kaplan. It's also the height for your capital letters. And since we're doing a all caps font, we want to make sure that our letters spanned on this whole length. I'm going to keep in mind the overall style that you're going for. I'm going for something a little like modern cartoony. I'm, I'm gonna talk about modern versus say traditional. I feel like it also plays into whether or not you want to have a serif or sans-serif. And as I explained in, I am not necessarily going for a very clean and precise sans serif, but I do want it to feel a more casual. So that's what we're gonna do with this. And as you see, I've added these little elements here, but what you can do is just select your eraser brush tool and you can erase any element and that you don't want included. And what's nice choose that you can change the eraser brush as well to match the actual brush that you're using to draw with. And what I like to do when I'm creating these is kinda start with the line work and then fill in for how thick I want the letter to feel. A typeface fonts that you find in on markets and things like that tend to have various weights to them. But for this one, just for ease views and just to make it a little bit simpler to work with, we're just going to work in one weight. So keeping in mind the weight of each of your letters, making sure that they match. But typically there's a bold and italic and then a regular weight for most fonts that you'll see out there. And there are certain letters that I like to start with as well because I can utilize them and copy them and revise them like the R here can also be RPI if you remove that leg B. So I'm going to utilize my Lasso Tool here. And I'm going to select this R. And then I'm going to go into my menu options up here. I'm going to select Duplicate. And then I'm going to select my move arrow here. And I'm gonna move this over. I duplicated that. And then I'm just going to select my eraser brush tool. I'm going to deselect this now, just tap anywhere on my screen and then I'm going to go into my erase brush tool and I'm just going to erase the leg of this here. And it gives me the p. And then I'm gonna do that same process again, select the P. Now, go into my menu options, select duplicate, select my move tool. Move this letter over. Select my freehand selection tool again and just tap on my screen so it deselects. And then I'm going to select my brush tool again. And then I'm going to make the bottom part of the B now. And then just adjusting and revising as needed. And now I'm gonna make the O, I'm going to utilize this C as a starting point and then just kinda adjusted as I go. So I'm going to select it with my Lasso selection tool and select Duplicate. I'm going to just tap out of the screen. So I de-selected, go to my move tool, select that, and then just move it over. Can, once I've duplicated that, then I can go in and they can start revising it. So I want the OH, to kind of have the same feel of this C here. And I'm just basically going to close this up and clean up my line work. And this is kind of one of the reasons why I like to do my sketching digitally as well makes it a little bit more streamlined and quicker. And I'm just going to revise this to basically kind of create more of a U-shape. I'm gonna take my eraser brush and I'm going to erase the top here. And I'm just going to adjust the overall angles as I think you raise it to the midline and then finish the line work here just because on the top kind of comes in and I want to make sure that the you go straight up. So now I'll go to my paintbrush tool. And again, keeping in mind the overall character of what I am trying to establish with the rest of these letters. So I wanna, I don't want the line for the YouTube, kind of like a flat cap. I want it to be rounded. So I'm keeping that in mind as I draw this in. All right, So basically this is how you can continue to sketch in your, on your iPad using Affinity Designer on the iPad app. Now I want to show you how you can do the same kind of process. But on the desktop version, we're just going to take this whole file and I'm going to export it and just show you around the interface on the desktop version as well. So what I'm gonna do is export this file. I'm going to select my menu option up here, and I'm going to go and select Export. And then I'm gonna save this as PSD file because pianos raster, we were working on it in the raster pixel persona anyways. So I'm going to change my file name. I'm going to change my filename to letter sketches. Hit Return. I'm gonna make sure I export the whole document. Make sure preserve accuracy for everything else, and then make sure it's PSD and then hit Okay, and then I'm gonna save this to my iPad. And then the beauty of working in a Mac environment for me is the E, the accessibility. So I'm just gonna go to my files and I'll be able to select my recent files. And my letter sketches will be there automatically. And what I can do is just hit the Select icon in the upper right-hand corner. Select that file. And then I can hit share. And then I can just AirDrop it directly to my computer. And then I can hit done. And then we can go into the desktop version of this and just kind of give it a look. 8. Sketching in Affinity Designer on the Desktop: Now that we've sketched on the iPad, I wanted to take us into Affinity Designer on the desktop, just so that you can get a feel for the overall layout of the software on the computer. I already exported that filed. So what I wanna do is right-click that and I'm going to open it with my Affinity Designer app. And I am working on the desktop without a mouse. They'll, but you can do this with a mouse. I'm personally working with a Helion tablet, um, because it just, it gives me more of a realistic real-life feel when I'm sketching and makes it a little bit easier for me to digitize my artwork because I can see what I'm doing and it can utilize the stylus pencil tool. And it just feels a little bit more organic for me. Alright, so as you see when we open this up, we have all of the different layers that we were working with before. It builds really similar. Only. We don't necessarily have like the studio layout that we had on the iPad that here on the right-hand side, you'll have access to those same kinds of things like color studio, your swatches, your Stroke Studio, all of your layers on your transformed area. And then on the left-hand side, you'll have all of your tools here. And then on the top you have your regularly document menus. So what I'm gonna do though, just like what we were doing before you do have the ability to switch between persona. So right now we're in the designer persona. If we click on that middle one, it looks like pixels. We are going to be in our pixel persona. And right next to that you have the export persona again. So let's go back to the pixel persona. And what we're going to do is work on creating more of these letters so that we can finalize the entire alphabet and get it ready to be digitized in a pixel persona. Like I said, you have access to all of the same kind of tools that you wouldn't designer persona. You have the ability just it's, it's sketching. You're, you're not necessarily having to worry about nodes and lines segments like you would in the designer view because you are working with vectors. But instead you're just working with raster layer. So you can kind of just draw on the screen. So I'm going to select that brush tool and then I'm gonna go to the right-hand side and I'm going to go to my stroke and I'm just, I'm gonna go to my brush, my brushes options here and then I'm going to change it from basic to the pencils again. And just like before I have access to all of this same one. So I'm going to select that mechanical pencil HUB again. And then I'm going to go into my stroke and I'm going to increase the size of the stroke. I'm going to use this little eyedropper tool and I'm going to pick up my color just so that I can make sure I have the same color. Again, I'm removing the stroke and I just want to have the color and the fill. And then I'm going to go back to that stroke and I'm going to increase its size of it and just double-check. So making sure I'm on the brush tool, Let's test this. Hey, it's a little small, so I'm going to increase the size of my stroke. And then I'm going to go into the upper left-hand menu here you'll see you have the opportunity to adjust your width, opacity, flow hardness, just like what we saw before, only it just in a different place. So we're going to adjust our width of this. And then I'm gonna change my flow from 15 percent to a 100 percent. And I think this is a good starting point, so alright, so we have an OH, what I think we should probably do next is our a and we can, again, kind of reuse some of these elements. So the thing is though, we just want to make sure we're on the correct layer, or we can select all of these layers and just merge them to make things a little easier. So what I would do is select the first pixel in our layer bunch here, hold Shift, and then select the last one. And then I'm going to, and then I'm going to right-click by hitting Control and then clicking on them. And I'm