Chess for Beginners - Learn Chess Strategy from Scratch | Shervin House | Skillshare

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Chess for Beginners - Learn Chess Strategy from Scratch

teacher avatar Shervin House, Instructor & YouTuber

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

44 Lessons (5h 34m)
    • 1. Chess for Beginners Course

      1:24
    • 2. What We Cover In This Course...

      2:41
    • 3. [Basic Moves] How Pawns Move

      16:56
    • 4. [Basic Moves] How Other Pieces Move

      9:58
    • 5. [Basic Moves] Check & Check-Mate

      7:05
    • 6. [Basic Moves] Castling

      5:37
    • 7. Types of Games - Blitz & Bullet Explained

      4:35
    • 8. Controlling the Center of the Board - Chess Opening Principles

      18:48
    • 9. Developing Minor Pieces (Knights First) - Chess Opening Principles

      8:36
    • 10. Avoid Making Multiple Moves With One Piece - Chess Opening Principles

      7:08
    • 11. Avoid Checking Without Purpose - Chess Opening Principles

      7:46
    • 12. Avoid Bad Trades - Chess Opening Principles

      9:17
    • 13. Keep the Game Closed If You Are Behind In Your Development - Chess Opening Principles

      7:50
    • 14. Develop Your Queen Behind Your Pawns - Chess Opening Principles

      8:16
    • 15. Castling Kingside or Queenside? - Chess Opening Principles

      5:56
    • 16. Prevent Your Opponent From Castling - Chess Opening Principles

      5:01
    • 17. Forking - Middlegame Tactics

      5:43
    • 18. Pinning Down Pieces - Middlegame Tactics

      3:58
    • 19. Discovered Attacks - Middlegame Tactics

      6:26
    • 20. Double Check - Middlegame Tactics

      4:15
    • 21. Pawn Structure - Pieces Working Together

      11:29
    • 22. Double Bishop Advantage - Pieces Working Together

      4:23
    • 23. Doubling Up Rooks - Pieces Working Together

      10:58
    • 24. How Games End in a Draw - Offering a Draw & Forced Draws

      3:44
    • 25. Draw By Stalemate

      4:34
    • 26. Draw By Constant Checking

      4:51
    • 27. Draw By Repeating a Position 3 Times

      8:31
    • 28. Draw Due to the 50 Move Rule

      6:14
    • 29. Queen & Rook Endgame

      4:23
    • 30. Two Rooks Endgame

      3:03
    • 31. Queen & King Endgame

      8:24
    • 32. Rook & King Endgame

      5:32
    • 33. Two Bishops Endgame

      6:33
    • 34. Rook & Pawn Vs Rook Endgame

      5:49
    • 35. Smothered Mate

      4:54
    • 36. How to Solve Puzzles - Prep for the Class Project

      12:56
    • 37. Solve Puzzles Along with Me 1 - Prep for the Class Project

      9:19
    • 38. Solve Puzzles Along with Me 2 - Prep for the Class Project

      14:59
    • 39. The Ruy Lopez Opening - Chess Openings

      8:42
    • 40. The French Defense - Chess Openings

      10:54
    • 41. The Queen's Gambit - Chess Openings

      8:22
    • 42. The King's Gambit - Chess Openings

      12:42
    • 43. The Fried Liver Attack - Chess Openings

      14:18
    • 44. You Made It...

      1:14
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About This Class

Hi, my name is Shervin House. I am a dedicated Skillshare instructor, and in this course I will be teaching you how to play chess like a pro!

I've been in love with the game of chess since I was introduced to the game by my grandfather at the age of 6. After decades of taking lessons and learning from strategy books, I have put together a comprehensive course that covers all the fundamentals of chess that every chess player must know. I also teamed up with two different International Masters who looked over the course and gave me feedback on how to make it even better and more comprehensive, just to make sure there aren't any fundamentals missing from the course.

This course is for beginner chess players. This includes those who have never played chess before in their lives, as well as those who have some experience playing the game, but are looking to take their game to the next level. For example, if you are a 1200-1300 rated player or lower, or if you don't have a chess rating, then this course is perfect for you.

What can you expect from this course?

  • The most in depth chess strategy course online

  • A complete guide for those who are beginners to chess, as well as those with some experience

  • All the basics covered, material such as how pieces move, chess opening principles, common tactics, etc.

  • All the fundamentals covered, all throughout the opening, middle-game and endgame

  • Common chess openings covered in depth in order to provide you good foundations in the opening stage

  • Common chess endgames covered in depth in order to provide you good foundations for finishing off from a winning position

By the end of this course, you will know all the fundamentals of chess in all 3 stages of the opening, the middle-game and the endgame. The aim of this course is to teach you how to play chess properly in order to boost your ability, as well as your ratings from a beginner to.a great player; we basically take you by the hand and walk you through all of these fundamentals step by step. Together, we go over important topics such as...

  • Opening principles

  • Common mistakes in the opening and how to avoid them

  • Opening traps

  • Middle-game tactics, such as

    • Forking

    • Pinning down pieces

    • Discovered attacks

    • Double checks

    • Pawn structure

  • Learning endgames

  • Best openings covered in depth

  • How games can end in a draw

  • and more...

          All the concepts covered in this course are must know concepts for those who wish to become great chess players. The material we cover are the building blocks upon which you will build your chess skills in order to become a master of the game.

