Complete Beginner Guitar - Play YOUR FAVORITE SONGS in weeks | Kurt Berg | Skillshare

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Complete Beginner Guitar - Play YOUR FAVORITE SONGS in weeks

teacher avatar Kurt Berg, 10+ Year Pro, 100% Success Guarantee

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

86 Lessons (2h 33m)
    • 1. Introduction

      0:42
    • 2. 1.02 - Getting Ready To Play

      0:43
    • 3. 1.03 - Your First Notes - [ Shape Of You - Ed Sheeran ]

      0:56
    • 4. 1.04 - Your First Riff! - [ Shape Of You - Ed Sheeran ]

      0:13
    • 5. 1.07 - Fretting Notes - [ Shape Of You - Ed Sheeran ]

      1:57
    • 6. 1.08 - Changing Notes - [ Shape Of You - Ed Sheeran ]

      1:45
    • 7. 1.09 - Some More Changes - [ Shape Of You - Ed Sheeran ]

      0:40
    • 8. 1.10 - Another Riff

      0:46
    • 9. 1.11 - Bringing It Together - [ Shape Of You - Ed Sheeran ]

      1:23
    • 10. 1.12 - Basics of Timing

      1:06
    • 11. 1.13 - Basics Of Timing - [ Closer - The Chainsmokers ]

      1:22
    • 12. 1.14 - More Timing

      1:20
    • 13. 1.15 - Bringing It Together - [ Closer - The Chainsmokers ]

      0:54
    • 14. 1.16 - Tabs

      1:06
    • 15. 1.17 - A Third Riff

      2:03
    • 16. 1.18 - A Third Riff - Pt. 2 - [ Say You Won't Let Go - James Arthur ]

      1:54
    • 17. 1.19 - Putting it together

      1:50
    • 18. 1.20 - How To Succeed

      1:37
    • 19. 1.21 - Section 1 Final Project - [ Attention - Charlie Puth ]

      2:50
    • 20. 1.22 - Conclusion

      0:47
    • 21. 2.01 - Intro To Section 2

      1:15
    • 22. 2.02 - Your First Chord - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]

      2:04
    • 23. 2.03 - How Are they displayed

      0:55
    • 24. 2.04 - Your Second Chord - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]

      0:22
    • 25. 2.05 - Changing Chords - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]

      2:36
    • 26. 2.06 - What Is A Chord? - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]

      1:52
    • 27. 2.07 - A Third Chord - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]

      4:18
    • 28. Capo Video

      1:58
    • 29. 2.08 - Strumming With The Right Hand

      0:46
    • 30. 2.09 - Simplifying Where Needed - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]

      0:46
    • 31. 2.10 - A Fourth Chord - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]

      1:57
    • 32. 2.11 - Bringing It Together

      1:36
    • 33. 2.12 - Strumming Pattern - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]

      2:27
    • 34. 2.13 - Gradually Increasing Speed

      2:34
    • 35. 2.14 - Gradually Increasing Speed Pt 2

      3:31
    • 36. 2.15 - Our Next Song - [ Hey There Delilah - Plain White T's ]

      3:06
    • 37. 2.16 - The Riff - [ Hey There Delilah - Plain White T's ]

      3:37
    • 38. 2.17 - Revisiting Perfect

      2:56
    • 39. 2.18 - Fuller And Fuller

      3:16
    • 40. 2.19 - Completing The Progression

      3:12
    • 41. 2.19 - Completing The Progression - [ Hey There Delilah - Plain White T's ]

      3:24
    • 42. 2.20 - Some Additional Chord Practice - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]

      1:46
    • 43. 2.21 - Exercise 2 - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]

      1:40
    • 44. 2.22 - Exercise 3 - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]

      2:58
    • 45. 2.23 - Attention Revisited

      2:27
    • 46. 2.24 - Give Me Some More Attention - [ Attention - Charlie Puth ]

      2:59
    • 47. 2.25 - Putting It All Together - [ Attention - Charlie Puth ]

      1:07
    • 48. 2.26 - Section 2 Finale - [ All Of Me - John Legend ]

      2:35
    • 49. 2.27 - Conclusion

      1:06
    • 50. 3.01 - Intro

      0:39
    • 51. 3.02a - Strumming Patterns

      3:15
    • 52. 3.02b - Aminor Walkthrough

      0:35
    • 53. 3.03 - Half Beats

      2:30
    • 54. 3.04 - Stay with me

      2:09
    • 55. 3.05 - Stay With Me Pt 2

      1:50
    • 56. 3.06 - 3/4 vs 4/4

      3:02
    • 57. 3.07 - Up Strumming

      2:37
    • 58. 3.08 - Despacito

      2:29
    • 59. 3.09 - Despacito Pt 2

      2:27
    • 60. 3.10 - Despacito Pt 3

      1:43
    • 61. 3.11 - Wonderwall

      1:28
    • 62. 3.12 - Wonderwall Pt 2

      2:25
    • 63. 3.13 - Wonderwall Pt 3

      1:55
    • 64. 33.14 - Conclusion

      0:44
    • 65. 4.01 - Learning any song

      0:29
    • 66. 4.02 - Ultimate Guitar

      1:17
    • 67. 4.03 - Chord Tabs

      1:24
    • 68. 4.04 - Song Structure

      4:22
    • 69. 4.05 - Listening To Songs

      1:09
    • 70. 4.06 - Coming Up With Chord Progressions

      0:51
    • 71. 4.07 - Learn A Song Of Your Choice

      1:33
    • 72. 5.01 - Intro

      0:31
    • 73. 5.02 - 16 notes

      0:36
    • 74. 5.03 - Let Her Go

      1:38
    • 75. 5.04 - Let Her Go Pt 2

      1:35
    • 76. 5.05 - Let Her Go Pt 3

      1:03
    • 77. 5.06 - Memorizing Songs

      1:04
    • 78. 5.07 - Palm Muting

      1:52
    • 79. 5.08 - Palm Muting Pt 2

      1:59
    • 80. 5.09 - Palm Muting Pt 3

      0:53
    • 81. 5.10 - Speeding Up Strumming Exercise

      1:27
    • 82. 5.11 - Palm Muting Pt. 4

      3:41
    • 83. 5.12 - Final Pointers

      1:42
    • 84. 5.13 Next Steps

      1:16
    • 85. 5.14 Conclusion

      0:41
    • 86. Skillshare Intro To Fingerpicking Course New Video

      1:05
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About This Class

Every exercise in this course is part of a REAL SONG

Let me ask you a question: why do you want to play guitar? For most people, the answer is "to play my favorite songs", or "to play cool music"

Most courses seem to forget about this and spend months making you play boring exercises and useless information, which leaves students demotivated and bored.

My main goal is to get you playing your favorite songs as quickly as possible.

So to do this, every single exercise in this course teaches you to play a real song. You'll learn all the techniques you need to by playing songs with those techniques in them, so you're never left learning something pointless or boring.

___________________________________________________________

What songs will I learn?

This course is based around popular modern music, you'll learn songs from:

  • Ed Sheeran - Shape of you, Perfect
  • Charlie Puth - Attention
  • The Chainsmokers - Closer
  • Justin Bieber - Love Yourself
  • Luis Fonsi - Despacito
  • John Legend - All of Me
  • James Arthur - Say You Won't Let Go
  • Sam Smith - Stay With Me
  • Oasis - Wonderwall
  • The Plain White T's - Hey There Delilah
  • And more!

By the end of the course you'll be able to actually play all of these songs, and you'll be able to learn any new song you want!

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Kurt Berg

10+ Year Pro, 100% Success Guarantee

Teacher

My name is Kurt, and I teach people to play guitar. Here's a little bit about my journey:

For some reason, by the time I was 5, I already knew I wanted to rock. It might have been that my dad played classic rock on the radio 24/7 for my entire childhood...who knows?

In any case, 5 year old me knew that guitar was my calling. The music studio near me told us that guitar is tough for really young kids though, so I waited not-so-patiently and finally had my first lesson the week I turned 10 - and I haven't looked back since.