going to select Group. And I'm going to double-click where it says group, and I'm going to rename this to letters. And then these curves here, I'm just going to select them by clicking on the first one, holding Shift, selecting the last one. And then right-clicking them by selecting control-click. And then I'm going to go to group again. And I'm going to rename this by clicking where it says group and renaming it guidelines. And we've already kind of have an idea of these guidelines so they don't need to be as dark. So with that layer group selected, I'm gonna go to my opacity here. I'm just going to bring it down a bit that way. It's not so intrusive as I'm creating these. And now what I can do is select that, LET letters layer group. And then I'm going to right-click it by hitting Control click. And I'm going to select rasterize. And it'll make everything all on the same layer. So. Now what I wanna do is again, start on this a. So what I'm gonna do is go to the left-hand side my tools. I'm going to select my lasso tool and I'm going to select the peak because I think it's the closest shape to what I want my eta look like. And then I'm going to go into my top menu. I'm after I've selected that P, I'm going to select Edit, Copy and then Edit Paste. And then I'm gonna take my move arrow and I'm just going to move this P over. And then I'm going to start revising it. So I'm just going to tap out of this by selecting my lasso and tapping anywhere on the screen to de-select. And then I'm going to go to my Eraser tool. And I'm just going to make sure I'm on that letter P layer and I'm going to start to just erase some of this. I'm going to erase where this kind of curve is happening and go in a slightly curved that edge. And then I'm gonna go to my office, my brush, and then I'm going to start filling in to create the shape that I'm going for, for this a. Again, I create the line and then I kind of fill it in by adding the shape. And then I just use the eraser tool to kind of clean up around what I'm doing to make sure everything kinda feels the way I want it to feel. Then again, I can decrease the size of the eraser, increase it on my keyboard. I could do open bracket to decrease, close bracket to increase the size of my eraser. Now I'm going to work on my D because again, I feel like this P can work for the beginning of the letter D for me. So I'm going to go and select it with my lasso tool, making sure I'm on the correct layer. Because again, once we pasted the P to recreate the a created on a new layer. So just going back to that original layer, selecting it, then hit it, then hitting, and then going up to Edit and then select Copy, Edit, Paste. And then clicking anywhere on the art board to de-select is taking your move arrow tool and then just dragging it over to this side. So this is going to be the start of our letter D. I'm gonna get in a little bit closer. So you can kind of highlight why I think this will work. So what do we look at this? The top portion I think is it has a really nice shape for that letter D. So I'm going to select my eraser tool and I'm going to make sure I'm on the correct layer. I'm going to start erasing that center area here. I'm going to then go into my brush tool and then I'm going to start to reshape this. And then again, I wanna make sure I keep the weight similar. And then I can go in and clean up anything that I don't necessarily like using my eraser tool. So it's very similar to what you get on the iPad. Only the interface is just slightly different. It just once you get orientated, the process is exactly the same. Now what I'm gonna do is kind of speed things up a little. I'm going to finish creating the rest of these letters. I'm going to finish filling up this first area and then I'm going to just duplicate my guidelines and bring them down so that I can create the rest of the alphabet. So really quickly I'm just going to select that guideline layer, layer group. And then I'm going to select Edit copy. And then I'm going to select Edit Paste. And then I'm gonna take my move arrow. And I'm just going to drag those guidelines down. And then I'm going to do the same thing. I'm going to copy and paste once more and then I'm going to drag those guidelines. I can get nine letters on each of these lines, so we'll have everything all on the same board and everything should be, will be the same height because of these guidelines. So I'm going to fast-forward a little bit and get through creating the rest of these letters. And then we'll jump into the next step, which is digitizing the letters here in Affinity Designer S. Okay? Okay. Okay. 9. Digitizing in Affinity Designer: So this is the final set of sketches for all the letters. I did end up redoing the a I think on a keep with more point t versus the original a that I drew. And now what we can do is start to digitize. And this is the nice part of doing the sketches digitally. I get to skip this step of scanning and I can just jump right into digitizing. So what I like to do is get rid of any of the guidelines that I no longer need. I can just uncheck Markham and drag them underneath or you can just delete them by selecting them and then hitting the little trash icon at the bottom here in the layers that I like to keep this almost like a template that it can go back to whenever I'm working on concepts. So once I've done that, then I just have my white background, which of course I can turn off at anytime. And the pixel layer with all of my sketches on them. So what we're gonna do now is utilize this as our map, as our guideline to vectorizing each of these letters. You can utilize the pen tool. But what I like to use actually is the pencil tool, which I think gives a more organic field to tracing these letters. But there will be some instances where we'll utilize a pen tool and we can modify and adjust nodes and whatnot. So if you are still in your pixel persona, make sure you select designer persona. And let's get started on vectorizing. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to create a new layer on top of the current pixel layer. So I'm going to select this New Layer icon. And it's going to give me a brand new layer. I'm going to go into my pencil tool here. And then what I wanna do is change my brush options. I'm don't want anything like scheduling for this. I wanted to be really clean. So I'm going to select my pen. I'm going to go with this first option up here, which is the solid pen with pressure. Have any pressure sensitivity for this because I don't want my line weights to change. While I create these lines, you can see that under stroke, my caps are that rounded cap. And then I'm gonna go over here to the upper left-hand corner. And I'm gonna make sure my width is about ten. And I have sculpt turned on so that it adds to the lines that I'm working on. That's the nice part of using this pencil brushes that would sculpt whatever I if as long as I keep starting at that same line that connects those those two segments together. So I'm going to select my pixel layer with my sketches and then I'm going to click on it and my layers. And then I'm going to go into my opacity and I'm going to lower the opacity down just a bit so that it's not overwhelming to try and draw on top of something that's a really dark. And then I'm going to select my pencil tool making sure I have a stroke color. But with this Tn have sculptured non. I like to also mark the stabilizer because a handheld cities shaky. So this gives me this gives me a little bit more of a stable touch while I'm drawing. And then controllers at non making sure I have no pressure sensitivity turned on so that all of my lines are the same width. And then I can just begin to trace these. And what's nice too is that because I'm using the pencil brush and creating a vector lines so I can adjust my lines as needed so that I can create the shape that I'm going for. And I can go in and edit my lines really easily by selecting my node tool, clicking on the line, and then adjusting as needed. And then if I feel like these lines are too thin, I can just select them by selecting my move arrow tool, clicking on one part of the segment holding Shift, selecting the second. And that I can go into my stroke here and I can adjust so that it's a little bit thicker for what I'm going for, that I can also double-check. So that's a 14 with, so I can go back to my pencil tool and make sure I've increased it to 14. So with this G, I've utilized my pencil to kind of create that stroke, outline the GI. And then I added a little segment on top. And you'll see there's both Rs, two separate curves on two separate layers. What we need to do is connect these together so that they're not two separate segments. So I'm going to select that first line curve, hold Shift, select the second. So what we'll wanna do is utilize our geometry functions. So with those two segments selected, we can right-click the selections. And then we're going to scroll down to geometry. And what we want to do is select merge curves. And it'll merge the curves together so that it's one shape versus two different segments. Now we'll go back to. The pencil tool again, and then we'll just kinda complete this