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Shervin House

Instructor & YouTuber

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Transcripts

1. Chess for Beginners Course: Let me guess. You want to play chess and you want to know how to play that approach. My name is server, and this is my chest for beginners course. In this course will cover all the fundamentals of trust so that you will learn everything they need to know in order to play chess, like it. Together with earn about the different pieces of the game, we learn the main operating principles and Maslow tactics in the middle game and all the common and games that you need to know in order to crush your opponent's gains engine course. We will not only learn about tactics and strategy, well, we also learned how to have the proper mindsets in order to take your game today. So you don't have to read any chess strategy books. You don't have to take private lessons. You can just watch me explain all of these concepts to you one at a time. And step by step. All the lessons are done using visual guides and in-depth analysis so that we can incorporate all of these concepts. It's your own game as seamlessly as possible. I'm so confident you will love this course. So if you want to learn how to play chess properly and what are you waiting for? Sap for the course. And together I will make it great chess player entity. 2. What We Cover In This Course...: Welcome You guys. Welcome to the chest for beginners course. Super excited to have you guys here together. We're going to learn all of the fundamentals that you need to know about the game of chess. Now, as the title suggests, this course is mostly targeted towards beginners. So if you're someone who's never played chess before, or if you're someone who has played chess before where you're not particularly doing all that great. I, you need to learn the fundamentals so you can improve your game massively, then this course is perfect for you, right? So we're talking mostly about people who are newer to chess and also people who are maybe a little bit more experienced, but there are rated like around 1200 or 1300. Or if you're even lower than that, then that's totally fine too. We cover everything from the ground up. So no matter how much knowledge you have prior to taking this course, you can follow along with us, Right? So even if you don't know anything, even if you don't even know the basic whoops, no problem whatsoever because we covered those as well for the people who don't know anything about chess. But if you already know some of the more basic stuff, you know the basic moves, maybe you know some of the main principles of the game. That's perfectly fine as well because I always indicate what I'm going to be talking about in each of the videos. And you can see if it's something that you already know. You can skip ahead to the next topic where we cover some other fundamentals that is very important for you to know. So no matter where you are, whether you're a complete beginner, little bit of a beginner, but you kind of know some of the basic stuff. Or if you're an experienced player who's just looking to take his game to the next level. I have all of you guys covered and you can all follow along and very easily navigate your way around and of course, to get the maximum amount of value out of it. So super excited to have you guys here in the next couple of videos, I'm going to cover the basic moves, and I will reiterate this in the video as well. So the next couple of lectures are mostly targeted for the people who are complete beginners the game and have no idea how the game of chess works. So that they can also get up to speed with us and they can follow along with us as we get into the more complicated fundamentals, right? So if you're one of those people who have no idea how the game of chess works at all. You don't know any of the basic moves, then definitely just keep watching all the videos all the way through. If you are someone who already knows that material that you can skip ahead to after all the videos that I have labeled as basic mips, right. So i've, I've put a label on there, so it's really easy for you to recognize which one you need to watch them, which one you, you can just skip ahead and not worry about too much, right? So go ahead, navigate your way around the course. And I will see you in the next lecture. 3. [Basic Moves] How Pawns Move: All right, Welcome to your first lesson in how to play chess. And this lesson we're going to start with the very basics. So we're going to start with the basic moves. And we're going to talk about what each one of the pieces are called, how they move, how they capture other material and all that stuff, right? So we're basically starting with all the basic rules of the game. So if you already know, are the basic rules, like how the pieces move, how you win the game by checkmate in the opponents and stuff like that. Then feel free to skip ahead to, after all the classes that I've labeled with basic moves. Okay, so I've labeled the first couple of lessons with basic moves. Because these are basically lessons for people who have never played chess before in their lives and want to learn all the basic rules of the game from scratch. Okay, so I know a lot of people who are taking this course probably already know how to play chess. At least know the basics of it. They know how ponds work, they know how rocks move, they know how bishops move. And they know all the basic rules of the game basically. So if you are one of those people who already knows all the basic rules, then feel free to just skip ahead until after all the videos that I've labeled with basic moves. And skip to the video where we start talking about the openings and the main opening principles. That's where we get into the good stuff. And you can jump straight to there and you're welcome to watch these videos too if you want. But I'm assuming you already know all the stuff that I'm going to talk about because in these videos, I'm basically going to go over all the basic material that people who've never to play chess before need to know so that basically anyone who takes this course is able to follow along with us, Right? So if you are one of those people who already knows all the basic rules, go, feel free to skip ahead. If you don't know the basic rules, then don't worry, I'm just going to cover it all for you right here. So you know exactly what's going on. All right, let's start from what the pieces are called. First of all, we have in the second row, you can see we have eight identical pieces and these are what we call pons. Now, ponds are basically the first line of defense in our chess game. And they are the most expendable piece, right? There are definitely the ones worth the least. And however, they can be very key in how the game plays out. So we're going to talk about how they move in this video. But first, let's talk about what are all the other pieces are called. We have, are two rooks. These are the rooks. We have nights, so these are the nights. We have two of those. We have two bishops right here. And notice here, one of the bishops is in a light square right here, and the other one is in a dark square. Now, we're going to talk about why that's important a little bit later on, but just take note of that. One of the bishops is in a light square. The other one is on a dark square, same with black pieces e right here you see this one has an, a light square. The other one is in a dark square. This is what we call queen. This is the most significance and the most important piece in the game. Other than the King. Obviously, the king is the end-all, be-all of the game, right? So if you King Falls, you lose the game. If you capture or make the other, the other king fall, basically, you win the game. And that's pretty much all the different material that you have. Some other basic stuff that we need to cover first, white always goes first. And just, so that's just how it is. One person takes the white pieces, the other person takes the black pieces and what goes first? And then each person plays one move per turn, right? So basically, I play one move, black boys won't move. I play another move, blackboards and on the move, and that's how the game goes. Also, let's talk about this for a second. So each square on the chessboard can be communicated using the row number and the file number, right? So we have eight different files. Each of them are noted by a letter a, b, c, d, e, f, g, and h. And we have eight rows. The rows are denoted by numbers 12345678. And as you can see, the number one starts from the first row of the white pieces, and number 8 is the first row of the black pieces. And of course the same thing about the letters. A is the most left piece for whites and the most right BCE for left, right. And then using these system, we can just name any score. So for example, if we wanna talk about this square root, for example, we see that's an F and it's in the fifth row, so that's an F5. Alright, so that's an F5 squared. This, for example, would be a, B seven squared. And that way we can just name all the squares in the game, basically. Alright, now that we covered those basic stuff, let's talk a little bit about what ponds do because that's what we're going to cover mostly in this video, we're gonna talk about how pawns move, what they can do, and all that stuff, right? We're going to talk about the other pieces in the next video. But for this video, let's just focus on the pons. Now, the way pawns move is that they usually, this is their main move, the move up one square, right? So wherever they are, as long as the score they're moving up to his unoccupied, they can move one square forward. Now, take, take into consideration that they can't just move any number they want. Like they can't just move for or anything like that. They can move a wonderful work. All right, so that's the basic move of ponds. And again, you've got to make sure it's an unoccupied square, right? For example, right here. This black pawn cannot come here because this square is occupied by my piece, right? So for example, again, if it's my turn, I cannot move there because this square is occupied by my opponent's piece. I can move this bond because there's nothing occupying this square. But here I couldn't move this basically, right? That's the main movement of ponds. There is another movement that you need to know about pause. And this is, this can only be done on the pons, first move. All right, so on the very first move that each poem makes, that pawn is able to move two squares forward. But again, it has to be two unoccupied squares that he's going forward to seeing what my opponent, he can move it twice. Same with this pond, for example, same with this one, for example. But just be aware that that's only for the very first move. So, for example, this pawn cannot move twice now, because it's only for the very first movement became move once. That's totally fine, but it couldn't move twice forward. It's only for the first move. And again, you've got to remember, it's only if both the squares that are going forward are unoccupied. So for example here, because my pieces here, this pon, is unable to move twice because that's an occupied square. They move once because that's an unoccupied square, but it couldn't move twice. All right, so again, for the very first move of each pond alone, and again only for the very first move. The pot is allowed to move either once or twice. Every other movie it has to be only one square. But for the very first move, you have the option of moving up two squares. Now, let's talk about how Paul's capture. Because we just talked about this. We cannot capture by just going forward on the beach, right? And when we talk about capturing, capturing and chest is basically when you go to a square where an opponent piece is already occupying and you basically capture that piece and throw it out of the game. Right? Now, the way ponds can capture pieces is by doing this. I think you've captured either forward right, or forward left of where they are, right. So forward right would be this square. Forward left would be the square. Now, they cannot capture going forward. This is very important too. No, and this is something that you should not get confused by even as we move forward, they're not allowed to capture going forward. So for example, if this pieces here, we're not allowed to capture it. But if this piece, so let me just play this for example, and then my opponent plays this. I am allowed to now go ahead and capture this piece because it is for two forward left of me, which I'm allowed to capture. Remember I'm allowed to capture either of these directions if there is a piece occupying it, right. So I couldn't just normal, normally just casually move there. I need a, an important piece to be occupying this so that I can go ahead and capture just like that. As you can see, my opponents upon just got thrown out of the game because I just captured. Now, just a couple of things to keep in mind is that the first of all, the pon is the only piece that captures differently than its movement, right? So all the other pieces they capture, similar to the way they move, but pawns, they don't do that, right? They move forward. Only. They cannot move between files on their own. But they're capturing is only from one file to another, right? So if I'm in the E file, I can only capture something on the D or an F file, right? Because I can only capture one of these two directions and only in these squares, right? So if there was something here or here, I couldn't capture it. I can only capture here or here. And it has to be an appalling piece occupying one of those squares for me to capture it, right? I couldn't capture like if it was my own piece, for example, that wouldn't make any sense or I don't want to throw my own stuff out of the game. So I can just go out and capture just like that. Now, there's one more move we need to know about