I took lessons in theory and playing for 8 years, and ended up teaching at that same studio. I left to get my mechanical engineering degree, but I kept teaching on the side to help pay for school. I performed wherever I could, and played in several... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: My name is Kurt Berg, and I'm gonna be your instructor for this course. I'm playing guitar for over 16 years and talked for a good chunk of them. I started teaching in person and then moved online and started five minute guitar, our YouTube channel, which now has over 20 million views. So in this course, we're gonna go through all the basics that you want to learn as a beginner guitarist, we're gonna go through chords and how to play them how to strum along with the records. We're gonna work on your timing work on the left and right hand on their own so that we can bring them together and make this whole journey nice and smooth and easy. I'm also gonna teach you a bunch of songs throughout this course. So they come up with some songs you can play and show off and uncomfortable knowing where to go on where to progress after this course is up. So if that sounds fun, then let's get started 2. 1.02 - Getting Ready To Play: holding the guitar is pretty simple. Both electric and acoustic are the same. They've got a curve on the bottom that you rest on your right like your right arm goes over top of the guitar body and your left hand goes around the neck and fretboard near the end. Your pick can be held, however it feels most comfortable to you. But I personally find it easiest to play by holding the pick sideways on my thug and gently curling my first finger around the other side of the pick pulled it tight enough that you're not gonna drop it, but not so tight that your tents. If you don't have a pick, you should go get one because they cost about 50 cents each and will make your life much easier while you're at it, get five because they get lost all the time. Or maybe that's just me 3. 1.03 - Your First Notes - [ Shape Of You - Ed Sheeran ]: Okay, Now the troll set up, started playing first notes. Take your right hand and pick the thinnest string. We call this the top string. It's taking on the bottom, but it's got the notes with the highest pitch, so we call it the top stir. You just played a note. The note is just a specific sound. When you play a different string, you play a different note. We named the notes the different letters of the alphabet A, B, C, D, E, f and G. Don't worry, you don't need to remember this right now. Okay, Now try playing the second string, which is the string just on top of the one you just played. Ah, Now play the third string, which is the one just on top of the second. And that and that simplest form is how you play the guitar by playing it a bunch of different notes in a specific order to make a melody 4. 1.04 - Your First Riff! - [ Shape Of You - Ed Sheeran ]: okay, we're just about ready to dive into our first riff riff is just a combination of a bunch of different notes. You'll see what I mean, pretty soon, keep your ears open and see if you can guess what song were planning the next few videos. 5. 1.07 - Fretting Notes - [ Shape Of You - Ed Sheeran ]: there two ways to change The note you're playing on a guitar first is just by playing a different string like we did another video. The second is by fretting a different fret on the same string. Fronts are the metal bars that run across the fretboard by pushing down the streaming Wanna play it just before the fret, we could make the string play different. Note like this. Now it's your turn, please your index finger, which we call your first finger if you play be Adul before you might get a little confused here because we don't use the thumb and guitar. So we count our fingers starting at the index finger, take your first finger and placed the tip of your finger just a little bit behind the first fret. Your finger should be fairly curled here and take your thumb and gently place it on the back of the neck. Now press down on the string with your first finger. You need to press somewhat hard, not too hard, but just enough to get the string touching the front itself. If you press too hard, your fingers will tie up. Tire up pretty quickly. Okay, now keeping your finger in place. Pick the stream with your right hand. You don't have to pick it very hard. A good rules to err on the side of going to light rather than to heart. If you pick too hard, he could break a strict, which isn't a huge deal, but it's kind of a hassle. Replace everything is done right. It should play a nice note that's higher in pitch than the open string. If you got a weird buzzing noise like this, it means you push down almost her enough on the front, but you need to push a little harder. If you got a muted click, you need to push down much harder. Remember, if it's not quite working right, pause or replay the video and try this as many times as it takes as many times as it takes as many times as it takes as many times as it takes until you can get a nice sound most of the time, once you get a good sound, move on in that section 6. 1.08 - Changing Notes - [ Shape Of You - Ed Sheeran ]: The next step is how we make melodies or riffs by playing multiple notes in a specific order. Once you can smoothly play multiple notes, you combine them to make a play. Simple tunes, Complicated tunes Air made the exact same way just by playing different notes in a specific pattern. Usually just more notes played faster. Let's try it. We're gonna start by playing the open first string, then change playing the third fret on the first string. Oh, and then repeat note. This time we're using our third finger or a ring finger on the third front. Same technique is before we've got some on the back of the neck. Use the tip of the third finger curlett and pressed down just before the third friend. Try it out your own speed. It's probably gonna take you a little bit to change back and forth. So expected T. Sound kind of choppy right now. Once you pause the video and spent a little bit of time working on your own. See if you can play along with me. Oh, move on to the next video. Once you can play along with me, feel free to take his much time as you need here. This is the first time you fret a note, so it might take a while to get used to. It's a movement unlike anything you've done before if you haven't played a string instrument. 7. 1.09 - Some More Changes - [ Shape Of You - Ed Sheeran ]: Okay, let's try a very similar exercise. Start with the open first string, then the third front with your third finger in the open first staring again and then repeat . Listen to my timing. Try it out and then see if you can play along with me one to three. Oh, how is that not to hire? Right? Does the riff we just played? Sound familiar yet I'll see in the next lesson to find out. 8. 1.10 - Another Riff: Okay. This time we're gonna play something entirely different. We'll start with our second finger on the second fret of the first strip, then play the open first round. After that, we're gonna jump down to the third fret of the second string with your third finger. Watch me try it yourself. Then try playing along with me, ready to move on to the next video when you can play along with me and it sounds decent. 9. 1.11 - Bringing It Together - [ Shape Of You - Ed Sheeran ]: Okay. Now we're gonna bring the lost to risks. We learned together to play our first complete ref, the one that's playing through most of shape of you. So what you're gonna dio is play the first part three times and then finish off by playing the second. Or if we learned once at the end, as usual. Listen to me play. Then pause the video and try it on your own and then try and play along with me. You know, you're ready to move to the next lesson once you can play along with me. Oh, oh! 10. 1.12 - Basics of Timing: there are two main parts to making a song or melody. The first is the notes used as we looked in the last three videos, and the second is timing. Timing is how long you play note for and when you play it. If I play. The exact same notes is Jingle Bells, but hold them for different lengths of time. It sounds like a completely different song. Oh, so timing is almost a important as the notes you're heading to help with timing. It's useful to tap your foot on a constant, steady pace, the master and changing notes in a smooth, even rhythm. Even simple melodies can sound very good. Many guitar souls aren't that hard to play technically, and they still sound great because they're played so smoothly and our next riff We'll look a bit more on the timing. 11. 1.13 - Basics Of Timing - [ Closer - The Chainsmokers ]: Okay, let's try something new in this riff. Start with your first finger on the first fret of the third string. This time, play that once. Then put your third finger on the third fret of the third string. You play that twice, then go back to the first friend. Listen to me than try it out. This time, though, we're gonna tap her foot in a constant, even rhythm and play the note every time we tap our foot 1234 It's much easier to play an even rhythm if you tap your foot, too. It's a good habit of getting into, and it will make your timing much better over time. E o. Something else you might notice is that for the most part, when playing the first fret, you should use your first finger, your second finger on the second front. You're surfing on the third fret and your fourth finger or pinky on the fourth. Fred, this is the same for all strengths, even in the next video, when you can play along with me 12. 1.14 - More Timing: Now let's try another. Just like the last exercise, you're gonna continue tapping your foot playing one note each tap this time, Start on the first fret of the third string with your first finger, then moved to the first front of the second string with your first finger and play that twice, then move back to the first fret on the third string. Uh, now, here's a little trick to make this easier. Sometimes we can purposely be lazy with their fingers when moving from one string to the same front and a string above it. Instead of moving your whole finger to the other string, you can just lay it down flat and Fred it with a flood of your finger. This makes it easy to switch back and forth way. Most of the time you want to play with a curled finger on your fingertip, but I'm giving you permission this time to be lazy. Try that riff out with a new technique. Move on. Once you can play that 13. 1.15 - Bringing It Together - [ Closer - The Chainsmokers ]: okay, time to complete her second riff, using the two patterns in the last videos. You'll play the first rift twice, then the second roof, then back to the first draft one more time. 1234 And there we have it. That's the main instrumental roof of Closer by the chain smokers. It's played on a synthesizer in that song, but we can easily play the same riff on guitar because the notes are the same between instruments. The only thing that changes is the Tambor or the sound of the instrument itself. Pretty cool, right? Just a few lessons in and you're already playing along to some real top pop songs. 14. 1.16 - Tabs: for simple riffs. It's fine for me to just show you where the notes are. But a much easier way to learn songs once they get more complex is through written music notation. If you've ever seen standard music notation, we're not gonna be using that here. Guitar has its own special type of notation on Lee used for guitar that's much easier to read than standard music. This notation is called a guitar tab. Here's the tab for the next refer Learned you'll have to play it to figure out what the next song is. There's six lines, each representing a strength. The bottom line is the sixth string. On the top line is the first string. The numbers represent with fret to press down. Multiple numbers on top of each other means multiple strings air played, which means a court we re left to right, the same as reading words, timing and which finger to use aren't included and taps to figure out the timing. You just have to listen to the song and to figure out which fingers to use. You'll just have to know proper finger placement. I'll still walk you through it. For now, though, If you can understand how this works, you can figure out most halves. The next lesson will play it and it will be much clear. 15. 1.17 - A Third Riff: Okay, let's take a look at the tab from our last lesson. Again, the best thing to do when looking a new song is to try and figure out if anything repeats, which makes it much easier to sort up. If you look at this tab, they're basically four sections that are very similar. You start with a low note, then moved to the second string for a few notes. We'll break it down and start with the first section. Start with the third fret all the way up on the six string. This one might be a bit of a stretch. You're playing the third fret, so usually you'd use your third finger. But this time we're gonna use our second finger. Actually, sometimes it's actually easier to use a different finger. So after that, place your third finger on the third fret of the second string. So that's easier than if we use 1/3 finger for both the second string and the six turn. Lastly, play the open second string here . Now try the same thing, but this whole time, hold the last note for two taps of your fun. This is also known as two beats to hold the 1st 2 notes for one beach and lost for two. Great work as usual. Practice this one until you can play it smoothly with me and then move on. 16. 1.18 - A Third Riff - Pt. 2 - [ Say You Won't Let Go - James Arthur ]: now we'll move in the second section. This one's very similar, but even easier. Start with the open fourth string, then go back to the same ending. This the last lesson. The timing is the same as well. Hold the 1st 2 notes for one beat on last note for two beats. One, 234 Awesome. If you got that move on to the next section again, this one is incredibly similar. Play the open sixth string, then back to our second string notes. The timings identical lost two sections. One, 23 four. And finally, let's go through the last section. This one's a little different. We'll play each note for one beat and fall along with the tab to figure it out. One, 23 four. Cool. Once you got the those three sections, move onto the next video and we'll put it all the other 17. 1.19 - Putting it together: Okay, now that we've all the section ready, all that's left to do is put them together. Listen to me while following along with the tab, then positive. Don't try it out once you could play it on your own. Play along with me. Ah, that's how to play. Say you won't let go By James Arthur. You might have noticed it sounds a little off. I modify the timing and notes a bit in the last exercise to make it simpler if you want, you can try to play along with me now, and I'll use timing more like the actual song. It's a little tricky, though, so I won't go into detail on how to count it yet. But just figure it out by Listen to me, it's often easier just to listen to a song rather than try and count it out. - Awesome , great work. So far, you've learned a ton about the fundamentals of a guitar, and you can play three riffs from real songs already 18. 