whole process. Once I've created one line, What's nice too, is that I can kind of straighten things out. This it feels like it's two curves by selecting my white node tool. And then I can just adjust the line of that on that. And once I created that one line, I can just copy it and then paste it and then use my move tool to drag it over. On that, I can go back to my pencil tool. If you hold Shift, you'll find you're able to create a straight line. And I can just edit and adjust. I'm not, again, I'll just select each of these segments together so I can just drag over it with my mouse or your stylus, or you can select one hold Shift and then select the rest by clicking on them. And then once everything selected, we can then right-click by hitting Control and then clicking out anon. We can scroll down to geometry and again, merge curves so that all of our lines are merged together as one. All right, So basically I do this whole process for all of the entire alphabet on. But what I want to do is touch on some more of the tricky shapes when it comes to these letters. So like the S and the B, you'll find that with the pen, the pen tool where you have to create line segments and then utilize Bezier curves. It can be really tricky to get those curves to look natural and feel like the way you originally intended them to. So that's why I opt to use that pencil tool because it allows me to organically create those smooth curves. So let's scroll down to the AST really quickly. And I'm just going to utilize this pencil tool. So follow my original curves. And then I can adjust by selecting that little white node tool. And then I can just adjust my curves by clicking on the nodes here and adjusting my curves as I need. And this allows them to feel much more organic versus versus utilizing the pen tool, which can be tricky if you're not used to it. If you're a beginner, if you're used to the pen tool, go for it. The process is relatively the same, but you're just utilizing the pen tool to make line segments that you then can curve. So here is the curve that we made with the pencil. Now let's try it with the pen tool. So I'm gonna select the little pen tool over here. I'm going to click off of my original asks, go to my pen tool and then I'm going to create the curves with the Bezier curves and the line segments so that the tip to keep in mind when you're creating curves with the pen tool is to have as little points as possible. So in this case I'm going to start at the end here. And then I'm going to think about where I'm going to need the curve. And I'm going to think about how I can split this up. And I'm thinking off split it up in half. So I'm going to start at the end here. I think I'll split this first curve up and half, and then I'm going to curve at the center here. I'll hold Shift and then pull down on that red area there. I'm going to click back on that red area. And then I'm going to curve it down here. That I'm going to click back on that last point, bring it down to the widest part of the US here and then finish it off by clicking on that original point and then, and then closing it off at the end here. And what's nice is that again, you can go in and adjust these curves utilizing that little white node tool. And you can drag elements in if it feels like it's too rounded, you can do that. Cells like any of the areas are too pointy. We can clean that up as well. But it's a little bit more complicated utilizing the pen tool than it is with the pencil tool, which again, you're just kind of drawing as you would with a traditional pencil. So as I said, with the pen tool, you're thinking about line segments and then you're creating the Bezier curves with your node, with each of your nodes. And then with the pencil tool, you're just, you're still creating vector lines, but you're doing it in a more organic way. So it makes it a little bit easier. It makes it a little bit easier for beginners to kind of get used to working with the line segments in this vector-based program. So I'm gonna go in, I think I like the S that I made with the pen, with the pencil tool. So I'm just going to adjust it just a bit. I'm going to get rid of this one here by selecting it and then hitting the little garbage candidal delete it. And then I'm going to drag this back over here. And then I'm just going to go back through and finish outlining these utilizing. The pencil tool and finishing these off. What you might find though, is that you may have more control creating your line segments for a straighter looking letters utilizing that pen tool. So in this case like the eye, I'm going to create line segments really easily out. Click at one end of the top of the I hold Shift to create a straight line. And then what I'll do is just out a copy, edit, copy, edit, paste. And then I'll just drag it down. And then I'll go back into my pen, my pen tool, create my, my straight line from the tap, go towards the center of that original line segment. Hold Shift, and then drag that down. And I'll have that letter I really quickly created. And if any of your line segments are too big, you can just click on them with your arrow tool and adjust as needed. And then I also like to utilize I'm going to select the bottom part of this. I hold Shift and then select the top part on that. I'm going to utilize my alignment tools at the very top. You'll see these little aligned functions if you sell lack left align, it will make sure that your segments are aligned to the left or they can be aligned to the center. And I just like to do that to make sure everything is uniform. So once I've done that, then I'm just going to select all the bits and pieces that are part of this i, so all of the line segment here, I'm going to right-click. And I'm going to go down to geometry and I'm going to select merge curves. And then it'll have it be all one shape. Alright, so I'm going to keep doing this process utilizing my pen tool or my pencil tool, whatever you feel most confident with. What I also like to do, I'm going to undo combining these curves really quickly so that I can show you how you can utilize some of your other letters, the pieces of those letters to build additional letters. So I has the same kind of topper as the J. I can use the line segments for E and F as well. So I'll copy those, those little line segments and move on to key places where I can utilize them. And again, this just makes the process of doing this much quicker so that as I build things up on, it's just faster and more cohesive to in terms of the overall shapes of all of these letters. It's just a really smart and strategic and efficient way of creating your letters to make sure that everything is balanced and that matches and that your forms are harmonious relief. And that this is really what I think makes things so convenient when you're vectorizing in the software. If you don't feel comfortable using the pen tool, you can utilize the pencil tool so it feels more natural. And then you can utilize bits in pieces of your letter forms to create and build your additional letter forms. Cheers, trigonometry. So with you, again, we're creating a curve that can be difficult to create with the pen tool. But I'm going to show you that option first, and then I'll show you. I would opt to use, which is the pencil tool just because it's a little bit easier. So with the U, again, when you're creating these curves, you want to create the least number of points on your elements. So I'm going to start with my point at the top. And then I'm going to create a point right at the center of my, of my U shape. I'm going to hold Shift so that I can then start to create that Bezier curve. Take that original curve and copy it, and then paste it. Right-click it. And we can go to Transform and we can flip it horizontally. And then we'll have the other half essentially of that shape. And then we can hold Shift. And we can select each of these elements. And we can right-click. And then we can select geometry merge curves, and we'll have our u. So that's one way and we could still edit this you as well. We can select our Node Tool, click on the EU, and just kind of revise the overall shape of this. If we want to kind of make it a little bit thinner, things like that, bring the top portion in a bit. So that's one way I'm going to move this u to the side. But another way is again to just use that pen that use that pencil tool and just kinda follow the line shape that you've originally created in, even if it looks a little wonky, what's nice is we can go back to that node tool and we can revise these lines and fix them so that they don't look as messy and we can edit as needed. So I think I like the UI made with a pencil. So I'm gonna get rid of this pen tool one. Alright, so now I'm going to finish up the rest of these letters. And then we can move on to our next section. And what's really nice again with the pencil tool is that you can just use it to kind of follow your guidelines, follow your shape lines, without having to build out the letters so much with that pencil tool or with the pen tool using those line segments and the Bezier curves, which can be kind of difficult. So this is a nice kind of quick and easy way