the pond and that is called onPause soften. This is a common edge case scenario. It's not a very common moving now, going to see it all that often, but it's good to know about from the very beginning because it is a legal move for the palm. Now, let's say my opponent plays something like this over here. And then I go over here, right? So in this position where I have moved my palm three squares forward from its original square. In this position, what could happen is one of the opponent bonds could just decide number. The first move upon mix is allowed to be just two square move, right? Only for the first move. So what am I pointing could do is he could take advantage of those, right? Because think about this this way. If I have upon on the file and my opponent wants to move his pawn on the D file. At some point, our ponds are going to be able to capture each other, right? So think of it this way. Let's say I hadn't move there. If my opponent moves here. And let's see. Let me just say I move this. If I import it moves there, I can just capture, right? Or at least I have the option to capture it. If I hadn't gone or two squares up, if I had just gone a single square up from the first move, my point had done that. Let me, let just say I did this. Eventually at some point. If this pod wants to pass my pawn and just keep going forward. At some points, these two paws are going to be able to capture each other, right? Except for this very edge case scenario where I moved three squares. And my opponent just takes advantage of that and just jumps two squares, right? Because any pause allowed to move two squares for their first move. When I'm in this position where I've moved three squares ahead, this pod is allowed to sneakily, tried to get ahead and just go forward and basically skip over this, this square where I would have had a chance to capture this bone, right? And because of that, now I don't have a chance to capture it, right, because it just moved past me. And this is what we call on Poisson. On Poissonian French basically means in passing, which is basically what this plot is trying to do. It's trying to pass me by without me ever having the option capturing it. And in order to cover this edge case and not allow the opponents to have this opportunity to just go ahead without me ever having the option of capturing them. We have this move where you can capture as if this pond had only moved one square. Because remember, if it had moved one square root would have been here, right? And if it had been there, I would have been able to capture it just like that, right. But it didn't it moved two squares. But in order to prevent this pond from being able to just pass me by, I have the option only in this one move. I cannot do this later. In this one move after my opponent moved, I have the option to just go ahead and capture as if he had only moved one square root just like that. All right, so let's, let's run the tape backwards just to see what happened there because that might look a little confusing. You're probably wondering how could you capture this piece by moving there. That makes no sense. Well, think of it this way. Think of it as if this piece hadn't moved two squares. It had only moved one square. If that had happened, I will be able to capture it right there, right? So basically this two square move, because it is trying to pass me by. It also enables me to capture it as if it had only one, will move one square, right? And again, I don't have to do this. It's just an option that I have that I can use. If I don't want to, I can just place on the mouse and go on with my life. Let's say I played this and then that's it. The opportunity is gone, right? So next move, I cannot do this anymore. It's only for that one move that I could do it. So now I can no longer do this. You see it's not working. It's only on the move right after my point and makes this move, if I am in this position already, which is three squares ahead of where I start, I can go ahead and make that capture, okay, but again, if you're confused about this move, don't worry about it too much because this is very an H case scenario. It's not a common scenario, but it's just good to know about because a lot of people get confused about this and it's completely understandably so because kinda confusing rule. But it is completely legal move and it is something that you might see every once in a while. So just be aware of this. But that's pretty much what you needed to know about pods. One last thing that you need to know is that if the Pon, Pon is able to make the last row of your opponent's pieces. So basically any of these squares on the last row, what happens is that this part has the option turned into any piece it chooses to write. So I can turn to any piece, obviously, the queen as the most valuable piece. So it's usually the best idea to turn your pollen into a queen. But depending on the scenario, you might want to choose to turn to something else. That's totally fine too. But let me just show you how that works. So let's say I have this bond. And let's say my opponent is not playing very well. Let's say they just do this. I capture that again. Let's just say they're not playing very well. I just capture that. Again. They move here. I moved there. Let's say they move there. And if I get to the last line of the squares, which I just did, I have the option to turn my, my pond into any, any piece of my choosing. And of course I'm going to choose a queen because that's probably the best. No, not probably definitely the best. The best choice vast majority of the time, right? It's just the best piece in the game. Obviously, you can't turn into a king because there's only one king, but he can turn to any other piece that you have on the board. So that's another thing to know about ponds. And the goal with the pons is to eventually, somehow managed to sneak one past the opponents defense and get it to the last line over here, because then you can turn into any valuable piece and then it's all worth a lot more to you and your attack. And that's all you need to know about pawns. Let me just run the tape back and kind of review what we learned together. Again, remember it ponds move forward once that's their main move, as long as the square root or moving to as unoccupied. On the first move, they have the option to move two squares and sort of just one, but only on the first move. And the way they capture is by capturing either forward right, or forward left, for example, like. And that's pretty much it for this lesson where we talked about how ponds move. Hopefully that all made sense. If you have any questions, feel free to let me know. But hopefully that all made sense to you guys. And I will see you in the next video where I'll talk to you about how the other pieces on the chessboard move. 4. [Basic Moves] How Other Pieces Move: All right, Let's talk about how the other pieces work on the chessboard. So we already learned how the pons move and what their purpose is and how they capture other pieces. Now let's talk about rooks, nights, their ships, and of course the queen at all, of course, will touch on the king as well. Let's start with rooks. And I want to just give my ROCC out of here. Say that they're perfect. So basically the way it moves is by doing this motion. All right, so a ROCC can move basically anywhere forward, backward, left, and rights. And he can move as many squares as it wants, as long as there is no other piece between the point where you start and the point where you finish. All right, so for example, all the squares in-between have to be empty if I'm going from here to here, for example, right now, it's okay if there's an opponent piece here, I can go ahead and capture it. Because remember, unlike ponds, where they're capturing, it was different to the way they just normally move. All the other pieces they can capture with their movement, right? So if there is another piece here, I can capture it. I just need to make sure there's nothing in between because we can't jump over material with a rook. We can only capture appointed materials. So for example, right here, take a look at this. If I move forward, I encounter an opponent pawn. Now, I can go ahead and capture that if I wanted to, because between this, my starting point and my finishing point, every single square in-between is unoccupied. So I can go ahead and capture it if I want to. Alright, so now my turn right now, That's why I couldn't right now. So let's say my opponent like that. Now it's my turn. I can go ahead and capture that if I want to. Right now. Just be aware that i'm, I can't, for example, jump over this poem right here. I can't just go past it and attack the king or anything. I can only move with a rook. I can only move up until the point where in-between all the squares are unoccupied. But other than that, there is no limit to how far you can go, right? It can move in either direction, as many squares as it takes as far as it's all unoccupied squares. And I can move basically as long as it needs to in one single move. All right, so that's how a rookie moves. And let's take a look at nights. Now. Nights are the only piece and Chess. They can jump over material. All right, so for example, I can play this. And again, this is only with knights. There are no other pieces in chess. They can jump over material. But that's CAN. And the way knights move is two in one direction and another direction. To kind of like a, it's kinda like an L shape. Think about the letter L. It's like this, right? It has two in one direction and another direction, just like that. All right, that's an L right there. And that's the way a knight moves in an L-shape, movement in one direction and another direction. Right now, this can be in either direction as far as the square root you end up too, is either unoccupied or occupied by an important piece, right? It doesn't matter what's happening here or here. You can jump over material. Like for example, right here. Here I'm jumping over these two material and going to that, to that point, for example, alright, I'm jumping over, going, they're jumping over is perfectly fine as long as the square root you end up in is not occupied by your own material. Like I can't go here because I can't capture my own material. Right? But if there's an employer material right there, I can go ahead and capture that. That's perfectly fine. All right, so knights can move basically to any square as far as that square, n square, that is two in one direction and one in another direction. As long as that square is either unoccupied, are occupied by an appointed Peace. Alright, so that's how night's work. Now let's talk about bishops. Now, remember, in the last video where I was introducing all the materials to you, I told you to pay attention to the fact that one of the bishops is an alert square. The other one isn't a dark square. Now the reason why I asked you to pay attention to that is because the way bishops move is diagonally, right? And because they move diagonally, the always stay in the same type of square on the board. So for example, if this bishop look at this picture, but it's an, a light square, right? This bishop always say in the white square because no matter which direction or move diagonally, and that's the only movement that can make it. It can only move diagonally. It always stays in the square, squares, basically, right? Whereas let's take a look at the other one. This other Bishop right here. This bishop can only move in dark squares, right? It cannot move to any lights wherever. So that's a very important thing to know. Even though bishops are very powerful and important pieces, each of them can only access half of the squares on the board, right? So the other half of the square. So for example, for this bishop, all the scores that are light are out of the bishops reach. It can never go to any of those squares, and it can never capture anything about those squares. Because of that. You want to be aware of that right? Now. Obviously this plays into strategy, which we'll talk about later on in the course. But for now, just be aware of this. And again, the way they move is diagonally and similar to a rook I. They cannot jump over material and they can move as long as they want. As far as going diagonally, they can go as many squares diagonally as they want. As long as from the starting point and finishing point, there are no material in between. All right. As long as that's the case, they're perfectly fine. But if there isn't, if there's some material, they can't jump over that material, right? So for example, if this thing is here, I cannot go to this square because I can't jump over the material. All right? But I could go ahead and capture that, for example, if I wanted to display that, and I can go ahead and capture that right there. All right, so that's how a bishop moves. Onto the queen. The queen, as I mentioned before, is the most valuable piece in the, on the chessboard. So let's take a look at this right here. So m Kuhn can move in any direction and chooses whether forward, backward, left, right, or diagonally. There we go. All right? And again, similar to the rook and the bishop, it can go, it cannot jump over material, and it can only go to a certain point as far as the starting point and the finishing point, there's nothing in between, right? So in this piece count go here, for example, because it would have to jump over this pond in the middle and account do that. But it could go and capture that for example. So let's might want to place that, lets say. And I could go and capture that. That's not a great idea because this bishop can capture me. But if I wanted to, I could, is basically what I'm saying. Alright, so that's how a queen moves. It can move in either direction, as many squares, as long as there's nothing. We're not jumping over anything basically. Now onto the last piece that we're going to talk about, and that's the king. The king moves is basically one square in either direction. All right, so let me just move it to the middle. Here. There we go. Let's say we play. I also put played that. There we go. I'm just going to count off. Let me let me see. Let's do that there. Let's see this thing there. Is that there, there we go. So let's piece can move once and each direction, as long as it doesn't get checked. And we're going to talk about what a check is in the next video. But for example, right now I can't really move to this square, but don't worry about that for a second. Let's just focus on the movement of the king. The king can move once in either direction, but only one square. All right? It cannot move. It cannot move two squares if that makes sense. Now, it is very important to just be aware that the king, even though it moves a once in each square, is usually not the best piece to be moving around with. And we're going to talk about that more later on. But basically that's the movement. It can move one square in either direction as long as it's not checked into the place that it's going to a, but moreover, it's just not the best idea to move the cannula, and we'll talk about that later on in the course, but that's pretty much it. That's all the movements that you needed to know. Hopefully this is all making sense. That's all the movements of the pieces. If you have any questions again, let me know. But hopefully the instructions were clear and you are starting to put the pieces together. So go ahead, make sure you understand all of that stuff before we move forward. Because obviously, it's very important to know this material. It's the basic moves. And once you feel comfortable with how all the pieces move, feel free to check out the next video where we're going to talk about checking and check meeting. 