1.20 - How To Succeed: guitars like learning any other physical skill, like basketball or hockey or painting, which unfortunately requires lots of time in practice to get good at. But you can reduce this time by practicing smart. You get much better results that you can focus and think about what you're learning and, most importantly, learned from your mistakes quickly. Here's some strategies for getting the most out of this course. Practice regularly. Make it a goal to play every day for 10 to 20 minutes. There are very few people who don't have just 20 minutes a day to put it. Practice intelligently doesn't help if you put a halfhearted effort, and while you do practice, you should focus completely on guitar while practicing. And really think about what you're doing versus what you should be doing and figuring out your mistakes. Play along with the videos. When I show you how to do something, you should either play along with me or listen. Pause the video and try it yourself. You should always have a guitar in your hands while watching these videos go back to the videos multiple times a refresher. These videos are all pretty short and usually teach you one or two things. This was done on purpose so that you can go back and look at a specific thing. You didn't quite get the first time around. But don't get stuck on something. You don't have to be totally perfect before moving on. We watched videos and read You exercise until you understand everything and a comfortable playing all the exercises move on. I still many mistakes when I played now, so you shouldn't expect yourself to be absolutely perfect before moving on. Finally, if you've got any questions or concerns, don't hesitate to contact me at any time. As long as I've got an Internet connection, I'm not sleeping. I usually reply pretty quickly. 19. 1.21 - Section 1 Final Project - [ Attention - Charlie Puth ]: Okay, let's put everything we've learned in the section together for one final ref, this one's gonna be tricky. So don't expect to master in a single day. I'm gonna walk you through it a little less this time because I want you get used to figuring things out on your own. So without further ado, let's try it. Attention by Charlie Booth. First, just listen to me and try and follow along with the tap. - I'll play it much fellow are now so you can see you might want to start this speed or even slower if you need to. 1234 The second thing that note is that just, like, say, you won't let go Her last riff. This one also has four sections. Learn this one. You want to do the same thing as the last one and break it down, section by section, learn one part and then move on to the next part. Once you could play the 1st 1 For the most part, use your first finger on the first fret second on the second and so forth. The only difference is that the last section where you'll want to use your pinky for the first time now, your pinkies by far the weakest figure. So it's gonna feel awkward at first, but you want to get used to using it so that it gets stronger over time. All right, that's everything I've got to say for this final ref. Your final challenges. Section one is to learn this riff on your own and practice until you can play along with me . If you can play this riff, you'll be doing great at an awesome place for one to move into cords and Section two. 20. 1.22 - Conclusion: marched down a Section one. You've learned a ton in this section. How to play melodies, how to read tabs to tap your foot and use timing. And you've learned riffs from Ed Sheeran, the Chain Smokers, James Arthur and Charlie Booth. Great job for sticking with it to the end of Section one. I'm glad you fulfilled your promise. You've now made it over the hardest part of learning. That's hard. The very beginning. Everything from here on is more fun and even less confusing. Now that you've got a good grasp on the fundamentals, the next section will move into the most important part of playing guitar chords. Because you spent a bunch of time getting used to the fretboard, you'll have a much easier time learning chords than many beginners who try to jump into them right away. I'll see in the next section on we'll start playing some courts 21. 2.01 - Intro To Section 2: they're welcome to Section two. Last week you got oriented with the guitar and learned all the foundations to move forward . In this section, we're going to dive headfirst and arguably the most important part of playing guitar courts and music. Accord is just playing more than one note at the same time I'm a guitar. We do this by playing multiple strings at once. We're gonna focus mainly on the left hand. In this section, your right hand still gets used. But the left hand is by far the hardest part of playing chords and the part most beginners struggle with. Just like Section one, we're gonna learn a bunch of different songs in this section. We'll start super simple and gradually add in all the pieces until they're playing something cool to stay tuned and try and see if you can guess what song were working on each video. Remember to make sure you don't rush this horse and progressive your own pace. Instead, you learn much better by going at whatever speed works for you. Everyone has a different learning styles. I recommend taking the time needed to play each exercise comfortably. But don't worry about being absolutely perfect before moving on. We covered some good ground in theory last week, So this section is more exercise based in Los Section. On that note, grab your guitar. Let's get to play. 22. 2.02 - Your First Chord - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]: OK, now it's time to actually play your first court. First things first. I hope you've been remembering to tune your guitar before you play each day. I can't stress enough how important it is to tune the guitar each time you play. I didn't when I was learning, and I had a tough time working on my ear a few years later because I learned the wrong note associations early on. If you tune your guitar already, great. If not, make sure to tune it before continue chords some awful when a guitar isn't into and that's out of the way onto the court. The first quartile play is a G. This is about a simple as we can get with courts. Take your third finger and front the third fret of the first string. That's it for the left hand. Just so you know, I'm moving my unused fingers out of the way so you could see it better on camera. You don't have to move your fingers out of the way when you play. Once that's in place with your right hand pick. The top three strings picking multiple strings is called strumming. Try it out and That's your first court. A few important things to keep in mind. First off, make sure you're playing lightly with your right hand is the same miss things. Single notes. If you play too hard, it'll sound rough and choppy, and you might break. Break a string also similar to single notes. Make sure you're fronting properly. I want to stress this right here is going to be extremely important in this lesson. You should be fronting the third fret with the tip of your finger curled and just before the front. Make sure you focus on this because you'll have an incredibly difficult time with the next cords. If you don't focus on proper finger for his position, let's try the court again. Make sure you're fretting it correctly, played a few times and seating at a nice, easy, smooth sound. Once you can play this nice and easy and you actually like the sound of it, it's time to move on the next video 23. 2.03 - How Are they displayed: so you may have noticed the diagrams in the corner of the screen in the last video. These air fingering diagrams will use them throughout this course to show you what you need to play. Reading them is pretty simple. The layout is meant to represent the fretboard of the guitar standing upright. The vertical lines represent each of the strings on the horizontal lines represent each of the fronts. I love that there's either an X or an O freed string. Those indicated string you play at X is indicated string. You don't play. What you're playing requires a finger. This will be indicated by a circle with the number where the circles located Shows you the front to play in this case is the first Fred of the first string, and the number inside tells you which finger to use. Remember your index finger or first fingers, one middle fingers to ring his three and pinky's for because cords of multiple strings played, there will be often be more than one circled Indicate your fingers 24. 2.04 - Your Second Chord - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]: time for your second court. This one's even simpler than the G. This court is an e minor for this one. You don't need any fingers. Just play the top three strings and that's all there is to. It doesn't get much simpler than this was easy. 25. 2.05 - Changing Chords - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]: songs that sound pretty boring if we just played one single core the whole time. So just like notes, we play multiple different cords to make a song. We try changing between courts. This is really where the magic happens and where you're playing starts to sound like actual guitar playing once you can get it smoothly. A Warning of the vets This is the single hardest skill for beginners to get used to. Changing chords requires you to coordinate a lot of different hand movements very quickly. We're starting with very simple chords right now, so it should be all right. But take your time on the section because it's not easy. If you can master this section, though, you'll already be 80% of the way to play in real sound songs that sound good. We're going to start the same way we did in the first trip by switching between the G and the E minor chord Hold for one beach. Try this a few times till you can play along with me. One trick that will help you out is to not worry too much of play, but playing only the top three strings. If you play the fourth string accidentally, It honestly doesn't make a huge difference. Uh, it will, for some chords if there's a really dissonant note. But for the most part, it's not critical that you only play the specific strings. Humans can't tell apart low notes nearly as well as higher notes. So for the most part, lower strings kind of get lost in the overall sound. It's also much harder to get used to switching with your left hand, so you should focus on your left hand much more than your right hand. Just make sure you're not strumming to heart. With that being said, Let's try switching between a G and E minor for one beach. Remember to focus on your left hand and try and play smoothly and gently with your right hand, making sure your wrist is loosed and not tense. Try this exercise until you can play along with me. The most important part of this exercise is timing. You want to try this exercise as many times as it takes to be able to play along with me. Smooth transitions between chords is the biggest difference between big beginners and non beginners from playing courts If you can play that along with me, that's fantastic. You're now actually changing between courts. If it's still struggle, take your time and work on this until you can play along with me and have it sound nice. 26. 2.06 - What Is A Chord? - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]: accord is just playing multiple notes at a time. We do this by playing multiple strings at once. The combination of multiple notes makes nice, full sound that's typically uses the background music or rhythm. Guitar songs are typically made by putting a bunch of single notes together as what should recognize the main melody of the song, which is usually sung or played as a guitar riff. And other instruments playing chords make up the background of the song. If you listen to someone singing with a guitar in their hands, typically they're playing chords on the guitar and singing single notes and at a time to make up a melody. If you can remember from Last section and music, we named the notes the different letters of the alphabet A, B, C, D, E, F and G. Certain combinations of notes sound good together, and some don't by combining the notes that sound good. Together we create courts. We also named cords in a very similar way to single notes from a letter from A to G. Naming cords is a bit more complicated, though, because we've got a bunch of different types. The three main types of chords will come across and actually dozens of different types. But most of the time we only use the 1st 2 and sometimes 1/3 types these air major, minor and seventh courts. All you really need to know is that major chord sound happy, minor chord sounds sad. And seventh chords sound like something is just a little bit off. This is all you really need to know. To be able to correctly identify most courts, staying true to our goal of playing your favorite songs as quickly as possible. We're not gonna go into depth about why they sound this way because it won't help you play better, and it will slow down your progress. But if you're interested in the theory behind these cords, feel free to research it more on your own. It's really interesting stuff, that's kind of thing you like. 27. 2.07 - A Third Chord - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]: okay, it's time to introduce another court. This court is a C and is definitely harder than lost ones. Still just one finger and three strings, except this time, our fingers on the first fret of the second strength. This is where proper fretting becomes absolutely critical. I hope you're focusing on your finger position in the last two courts. The reason finger position is so important now is because sloppy fingers will block the other strings and stop them from playing. I try and play the sea, but I don't press down with my fingertip and I don't curl my finger. Most of the strings won't even be playing, and I'll be left with mostly buzzing and clicks. However, if I use my finger tip and I curl my finger, everything will play nicely and I'll get a full court. Now it's your turn. Make sure your finger is on Lee touching the second string and see if you can play the sea Court along with me. Remember that you don't need to move you on unused fingers out of the way like I am. It's just to show you better. You're probably gonna be blocking since strings at that point, and that's totally normal. Small players have the disadvantage and stretching their fingers, but a major advantage here because bigger fingers make it tougher not to block other strings. A good way to test if you're cords are working right is to place your fingers, then pick each string individually. This way you can see which strings are causing your problems and fix that specific problem most of the time. If an open string doesn't make the right sound because another finger is blocking it most of the time. If a fretted string isn't making the right sound, it's because you're not using proper finger Is your fingertip troll your finger on press fairly hard, right before the friend. By playing each string individually, you could tell instantly what your problem is and how to fix it. Don't expect to get this right away. It's totally normal to take a bit of time to get used to the motion. Take some time to figure out what mistakes you're making and fix them. Try and play along with me for four beats each unjust this cord and get all your notes playing right. Once you can do that, will try and change chords from a G to any minor to a C all hold for a count of for move on. Once you can do that smoothly, Jane and cords is not easy. In fact, it's probably the hardest thing for beginners to learn. Remember, make sure you're getting all of your notes. If you can't play along with me a full speed, now is the time to try starting a slow as you need and work your way up to my speed. Once you can do that, let's try strumming. A few more times you're gonna play the same chords, but play each 16 times before switching. When tapping your foot and make sure you do tap your foot well, you'll do. Here is tap your foot. Every three strums. That's the beat of this, too. A little strange, but just trust me on this one, and you'll see why in a few videos. 