to start. So you can just get used to working with the line segments and then creating the curves as you normally would when you're drawing them naturally versus having to create points and then creating a Bezier curve. All right, so let's finish this up and then we'll jump into exporting these for use in the Glyphs app. 10. Scaling in Affinity Designer: Now that we're done actually digitizing our artwork, what we wanna do is basically set it up so that it's easy to pasted into glyphs on. This part might seem a little tedious, but the whole idea is to get all the hard work that tedious work done in Affinity Designer before we copy and paste each of the glyphs into the Glyphs app. So what we wanna do before we even set up our next file is select all of the letters that we've just created using our black arrow tool. You can also go in and go into your layers on the right-hand side and select your first layer curve in your series. And then hold shift, scroll up, and then select the last. And then it'll select all of the different layer curves in this whole series here. So what we wanna do though, is basically expand our selection. So it's not just lines and curves merge together, but that it actually outlines the entire shape of each letter. We're going to go into our layer menu. And then what we wanna do is scroll down all the way to expand stroke. And basically what this does is outline each of the letters so that you see it in its full shape and format. So now that we've done that well we can do is start to set up our file to basically re-scale each of these letters so that it's easy to paste it into Glyphs Mini. So what we're gonna do is go into our file menu, select File New. And what we wanna do first is make sure our document units is changed from whatever your current setting is to points. And we do this because Glyphs Mini that piece of software works, sets up files based on a point system. So we want to just make sure that our document units are matching between the two pieces of software. So we're going to select points. And then what we wanna do is create a document that is 1 00 00 00 00, 00, 00, 00 00. Your DPI at 300. And then what I like to also do is just check mark create our board. And we do this for a reason as well. So just to make sure you have that checkmarked and then you can hit Create. And then once we are in this new document, this is what it looks like. And what we wanna do is turn on your rulers if you don't have them, and we're basically going to give ourselves some guides. So before I explained the guides, let me get you into being able to turn on your ruler. So as you see on the left-hand side and the top, I have rulers like basically guides that I can drag guides from in order to kind of align certain areas on my WorkBoard here, my art board. So to do that, you'll go into View and you're going to select Show Rulers. When you de-selected the rulers, go away. When you re-select it, the rulers pop-up. And I like to use this just so that I have kind of like a visual to see where my measurement to R1 and placing my gut. But also what we're gonna do is this and this lower right-hand side here, we have our transform, we have our transform studio here. So that's going to help us be much more precise as well. So now when it comes to setting up your guides, I want to kind of explain how this works. We're going to launch Glyphs Mini. And if you click on it and you don't see anything pop up, that's okay. Just go to your top menu and select File New. And this is just giving us the base, the base interface for glyphs. And what you're going to see here is that there's lots of different stuff that pops up what I want to highlight. So you understand the purpose of the measurement here, how this works when you're looking at an actual letter. So if we go up into our File menu, let's scroll down to font info. And what you'll see is that list many has kind of like a standard of the cap height, the x-height ascender, descender, basically the measurement of an actual letter within a font or typeface. So our cap height is 700, or x-height is 500, our eighth centers 800 and our descenders 200. Basically, the cap height is how big are what the measurement is of a fully capitalized letter. The x-height is the actual height of a lowercase x. And then the descender is anything that goes below that baseline. And then there's these other additional elements that we don't really need to worry about today. But of course, if you end up wanting to move forward with this and make more fonts and things like that. These are sections that you'll want to get a little bit more familiar with. So these are the four measurements went to keep in mind. And then down here at the bottom, you'll see different information on weight with we're just going to be making a regular. You can, if you are doing more of a bold or Demi bold or medium size font, you can update your weight here. And your width and things like that. And the units per m is 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0. So that's why we're setting up our fall at 11000. We're going to be adding guidelines at each of these key measurements to help us in terms of making sure that when we copy from Affinity Designer and we paste it into glyphs, we don't have to do much for that Olin and changing and re-scaling and things like that once we're in the software. All right, so now let's go back. I'm going to minimize this. Let's go back into Affinity Designer and let's set up these grids. So I am going to include a guide for you all in the class resources for this section and basically have everything all set up for you. But I want to walk you through creating this just so that you know what we're doing. But you can utilize this scale guide as well. And it will help you set up and re-scale and resize all of your letters as you work through this project. But basically what we're gonna do is we're going to start with our ascender. So I'm going to go into, through my pen tool and I'm going to create a stroke. I'm going to update the width of that stroke by going into the upper left-hand quarter and increasing my width just a bit. And then I'm going to go to the stroke color by tapping word is black and then just adjusting the color so something bright that you can easily see. And then I'm going to just create a straight line. So I'm going to click on and I'm actually going to also turn on magnetics just so that it's easier for me to see and make sure I'm on the right. In the right parameter, you'll see these little guidelines kind of like pop-up on the left and right and top and bottom. So I'm going to go to my left-hand side of my art board. I'm going to just tap anywhere on there to create my first dot. And then I'm going to hold Shift so that I create a perfectly straight line. And then we're gonna get that other green guide to pop up. And once I do that, I'm going to click and it'll have made my straight line. And then what we can do is just increase the stroke if it's hard to see, um, just so that it's easier for us to see. So I think 1.5 is perfect for now, once I've made that first stroke, what I'm gonna do is place it in the baseline or the ascender measurement is. So if we go back to Glyphs Mini, we know the center is 800, so basically that's our baseline. So we're then gonna go over to our Transform tool. And in our y-coordinate, we're just going to type in 800 and hit Enter and it's going to take us exactly there. And so once I've done that on a hit, I'm going to select the line so that it's highlighted in blue. I'm going to hit Command C or you can go up to edit copy and then edit paste or Command V. And I'm going to paste and it's gonna give me a new line. And then what we're gonna do is we're going to move it to the next section. So we have our ascender, we're going to move it to our x-height, which is 500. And even though it says x-height, it's not. The x coordinates is basically the height of a letter acts if it's lowercase. So in our y coordinate here, we're going to change it from 800 to 500 and then hit Enter. And it's going to create our x-height. Let's go back to glyphs. We want to create our cap height of 700. So this is where it gets a little trickier, a little confusing. So the idea is this whole thing is 1 thousand points, right? So we know that this first line that we created was 800 points. So that means there's 200 points below it. But in order to get to 700, we have to keep in mind the measurement of where it's basically 700 points from this 800 points. So 800 minus 700 is 100. So let's copy the line again and let's paste it so you can select it, go to edit, copy, edit paste or you can do, you can select it and hit Command C, Command V. And it'll give you your third line. And what we're gonna do is go into our y coordinates and then hit 100. That's going to be our cap height, which is the most important because that's what we're working with in this font. We're creating an all kept him lettered font. So that is the measurement. We're really looking for that cap height and that baseline. So this is basically how I set up my file. And I utilize this as my guide. And you can delete these guidelines after you're after you place