5. [Basic Moves] Check & Check-Mate: Alright, in this video we're going to talk about what checking is, how we can check mates and win the game. And the fact that we need to remove a check whenever we are checked. So let's start with what a check here. So a check is basically anytime you threat the appointed king. So for example, let's take a look at this, right? In this case that's a check right there. Because what I'm doing with my piece, it's not a good check, but it is a check, right? You probably shouldn't be doing this move. I'm just showing you what a check as though what is happening here is that with this queen, I am checking the opponent King, which means that I'm threatening it, right? So if my opponent who were too, you're not allowed to do this. But if my opponent were to just play something else, for example, not pathos and the king. That would mean that my piece would have captured the king. However, whenever capture the king and the game of chess, and you are never allowed to play anything other than removing the CheckMate or removing the check when you are checked, right? So for example, in this instance, when I am checking the opponent, the opponent must do whatever they can to remove this check before they do anything else. So they have to play something like in this case, they only have one move they can play. And that is this move, right? It's the only legal move they have because anything else means that the remaining checked and then I can just go ahead and basically, well, you don't, you don't capture the king, but that's the implied. The implied captures what we're talking about here, right? If the reason why they have to make this move is because any other move means that their king remains in check. So you always have to remove a check or a threat to your king before you can make any other loops. All right, seems simple enough. Now, checkmate is when there is nothing you can do to remove a check, right? So for example, take a look at this right here, let's say, and say I played this, my opponent is this move. If I make this move now, that is checkmate. And the reason for that is because there's nothing my opponent can do to remove this threat right here, right? There's nothing like my opponent can't remember the, the, this cannot come here or unblock any of these entry points because that's not how a knight moves, right? And the bishop, the bishop can only move to these, to these squares, right? We can't do anything to save this king and the king. They can't really go anywhere because here it's surrounded by its own pieces. So it can't really move in either direction. And it can't move here because it would still be checked by my queen. So basically there's nowhere for this king to go, right? So this is an example of a checkmate. Basically what I've caused is I've checked the king and there's no way for the king to remove the check. And when that happens, I will swell. We call it a checkmate. And that means that I win the game because I have threaten the king and there's no escape for the King. Which means that it's implying that I will capture the game, but we never captured the king in the game of chess. We just check. And if there is no way to remove that check, that's what we call it checkmate. Alright? And that's the goal of the game, basically is to check me the appointing game. Because if you checkmate the opponent king. You win the game. Right? Now, obviously, it's very important to have a material advantage, to have more material than your opponents, to not give up material. But at the end of the day, the only thing that matters is to check me the appointments, right? So if you give up all your material and let's say your opponent is doing very well. It's bringing all your materials. So let's say that happens. This is a really random game, right? I'm just trying to prove a point here. Let's say I move that there and my point that captures that. Let's say, and let's say I make this move. I know that if this at this pont is not here and it moves to a place like this. And if this square was, let's say, covered up, let's say, let's go back actually, let's set a little bit, little bit differently. Let's say my my point had made this. Okay. I know that if I can get this pond to me, move here, that would mean that I can just check me. It's right by going and moving my queen from here to over there, right? I could just check me the point if this pawn wasn't here. So what I could do is I could just sacrifice my pieces and get this pond added there basically, right? So I could do whatever it takes basically. So I could just do this, for example. He captures that. Let's say I do some other crazy stuff. All I care about is to get this out of the way so I can do whatever the hell I want. Let's say, let's say they don't play that. Again, don't do this. I'm just trying to prove a point here. Let's say that I do this and and this happens, okay? Or actually maybe not that Let's say, I don't know. Let's say I do something like this. What happens here is I look, if you take a look at my material, I'm down a lot of material, right? I have lost a bishop, I have lost a night, and my opponent hasn't lost any of those pieces, right? So I'm down a lot of material. But when I make this move, I win the game, right? Because I checking it at the opponents. So it doesn't matter that I am down so many material. The only thing that matters is who check mates the appointments right? Now. Obviously, a lot of times, if you have more material, you're more likely to check me the appointment because you just have a lot more tools at your disposal. Right. So this is by no means me saying, Oh, go lose all your material. No, absolutely not. Material is very important. But what I'm trying to say is what is even more important than material and what is the absolute most important thing in a game of chess is first making sure you don't get checkmated it. Because if you get checkmated you lose. And to, to checkmate the opponent. Because if you checkmate the opponent, you went. Alright, but obviously it's first important to not get treatment of yourself because even if you're about to checkmate the opponent, if you get too many yourself first, you lose, right? So first thing that you need to be aware of is to not get checkmated yourself. Always protected King, king safety comes first before anything else. And then second priority should always be to find a way to checkmate the opponent. And then after that, you can worry about material, right? And again, we'll talk about this a lot more throughout the course. And we'll talk about different strategies, especially medal game and end game. But for now, just be aware of this, okay, So the goal of the game is to checkmate the opponent King. And also too. This is an implied goal of the game. It is to avoid getting checkmated at all costs, right? So even if you have to sacrifice material to debugging Check minute, obviously that's worth it because if you get check me in it, it doesn't matter how much we threw. Have you loose? Right? It doesn't matter what you have left, so avoid getting took me out with all costs. Checkmate the opponent also at all costs, I guess. So. Yeah, that's pretty much it for this video. And I'll see you in the next one. 6. [Basic Moves] Castling: Alright, in this video we're going to talk about canceling. Canceling move is a specific moves that you perform it between your king and one of your books. Alright, so it can be either this or this right? Now when you castle with the rook that is closer to the king, that's called the King side Castle. When you castle with the ROCC, that is on the longer side and is closer to the queen rather than a king. That's called a queen side castle. Alright, so this is a king side castle. This is a queen side cancel, right? And let's talk about how the castle works. So first of all, for a castle to work, you need a couple of components. First component is to, as a you need to have not moved your king by that point. Point you Castle. All right. Second component you need is the rock that your castle linguist needs to have not moved throughout the game. So let's say I'm making a king side castle. I need to first make sure my king and my book, which is on my king site, have not moved so far. If they have moved already in the game, then I am I am not allowed to castle anymore. That's it. But if neither of them have moved, the next component I need is to clear all the scores in between, right? So for example, let's say we're playing our game. This guy goes there. Take this guy out there. Right? Now in this point, I have cleared all the scores between my king and Mike, my rook. What I can do is I can make a king side Castle, which means I take my king. Now remember the kink moved one in every direction. This is the only exception where the king mix different kind of move is when counseling and you're only allowed to do castle once again again, provided that all the conditions that I'm talking about are already in order. Basically, what the king can do in this case, because the king has moved, the ROCC hasn't moved in the game. And all the squares in-between are clear. What the king can do is it can, can move twice over here and look at that. The ROCC just jumps over and goes two squares to the left as well. This is what we call a castle mean, right? And you can only do this once every game. And this is, I swear to God, this is the last, a weird move that we're going to see. After this, we're done with all the basic rules and basic moves, okay? But this is an important one to learn. And this is actually very common move, right? Almost every game, not every single game, but almost every game has at least one of the players castle link on either side. Okay, So this is very important to learn. Actually. This is not a rare move or anything like that is a very important and move that we're going to actually talk about later in the course as well. We're going to talk about should we castle on the king size request on the queen side? What are the advantages each of them about? Let's just talk about that later. For now, let's talk about how it works precisely, right? So let's take a look at how it would have worked if we were doing it on the other side, Let's say I wanted to Castle on the coincide. So again, we need to basically get all the stuff in there, out of there. Let's say we make this move appointments now move, we go there and makes it move, right? So I need to get all the squares between my king and my rook cleared up. So I move all of these pieces out of there and move that out of there and move that out of there. And move that out of there so that basically everything here is cleared. And what I can do it again, he moved twice in this direction when it's my turn actually. So what's the point to make it, make it move? I can move twice in this direction. And voila, the rook jumps 32, right? Right. So basically, the rook jumps over our king when we perform a castle and comes over here, right? So in the case of the Kings I castle only move twice. In the case of a coenzyme castle and moves three times, right? So that's what a castle is. Counseling is very important for everyone, even for beginners, I recommend every single time to Castle, because the best thing about the castle counseling and making this move is that it gives our, gives our king a lot of safety because it gets it to safety. It gets it away from the middle where all the action is going to happen. And when, when our king is in the middle, it's actually a very exposed, right? And we'll talk about this later on in the course. But when it's in the middle, It's very exposed. A lot of threats can come from either direction. But when we perform a castle, it goes to one direction. It is already protected by some sort of pause structure hopefully. And obviously we can choose which side to counsel on. So if there's one side that's not doing so well, we could just castle on the other side. And it gives our Kenya lot of safety. So it's a very important method to do. And also it gets our rook and out of this weird spot where it's not probably not going to be moving too much and it gets, gets an active and into the game, right? So it has a lot of advantages. Again, we'll go more in-depth into these advantages or later on in the course, but that's how a gasoline move works. Okay? So hopefully that made sense. If it didn't, make sure you learn this because like I said, this is a very important move to note. It's not a rare move or anything like that. It's a very common and a very important move. So learn that move, and I promise you that's the last basic moves that we're going to learn after this, we're going to go into talking about strategy, talking about openings and all that stuff. Okay? So that's how we perform a castle on either the king side or liquid CYP. And I will see you on the next video. 