12 three, four, Move on. Once he could play this smoothly, make sure you can play the smoothly before continuing because their next lessons they're gonna be tricky 28. Capo Video: many songs will use something called a cape. Oh, it's basically a clamp that she attached the neck of your guitar at a specific threat by placing it on a different fret. It makes all the notes on the strings higher or lower. What this does is allow you to use the same chord shapes to play different courts. If I play a C chord without a cape, oh, it's a C court. But if I put the cape on the second fret and now play the exact same chord shape, it's actually a D chord this time. Ah, this simplifies things for us because we don't have to learn as many different chord shapes to play multiple different courts. Many songs will match the voice of a vocalist with the Cape. Oh, moving the cable up or down, depending on the vocalist has a higher voice, like a female or a lower voice, usually a Man. Taylor Swift song, You Belong With Me is played of the cable on the fourth front, as you can tell that my voice is a lot lower than Taylor's. So if I was gonna play that song, I'd probably take the cape off to make all the cords lower and better match my voice. I recommend buying or ordering Cape right now. You can go through this course with that one, but you won't be able to play along to the actual song. For many of the songs will learn this course. If you don't have one, you may not need one if you're looking to play mostly distorted rock music. But if you want to play acoustic stuff, you'll want to get one. And it's a good idea. Either way, even if you don't get one for this course, I guarantee you you'll want one. Eventually, as a piece of advice, I looked by one That's a clamp action, as opposed to a screw the screw cap. Oh gets really annoying to take on and off all the time because you have to actually screw it down, put on and then unscrew the whole thing to take it off. If you want my recommendations, I'll put some links to my favorite ones in the next video 29. 2.08 - Strumming With The Right Hand: I want to take a minute to talk about the right hand while playing courts. There are few keys to strumming. Well, that'll make you're playing so much better. I've already been most over most of them, but I just want to repeat myself so that you remember. The first is to be loose and light the opposite of most beginners. Most beginners tense their wrist in their hand and Pickhardt. The goal is to keep your rest nice and loose and hold the pick with a medium grip and pick lightly on the strings. The second part that goes against conventional wisdom a bit is to not worry too much about hitting extra strings. It doesn't make that big a difference to the overall sound. And he should be focusing on your left hand, at least at the beginning, because it's much more difficult. That's about it for the right hand again, play nice and easy, and don't worry too much about this hand. For now, 30. 2.09 - Simplifying Where Needed - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]: I want you to make things easier on yourself, cords of frustrating and challenge, and we're gonna pull. Start playing some tough records down in any of the exercises, riffs for songs and play moving forward. If a court is too difficult and you're having a tough time getting it right, I want you to just simplify it. For now, take off as many fingers as you need and Onley play the top strings. It takes some time to get used to full chords, and you'll stay much more motivated by simplifying them and continuing to progress to the course of a good pace. Your fingers will stretch out in time, and eventually you'll be able to play every quarter. That's full for when you feel ready, adding one finger at a time. Don't try and push yourself too hard to be perfect. Progress is more important than perfection for your long term motivation. 31. 2.10 - A Fourth Chord - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]: Okay. Are you ready for a challenge? Now we're gonna try a D chord. This one uses three fingers and four strings, so it's gonna be difficult. We'll take you some time to get used to. So don't get discouraged her. I promise you that everyone who does this lesson will struggle, Justus, Much as you do, put your second finger on the second fret of the first string. Then put your third finger on the third fret of the second string. Finally, put your first finger on the second fret of the third string. Once you've done that, play each string individually to make sure that all sounding nights most common issued here is the first string getting blocked by your third finger. Make sure to use your fingertip and curl your finger to avoid blocking the first string here. Once all of your strings we got nicely play all four strings at the same time. How's that sound? It'll probably still be a little rough. I just want you to play around with this for a while and see if you get all the strings ringing out. Nicely. Try this. Set up your fingers, then play each string individually fix any problems, then play all four strings. After that, move your hand away from the guitar and then bring it back and try and set up again. Do this a few times. You know you're ready to move on once you can place your fingers once and have all the strings ring out without having to readjust anything. 32. 2.11 - Bringing It Together: your D accord should be decent by now. If you completed the last exercise now we're gonna put what we've done so far together. Start with the G, then play E minor, then see then d play each chord once before switching. I'll bet the D chord was the hardest. Such for you. Here. Try the last exercise a few times before moving on. The D chord is going to be tough, so don't worry if it's not super easy right now, it just takes practice. This is a good example of what I said earlier by simplifying court, if you need to. If this full D chord is too difficult now, take off your first finger on only play the top two strings, then play the chord progression with the simplified again. It's more important to keep moving forward than to get all your fingers working perfectly. Cords air very, very difficult. In the beginning, 33. 2.12 - Strumming Pattern - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]: Now let's try the same chord progression G E minor C d. And this time play each chord for six times before switching. Remember to tap your foot Every three strums to help you count And keep a steady pace one to three four If you've got that, try the same thing but play each chord 12 times before switching. This one is hard to count So this is where tapping your foot becomes very important You tap every three strums So you know you're at 12 strums once you've topped four times one to three four way Recognize the song yet you just played perfect by edge here This is the rift that's played for most of the song Take a listen and see if you can hear what you just played in the actual song Don't worry If yours doesn't sound exactly like the actual song it we'll get there It just takes a bit of practice 34. 2.13 - Gradually Increasing Speed: This is a new concept and by far the best method for learning a new song on guitar. The best way to get good timing is to practice with and even beat. This is called a Metro. No, All it does is make a sound at a regular interval. We call this interval the number of beats per minute, or BPM. Up to this point, every exercise you've done has been at 60 beats from a or 60 BPM. There's 60 seconds in a minute, so that means at 60 bpm there is a sound exactly every second you can try this out for yourself. If you go to Google and search Metrodome, a little widget pops up. By moving the slider, you can change the number of beats per minute. This is called the Tempo of the song. Try sliding into 60 BPM and press play. If you look oclock that shows seconds, you'll notice that the time between beats is the same as the time for the second hand to move. Once most modern pop songs air at 1:20 p.m. That's the standard tempo. Slow songs will often be around 90 bpm and some particular fast ones made upto 1 40 or higher. So how does this apply to our plan? Up to now, when we've sped up the exercises, we've gone from holding a note for four beats, toe holding it for two beats and finally the one B. But if we change the tempo, we can still hold for four beats. But make those four beats faster, slower This way, we're not changing the individual timing of the notes in our song or changing the speed of the song itself. You ever heard a remix of a popular song? This is what they're doing if the remixes faster than the original, just changing the tempo. I took a pill any easier to show of e g. I was cool. I took a pill, any bees to show a Fiji I was cool. This also happens to be the single most effective way to learn songs. It's exactly how I and every other single good guitarist learns a new song when you're just learning a song that there's no way you can play it at full speed. In the beginning, it'll just sound like a mess, but it doesn't take much practice to play it at 1/4 of the original speed, or sometimes even less. By starting at a super slow speed and then gradually increasing speed, you learn to play things much faster and more accurately than fumbling around at regular speed. They're too easy and free ways to have a Metro. You can just use the one on Google or download another app, like the guitar tuner there, dozens of free ones that all do the same thing. Just search Metrodome on the APP store and pick one. Download a metronome app, and I'll see in the next video we'll try it out. 35. 2.14 - Gradually Increasing Speed Pt 2: Okay, let's try this out. We're going to try the same chord changes last section from G to E minor. To see the deep, we'll start where we left off in the last exercise and work our way up to the speed of the actual song. We'll add 10 bpm each time until we get our speed all the way up. You can either fall along with me here or do this on your own. Depending on your comfort level, you might be able to go up by more than 10 BPM at a time to start, or maybe less. The key is to do it at a pace where it makes it relatively easy to keep increasing speed. So I set my Metrodome to 35 BPM to start. - So play that one a few times, and then when you're comfortable, move up to 45 bpm and then once you comfortable with that will move up to 55 bpm. So play that a few times, and we're comfortable with that move up to 65 BPM, which is about the tempo of the actual song. How was that? That's the actual speed of the song. Hopefully you can see. It makes it much easier to get your speed up. I encourage you to do this for any exercise in the course that's too fast for you to play the start. Watch me do the exercise than pause the video and try it yourself a slower temple. Then slowly work your way up to my speed or somewhere around there with the Metro is one of the most valuable practice skills you can have and is by far the best way to learn to play things that are too fast to play right away. I usually find 10 BPM at a time. Is a good balance between not taking too long. First, play it well. Usually, though, once you're getting faster and closer the actual tempo, you might have to raise it by just five bpm at a time, or sometimes even less. I've had songs that I've been learning where I've had to work my way up just one bpm at a time, 36. 2.15 - Our Next Song - [ Hey There Delilah - Plain White T's ]: Let's move on to a new song this time will combine single notes and chords. Sounds hard, but I'll break it down so it's more manageable. Your left hand is just gonna play chords, but your right hand will alternate between strumming and playing single notes for the first chord. Plays your first finger on the first fret of the second string, then please your third finger on the third fret of the fifth string. This one's a stretch. Don't worry about blocking the fourth string for this one. It doesn't matter right now. Now play the top five strings first, individually them together. Remember that the fourth string is allowed to be blocked. Right now, this one is a C court. There are multiple ways to play every court. The 1st 1 who played see only used three strings. But if we want to make the sound fuller, we can add an extra strings like we're doing here. Obviously, this is harder, though, because we're adding one more finger again. Don't worry about blocking the fourth string right now. We don't need the fourth string for this song. Sometimes, like right now, we actually want to intentionally block a string. Now our second court place your second finger on the second fret of the fourth strength. Now play the top four strings this time, start individually and then make sure everything plays nicely. No, this court is actually an e minor. The minor sounds fuller than the three stringy minor we learned before because we about it in the fourth string. Now let's try switching between the two courts. How is that? The most common problem here is blocking the third string on the E minor work on that last exercise until you can play in time and then try the same thing. But play each chord four times before switching. You ready to move on when you can play that last progression with me? Remember that for the C chord, it's fine if the third finger blocks the fourth string 37. 