everything, but I use them to kind of help me rescale everything. So once we've done that, I'm just going to go in and hit Save, Save As, and then save it as my guide. And then I'm going to select all of these curves by clicking on that first layer holding Shift, clicking on the last. And then in my layers functions here I'm gonna, I'm gonna click on that little lock. Basically this ensures that those lines won't get moved. Now we're gonna go back to the letters where we've expanded the stroke and we're just going to select all of them by selecting our black arrow tool, dragging over all of them, and then making sure you don't have that background selected, I just hold Shift and I click on the background and it'll de-select it for me. And then I'm gonna copy, I'm going to go into Edit Copy. And then I'm going to go into my new file, my working guide. And then I'm going to select Edit paste, or you could do Command V to paste it. So obviously our letters are much smaller than what this guide is. And that's okay, That's the beauty of vectors. With vectors, we can increase in size and not lose quality. And what we wanna do is basically resize these letters so that they fit within the parameters of this guideline. We want to have our cap height hit that first line, and then the bottom of our letter hit that baseline that a sender here. So what I like to do first is resize it based on this H. And with everything selected still, I'm just going to hold shift and it's going to resize everything together. And I'm just going to drag from my corner and I'm going to resize my letters. And if you have to zoom out to do this, that's okay. Just take two fingers on your trackpad. And then you can zoom out by pinching in and you can zoom in by pinching out on your trackpad. Or you can just go to View as well and Zoom. You'll select View and then hit zoom and then zoom in, zoom out, things like that. So I'm going to continue increasing this until I have my h somewhat centered. And I'm going to get as close as I can to this top line. And it's okay if it goes just slightly over because it does have rounded edges. Once I've resize it, I'm going to center it just kind of using my eyes. And then what we're gonna do is basically set up each of our letters so that it fits this guideline properly. So now that we've done this on making sure everything is still selected, well, we wanna do is utilize our alignment tools to align all the letters to that H. So we're going to go up in the upper menu here, and you'll, you'll see the alignment functions. And I'm not talking about the alignment functions that are over to the left here. We want the full menu, so we're going to select alignment. And the first thing we're gonna do is just click on one of these alignment functions. So I'm going to select Align Center. And then what I'm gonna do is I'm going to change it from Align to Artboard to align to first selected. And in this case it is my h, so it's going to align all of these letters. And then what we wanna do next is then go down to align vertically and we want to align to the top and make sure it still says Align 2 first selected, and then it'll align everything to that H. Once we're done, we hit Apply. And then making sure everything is still selected. Then what we wanna do is go back into that align function. And then we're going to select a line to the center again. And then instead of to first selected, we're going to select Artboard. So basically it all lines up perfectly in the center of our art board and then hit Apply. And I know you're like, Oh my gosh, we can't see anything. That's okay. Don't stress. What's nice is that we can turn on and off each. Basically when we're creating this in affinity, all of these letters, and when we've grouped everything, all of these letters are each created on their own layer. So we can turn on and off these layers by selecting the little checkmark to the right of them in our Layers panel here, and it'll turn on or off the layers. So the first thing I wanna do is just kind of go through and just double-check to make sure these each of these letters look the way I want them to look. So I'll just go in one by one. And while I'm doing that, I can also rename them so that an organized and keep everything kind of clear in terms of what I'm looking at with my file so I can double-check the placement of the H. But then at the same time, I'm going to rename this layer. Double-click where it says curve. And I'm just going to rename it h. And then I'll turn it off and then I'll turn on my G. And I'm just going to double-click where it says curve and type in G and rename it. But then I also am going to look at it and make sure that it is looking the way I wanted to look at in this case, as we can see, the G is a little bit small, so holding shifts so that everything stays in proportion. I'm just going to pull from the corner just so that it hits the baseline. And once that's done, I can turn it off and then click on my next letter, which is the I. And I'm going to double-click or it says curve and I'm going to rename it I. And then same as with the G. It's looking a little small, so I just need to refine this and resize it. And I also have magnetics turned down just because it makes it a little bit easier once I've put those guides in place to make sure that my letters are hitting those guides. So I'm just going to go in and do this for every single letter, making sure everything's looking okay. And if anything looks off like this W it looks like I kind of undershot the width of this. I'm just going to double-click it so that I get my direct selection and utilize that white node tool. And then I'm going to click on a node that I want to adjust. I'm not going to adjust each of these one by one because it would kind of make my letter look off and wonky. But I can select multiple notes. I'm going to select that first one in this little curve of the W hold Shift. And then I can select the next one and the next one. And then keeping shift held down, I'm just going to drag this down with my, my my mouse or your trackpad or whatever you're working with. And then I'm going to make sure that hits that baseline. I see that little line pop up because of my magnetics. So I know everything is in line with this. And then it looks exactly the way I want it to look. And I'm just going to repeat this process for the rest of my letters, making sure that it's touching right at the top of my cat, my cap height, and it's hitting right at my baseline. And then doing any fine tuning that I may need to do while I'm in this software before I bring it over to Glyphs Mini. And then we'll re-size it just so that that little tail come down just below the ascender. And if you notice you're having any issues with resizing your shapes, your letters, just make sure on the right-hand side, when you select a stroke in your Stroke Studio that you have scale with object selected. Because if you don't, it's going to basically resize your stroke widths and it'll make your letters look all wonky. So we don't want that. We want everything to stay the same in terms of width as we're working on this. And then once I've resized everything, I just like to go back and select them all. And then just kind of redo the whole aligning so that everything is centered. So making sure HSL, your first selected hold Shift, select your last. Go into your alignment options. Select Align Horizontally to the center. First selected is your align tool option. And then select vertically again, aligned to the top for first selected and hit Apply. And then go back and making sure everything is still selected. Go in and align horizontally to the center. And instead of first selected, make sure it's to artboard and then hit Apply. And then everything should be perfectly centered within your Artboard. The last thing we wanna do before we bring all of these letters into Glyphs is make sure that our, our board is aligned to 000. We want to make sure our x and y is aligned to 0000 so that when we pull it in, it doesn't offset our letters and it looks like everything. Once I select the artboard, you'll see it outlined in blue. Once I've selected. And we check in transform everything x and y is at 000, our width and height is at a 1000 points each. So this works beautifully. 