Constructing a Story: Advanced Visual Storytelling

Daniel Gonzales, Animator at The Walt Disney Animation Studios

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11 Lessons (2h 45m)
    • 1. Your Story Structure

      13:43
    • 2. Your Story Structure (Part 2)

      14:55
    • 3. Your Visuals

      11:05
    • 4. Your Visuals (Part 2)

      12:55
    • 5. Your Visuals (Part 3)

      11:18
    • 6. Why Artists Create Stories

      10:24
    • 7. Why Artists Create Stories (Part 2)

      9:56
    • 8. Story Problems and Characters

      9:12
    • 9. Story Problems and Characters (Part 2)

      12:04
    • 10. Story Problems and Characters (Part 3)

      13:00
    • 11. Bonus Q & A Session

      46:42

Project Description

Bring Your Story To Life With Compelling Visuals

Getting Started With Your Story

  1. Create a story

    Think of a story or a scene and write out the story points.

  2. Revise your story

    Read the lecture 'Your Story' and revise/adjust your story.

    Tip: Try using the seven sentences I provided in the lecture as model for your storytelling. 

    • Once upon a time...
    • and every day...
    • Until one day...
    • and because of this...
    • and because of this...
    • Until finally...
    • Ever since that day...

    For example, Elad David starts his story with Once upon a time:

    "Once upon a time there was a boy that had a big head."

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  3. Share your story

    You can share a scene you created or a full short story! Do not include visuals yet, only words. Just have the main points of your story written out (beats).

  4. Draw your story

    Draw the first pass of your story. Try to include a variety of shots that we covered in the lecture.

    • Wide Shot
    • Long Shot
    • Medium Shot
    • Medium Close
    • Close Up
    • Extreme Close Up
    • P.O.V. Shot

    Lucia Tjhin shared some of her concept sketches:

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Injecting Substance and Fixing Problems

  1. Revise your story

    Fix and make corrections based on feedback. How will you express your theme and character development? 

  2. Share your second draft

    Your story should show solid structure and have a clear theme and character arc. Share your work! Give five fellow students feedback and adjust your story based on the notes you receive. It's easier to find problems in other people's work than your own. You might very well find the solution to your problems in another story!

Wrapping Up Your Story

  1. Finalize your project

    Finish your story and drawings!

  2. Reflect on your progress

    Write a paragraph on the evolution of your story and your experience! Be sure to comment and look at all the other stories.

  3. Share your story

    Put your visuals up and check out everyone else's work! I'd love for you to record yourself telling your story but it's not mandatory. I hope you had fun at this point and be sure to share the evolution of your story and your experience in a short paragraph.

Additional Resources

  • Lectures Slides

    • Lecture one (full version, no audio)
    • Lecture two (full version, no audio)
  • Lectures Slides

    • Lecture three (full version, no audio)
    • Lecture four (full version, no audio)

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