2.16 - The Riff - [ Hey There Delilah - Plain White T's ]: Okay, let's finish off this roof. Now take a look at the tab on the street. We'll start by holding the sea Court we're doing here is alternating between the fifth string and then playing the top three strings at the same time. So your left hand doesn't move, but your right hand is a little tricky here. The good thing is, if you're blocking your fourth string and C chord, that makes it easier to hit the right strings. Because even if you hit the fourth string by accident, it won't make any sound. - Now , let's try the same thing. But with our second court alternate between the fourth string on the top. Three strings this time. Okay, Once you've got that, let's put it together. Start with your C chord on play the first drift. Then switch to the second one to three four. - And that's how you play. Hey there, Delilah. By the plain white tees, the last step is to work your way up to full speed. I'm gonna play it full speed now and your exercise toe work all the way up gradually using a Metrodome. I believe this is optional, though. If you want to work up to full speed. Here you come. Otherwise just move on to the next video. If you want to try working up to the full speed, start a slowly is you need to and the work up the tempo of the actual song which is 105 bps . Start slowly enough that you can play it comfortably and increase the speed on Lee one. You can play it comfortably at your current speed. Start by going up 10 bpm at a time. But once it gets tough, just go up by five BPM. Time again. This is an optional bonus exercise and you won't be at a disadvantage if you skip this now . 38. 2.17 - Revisiting Perfect: so we played perfect as our first rest. The reason it might have sounded a little off was because we played simplified cords using only the top three strings. I did this to help you get used to cords and the simplest way possible. Now that you've got a bit of experience of chords, let's try the same song again with fuller courts. This will sound a lot better, but the trade off is that it's tougher to play. Let's start with playing the riff again to refresh your memory. That should be pretty easy for your by now. The D might still be a little tricky, but don't worry. If it's not absolutely perfect, it will get better over time. So now let's fill up the sound of it. We'll start with the minor. Remember how we added in a finger to play a minor and hey there, Delilah, Start by grabbing that court. This time we're gonna add in the bottom two strings, though. Move your second finger up to the second front of the fifth string instead of the fourth, and then put your third finger where your 2nd 1 used to be. On the second front of the fourth string. Once you've done that, play all six strings, start individually and then play them all together once. Everything's good. Okay, Now we're gonna play this chord 12 times, like we've done in the actual song. Remember to tap your foot and played court three times between your taps. Pause and readjust If you find all your strings aren't sounding properly. Now let's see if we can add this new court and with our existing core progression, play every other court the same as we did before, but at in the full six stringy minor. So G e minor C then D this time Sounds fuller already, doesn't it? Move on to the next video when you can play that last exercise with me? 39. 2.18 - Fuller And Fuller: So now C and G r only simple chords left. Interestingly enough, we've already almost played the full see court. And hey, that allow This one's gonna be difficult, though, so don't get too caught up in trying to make it flawless before moving on. Even if you're blocking some strings for now, that's fine. We'll get lots of practice with this court in later sections. Grab the C chord from Hey there, Delilah. First finger on the first for the second string and third finger on the third foot of the fifth string. You can block the fourth string right now. Now try playing our 12 note rhythm, tapping your foot every three beats, and that feels all right. Try adding and into our four chord progression G E minor. See? Indeed, - once you can do that, we're gonna play the Complete See Court. The difference this time is that we want to place our second finger on the second front of the fourth strength. This one might be a little tough and a big stretch played. String individually, fix your wrist aches and then try and play the full court. This court uses five strengths once you can do that. Try playing our same 12 note rhythm, tapping your foot every three beats. Finally, try adding this to the four chord progression of G E Minor, C and D. Now we've got some real difficult changes happen. Take it slow and speed up on Lee when you're comfortable. - Move on when you can play along with me comfortably. Don't worry about playing the full song at full speed yet. 40. 2.19 - Completing The Progression: you probably guessed it. Now we're gonna play the full J court. This one is the toughest of all of them so far and will take you a while to get used to. So take your time. Put your third finger on the third floor of the first string, just like we usually do. Now. Put your second finger on the third fret of the sixth string. Finally, put your first finger on the second fret of the fifth string. As usual, played string individually readjust, and once, once each string is playing nicely, play the whole court together. How's that guessing? It's tough and your fingers struggle to stretch that far. There's one will probably take you a while to get used to. Everyone struggles with this car. Remember to simplify this court if you need to you for now and add another fingers. Once it's more comfortable, you can leave it as just a three string chord or add on just your first finger on play. It is a five string chord on Finally, add in the second finger when that's comfortable. Just do what works for you here. And don't worry if you're playing some simple fight ports. We'll get plenty of practice with the geek or later on. Let's try playing this 1 12 times in a row like we're used to remember. Tap your foot every three Strom's. And finally, let's bring this cord into our full corporation. We'll go nice and slowly because it's not easy. Start slower than me if you need to, by using the Metrodome and move on to the next video. Once you can play with me and it sounds decent, don't worry if it's not totally perfect. It may still sound a little ugly now, but it will definitely get better with a little practice. - This is your first full chord progression these air four of the most common chords in music. Once you could play these nicely, you'll instantly be able to play literally hundreds of songs is gonna be tough for the first little bit, but if you could get used to this, the world of guitar will really open up for you. Believe it is an exercise to you. If you want to try and work up to play in this at full speed, the full songs at 65 BPM. Try it if you want But it's not easy, so you don't have to be able to do that before moving on. We'll get more practice with chords in the next lesson. 41. 2.19 - Completing The Progression - [ Hey There Delilah - Plain White T's ]: you probably guessed it. Now we're gonna play the full J court. This one is the toughest of all of them so far and will take you a while to get used to. So take your time. Put your third finger on the third floor of the first string, just like we usually do. Now. Put your second finger on the third fret of the sixth. Strict. Finally, put your first finger on the second fret of the fifth string. As usual, played string individually readjust. And once, once each string is playing nicely, play the whole court together. How's that guessing? It's tough and your fingers struggle to stretch that far. This one will probably take you a while to get used to. Everyone struggles with this court. Remember to simplify this court if you need to you for now and add another fingers. Once it's more comfortable, you can leave it as just a three string chord or add on just your first finger on play. It is a five string chord on Finally, add in the second finger when that's comfortable. Just do what works for you here. And don't worry if you're playing some simple fight ports. We'll get plenty of practice with the geek or later on. Let's try playing this 1 12 times in a row like we're used to remember. Tap your foot every three strong's. And finally, let's bring this cord into our full corporation. We'll go nice and slowly because it's not easy. Start slower than me if you need to, by using the Metrodome and move on to the next video. Once you can play with me and it sounds decent, don't worry if it's not totally perfect. It may still sound a little ugly now, but it will definitely get better with a little practice one to three four. - This is your first full chord. Progression these air four of the most common chords in music. Once you could play these nicely, you'll instantly be able to play literally hundreds of songs. It's gonna be tough for the first little bit, but if you could get used to this, the world of guitar will really open up for you. Believe it is an exercise to you. If you want to try and work up to playing this at full speed, the full songs at 65 BPM try it if you want, but it's not easy, so you don't have to be able to do that before moving on. We'll get more practice with chords in the next lesson. 42. 2.20 - Some Additional Chord Practice - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]: these next three videos air optional depending on how you're doing. So far, I'm gonna show you three exercises you can use to work on your court changes. If you found perfect, Easy, then feel free to skip ahead past this video and the next two. If you want some more practice, getting your court change is good, though. Keep listening. We use perfect as our example because you already know the court progression. In this first exercise, set your metronome to 10 bpm higher than the fastest you can play this chord progression comfortably, so you should be a speed where you can sort of play the corporation. But it's a little rough now. What you're gonna do is make sure to stay in time, even if your left hand can't keep up to start your Metrodome and make sure you're changing chords in the right spot, no matter how sloppy it sounds. The goal of this is to get your fingers used to changing quickly because you have to be able to change really quickly to play smooth core progressions. I'll show you what I mean. So even though my left hand couldn't keep up with the timing I made sure to keep playing in time with my right hand and keep changing the cords at the right place. This is the best thing to do if you're playing along with someone singing or if you're singing yourself. Often, people won't even notice. If you're playing is a little sloppy, as long as you stay in good time. 43. 2.21 - Exercise 2 - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]: Here's the second exercise to try for struggling with getting your court changes quick. Remember that this is optional, but she should try this out if you're still struggling. Change of courts This time we're not going to use the right hand at all using your same corporation of G, E, minor, C and D. We're just gonna rapidly switch between them without strumming. The goal here is just to get your left hand used to the patterns. I'll start slow, but feel free to start even slower if you need to. - Once you got the hang of that one, you can try it a little faster. As always, you can work your way up gradually to what I'm doing at whatever speed is comfortable to you. Don't worry, and don't try to rush it. Just give it a little time and it'll eventually be second nature 44. 2.22 - Exercise 3 - [ Perfect - Ed Sheeran ]: Here's 1/3 optional exercise for getting your court changes Better. Just keep working on these three exercises, alternating between all three until you're comfortable with your court changes. This time, all you're gonna do is grab the cord, play it once, then release your fingers, but keep them in the same position they're gonna press down again. Play it and release again. We'll do this four times before switching cords and will use the same court progression. - The goal of this exercise is to get your fingers used to the shape of the chords themselves. Instead of fretting each finger individually in order to change courts quickly, you have to get used to not doing each finger individually, but rather the entire court is a shape. Muscle. Memory is when your brain gets used to a specific emotion, and it's a guitarist best friend. We want to remember these chord shapes so that we don't have to think about it. We just see the name of the court on the screen and our fingers just know where to go instinctively. Let's read a bit faster. - Using these three exercises, you should have no problem getting perfect up to It's really speed with a bit of practice. It might take you a few days, so don't get frustrated if it doesn't come instantly. But I promise you it will come. Just try these exercises and move on. When you're happy with your results. As always, don't worry about being completely flawless before moving on. Your goal is to play it comfortably and have it sound pretty good. 45. 2.23 - Attention Revisited: there's something pretty cool. Remember all the way back to attention and Section one, Well, you didn't realize it then, but you're actually basically just picking out chords. Kind of like we didn't Hey there, Delilah. Let's take a look first to refresh your memory. Let's play the rough again. So in Section One, we just picked out each of these notes individually because it was easier to start with. But what we're actually doing this rift is just picking a bunch of courts. Therefore, sections to this riff and four chords that it switches between the cords this time or D minor C a minor seven and B flat. Some funky names here Now that you're used to the cords, the easier way to play this rift is just to hold each quarter with your left hand and pick the individual strings with your right hand. Just like we didn't. Hey there, Delilah. Let's go with the first section. Grab a D minor court. You can see the diagram on the screen first finger first fat first ring, third finger, third fret second string and second finger. Second fret. Third string has always plays. Note individually, readjust them, play the full court. Now you're gonna play the first section of the riff, but you're just gonna hold the court with your left hand instead of fretting. Note by note. The only thing you have to do here is take off your first finger when you play the open first string. Otherwise, you could just hold the court the entire time, watch me and try it out on your own. Uh, makes it a little easier, doesn't it? We're going to the same thing for every section, and we'll go through it in the next video. 46. 2.24 - Give Me Some More Attention - [ Attention - Charlie Puth ]: Let's try the next section. You already know how to play, See court, so grab it and we'll get started. You hold your C chord for the whole time. The only thing you have to do differently is play the third fret of the second string with your pinkie. Now I know the pinkies still awkward, but I want to get used to using it because it's much easier in the long run to have four fingers you can use instead of just three. Let's play it slowly. Now watch me. Make sure you're doing the same thing. 