11. Working in Glyphs: So now what we can do is do a side-by-side view and basically copy and paste each of our letters into glyphs. Which is a little bit tedious, but that's okay. So once we are in glyphs, I launch glyphs. If you don't see anything like I showed you earlier, just select File New and it'll give you a new file. I'm going to X out of this just so that I have something fresh to work with. We have all of our measurements that I'm going to resize my window pane so that I can look at these side-by-side. I'm also going to save this file once more just so that I have it saved and everything is safe and situated. And then I'm going to go into my glyphs. And the first thing I wanna do is get rid of anything that we're not going to be working with. So since we're not going to be creating lowercase letters and we're not doing any numbers or punctuation. What I'm gonna do is select all of these and just delete them so you can select your first and the letter a, and then hold shift and select Z and it will select all of them. And what you can do is go down to this little, you see a plus and a negative icon, you hit negative. It'll allow you to remove these glyphs. And this just makes it easier so that, you know, you don't have to worry about on and the other letters popping up while you're typing. And it just makes the file a little bit more manageable. So I'm going to select 0, hold Shift, select nine, and then hit the minus sign and I'm going to select Remove. And then I'm gonna do the same thing for the punctuation. Select them all, hit the minus sign, remove them. And then I'm just going to keep the space in there because we will need that. The next thing I'd like to do is go into the little eye icon that is your font info. And I like to update this so you can update it with your name for designer. And then I can add in my website. Don't worry about the manufacturer, the URL, everything else is fine because it has all of our base set that we, we kind of worked with that seven hundred and five hundred, eight hundred. And our units per m is all the same. So, and then we can just X out of this and our font info will be updated. You could also rename your font in this same info area and then just double-click where it says new font. And then you can update the text here. And I'm just going to name it bubblegum just because it's loud, nice, round, kind of bubbly looking font. And then we can go back to our little folder that says font. And then we can start placing things in. So while we're in glyphs, we are going to do a little bit of maneuvering. But first before we do any like fine tuning and revising in terms of kerning and whatnot. What we're gonna do is just paste all of our letters in. So I'm just going to go in order of what I have you can go through and who pre-order your letters in your layers in actual alphabetical format. And I'm just going to go with what I have. So I'm going to select that first. I'm going to turn on that first layer and it's going to be my y. I'm going to select my black arrow tool and I click on that letter, hit Command C or you can go into Edit and then select Copy. And then I'm going to go into glyphs right here, and I'm going to double-click the y. And this is the base kind of like template for your letters. All this gray letter is is just a guide for placement. So I'm going to click inside of here, and I'm going to select Command V to paste it. I know it looks kind of funky. It's because you just see the outline of the glyph. But if you hold your spacebar down, you'll see the actual letter. And I know it's over to the left, but don't worry about that. We will revise that as we go. So we've got Wien's, I'm going to X out of that. I'm going to go to my next letter, which is the ax, and just repeat that same process, copy it, and then go into my x letter in glyphs and then paste it in. And then go back and forth between the two softwares so that I can paste the rest of these letters. And then we'll come back in and start to revise things like Corning. If you're noticing that once you place any letters that have cut out like BP, things like that, what you'll wanna do is you can double-check it by hitting Spacebar, for example, maybe doesn't have the cutout centers. So I'm going to select it with my black arrow tool. And then I'm going to go up into my glyphs mini menu and blue, and I'm going to select correct path direction. And that will basically reset and fix my path direction so that you see each of the paths that are necessary to create the full letter. So that fixes any of those issues. Hi. 12. Spacing and Kerning : Now that we're done adding all of our letters into glyphs, we can act out of our Affinity Designer. Then we can start to play around with kind of race, basing everything, working with the kerning within our glyphs app. The other thing I like to do is go into the Glyphs menu and select tidy up paths. And what this does is just kinda deletes any doubled. Like double nodes are Anything that has too many. Too many nodes are double coordinates just to clean up the past within each letter. And I think this is a good job of just kind of tightening everything up. And then what we need to do is basically work with our kerning and our spacing. Basically the spacing on the side of our letters and then the spacing between the letters themselves. So what we're gonna do next is just test out the set a we have already placed in and kind of figure out where we need to revise things. So what we're gonna do is just double-click on one of the letters. And it's going to take us into the edit mode. But what's nice is that once we hit the little icon that is right underneath the name of our font, not in that upper left-hand menu, but the menu right at the very top of your window. It will allow us to type all the letters. So I'm just going to use my arrow keys to go to the right. And I'm just going to type the rest of the letters in my font set here and make sure that you have Caps Lock turned on because our font is case-sensitive. All right, so these tough on to actually look really nice. But the rest of these are kinda looking a little too close in certain areas like the w and b and Ax. So now what we can do is kind of go in and start playing around with the spacing of our letters. So I'm just going to go back to the font and I'm going to double-click on any of these letters. So I'm just going to start with the H here. And then I'm going to double-click inside of this so that it basically gives us our edit mode for the actual letter. And then I'm just going to zoom in a bit so that I'm up-close and we can see what we're doing. So if we look at our past, you see everything's kinda like shifted over to the left side of our bounding box. So any space that you see to the left or the right is what's going to be seen between the letters. So ideally will want to have our letters centered within this bounding box. So the idea is to kind of give yourself space on the left-hand side of the letter and on the right-hand side. And what's nice too is that if we're in that set that we've typed out, you can actually added the letters while we're in here as well. So say we want to revise this and if I double-click on it, and you'll get the edit mode in order to revise the spacing between the letters directly within the, the part of the document where we've typed. But what's really nice is that we can just fix this relatively fast, right, within the glyphs software. So in order to fix this, we're gonna, we're gonna want to go back out into our original font. And I'm going to show you some of these letters first before we go in and basically try to fix all of them at once. As we select on that letter aid, don't double-click, just click on it so it's highlighted in blue. And we go down to the lower left hand corner. This is where we see this measurements for like the kerning and the bearing. So the bearings are basically it's the space on each side of our letter. So this little area, outlines are Kerning and it also highlights our bearings and then also the width of the letter. So if we look at this, basically the bearing, the bearing measurement, It's the space on the left side and on the right side of each letter. And then that bigger number down here, 600 is the full width of your letter. So just to kind of highlight how this works, what we'll do now is double-click that a and then what we're gonna do is just zoom in so we can see what we're working with here. And that that little area with the measurements, the kerning, the group settings and things like that will also pop up in this edit menu. So what we can do is play around with the bearings, right in this edit function. So I'm just going to select the left, the left bearing really quick, highlight it and type in 50. And then I'm going to go to the other side and type in 50 again. And basically it'll give me space on each side of the letters. And it will help to kind of like center it. And it's just just kinda of like a random number then picking in terms of the spacing that I'm trying to give each of the letters. But we, obviously we can go in and do more fine tuning, but just so that we can kind of see how this works, it'll help to kind of give you a visual of the spacing that will need to kind of house the letter within its own kind of like I'd say, this kinda reminds me of like an art board. Now if we go back into those letters settings, you'll kind of see that it's already revise the placement of that. A was kinda moved it a bit over closer to the B. Now. Now what we're gonna do is go back to our font overview again. And now we're going to select all of them by selecting the first letter, hold Shift and select the last letter. And then we're going to go down to that area where we were looking at earlier. It says, it says multiple values, but what we're gonna do is double-click where it says multiple values. We're going to use that same number that we used before, the 50. And we're going to type it in both sides. And then you'll see that each of these have kind of like shifted as I've updated those values. Now let's go back into