7. Types of Games - Blitz & Bullet Explained: All right, Before we get into the main opening principles, I just want to let you guys know about some of the different types of games that you might encounter when you play chess. Now, obviously, there's a standard way that you may have played with a friend where you just solve the board, start playing and you don't really worry about the time that you're spending on the game. But a lot of chess games, especially competitive ones, are timed in one way or another. Some of them are longer. For example, maybe you have an hour for all the decisions that you make, but some of them are shorter. For example, bullet and Blitz are the two that we're going to talk about today. Bullet is a type of game where you only have one minutes. All the decisions you make. So every time you're playing and it's your, it's your time to make a move. Your time is going by, right? It's going down. It's counting down from o minutes all the way to 0. And the way it works is that if your time reaches 0, you lose the game no matter how far ahead or how far you're losing, no matter what's going on. If your time hit 0, it's over, you lose. And that's how the game goes, right? So that's bullet. There's also blitz. Let's us a little bit more. It's a little bit better than bullet as far as time consumption because you have three or five minutes. And there's a lot of times there are blitz games where you maybe gain a second or two for every time you make a move. So it's not as and there's not as much time pressure on you as they might have been without that timing had enough. So that if you are, let's say down on time and you only have 10 seconds left, then you can start making a lot of fast moves and just kind of gain back some of the lost time you have. But also there are some games where you just have three minutes and that's it, right? So if your time is running low, if you're down to 10 seconds, That's all you got. You got to make do with that, right? So you gotta be very cognizant of your time in those games. You've gotta make sure that from the beginning, especially with the open easy already know all the openings so you don't waste a lot of time on the opening soup, which is why it's such a good idea to study the openings that you want to play fully. And then also in the end games, that's another place where you want to try to preserve as much time as possible, right? So most of your time consumption should be on the middle game, because the middle game is the part of the game which is the most fluid and is really there. There are a lot of different avenues that might open up an ad, lot of different attacks that might come up from your opponent and a lot of things that you have to think about being aware of at all times, right? But in the opening and an end games, you want to be really a little bit more automatic about it, right? You want to make sure that you already know all the stuff you need to do and just execute them right, so that you don't end up losing a lot of time and then having a really tough time winning because you just don't have enough time ever. Now, it's also a really good idea to start playing these games, blitz and bullets. Both of them, I would actually recommend that you play a lot. And just Assistant fun. You don't even have to like start out. It might be a little tough for you when you're starting out. Just try for fun, okay? Try your best. I guarantee you it will get a lot easier as you try it a couple of times, you start getting used to the formats and you start getting used to the time pressure being on you. And it's always a good idea to develop your skills under time pressure. Because even in lot of those games where you'd have, let's say an hour to play all your games. A lot of times, by the time it gets to the end game, there is not much time left on the clock. So if you're not already in the mood of playing super-fast and finishing off super-fast. And maybe you haven't been playing bullet at all. And you're not really used to making like ten moves in five seconds. Well, then you might have a little bit of a problem finishing some of those even longer games off because by the time you get to the very end of the game, there's probably not going to be that much time left on your, on your clock. And if there are two players that are very even, well, a lot of times the one that's better at bullet a blitz actually comes out on top, just for the fact that at the very end of the game here is going to be a lot of time pressure building up. And the person who is better, better at dealing with temperature usually traps. So that's why such a good idea to start practicing them. And also it just makes it a lot easier for you to play, especially if you get really good at playing bullet and Blitz. Well, if you can play well, under time pressure gets how much better you will play when you don't have as much time pressure on you, right? So it's just a good idea all around to check them out and just try him a little bit, even if it's just for fun to start with, that's totally fine because at least you will get used to the format and the way it works, and how you need to manage your time throughout the game in order to make sure you don't run out of time like super fast, right? So make sure to check it out. Just try for fun and I'll see you in the next video. 8. Controlling the Center of the Board - Chess Opening Principles: All right, In this video we're going to talk about the main opening principles. And the first principle that we need to learn is about controlling this on the board with the central palms. And now before we get into that, let me just talk about what an opening is, right? So a game of chess is typically categorized into three different parts. That you have the opening, you have the middle game, and you have the endgame. So the opening is the stage where you just take your pieces and just put them on the board, get them involved in the game. You develop them, you bring them into the fold and just set up some kind of a strategic, strategic placement for all, all your pieces and get them involved in the game, right? So that's the open game. The next stage after that is what we call a middle game. Now, a middle game is once you've done all your setup, once your pieces are involved in the game, That's when you start maybe attacking the opponent, maybe trying to get ground on your opponent, trying to capture, trying to trade, and do all sorts of stuff, right? So that's the middle game where we go through all that stuff. And that comes after we have done all of our preparations and reopening. The end game is when we've maybe captured some pieces, maybe we've traded some pieces and there aren't too many pieces left. And it's basically about finishing off the game. That's what we call an endgame, right? When it's at the very end. We're just trying to finish off the game by either checkmated the appointment or whatever we're trying to do, right? We could be after a tie, for example, like if, if the situation doesn't allow us to check me, the opponent who might be after a tie. But if our situation does allow us to win the game, maybe we're after checkmated important, right? That's what the endgame is. But obviously, the most important is to first make sure we know how to do the opening properly. Because if you don't do the opening properly and if you make it a lot of mistakes in the opening, well, you're going to have a very tough time playing the rest of the game, right? Because think of the opening as the foundations of your game, right? As if you're building a building, right? Like if you're foundations of that building, that you're building is not very stable and perfectly tuned and fine tuned. It's not going to be, It's not going to be a pleasant experience building that building, right? It's going to probably fall apart at some point. As you get higher up in the levels, you might have trouble sustaining the weights because the foundations are just not there. So it's very important to make sure we have good foundations by making sure that we actually play the opening properly. And that's what the main opening principles are. They're just a number of guidelines that help us make little to no mistakes basically in the opening and play as game theory optimal as possible. So that later on we are able to have a much easier game. Alright, so I'm gonna go through all of them with you to make sure that we learn properly from the very beginning how to set up our game so that we can set ourselves up for success later on in the game, okay. And the first thing that we're going to talk about is controlling the son of the board. Alright, so that's the first opening principle in chess. Controlling the center of the board is very important. And the reason for that is because if you have, if you occupy one of these central squares or any of these squares alongside the central squares. If you occupy any of these with your pieces, your pieces are actually a lot more powerful than if they are on the sides or somewhere like in rest position or they haven't moved quite to the center, right? Because think of it this way. Think of this this night over here, right? Assume there is no other pieces around it. How many legal moves does this knight half, right? It can move here if there was no other PCR, for example, it can move here and it can move up there, there, there we go. I can move their right. It would have three illegal moves. Whereas if it was in one of these central squares, let's say, let's say that this knights was over here, right? It would have one move over there. One move over there. One move over there. One over here, one over here, one move there. Now they're moved there. And I would have eight moves as you can see, right? Assuming again, there is no other pieces here, it would have 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 different moves that you can make, right? So instead of the three that has over here, it would have eight moves. So obviously if your piece has eight possible moves, it's a lot more powerful because you can make a lot of different. Again, that's just one piece, right? If you have another night, this night, again, also only has three possible with here. If that night is positioned, let's say here, that would also be another eight possibilities for this piece, right? If this bishop is positioned here, again, it will have a lot more possibilities, right? Because once position here, it can cover all these squares and these cores. So that's 20 over here for 67 squares. Whereas if it was in 1-D. central scores for example, here we'll cover 1234123456789, 10, 11, 12, 13, right? It will cover 13 scores if it was in this position over here. Again, assuming there is no other pieces here, right? But you can see the difference, right? If it's if any of them FOR pieces are on the sidelines, they don't have as many options available to them as if the compared to when they are in the middle. Basically. Now, the reason why it's very important to grab a hold of and control the side of the board from early on is because that's what your opponent is going to do as well. Your opponent is also going to be after dose central squares because the important also knows this. That if the opponent can get their pieces to the middle, they can also be like make their pieces of our more powerful. So it's really two-fold. That's really important when it comes to controlling the center of the square. Because if you control the central squares, your pieces will be more powerful. And also your opponents won't be able to use those squares because you're already using them, right? So it's not only an advantage for you because your pieces have more options to them. It's also an advantage because your opponent doesn't get to use those squares. So it's very important that we try to basically assert ourselves and assert our dominance when it comes to controlling the central squares. And the opponent is also going to do the same as well. Ideally, if we could control are all four of these squares, then we'd be in a really good position, right? But the thing is that the opponent isn't just going to let us have those squares. They're at a point is going to fight back and try to get some of those scores as well. So usually what happens is now we can kind of capture, kinda get a hold of two of these squares. And our appointing kinda gets a hold of two of them as well. And then we have to battle out about the control of the central squares. Or does squares surrounding the central squares, I should say. Right? So these ones would be the other scores that we start fighting after, afterwards, right? So that's basically the first thing that we need to be attentive of is trying to control this squares in the center of the board. Now, let's take a look at what would happen if one of the players is not aware of what's happening in the center, right? So let's say we are trying to get after her center, but the opponent is an unbeliever, right? The opponent was like, I don't want to control the center of the square, just want to play my own game. Let's see what would happen, right? So Let's say I make this move E4, very common roof. And the Panda's this, right. The appointment, let's say is not trying to fight back and try to control the main source. Because right now what I'm doing is I'm controlling this square. I'm also controlling