123 four. How's that? A little tricky, but not too bad, right? You started to get the hang of it, so let's move on to the next section. This court is technically in a minor seven, but we could make it easier for ourselves. All you have to do is put your first finger on the first fret of the second string when you go to play the third fret of the second string. Just keep your first finger in place and out on your third finger for just that note. One, 23 four and finally a lot in the last section. This one's a B flat, which is a really tough cord for now, so we'll make it easier for your first finger on the first fret of the fifth string. 1/3 finger on the third for the fourth string and put your pinkie on the third fret of the third string. Try that out by just playing the 3rd 4th and fifth strings, Uh, when he switched the notes on the second string. Just take your fingers off and play. These notes is usually what one to 34 47. 2.25 - Putting It All Together - [ Attention - Charlie Puth ]: Okay, that's all four parts. All of left to do now is put it all together. Watch me than try it out. 1234 And that's the rift once you get used to it, this rift is much easier to play this way, and it works on your chord changes. What we're doing here is called arpeggio. Eating a court arpeggio hating basically means just picking each string of a court individually. It's a very common technique, and you'll see it in a lot of songs. So now if you ever hear the term arpeggio it again and I'm sure you you'll see it at some point, you'll know it's not nearly as complicated as it sounds. 48. 2.26 - Section 2 Finale - [ All Of Me - John Legend ]: Let's finish off Section two with one more song All of Me by John Legend. We've already looked at all these chords, so there's nothing new here, but it's definitely good to get some more practice. The core progression for this song is E minor, C, G and D. Sounds oddly familiar, doesn't it? These are the exact same chords is in perfect, just in a different order. Most songs actually use the same few chords, so if you learn the main cords, you can play just about any song. It won't be long now before you can learn just about any song you want. See, Guitar isn't so hard after all, once you get used to the basics, at least so start this song by playing each chord once before switching. Now Plage cord three times before switching one to three. - Uh , the only thing remaining in the song is the timing. The timing for the song is a bit complicated for now, so just listen to me and try and play it. We'll look into more complicated timing in later sections of the course, but for now it's much easier just to listen to me work on this, and once you can play it comfortably, you're finished. Section two Great work. 1234 49. 2.27 - Conclusion: That's the end of Section two. Now you're really getting used to playing guitar in this section. You went all the way from not being able to play any chords to being able to play complete chords with three fingers and all strengths. We also went through songs by Ed Sheeran. The Plain White Tees Revisited Charlie Booth and finished off with some John Legend. Your song bank is getting bigger already. You know. No, four of the most common cords used music with just these cords. There are literally hundreds of songs you can play and only a few more chords. You need to be able to play just about every song in the next section. We're gonna work more on the right hand to make your playing sound more natural and start playing some really interesting core progressions. By the end of next section, you'll know just about everything you need to be able to play. Most songs also teach you how to learn songs on your own so you can start looking up songs and play whatever you want to learn. Next section is gonna be a big one, so get excited. His is where it all comes together. I'll see in the next lessons 50. 3.01 - Intro: again. Welcome to Section three, the sections An important one. We're gonna work on playing more advanced chord progressions to get your plane to a level where you could really play the majority of songs. By the end of this section, you'll be able to play along with just about any song. This section is a great one because you finally have every piece of the puzzle needed to play. Most songs you're playing will sound much more professional once you're good at this stuff from the section. As always, remember to tune your guitar before you start playing. If you need a refresher, head back to Section one to rewatch the tuning video. So on that note, grab your guitar tuning up and let's get started. 51. 3.02a - Strumming Patterns: So far, we haven't much looked into timing on courts. But just like notes, timing is half of what makes a good core progression. We call different timing variations within individual chords, a strumming pattern. Most of the time, you use the same strumming pattern for each court of your progression. A strong pattern is just a combination of different timings that you repeat usually every four beats. For example, one strumming pattern could be one beat than two beats than one beat, all played on the same court. Another strumming pattern is two beats than two beats, and another one could be three beats than one beat. If you'll notice. Each of these strumming patterns is four beats long. One plus two plus one equals 42 plus two equals four and three plus one equals four most throwing patterns, or either four beats long or a pizza. So when you change chords most of the time, you'll keep your strumming pattern the same. For example, if I switch from a minor to F to a C, I can keep my strumming pattern the same. Even why such courts? I'll use a three beat than a one beat strumming pattern for this exam. For most songs that have just background chords, just about any strumming pattern will work, and nobody will really notice the difference if I play the same chord progression with three different strumming patterns, even though they're slightly different, it doesn't really make that big a difference, kind of like taking strings out of courts. As long as you switch cords at the right spot, you'll be fine. This gives you some room for creativity. When playing songs, as long as you're chord changes air smooth and your timing is smooth. You can be adventurous assed. What specific strumming pattern he play. It's usually best to start really simply, I'd recommend starting with one beat record and then making it more complicated from there if you want it. Of course, if you want to learn exactly how the song is played, you'll have to listen to the song and figure out the strumming pattern they have used. But don't be too concerned about that yet. Well, look more of that in later videos. Just remember when in doubt, as long as you switch cords at the right spot, it doesn't much matter what else you dio 52. 3.02b - Aminor Walkthrough: Okay, so here's a new chord. This one's gonna be a minor place your first finger on the first for the second string, third finger on the second front of the third string and second finger on the second front of the fourth string. Then you're gonna play the top five strands. Try that out, fix your mistakes, then try playing it a few times. 53. 3.03 - Half Beats: up to this point, we've only played notes for 123 or four beats. Another really common time and you'll come across is half beats, half beats or exactly what they sound like. 1/2 of a single beat. So in a single beat, their to half beats. We've got to introduce the new timing to play these. Up to now, we've been counting 1234 when we want to add and 1/2 feet, we say and in between each beat. So that would sound like one and two and three and four and one timed out. It's kind of confusing, but it'll make more sense when we play it. And this next exercise, such from a day minor to a seat, we're gonna play just half beats. So you gonna play on the beat and then in between the beat as well. This is where tapping your foot is very useful. The beat is when your foot hits the ground and the half beat is when your foot up so this exercise will look like one and to and three and four and on the a minor. Then you'll switch to a C and do the same thing one and two and three and four. And, uh so this exercise will look like one and two and three and four and on the a minor. Then you switch to the sea under the same thing. So you're just playing each chord eight times before switching to the next. The tricky part is playing in between each beat and tapping your foot. Watch me and try it yourself. - You ready to move on when you can play this comfortably while tapping your foot at the same time, it might take a bit of practice to get used to the coordination. 54. 3.04 - Stay with me: Now, let's try this out of song. We're gonna play Stay with me by Sam Smith. Now, first we gotta learn to new courts A minor seven and F a minor seven is easy. Well, they have to do is put your first finger on the first flight of the second string and then put your second finger on the second front of the fourth strings. Now you're gonna play the top five strings. Uh, f is a little trickier. Place your third finger on the third fret of the fourth string. Your second on the second fret of the third string on your first on the first floor of the second string. And here's the tricky part. Remember how he flattened our fingers when we played closer? We're gonna do that with our first finger now flat in your first finger. So that's fretting. Both the first and the second string on the first fret. This is called barring a string. The biggest thing to watch here is to make sure your second and third fingers don't block the other strengths. As usual, front the cord played string individually and then correct any of your mistakes. We're playing four strings for this court. Once you can get these two chords, let's try switching between them, holding each chord for four beats before switching. - This F court is something new, so play around with it for a while until you're used to it before moving on. 55. 3.05 - Stay With Me Pt 2: How's that half court feel? It might take you a while to get used to that one. But just do your best. And if it's not sounding great, just pause for a minute on plea to the strings individually to try and correct your mistakes, you want to make sure you don't get in the habit of playing bad chords, so just take your time. And like everything in guitar, it will come eventually. It just takes a bit of practice, so we'll play the chord progression in the versus. Stay with me. Now you'll switch from an a minor seven toe F to see. The good thing is for this song, you only have to play each chord once, and there's plenty of time to change in between. The timing is the tricky part here. Stop playing the A minor seven on the one. Then you'll switch to the F on the three and then you'll play the sea on the and of four. You hold that see for the next four beats, listen to me and follow along. It's also helpful. Listen to the actual song will be playing with the piano plays in the song. - How's that The good thing is the song of slow, so it's relatively easy introduction, 1/2 beats and our new courts. As usual, start this song slower if you need to, and gradually work up to my speed until you can play with me. But once you got that, you can play all the verses to stay with me. If you don't know what a versus, don't worry, we'll get into that in a later video. 56. 3.06 - 3/4 vs 4/4: usually songs accounted for beats at a time. You leave account a nice rhythm by counting 12341234 etcetera. The first beat, or the one is known as the downbeat. It will often be accented in some way by the instruments or drums and give. This gives the song a strong sense of rhythm. Some songs, though, only have three beats in these songs. To follow the rhythm, we have to count just up to three. 123123 etcetera. If you try and count four beats in these songs that get thrown off, the downbeat is still the one. But we count only up to three to fall along with a song. See what I mean? It's usually pretty easy to identify whether it's a three or four beat song by just trying both and see which one works, right? I'll play a few examples here, and I want you to try and guess whether their three year, four beat rhythms I'll play them without timing than adding the timing so you can check your answers makes it much easier to count along with the song. Once you can tell three vs four B time 57. 3.07 - Up Strumming: time to really improve your chords with a few new techniques. The first of these is upstream. Up until now, every note or chord even played has picked down towards the four this fine and dandy. When the song isn't that fast, it gets really hard to play quickly, just picking down when you pick down. You gotta move your hand back up anyways to pick again. We can take advantage of this upward motion and picker strum on the way up to we picked down and up instead of just down becomes pretty easy to start strumming a lot faster when you play half beats almost all the time, you actually want to pick up instead of down. So you play down on the beat and up on the end. We'll try it out now and play half beats 15 bpm. The left hand won't move, but your right hand's gonna alternate, strumming up and down and a nice, smooth rhythm. - How is that? Pretty awkward, I'm guessing. Try the exercise a few times, either on your own or playing with me. Keep your wrist loose, pick gently on. Most importantly, try and play in a smooth, even rhythm pick up on our down on the beats and up on the ants. Let's do it again with a C. As usual. Don't worry about too much about playing extra strings at this point cause it's not that important. Your focus should be on smoothness and timing right now. - Cool . That's about all there is to it. With upstream, as with everything, don't expect to master right away. It's a new movement and might take you a while to get the hang of, well, try this out more as we go forward. 58. 3.08 - Despacito: Let's try getting used to some more complicated up streaming by using everyone's favor. Latin Tune Esposito. We'll play the main inverse part, but you can hear in the beginning of the song if you like the Justin Bieber version. This is where Justin saying, And if you prefer the lewd Fonzie and Daddy Yankee only version, this is where Louis comes in at the beginning. Our court progression for this one is going to be be minor G de on a way to new cords here B minor and a So we'll start with B minor. First finger on the second front of the fifth string, third finger on the fourth fret of the fourth string, fourth finger on the fourth fret of the third string and second finger on the third fret of the second string. Now this one, you want to play your first finger a little lazy so that we actually block the first string because we don't want that to play here, So you just kind of to play it a little lazier than you usually would. So then you're gonna play all five strings, but remember that the first string is gonna be blocked second quarter is a so it's gonna look like this. You've got your second finger on the second fret of the fourth string first finger on the second fret of the third string and your third finger on the second fret of the second string. It's a little squishy, but it's not too hard to play, and you're gonna play the top five strings. Let's play that chord progression a few times swift from B minor to G to D to a holding for four, Beat each, get comfortable with that exercise and then move on. 59. 