the alphabet that we typed. And it looks like everything's kind of basically spread out really nicely. And if you have breathing room between the letters. So basically what we've done is adjusted our spacing within our font. And this is probably one of the most important parts of this whole process so that when you're typing words out, it doesn't look like letters are overlapping or things are too far apart. And so this is the first step that I like to touch on. And then we can go in and revise this even further. So now that we've adjusted our spacing, we can jump in and refine more by working with our kerning. And basically kerning is just the space between two specific letters when you're typing out words. So this is where I actually like to get involved in terms of like typing outwards and seeing how certain words that are really common look together. So that we can kind of play around with the kerning to make sure things look usable and the look right when you're looking at them. So the best way to kinda work through this is to individually go through some of these letters. What I'll do is just hit Tab or hit Enter and I can start a new line and then just start typing certain words to kind of look at how they work together. So like the agent, the E looks really nice together. But then when we're looking at some of the additional letters like the O for example, it feels it gets really far from the owl. So what we can do is go in individually and adjust the 0 by just double-clicking on it and bringing it down just slightly from 50 to 40. So it doesn't feel like it's so far away from letters. So this looks good. I'm going to use some of the wider letters just to kind of see what it looks like when I'm placing them next to other wider letters or other smaller letters. So the W feels like it's a little too far away. So I'm going to adjust my right-hand kerning first. I'm gonna bring it down to about 35 and then adjust the left-hand as well. And then basically just typing in words that I think are familiar that try to utilize all of the letters at the same time. So abracadabra is another good one. So I'm going to adjust this C Now. I'm going to adjust this down from 50 to 40. Actually, I'll bring it down even more. What I notice is there's kind of like an optical illusion when you're looking at these rounder letters, you'll likely want to bring them a little closer to some more of these, to the straighter letters. And what's nice as well with glyphs is that once you've adjusted one letter, you can base your adjustments for other letters off of this. So for example, since we've already set up our, our measurements for o and say we want to align you based on that, we can select. We can go in and type, type out a word with you in it, and then click on, take your mouse and make sure your cursor is before the US so that you're working with your, you and you can go into your measurements instead of adjusting and doing this by a number, you can just type in a capital O and it'll base it based off of what that measurement was for the O. And keep in mind, you want to base this on the overall shape of your, of your letters and things like that. So I take the G and the Q will match with this 0. So what we can also do is just go back to your full view of your font. And you can select that, those letters you can hold, select Q and then hold Command down or control depending on if you're a Mac or PC. And then I can select those additional letter. So like Q, C, and G, I think will match really nicely with that. Oh, so these are going to match directly on the left bearing. So what we'll do is once we've selected these and we can go down to where it says multiple values, select the left side, hold Shift and then type in 0, and it'll adjust those based on that original setting for the o. And then we can always go back to where we've typed everything and just kind of double-check and look and make sure everything looks good based on that new setting. And then we can go down to our settings for the right-hand side and then hold Shift type O and hit Enter. So now what we wanna do is play around with looking at and really kind of finalizing and fine tuning our font when it comes to earnings. So we're going to go up to our preferences and we're going to select on in our main menu where it says Glyphs Mini scroll down to Preferences. And we are going to load in some sample of strings. And this basically pulls in sets of words that may not seem like they make a lot of sense and they may sound funny. But they're words that are most likely to be next to each other and letters that are most likely to be next to each other. And this will help us with the kerning versus my time consuming way of going back and forth and taping words that seem like they would have a lot of little letters that we're going to be using within them. So let's select sample strings. I'm just going to select the first option, which is the Quick Brown Fox jumped over the lazy dog. Because that is the set that is going to have the most letters for our cap setting here. So I'm just going to highlight it. I'm going to copy it. Then I'm gonna hit X, then I'm gonna go into this, and then I'm going to paste it in. So as we look at this, everything's looking good. And this basically just allows us to really double-check fine tuned and make sure that the spacing between the letters are kerning overall, everything is looking like it should. We can also go in and go into Edit and select sample text. And this will give us some additional unsafe you were working on a font with lowercase letters. And you can also just click on them and they'll highlight these different options. So this allows you to just quickly go through and make sure everything looks okay and you can go in and adjust your kerning some more ambitious helps with maintaining consistency and making the overall typeface, the overall font just look a little bit more professional. So it's basically what we wanna do is revise the V. So we'll click in front of the letter V and then we're going to select word says current. And then you can utilize shift and then up or down to decrease or increase the kerning between those letters. So I'm going to go into V and I'm going to adjust my left kerning and then I'm going to hold Shift and then use the upper down arrow to adjust my right kerning. Once you're done, basically refining your kerning, refining the spacing, then you can just kinda do a once over and make sure everything looks the way you want it to look. You'll also want to edit your spacing so the separator, so what I suggest is you click on that space, double-click and then type in a word or two that might be next to each other. To kind of revise and edit that text or to revise and edit your spacing between words. So once you've written your two words, Click on that center area and click on that first plus within there. And that will give you the edit ability for your spacing. And then what you'll want to do, it is you can adjust not the burning, but you could actually adjust the overall width of the space by clicking in the bottom portion of the space measurement so that you get the full width and then hold shift. And you can click on your up arrow to move your words further apart or select your down arrow to bring things closer together. And then what we can do is export our final font. 13. Exporting and Installing Final Font: So this is the completed font. It's very basic, very simple. I didn't add any lowercase letters. I didn't add any numbers just because I wanted to keep the overall project easy to kind of consume. So if you want to move ahead and add numbers to your, to your final font and add any additional punctuation marks you are more than welcome to. But what we can do now once you've gotten to the step is basically export our font for use. So before we export, I'm just going to go into my info bar just to make sure everything is set up the way we want it to be. So I'm going to go to File, scroll down to font info, and then just make sure all of my information that I need to have in there is in there and it is. And then I'm also going to add in a copyright. And then once everything is the way I want it within the info section, we can actually go out and back into our font and then we can start the export process. And I'm going to go into file and then I'm going to scroll down to Export. You can keep remove overlap in auto hint selected. And then what we wanna do is make sure we export it to a specific place that we want it to. So, so you're going to click where it says Export destination, and click on the actual path. And then you're going to select where you're going to export your file. So for me, for example, I'm going to export it to my project file in my course files. So I'm just going to find that within my file folders and then I'm gonna save it into my project files I've already created a folder for. And then I'm going to select Open, and then I'm going to select Next. And then glyphs will basically export the font and then we'll be able to install it on our computer and use it in any of the applications that you're able to utilize, Desktop installed fonts. So what we're gonna do is I'm