this square because remember that's how upon can capture, right? So if I am positioning my pond here, I'm also saying that if anything else comes to the square, I can capture it right? Now, when I do this, am I pointing, does something like this? I could just go ahead and get a hold of the other two squares in the middle. Let's say my opponent does something else. Well, now my opponent is in a really tricky spot, right? Because now, no matter what my opponent does, he's going to have a really tough time playing the game, right? Let's say I play something like this or something. Right now. If my opponent tries to develop its night, it's going to run problems because now I can just say, I can just throw it out like that right? Now if this piece tries to come over here, obviously I can just keep threatening the peace until it has to retreat, right. And it can't go really anywhere. It can't go here because I just capture. It. Can go here it is. I will just capture it can't go here because I will just capture, can't go here because I will just capture, can't even go here because I would capture it can't go there because I would capture any of these places, right? I will just capture it. So this piece isn't a lot of trouble, so I can't even move from here. It has to just move back. And that's another thing that we're going to talk about in the later videos is that in the opening stage, the last thing we wanna do is to make multiple moves with the same piece, because in the opening, it's very important for us to get as many pieces out there and developed as possible, right? And when we say developed, we mean just taking a piece out of its rest positions. For example, this bishop is in its respiratory. Now, we want to take these out of the respiration and get them involved in the game, like somewhere around the central squares where they have a lot of options available to them, right? So later on we can use them and strategize about how to attack or do whatever maneuver we wanted to do with these pieces. And obviously, right now because I have complete control of the center of the square, it's very hard for my opponent to do anything, right? So let's say he doesn't play that. Let's say you play something like this was atmosphere. I can just go ahead and throw that piece again. And we're just going to go realistic because here I will just capture him. Here. I could just capture if he goes there, I can just move this up, right? So if he goes there, I can just do this. And again, same problem. If he tries to capture that I just captured back and he tries to go there, I can just capture it. Tries to capture this. I can capture him. And he goes there. I can just capture them, right? So he isn't a lot of trouble already. So we can make that movie there. Let's take a look at the other nodes. So what if he tries to, let's say developments Bishop, well, where's the special gonna go? Because if the Bishop comes here, I can just capture him. Just like that. Michelle goes there, I can just capture him. The bishop goes there, I can just capture him. And even if the Bishop goes somewhere like here, let's say I just play something else. If the Bishop comes here and just do this right? Again, where does it go? Can't go here. It can't go there. I can't go there. Can't stay here. Obviously. There's no way to go that way, so probably just has to retreat again, right? So as you can see, because my opponents didn't pay attention those first two or three moves. And I just got control of the central squares. Now my opponent is in a lot of trouble and it's really hard to, for the opponent to actually start playing, right? He can't get really any of the pieces involved in the game. He can't get either the knights involve them again because I just threatened them and they have to retreat. He kept really good the bishops involved because again, same thing. I am smooth this, if this bishop comes out, really, what is he going to do? If he comes here with the bishop? I can just move this one. All right? As you can see, it creates a lot of problems for, for the opponents, right? So that's why it's very important for us to make sure we pay attention to the central squares. And early on, from very early onRestart battling it out for the central squares, right? So for example, if I play something like E4, it's much better for my opponent to just respond with either an E5 or E6, either one of these, right? Either one of these moves is much better because with E6 he's controlling this square. And I'll also setting up this movement later where is supported by this pump with E5 obviously is controlling this square and also trying to assert its control over this one. So if I make, and make it move like this, you can just capture me and still have control of that square. Also, keeping this score open for the other black pieces to take control off later on. Or he could do. Let's say if is here, he always has the option to bring out the night so he can protect this square and I can try attacking that square. He also has the option to bring out this knights to attack this square that I have claimed. There's a lot of different things that you can do, right? So this is a much better move than just moving something over here. Which is just not going to be helpful to black at all because, I mean, just look at this. I mean, look at, look at the statistics over here, right? This is great. So. Anytime white has opened with y4 and black, his responded with this MOOC. Look at what happens 61% of the time, white wins, right? If deforest platelet later on. So if this move is played 64 percent of the time, white wins, 61% of time commitments. If a night F3 is played half the time it's tied. The other 50 percent, 33 percent white man's, right. So either way, you can see black doesn't have too many wins under these kinds of circumstances. And the reason for that is because this is just a real bad set-up for black, right? So a very simple move in the beginning you can see how effective it has, right? Like you might think like what's, what's the problem? It's just the first MOOC. Well, you can already see how it's setting you up for failure and it's setting black up for a lot of trouble going forward. Right leg is going to have a real, real challenge bringing out its pieces. Black is going to have a real challenge getting back control of the soundboard later on. And basically it's going to be a nightmare, right? So again, that's why it's very important to make sure we play the opening properly. Okay, now let's just take a quick look at the most common openings for white. The most common opening is E4, as you can say in the database. This is the chest database by the way. It kind of just has all the games that are saved, categorized so that we can see which moves are most, most popular. The most popular movies, E4, as you can see, it's been played 1.3 million times as the first move. The second most popular move is default. And as you can see that one has been played 1 million times. And I think just see these two are by far more common than any other move, right? Because this is 1.31 million. The next one is 300000. So that's a huge dive as far as the popularity. So these are the two most popular movies because they are the easiest for grabbing hold of the central squares. Because both of them not only grab hold of one of the central scores, they also assert control over another central score as well. And that's why these two are just so common, right? Because any other that doesn't mean that any other movies wrong. It just means that any other move just makes it so much harder for you to play later on in the game, right? So it's just much easier for you to play later on if you start with one of these moves. Now the third most common move, still thrown or the other. So still not crazy low numbers and we'll get to crazy low numbers over here. But the third most common move is knights, F3, right? And now you might think, well, what's going on? I thought we were supposed to get control of the central squares. Why is this MOOC even like a move worthy of talking about, right? The reason for that is because it is kind of asserting control over two squares. And this, as far as the central scores are concerned, it's a little bit more difficult than just playing one of these because you're not occupying all those central squares. But you are still asserting control over two of them, right? So it's still an acceptable move. It's not a terrible move by any means. And you can even see when and 3 is played. White is still winning more often than black. So it's not a terrible move by any means. It's just not as easy as one of these two, right? For beginners, I would recommend just sticking to one of these two because it just sets you up so much better for success later on in the game. And this one, you really need to know what you're doing. If you're opening with that, right, you really need to know your game well, forward and backward, right? And if you don't, you're going to be in trouble. So that's why I would just recommend one of these two. Let's also take a look at the fourth one because it's still two hundred, ten hundred and still a decent number plate. But then after that you see like it's twenty three thousand, twelve thousand is much less compared to these first four. So we're not going to worry about the rest of them, right? But let the fourth most common opening is C4. And C4. Again, it's asserting control over this square and the central square. And it is a little bit different as it is. It is not already occupying one of the central scores, but it is occupying one of the adjacent squares right next to the central square. Now, the reason why f, The reason why F4 is not maybe as good an idea As because you're already opening yourself and your kink up to getting checked, right? Whereas with S4, you don't have that problem, right? This is a queen. The queen can move, can do all sorts of things. So it's not as big a problem as if you just open with F4 because then you're just opening yourself up to all sorts of trouble. Well, when it comes to your kink being threatened by the opponents. And, but yeah, that's the four most common first moves for white. And again, we talked about how the reason why they are the most common and probably the best moves to make is because they just give you the most control over its central squares in the very beginning. All right, so hopefully this all makes sense. Hopefully you're following along with the way that we need to be thinking about the games, at least when we're starting out. And instead of just thinking about whole, we start out and just go after the opponent, right? Like it's not quite like that. Like we have to first make sure that we are positioning ourselves and setting ourselves up for success as much as possible by making the right moves, by moving in the right pieces in the right directions and just setting up a good formation and a good form for attack later on in the game. Alright, so hopefully you guys enjoyed this video. Hopefully it all makes sense and I will see you in the next video. 9. Developing Minor Pieces (Knights First) - Chess Opening Principles: Alright, in this video we're going to learn the second main opening principle, which is developing your minor pieces early on in the game. Now the minor pieces are usually just referred to the night and the bishop's as they are important pieces, but they're not as significant as the rock and the queen, which we can call the major pieces now. And so these are the minor pieces that we need to get involved early on in the game. And as they are not really that useful in the rest position, we need to make sure we get them out in the middle of the board as soon as possible so that we can maximize their power and basically use them as much as we possibly can. Now, with other pieces like for example, the queen, we want to be a lot more conservative because the Queen, the problem with the queen is it's a very powerful piece. But on the other hand, because it's such a powerful piece, the opponent is always going to be after our queen and it's going to always be on the lookout to threaten our queen, right? So if we get our queen involved way too early on in the game, there's always going to be a target on its back as our opponent can turn it with basically anything, right? Because any other piece is worth less than a week. So if the appointing can trade any other piece for our queen, it will be worth their while, right? Because this is the most powerful piece that we have. That's why we want to be a lot more conservative with the major pieces like a queen or a rooks. Obviously one of the books has to be stationary if you want to have a castle in auction. And the other one is not going to get involved either too early on, but the minor pieces and the nights and the bishops, we want to get them involved in the game as soon as possible. That's why a lot of times and the openings. So for example, let's play it regular opening. We see this kinds of mover we play upon. And then we go ahead and play in night, right? A very common. The four nights opening is also very common. You see this a lot as both players are trying to develop their nights as soon as possible. And that is perfectly fine. And the one thing that you need to take away from this is that it's always best to develop your knights first, then your bishops. And the reason for that is, there's a couple of reasons actually. The first reason is that the knights have a very short range, right? They can only make the L move. They can't cover anything else outside of that. So for that reason, when they are in rest position, they pretty much covered everything right. Like when let's take a look, let's go back over here. When my night was over here, it was covering these two squares and that's it, right? And of course, defending this part over here. But that's it. It doesn't cover anything else. Whereas with my bishop, even though I haven't developed yet and it is definitely something