3.09 - Despacito Pt 2: So the second part of the song is the timing. Most Latin music uses an upbeat timing pattern. This means you don't play on the beats, you play on the hands and step we're going to do. Here is the exact same chord progression. Except this time you're only gonna play on the ends. So one and two and three and four. And because these are the ads, you're going to strum each court up and sit down. Hence the term upbeat. Yeah, How's that feel used to that? Then we'll try it a little faster. 60. 3.10 - Despacito Pt 3: There's one more thing we have to add to finish the song if you'll notice in the actual song. The chords are played for a really short period of time instead of just ringing out. This is called staccato. The word is an important, but the technique is what we have to use. The only thing you have to change from the court progression we played last video is use your right hand to mute the strings. After you play the court, you use the side of your hand and just press down on the strings lightly after you played Accord and it'll meet it. So for each chord, you're gonna play the cord on the end than mute the strings on the next beat. This will complete the Latin feel of our song. Let's start off slowly. Uh ah, this is a pretty common technique. Any time you hear a core, this played short. The guitarist is just muting the strings, so let's complete this chord progression by playing at full speed. Work your way up gradually to my speed. If you need to take your time. We've introduced a bunch of new things here 61. 3.11 - Wonderwall: that song was a pretty simple introduction up strumming where core progressions really get fancy is when you add some more complex, troubling patterns. Let's try this out with arguably the most popular beginner guitar song of all time. Drum roll, please. Wonderwall. We've got some really weird name cords and this one, And this time I'm gonna leave it to you to figure that out. You already know the G. So your new cords, this timer E minor seven dc US four and a seven suss for you can see all the chord diagrams above my head Here. You might want to pause the video here and try them all out. They've got really weird names, but they're actually not that difficult. Let's get used to the chord progression by playing each chord for four beats. This is often the easiest way to get used to a new court progression. Just try the switches out without any complicated strumming in the right hand. Work on this until you can switch comfortably before moving on 1234 62. 3.12 - Wonderwall Pt 2: now, the strumming pattern for this one is where it gets really interesting. I'll play it for you first. So you see it and get an idea of what it sounds like while I'm explaining, - so we'll start really slow. You're going to start with your E minor. Seven. Play that one on the one and the three. That's the first bar or the 1st 4 beats. Try just this out. For the sake of it, that's pretty easy. Your next bar or the next four beats are where you switched to your G start by playing on the 12 and three. This time. Play it up, strum on the end of one. Everything else is the same. So one and two three four try don't want out on your own a bunch of times. 63. 3.13 - Wonderwall Pt 3: Now it's time for the second half of the core progression. D sess four is the first court. This one's played on the one and the three, just like E M seven from the last video. Next, we'll switch toe a seven sets for and simply enough. This one's exactly the same is the G from the last video play on the one the end of one, two and three. But it's time to put it all together. Watch me and then try and count along the timing of the E M seven and DSS for the same and the timing of the G and A seven sets for the same. We'll try it out nice and slowly play out a bunch of times until you're comfortable with it and then try working your way up to full speed. And now you can do it. Play along with the actual song you're gonna want to put your cape. Oh, on the second front 64. 33.14 - Conclusion: And there we go. In this section, we learned a bunch of different court techniques that will make your core progressions way more interesting and finally start to sound like real songs. Practice the songs we went through in this section until you're comfortable playing them and, even more importantly, comfortable counting the timing for them while tapping your foot. This is so important because it will make it much easier to play along with songs and figure out new songs. If you're good at counting and get a time, make sure you're ready. He's next section is a big one. Next section. I'll teach you how to learn any song on your own so you can start exploring. I'm playing the songs you love most. Practice up and get ready because you're gonna need the skills from this section to succeed in the next one. 65. 4.01 - Learning any song: Okay, We've covered a lot so far. You're now at a point where you're ready to spread your wings and try and fly on your own for the first time. Now I'm gonna teach you how to learn songs on your own. So you can large start learning any song you want and really start to get excited about guitar. What I want you to do right now let's pick a song that you want to learn the cords to. This could be any song you want. But as some advice, try and pick one with mostly cordial already know in the next video, I'll show you are define cords for songs. 66. 4.02 - Ultimate Guitar: Qatar is a great online community where many people listen to songs and figure out how to play them, then post them online so everyone can see. It's really great because it means you don't have to listen and figure out songs on your own. The biggest website for Posting Tabs is ultimate guitar dot com. This site will become Your best Friend is a guitarist. Doesn't look great, but it's continuously update updated and has tabs for just about every song ever written. It's pretty simple, but I'll walk you through the important parts. Tape a song in the search box that you want to play and hit enter to get your search results. Results have a bunch of different types of tabs, tab and cords of what you're interested in. There's a few other types that are paid options, but I've never tried them because the free versions work for me. I usually pick the tab or cords with the highest rating on the most number of ratings. Click on the cords. Chords will be over the lyrics, and often the cords used will have chord diagrams. If you hover over the coordinates. That's about all there is to it. Now I want you to do this for your son, find the song on ultimate guitar and take a look. If your songs got a lot of different chords or many chords you don't know. You might want to think about picking a difference on. 67. 4.03 - Chord Tabs: The first step to playing in any song is to learn the notes records involved. The good thing for guitar is that reading the courts to companies song is very easy by using a quartet, I Mean You Summer of 69 by Bryan Adams of As an example. You don't know the song. Check it out on YouTube or wherever you get your music and get a feel for So here's the cord tab for the song There's not much to it. You've got the song's lyrics with letters above it or to the side of the letters. The letters tell us records to play single letters or major chords, letters with an M beside them or minor chords and letters with seven beside them or sevenths. There's a bunch of other types, but it doesn't matter too much to know them as long as you get the fingering right. The song on Lee has major and minor courts. When you play the song, you switch the cords when the lyrics get to the word or syllable with the court on top of it. That's about all there is to it. If the court is before or after line of lyrics there. Some instrumentals before, after that line of lurks is the only tricky part, and you have to listen to the song to see where this changes. You may be wondering, where is the timing, or how do I know it's strumming pattern to play? Well, timing isn't written into court taps. You can listen to the song to figure out the timing. And here's another secret. As long as you switch cords at the right spot, it doesn't really matter what strumming patterns use. Take a look at your song here just to get a general idea of what's going on. 68. 4.04 - Song Structure: most songs have multiple different parts. It'd be boring if the song just repeated itself the whole time. There are few 1,000,000 parts that most songs have these air, the verse, chorus and bridge. I'll go through Summer of 69 show you how it's done so you can apply it to your own songs. The verse is usually first. Verses and choruses usually alternate the versus something different, often quieter and simpler. As far as the lyrics go versus Tell the story of the song, and the chorus repeats the single main idea or theme of the song. Each verse usually has unique lyrics. Looking at Summer of 69 therefore verses. How can you tell us? First of all, if you listen to the song all the verses of the same tune with different lyrics if you'll notice all the verses also have the same core progression in this case, just D to a. So the first core progression in this song is that if I play these chords along with the song, you can hear that they fit well. Uh huh. Here's a link to the song that will start just before the first verse. Try to listen and hear the court progression I just played next comes, of course, sometimes called the Hook, and it's usually the most memorable part of the song that everyone can sing along to. It's usually the catchiest part, so it repeats several times throughout the song to get stuck in your head. The lyrics were usually the same or very similar in each course. Each course had the same chord progression as well. This one is more complicated than the versus court progression. With four book courts. Be Minor, A. D and G. This song is three courses again. I'll play this chord progression along the song so that you can hear it for yourself. Okay, again, click the link here. I'm trying to hear the court progression I just played. The third main song component is the Bridge. There's usually only one bridge in a song, and it's usually after a few choruses and verses and the bridge. Most of the time, something different is played to add some more interest to us all. Often the bridge is just too slow down chorus, but equally often the bridge is something totally unique from the verse. Of course, in this song. There's a bridge right here and again. It has a different court progression. This one switches from an F to a B flat to a seat. Here's what the court progression sounds like played along with the bridge. Once more, click this link here, listen to the bridge and try and hear the court progression. I just played with those three things. You'll cover a good majority of songs. Their other components, like the intro out, Trump Recourse, which is usually before the chorus. But these vary from song to song. Just about every popular song will have a few verses, a few choruses and a bridge by deconstructing a song to its parts makes it easy to remember which chord progression have to use it. Each part of the song. Most songs will only have two or three different chord progressions with three or four chords in each song. This song has three different chord progressions, one with two chords, one of three on one with four. Your exercise for this video is to take your song and deconstructive Izvestiya camp. See if you can identify the verses, choruses and bridge. Every song is later differently and the no hard rules of song structure, but most will follow a similar pattern. Make a note of all the different chord progressions in your song and all the different chords that you used. 69. 4.05 - Listening To Songs: often on court tabs. You'll only have the cords and not any strumming patterns. When this happens, you'll have to figure out the strong and pattern on your own. The only real way to do this is to listen to the song you want to try and pick up the guitar and see if you can hear what's playing among the other instruments. This is a skill that takes a long time to get good at, but we can usually simplify things to make it a little easier. The first thing to think of here is that if it's just you playing a single guitar, you're never gonna be able to play the song exactly as it's written anyways, because they're always many instruments and any professionally produced some. So there's no need to play the exact same strumming pattern the actual song uses. As long as you change chords of the right places, many different strumming patterns will work for the same song and sound good. So if you want to do in, playing along with the song is get used to the chord progression and then just try out a bunch of different strumming patterns until you find something that sounds good with this song. It doesn't matter if it isn't the exact same thing the song plays. If it sounds good to you, it'll probably work as long as you change course at the right time. Next video. I'll give you a few strategies to help you. 70. 4.06 - Coming Up With Chord Progressions: so the first strategy to figuring out your own strumming patterns is just to keep it simple . Start by figuring out where the court changes happen and just play each chord on whatever beat it starts on. Once you've figured out where the cords changed, the next step is to figure out a strumming pattern. Most of the time, you can use the same strumming pattern for each court. Just try out a bunch of different combinations of up and down strums until you find something that sort of sounds like it fits with the song. It's not rocket science, so don't get too caught up in it. Just try something that sounds decent, and it'll get the job done. There are also dozens of YouTube tutorials for every single popular song. These are often good for beginners because they'll usually walk you step by step through a strumming pattern. So when in doubt, just search up a YouTube tutorial and you'll be up and running in no time. 71. 