just going to save this once more. I'm going to save it in my font file. Hit Save. This is basically the glyphs working file and not the font itself. And then I'm going to X out of here. And then I'm going to go find that file that we've exported. And you're going to see the OTF file, that's the file you're going to want. And then you're going to right-click it and you're going to select Open With, and I'm going to select necklace many, but my font book, because we want to install this font into my actual computer. So what we're gonna do is select Install Font and its bubble irregular. And you see all of my letters in here. And then what we're going to do is just open up a file. So I'm going to go into affinity again. So go to my applications, open up Affinity Designer. I'm going to just create a new document. So go to File, select New. I'm just going to create an A4, something really basic. I'm going to turn it on its side. And then I'm going to select Create art board because I'm not just going to use this for my tester, but I'm also going to use it for our class project and then hit Create. Once I've done that, we'll have a new document and then I'm gonna go to the left-hand side and select my type tool. It looks like a capital a. I'm just going to drag it out and basically it's going to give me a letter. It's going to give me the cursor, and it's going to just give me whatever font I have automatically selected. But what I'm going to want to do is now search for my already installed fonts. So I'm going to look for bubblegum, which is the font that I created. And then I can type with it. That is how you install your final font. 14. Class Project Process: So the next step in this process is we're going to be creating a really simple kind of like visual to go with the font. If we look at a website like Creative Market, often, just like what happens when you go shopping. People are very visual. They need to see the font in action. They need to see the product in use, whether It's an outfit at the mall, in a store, in a visual display, in a window. That kind of concept of merchandising will play into selling on a market like Creative Market or design cuts or something like that. So what we'll find is when we look under font and you can browse by category and you look for something like a display font like we, we utilize that we created. Many of these fonts are showcased in merchandise essentially with a visual. Some people utilize just the font and some sort of graphics. And people like to utilize images. I like using images. I think this is a really fun way to go about this. So we're gonna do something similar to this. I like to utilize a website called Unsplash.com because they have really great freely usable images. And I feel like my bubblegum, it like my bubblegum font is really kind of fun in poppy. So I'm going to look for fashion images that relate to this. So I'm just going to type fashion. And I'm just going to find something that I think will work well for my font. Alright, so I like this visual. I think I'm going to utilize this. I'm going to download this by clicking Download Free. And then I'm going to escape out of this window, go back to Affinity, and then I'm going to set up a new artboard. So I'm gonna go the left-hand side, select art board, hit insert art board, which is just going to duplicate the original art board. And then what I'm gonna do is go into my file, select Place, and then find my image and the downloads. And I want it, I want to resize this. So I'm going to hold Shift and pull in from my corners to resize. If you're having issues with that, you can just hold Command and it will resize it from your center. And then I'm just going to kind of like replace where this is on my artboard. And then I'm gonna take the typed and I'm just going to copy it by selecting it. And you could either do Command C or edit copy and then click on Artboard 2 and then I'm going to paste it. And then I'm just going to change the color so it's easier to read by double-clicking in the text box and then it'll highlight it all. And then I'm going to go into my color tool here, or you can go into your color swatches on the left-hand side, on the right-hand side in your color studio and you can adjust the color. I'm gonna make sure the color, something that kind of fits nicely with the overall theme of the image that I selected. I'm going to utilize my Shape Builder tools here over on the left-hand side, I'm going to select the heart tool just to create something fun for visual effect. Make sure it's the same color as my, as the font that I've selected. And I'll just go into my color picker tool here on the left-hand side. And then I'll just basically click on my text to get that color and it'll fill in and I'll make sure that I don't have a stroke by clicking on the color studio. I'm clicking on the stroke so that it pulled up to the front and then selecting that circle with a red line through it. And it'll remove my stroke. And then I can go in and revise the overall shape of this heart as well by clicking on my node tool that white select arrow. And then I can just adjust the overall shape of this and just create a fun kind of looking visual fact with this font. And then I'm going to go in. And typically what you'll find with Creative Market, it'll highlight the kind of font this is, and who created it. So you can highlight it just like a display font and all caps display font. And then you could add your name at the bottom. So I'm going to utilize a simpler font to kind of go along with this. You could use the same font if you want to, but I feel like sometimes be a little overkill. So I'm going to select my Text tool. I'm going to create smaller text. I'm going to change the color from red to black just so that it stands out. And then I'm going to go into my font options and find something that is just a little bit simpler. Type in the kind of font this is so all caps display font. And then I'm going to actually double-click and I'm going to triple-click so that I select everything and I'm just going to increase the size of this just a bit. And then I'm going to pull this to the center. If you have magnetics turned on, you're snapping tool turn-on. It'll help ensure that you're placing things centered within your artboard. You could also select all of these elements by clicking on one holding Shift and clicking on the additional elements and utilizing your alignment tools, you can use these alignment tools over here. On the left-hand side, you can just align to center and it'll align everything. Or you can come here and select the Align tools here. And select Align Horizontally and aligned to art board. And it'll habit smack dab right in the center of your art board. The other thing you'll likely want to do is right, who made the fonts can just go in and select the font type that you use to write the kind of font it is, and write your name using that. And then if you have a brand, what I also suggest is not just adding your name, but also adding your logo. So I'm going to place my Bella Sophia Creative logo. And I'm going to resize it just a bit so that it fits nicely. And then I'm gonna save this. And then I'm just going to name it font project. And then my first initial last name and save it to my final project file. And then I'm going to select Export. And I'm going to export as a JPEG. And I'm going to select the specific artboard from my drop-down menu so that I'm just exploiting our B2 with my final font visual versus my tester board. So once I've selected are, then I can hit Export. And then I'm going to save it to my class project. And then I'm going to hit Save again. And then it will export this as a JPEG that you can then upload to your class project within the class project gallery on the class. All right, so that is it. That is how you create your own font using Affinity Designer and Glyphs app. Let's jump into the outro. 15. Course Outro: Thanks for showing up, learning and creating alongside me today, I really hope that you found this course helpful and that you're more comfortable designing arrows, bonds in Affinity Designer and Glyphs Mini. I hope that you learn something new or a new way to do things that you already know how to do today. Before I let you go though, don't forget to submit your final project deliverables to the class project gallery. I'm looking forward to seeing everyone's inspiration there in progress sketches and final font. Also, please feel free to leave and share your thoughts about the class in the course reviews. I generally read all of these comments and check out your project uploads and, and the reviews as they all helped me to continue to evolve my courses and grow as a teacher. If this is the first class that you have seen of mine and you want to learn more about me and my work. Visit me online at www dot bellow Sophia creative.com. You can also check out more of my courses relating to the design and creative industries, right? And my teacher profile, I'll be sure to leave links for some classes that relates to this one and the class description below. Thank you so much for watching and for creating with me today. I'll see you in the next one. Bye.