that we want to do eventually is to develop it. But even right now that I haven't developed, It's still look at this. Just because I've moved this pawn out of the way. It's covering 12345 squares. And it's already been kind of active. It's not super active obviously, you want to get more involved in the game later on. But as of right now it's still kinda involved in the game, right? It's still making an impact. Whereas with the nights, this night pretty much has no involvement in the game whatsoever, right? Because there's nothing, there's not gonna be anything here. Because these pods are already defending them, right. And this pond already has a bunch of other pieces defending it, right? So it's not even like this. This night is really defending much here. So really this night is not doing anything useful for us, right? Whereas with the bishop, the bishop is already at least doing something. The black square or ducts where bishop is so far not really involved in the game, but as soon as I make it play like this, again, that piece is also kind of embolden game, sort of. Whereas again, this is nine isn't doing anything. That's why it's very important for us to develop the knights first because they are really, really powerless when they haven't been developed. Whereas with the bishops there are at least doing something, right. That's the first reason. The second reason is because that the bishops, the fact that they have such a long range and that they can move so many squares. And just one move means that anytime I decided to develop it, I can just do it like this, right? So it's not my term right now. Let's say you didn't make that move. I just do that right. Anytime you the site to whereas with the night. If I wanted to get involved me, I can't just pick it up and just put it in the middle of the board, right? I have to make a move over here first. And then I can make another move to the center, right? Because of the lower range, it's also a lot more time consuming to develop your and nights into a very good position in the center of the board. Whereas with the bishops, anytime you choose, you can just pick it up and go as far as you want, right? If I wanted to, I could even come over here that the range really gives us the ability to go as far as we want. Another reason why it is also because we don't really know where we want to develop this bishop right now, right now with the nights, it's pretty clear we want to go, you usually want to go here in this insight square, right? We almost never want to go out. Because look at this, like if I go out, it's my turn right now, so I'll just make the move. I go out here. I'm still not really impacting game that much. I'm still not involve, am still not close to the center. I'm not covering any of the central squares. I mean, this is all I've got here. Whereas if I make this move instead, look at how much better that is. I'm already covering one of the central squares on defending my pawn in one of those central squares. And obviously anytime I choose, I can make another loop to go into Windows Central squares. So my pieces a lot more active here, right? So it's already kind of determine where I should develop my night too, right? I mean, this, this over here is close down with my finite, It's not even a good move anyways, this over here again, not the best move because it's just so limiting. So obviously we have to make this move, whereas with the bishop, it's a little bit more tricky, right? Because where should I develop the special two right now, it's still early on in the game. We don't know what the pond structure is going to shake out to be like. So it's really tough to know where to develop, especially like if I develop it here, I'm blocking the bishop, myself with my own pond. If I develop it here. I mean, there's always the threat of this move. I mean, right now that the opponent can't do this. But for example, if they put in place this and let's say a play something else, then they can make this move, right? And now all of a sudden, I'm not sure what to do here, right? Do I ruin my pond structure? What I do, right? It's not the best. If I make you move over here, obviously be pointing, you just make this move, right? So right now, it's just not clear because of the fact that all, almost all the ponds then my opponent possesses are in the rest position. We don't know what the pawn structure of the opponent is going to shake out to be like. So it's really tough to know where to develop this bishop two on this, on this diagonal. Whereas with the bishop, say with the nights, The Knight's already kinda have predetermined where it is best to play them. So we can just make that move instead, right? So it's always best to develop your nights before you develop your bishops. All right, Hope hopefully this makes sense. And obviously a lot of the openings and a lot of the common openings are involved with playing your night first for the reason that I just explained. And we're gonna take a look at some of these openings little bit later on in the course. Obviously, we want to first make sure we understand some of the more fundamental parts of chess. But once we've covered the fundamentals, we also talk about some of the openings later on. And in those openings you see that the vast, vast, vast majority of time you develop your nights before your bishops for this very reason that I was explaining. Okay, so hopefully that makes sense. I will discuss more about how we develop our pieces in the future videos. But for now, just be aware of that. We want to develop art minor pieces, and we wanted to develop our nights first. And the knights always go to these squares that are close to the central squares because of the vast advantage that it provides us compare to the other moves that in that can make. Alright, so hopefully that all made sense and I will see you in the next video. 10. Avoid Making Multiple Moves With One Piece - Chess Opening Principles: Another main principle in the opening stage is that we want to avoid making multiple moves with one piece. This is a big no-no. And the reason for that is because every time we keep making a move with the same piece over doing is we're basically not developing another piece instead, right? So for example, let's say I open with this, and let's say I make another move with my night over here, right? Let's say my knight goes there, right? This is a terrible move, but I'm going to show you why it's such a bad idea to do this. Once we make this move, what happens is that now my opponent can basically threatened without any problem, right? First of all, the opponent can just capture this, right? But let's say I already had that covered. And let's say I played this before. My boilerplate, something over here. And then I made this MOOC. Well, my opponent could just threaten my nights with their palm, which means I have to retreat right. Now. What happens over here is that I fall behind in my development because now my point, let's say they can play something like this. And let's look and look at what happened, right? Because I made this unnecessary move over there and then back to the original point. I wasted two moves here. And in those two moves, looking at what my opponent that they meet, their bishops, basically have a very strong foothold in the game. It's developed over here. They moved up this part over here, build a very nice planned, structured or defending each other. So this night is now free to move or without having to worry about being tied down to this part anymore. And just looking at this position. Black is just so much more involved in the game ran like it's already starting to open up. The pathway for the white square. Bishop has also opened up over here. So if the opponent decides to make this move later on in the game, they have the ability to do so. Obviously there are much further ahead in the game right now. So that's why you want to make sure you don't make multiple moves with the same piece, because it's just going to lead to you falling behind in your development. And over here where I really made a big mistake was just wanting to make that move, right? This is fine. This is not the best move either, but this is the real, the real problem. When I make this move. Basically there's no way forward for me because the point is definitely going to throw me. And when that happens, there's nowhere else for me to go. Right? And that's what you need to think ahead. When you make any move in chess, you need to think ahead of what, what am I going to do if my opponent responds to this move that I'm making, right? I should have thought ahead about this. That if I make this move, well, what's going to happen? My opponent is probably gonna respond with something like this or something like this. Which means I don't have anywhere to go because I can't go there. I can't go there. I can't go there. I can go anywhere, right? I have to just retreat. And obviously retreating means that I wasted to move, so I have to just avoid making this move in the first place, all right, and just do something else. Another way that people make this mistake is by bringing out the queen tour. And then we'll talk about bringing out to Queen too early in a little while. But for now, let's just talk about when you bring it out and you start making couple of moves with it, right? Let's say the point of play, something like this. Now what's happened is that I've been threatened and I have to move the screen. Let's say I move it over here or something. The opponent threatens me one more time. I would say I move it back over here. And then my appointment executable, right? So again, look at what's happened over here. My opponent has developed two nights, whereas I have just been fooling around with my queen, haven't developed anything. All the minor pieces are back home. Both my knights are still stationary, so they're pretty useless. This bishop is kinda able to get involved in the game, but so is my opponent spaceships. So that's not really an advantage. When you look at it. Look at the central squares, right? Central squares are under attack from oppositions. This pawn has a very strong foothold in the game. And when you look at the central squares, I have occupied one. But I'm in a very shaky spot, right? And obviously, when you just look at the material involved, black has a low more material and bottling game. And the reason for that is because I was wasting moves, just moving around my queen all over the place and not developing my pieces instead. And what led to, what, what led to this problem was the fact that I was just not thinking about the game holistically and I was just thinking about making this move, this one move, this one move here. We need to make sure that in the opening, we're more concerned about setting up the foundations for the later on in the game, rather than just playing this move or distMoved, looks cool, or I should do this. We don't want to do that in the opening. The opening as really just about setting up a good foundation for moving forward, getting your pieces involved in the game, getting them as close to the central center of the board as possible, and just getting your minor pieces involved in the game. And then you can think about canceling. And only then you can think about your past structure and your queen getting involved in all of that stuff. Okay? So again, we'll talk about how to move forward from those for those areas later on. But for now, just be aware of what you're doing in the opening. And the fact that that's our goal in the opening is to just set up a very nice foundation, get our pieces involved in the game. And that's all. Alright. We don't want to make multiple moves with the same piece. We don't wanna just waste moves not developing. We'll wanna do moves like this or anything like that. Like for example, this would be a waste of time. Let's say the poem develops that if I make another move with this again, I'm not accomplishing anything here, right? But that might look like a cool moved to you, but it's not doing anything. And that's really problematic because the opponent can just take advantage of that. Keep developing their pieces. Let's say I'm making a move like this. And look at this. Three pieces are involved in the game. Already canceled. King is in a very safe spots. I have pretty much no attack going forward. But the opponent is getting all their pieces out there. And I'm going to have a very tough game going forward because I will just wasting moves, moving, moving these pieces, right? Not really doing anything. So that's why in yield opening, it's very important that you don't fall behind by making sure that you're constantly developing your pieces, constantly going towards the center of the board and attacking the center of the board as much as possible. And basically fighting for dominance in the center. And then later on we can worry about just what are the good moves, how we can think about attacking the opponent that comes later in the middle game. In the opening, we want to just built a nice foundation in the middle game, we can look at what sorts of weak spots are appalling has created. And then we can just attack those weak spots using the pieces that we've already developed. Alright, so hopefully that makes sense and I will see you in the next video. 