4.07 - Learn A Song Of Your Choice: So now that you've deconstructed your song, your exercise now is to play along with it, fall along with the cord tab for the first several times you play it through to help you with the record changes. But deconstructing the song like we did in the previous video, it makes it much easier to remember what chords to play at each section. Once you've played it enough times, you'll usually just naturally start to remember what chords are played, at which point this is great because it means you rarely have to actually think about memorizing a song. It usually just happens naturally by playing it. A bunch of times is usually a pretty amazing time for students. This is the first time they're actually able to play an entire song on their own. How does it feel? Pretty cool, right? Once you have chord progressions down and you know when to play each court, the last step is to play around with your strumming patterns. Try different combinations of 123 or four beats and see what different strumming patterns you can come up with. Throwing some up strums on the ans once you're ready to spice it up. Certain patterns will work better than others. So now is the time to just explore and see what sounds good to you. You learn best by trying things out and seeing what works and seeing what doesn't. I'll leave. This is something for you to try it on your own. Have fun with it. Experiment and don't be worried Teoh too much about it yet. We'll look more into strumming patterns in later sections. If you need some inspiration, look up a tutorial. Your song on YouTube to help you. So go off. Practice it on house of Fun. I'll see in the next section once you've learned a song on your own. 72. 5.01 - Intro: welcome to the final section of the course in this section. We're going to start by going over some or advance chord progressions and strumming patterns. We'll also take a look at a few other techniques you'll want to know. Finally, once that's done, I'll give you a few final pointers and tips and give you some next steps and continuing your guitar gery. By the end of this section, you'll be very comfortable with cords changes and strumming patents. You'll know everything you need to be able to go off on your own and play your favorite songs. Okay, let's get started. 73. 5.02 - 16 notes: So just like when we added in half beads. Sometimes we wanna have even faster or more unique timing than that. We could go even smaller with 1/4 beat. Just like the sounds there to quarter beats and 1/2 feet to count them. We say one e and ah to E and three e and four e and, uh so, therefore sounds and each beat when playing quarter beats the one and the end or strum down in the e and the are strung up. Let's try this with a song. Let her go by passenger. 74. 5.03 - Let Her Go: our core progression for the song is a minor F G and e minor. Let's play it to get used to it this time. Play each chord for two single beats. Now we're gonna add and 1/2 feet, play on the one to and then switch cords and play on the three four band. 75. 5.04 - Let Her Go Pt 2: Okay. Finally a lot on some quarter beats. You're strumming patterns very similar this time, but now you're playing one two e and, uh, then switch cords. Three for one to three four. And that's the chord. Progression of letter go by passenger. If you want to challenge, try working your way up to full speed, which I'll play now one to three four. 76. 5.05 - Let Her Go Pt 3: most of the chord progressions we've played so far have either been three or four quarts is pretty typical. But sometimes you'll find chord progressions that are longer than that. These ones are often tougher to remember. Let her go was actually example of a long corporation. We just played the first half, so the first half was a minor f g e minor. The second half is a minor than F N g. So pretty similar. The only difference the second time is that we don't play the lost a minor. Try playing this whole chord progression. Now your last step is to try and remember this corporation. You should practice this until you can play it by memory. So without following along with the video or anything written up, move on to the next lesson. Once you memorize this court for Russian 77. 5.06 - Memorizing Songs: memorizing songs is another skill that takes practice. Here's my favorite method for memorizing songs. Start by looking at the cord out of your song. Make note of the different sections, like the verse course and the bridge, Then write down the court progressions that are used in each section. Now you know how many chord progressions you have to learn, which is usually only a few parts. Then all you have to do is memorize a few chord progressions and the order of the different core professions. In the song. From here, i often find it easiest just to play the song. A lot of times I find it doesn't take too long to just naturally memorize it as long as you're aware of the different parts involved. There's nothing particularly magical about this process, but it works. It's usually not too hard to motivate yourself to learn the song because chances are no one's forcing you to, and you're doing it for fun anyways. And that's how I memorized the song. So your challenge for this lesson is to try and memorize part of a song, pick a song, then pick either the verse chorus or bridge and memorize the court progression of that song . 78. 5.07 - Palm Muting: Palm muting is one of the most common techniques and guitar. It's when you somewhat mute the strings as you play a note or court grab a G chord. Now we're gonna play single beats on just this court. So the trick here is that you're gonna place the side of your palm against the end of the strings, so half your hand is gonna rest on the strings and half is gonna rest on the end piece of the guitar strings, which is also known as the bridge. Watch me, then try toe. You can experiment with this a bit to figure out what sounds best, because if you go home or on the strings, the cords will get more muted. And if you go more on the bridge, the strings will get less mute. And some songs you want, Um, you, Dittemore and some songs you want to meet it less. It's a stylistic choice, depending on the song itself. Try playing the same thing, but play it more muted this time. Try and replicate what I'm doing, so that's a pretty heavily muted strumming pattern. Now let's play a lightly muted strumming pattern. Try and do what I'm doing again. See the difference in one, you're almost getting more of a percussive sound, and the other you're getting almost full but slightly muted courts. 79. 5.08 - Palm Muting Pt 2: this time you're going to stay on the G chord and you're gonna play single beats. But the first beat isn't muted on the 2nd 3rd and fourth beats are palm muted. Make sure to play around with that one until you get it comfortably. Next, we're gonna try changing course. He's in the same strong pattern start on the G than to a deep first beat. Not muted in the 2nd 3rd and fourth are all palm muted. Oh, once you can play that one, add on a B minor and then a d. So you're chord progressions now. G d B minor d awesome job will make this more interesting in the next video. 80. 5.09 - Palm Muting Pt 3: Now we'll make this core progression more interesting. You're gonna play the G once, then play it muted twice, then play the D once. Now add on the same thing with the B minor to D first beat open on diviner next to muted, then switch to D and play it once. 81. 5.10 - Speeding Up Strumming Exercise: This is another optional exercise based on how you doing so far. If you have no problems with up streaming fast enough so far, then feel free to skip this exercise. Otherwise, continue on. We're going to do an exercise to help you increase your up strumming speed. Start by grabbing a G chord with your left hand. We're just going to stay on the G court. For now, all we're gonna dio is play straight half beats on the G chord along with our Metrodome, picking a speed that's easy to do and start by just playing half beats. You might want to start at a different speed than I am, depending on how you're doing one and two and three and four and play that a few times. Then try and increase the speed by 10 bps and you know the drill from here. Play at this speed until you're comfortable and then move up another 10 ppm. I wouldn't keep coming back to this exercise if it weren't just so good. If you play this exercise every day for five minutes, your speed will increase faster than you know. Move up in speed only when you're comfortable each day Start from a really easy speed and end at the fastest. You can go comfortably, then play it a few times at this speed. Just above that, just to try it out. Do this exercise every day until you're happy with your speed. It shouldn't take you that long to dio. 82. 5.11 - Palm Muting Pt. 4: now a lot in the second half to this court progression and make it a long one. Just like let her go. The first half is still G d o B minor on D in the second half is a a d ah, the second half has played the exact same way is the first half. - Now let's try playing this whole thing a bit faster. 123 four and finally to complete off the verse and course of, there's nothing holding me back by Shawn Mendez. We'll change up our timing of it. The timing is a bit complicated, but it doesn't use any quarter beats. It's a long, strumming pattern, so just watch it on the screen and listen to me. Listen to where I change chords and fall along. Then try and play it yourself. One, 23 four. - Awesome . That's pretty complicated chord progression. We're now using an eight cord long progression up strums and down strums, full chords, unique timing and along strumming pattern. There's only one thing remaining fast chord changes. To do that. Let's try playing the song at full speed. As always, start slower if you need to and gradually work away to my speaking. If you can play this a full speed, you'll be able to learn just about any court progression in popular music. 1234 83. 5.12 - Final Pointers: And with that, you've made it through every challenge in this course. Here's some final pointers that will help you sound the best. You can quickly first focus on smoothness over perfection. As I mentioned earlier, Timing is more important than hitting all the right notes and strings. If you mess up, hit a wrong note, mute some strings, etcetera. But just keep playing in perfect timing. Most people won't even notice. COLUMN Piece of advice is that if you mess up, don't worry about it and just keep playing. I mess up all the time. I'm playing, but I completely ignore it and keep playing anyways. Focus on playing smoothly and evenly, and you'll sound much better than the person who feels the need to get every note right every time next simplify were needed. Can't play something exactly as it's written. Just make it simpler if Corbyn Russians to hard use easier courts. If the court production has lots of single notes, either just play the chords or only play the single easiest single notes simplified to the point where you can play it easily, you get playing the song much more quicker and have more motivation to learn the hard parts later. Next, focus on the easy parts. First on the same note is the last comment. Start with easiest parts of the song. First, they're probably only one or two tricky bits and most songs, and you'll spend most of your time practicing these. But if you start by learning the easier parts of the song first, you'll find that you can play almost the entire song pretty quickly. I'm not only pretty motivating, you can come back and work on the harder parts later. Finally, gradually speed up. I've said this a 1,000,000 times by now is probably the single most useful thing you can do . If you take nothing else from this course, take away the habit of starting slowly and gradually speeding up. 84. 5.13 Next Steps: Well, this just about marks the end of the course with the methods. In this course, you have a framework to learn just about any song. Come back and re watch any sections you find you on a refresher on and use the process we've used in this course for every song you play as a final recap, here's the process you want to follow to learn a new song. First look over the whole song and figure out all the different parts. Note any repeated sections. You only gotta learn these once. Be aware of the chord progressions and rifts in each section. Start learning the easiest parts first toe. Learn most of the song quickly. Start slowly and gradually speed up. Simplify any parts were needed and look up any cords and techniques you don't know. Then practice. Practice, practice. If you take this method, you'll have a much quicker time learning new songs. You should be able to learn just about any song some will take longer than others, but you can learn anything this way from beginner to advanced. So approach every single song with this process, and you'll do great. Notice how four of the seven steps. Don't even involve playing. Understand how the song works and then learn how to play it. You'll save yourself a lot of time by having a strong understanding of the song first. 85. 5.14 Conclusion: with that, it's time for me to sign off For the last time. I sincerely hope you've learned a ton in this course and feel confident in your ability to learn anything you know have all the fundamentals you need to go off on your own. So go ahead and play. You've learned all the fundamentals of the guitar and how to figure any song with the skills in a have You're in a great position to play anything you want And you're miles ahead of people that tried to figure it out along playthings you love perform in front of others and explore the world of guitar. Now that you've been through the struggle of starting out, you're ready to really have some fun with it. Thank you so much for sticking with this course and good luck on your journey. 86. Skillshare Intro To Fingerpicking Course New Video: hi and welcome to insert a finger picking. My name is Kurt Berg, and I'm going to your instructor for this course. I'm playing guitar for over 16 years and talked for a good chunk of them. I started teaching in person and then moved online and started five minute guitar. Our YouTube channel, which now has over 20 million views finger style guitar is, in my opinion, the most beautiful sounding form of guitar, because it's just a way to really make your guitar come to life and play multiple guitar parts in one single guitar. So that's what we're gonna learn and focus on this course. I'm gonna take you step by step, from the absolute beginning to being able to play a bunch of really cool songs that sound nice and that you'll have a lot of fun place. So in this program, I'm gonna teach you a whole bunch of different finger style techniques like walking bass, Travis picking alternate picking on a whole bunch of other things that will get a lot more into depth later. But all of this is gonna come together to be able to produce a whole bunch of cool songs on this entire course is gonna be song based. So we're gonna learn techniques that we need and then learned song to apply those techniques. So it's a lot more interesting than if I've just got a bunch of boring exercises for you. So with that said, let's get right into it.