11. Avoid Checking Without Purpose - Chess Opening Principles: All right, Another main opening principle is to make sure we avoid checking without purpose. Now obviously, checking can be a very useful tool throughout the game. Sometimes it's going to be very useful to help us win the game. But in other times it could be to our detriment because it could lead to us falling behind and our development or just make a mistake. All right, so let's take a look at an example. Let's say we have normal opening and we have French defense from the opponents, which is my favorite responses black. And let's say we're in this position and what goes and takes and black response right? Now, obviously, as you can see here, if the queen moves here, What's turns right now? But when it's black's turn, and the queen could come over here and check our king, right? Because if the queen moves there, that's a direct line to our king and it is checking us right. Now. You might think that, hey, I'm checking the opponent. That's a good thing, right? Well, checking is a tool that you can use, but you should be aware of how you use it and you should use it only when it benefits you. You shouldn't just use it just because it's something to do. And let's see in this example how that can be to your detriment. Let's say I do a very common move which is spring out my knights developing it. Nothing crazy. And let's say you decide to make this move, right? And check me. This is a really bad idea, one because you're falling behind in your development. Looking me, I've already developed one piece and in response to your check, I can't develop another piece. I can bring my bishop over here, block your check. So I'm removing the check. I am doing what I'm supposed to, but I'm also developing another piece now I have two pieces developed, whereas you don't really have any of the minor pieces developed. You have your queen out there, but that's not a good thing as we talked about this and we'll discuss this a little bit more further on, is that you don't really want to get your high-value pieces out this early because there's going to be target on their back, right? You want to first develop your minor pieces. And from those minor pieces you want to first develop the nights, then the bishops, and then you can go after the more valuable pieces later on. But over here, obviously you can't do that. There we go. That's a really bad idea because you can just capture. But right now we have removed the check with this bishop. And R Knight has also been developed, whereas the opponent, they don't really have anything. And now that it's black's turn, black can maybe start developing their own stuff, but right now they are far behind, right? And I can just go ahead and make my castle move over here. And now looking at this, I have developed two pieces. I've already canceled my kings in a safe position. Look at the line of defense. It's looking very solid, whereas the black, I mean, they have one piece developed, but that's pretty much it. And of course, let's say they develop another piece like that. And there's always the threat of this MOOC, right? And the reason why this move is threatening is, and we'll get to this later on. This is actually on the middle. Again, tactics that are very important to know is that we have the option of discovered attack. What are discovered? A Taiwanese, let's say black dose, some really useless move like this. I can just remove this bishop from there. We haven't discovered attack on the queen, and we're also pinning down the queen to this king over here. Again, we'll talk about all these different tactics in the middle game tactics, Muscle Tactics, videos. Later on in the course. But just to put it simply to you, now, this queen isn't a very dodgy situation, right? Because it's been pinned against this king, mean that it can't move. Because if, if this queen moves out of the way, this king would be under check because of this rook, right? So it can't move out of the way, which means that we can basically captured this queen. Of course, black could do something like this, try to block it, but that's beside the point, right? I'm just saying that this is a very bad situation for black. And even if like does this, now, this piece is trapped here and can't really do anything. We can make this move over here, right? And of course, the black cannot go ahead and capture it because if black captures what, you just capture their queen, right? So as you've seen, just led to a lot of problems for black. And that unnecessary check at the beginning is really starting to ruin things later on in the game. And now black has a lot of different things to worry about. Whereas white, the black king is secure, I should say. And every single piece isn't a very good position, right? This piece developed, this piece developed this piece can develop it anytime and there's nothing against it. It's not pinned against anything. It's not blocking anything. It's completely free to move as it wants. And of course, our queen rose over here and we can always develop this night as well, bringing into the game and put some pressure on these central squares over here. All right, so as you can see why it isn't, it's just so much of a better position. And the reason for that is because black maid and unnecessary check and there was no point to right. Like when we made that check, there was absolutely nothing there. Right. That's one thing I want to make sure I get across is that there's nothing wrong with checking your appointment. Just make sure there's a reason behind it, right? This movie, there's literally no reason behind because once I blocked the shock, like what are you gonna do? What's the plan like what are you going to come here and check me again, I can just plug that, right? There's not really any purpose to this move and there is no follow-up to it because I'm just going to block it. And then what like well, why why did you check me? What was the point of it? There's absolutely and not only can I block it, but I'm also developing this piece and I'm also clearing the pathway for me to go ahead and cancel. So it's almost as if I'm just playing my normal game, but you have stepped out of your normal game. You are not developing your minor pieces. Instead, you're moving around with your queen, right? And obviously when we make this move later on in the game, let's say black lives that we can play this. And now because of this threat that we just talked about, where I could have a discovered attack on the queen. And again, we'll talk about discovery tax later on in the middle again, tactics videos. But we just saw it like there's a real threat here to the queen. So the queen has to move out of here, or the king has to move out of here, or something needs to happen, or this tokenistic I'm here. Something needs to happen here to avoid this threat that is about to come towards us. And if we go ahead and move the queen again, well, remember what we just talked about in the previous video. We talked about how we want to avoid making multiple moves with the same piece. Also, of course, we want to make sure we, first of all by minor pieces before we get to the bigger pieces. So a whole bunch of stuff are going wrong. And that's all stemming from the fact that we checked when we didn't have to and we had no purpose behind our check, right. There was no reason for us to check. We just did it just because That's something that we need to avoid. So every time there's nothing wrong with checking the opponent, I'll just make sure there's a reason behind it, right? Are you doing it to accomplish something? Are you doing it because you have a game plan afterwards? Are you doing it because it enables you to do something else that helps you? If so, then go for it. Absolutely. But if not, then maybe play something else. Like right here. Yes. It's true that you come here and check, but there's no there's no point to that. So instead it's just much better to develop your own pieces, right? And of course, you're helping yourself. You're clearing the pathway for your own castle. You're developing your own pieces. You're exerting some power on the central squares. And just, this is just a much better move then a move like just taking a queen and putting it here and checking the appointment, which has no purpose behind whatsoever. Alright, so again, in the opening stage, it's very important that we stick to these opening principles. Otherwise, as you saw, a lot of things can go wrong later on in the game because we fall behind, can put your opponent right. So this is another one to make sure we never, we never do. And that was checking without purpose. Hopefully that made sense. And I will see you in the next video. 12. Avoid Bad Trades - Chess Opening Principles: All right, the next main operating principle that we're going to learn together is that you need to avoid the trades that are not beneficial to you, right? So we avoid bad traits basically. Now what is a trait? A trait is when you capture a piece and give up a piece in order to capture that piece, right? So for example, if I, let's say, played this one place that I capture my pointing chapters, we traded our ponds, they're right because I captured his peace and he captured my piece. That's what we call a trait. Now, sometimes the trade is beneficial to us, sometimes it's not beneficial for us. So let's take a look at an example, right? So a simple example. Let's say we move up here. Opponent is playing something else. Now here I could capture this night. And basically I'm trading this pond for that night. And this would be an official for me because obviously upon is worth a lot more than r8, I should say a night is worth a lot more than upon upon is now worth more than a night. That's for sure. And I guess definitely worth a lot more. All right? And that's how we need to think about it. Anytime we make a trade, we need to think, is this worthy trait is the piece that I'm getting worst more? Or is there another benefit to what I'm doing, right? And we'll talk about that in a second. But first, let's start talking about how much each piece is worth relative to each other, right? So we, we gather how much each is worth relative to a pawn, so upon. So we would say that's worth one pond, any minor piece, so any bishop or night is worth 3.5 bonds. Now what that means, it doesn't really mean anything in the game. It just means that if you get, for example, for ponds in return for your bishop, that's a worthy trait, right? So that's what we mean by 3.5 bonds, right? It means that having a bishop is equal to having 3.5 pounds relatively, right? Obviously, again, it depends on the context, but this is just a general rule. So we have a general idea of whether a trait is worth it or not. All right, so any of the minor pieces are worth 3.5 bonds, and the Brooks are worth five pounds each. The queen is worth nine points. Alright, so let's go through that one more time. Each part is worth one pond. Obviously, the minor pieces are worth 3.5 upon each, and the rooks are worth five pounds each, and the queen is worth nine points, right? So basically what that means is that if I trade my rook in order to get my opponents Bishop, that's on a worthy trade, right? Because I am losing the value of five pounds in my rock and I'm gaining a value of 3.5 pounds by capturing my opponent spirit. And that's obviously not a worthy trade because that means that I'm falling behind the same amount as 1.5 ponds, right? Whereas if I let say give up my broke and I get a bishop and a night, well then that would be a worthy trade because Mike broke is worth five bonds, but those two put together are worth southern ponds. So that will be a worthy trade. Now, sometimes we trade the same pieces, right? So for example, if I trade and night for another night, that's the same piece to obviously they're worth the same, right? However, sometimes that's not the case because there's something else that comes to training and that's how active the pieces that you're trading off. For example, let's say we're starting off. Pretty simple, pretty simple stuff. That's in my opponent plays. This say I'm bringing out my other nights. And what should we say my opponent does here? Let's say, let's say we play it simple for an eye opening. I bring this out here. And then we have this right now here. I could just go ahead and capture this night. But it's probably not a great idea. And the reason for that is because my night, my bishop is, has been developed. Whereas this night, even though it has been developed, it's not as developed as my bishop, is it like it's a little underdeveloped? The much better move would be for me to just retreat and come back over here. When I'm being threatened by this pawn, I could just retreat and come over here. I don't have to trade off my night now, I could think, Oh, maybe I want to get rid of this part over here. So if I trade them, my point has to play this or something. If there's something else, there's some angle to what you're doing, then it could be a worthy trait, but usually you don't want to develop, trade off, a piece that you have developed for a piece that hasn't been developed or is not as developed as your pieces. For example, let's take a look at another example here. Let's say my opponent plays this. We go over here and actually we can go over there. So that's how I do that because the point can capture us. Let's play this. And let's say my opponent plays this move. Let's say I play that move. My opponent comes there. Let's say I grab that. Let's say my point and it goes there, I grab that. So we have trade over there. And let's say we make this right. Now. Here, I could just trade off this bishop for that mission, right? But again, this is not a worthy trade because looking my bishop, my bishop has been developed. It's already active in the game. I could have even come over here with my bishop and just throw in this, this night over here and also potentially threatening this queen later on. I could've done a lot of other things, right? But, so this isn't active piece, whereas my opponents bishop is stationary. It hasn't moved out, it hasn't been developed, and it hasn't even gotten more than the game at all. So this is not a worthy trade for me. So if my opponent plays something like this over here, it's definitely not worth it for me to go ahead and trade this off. Because really what do I gain by this? I don't really gain anything. Like I'm not gaining any material obviously because like for like trade on, trading the same piece for the st piece. And really there's no other advantage that I'm gaining. I'm not gaining any positional advantage. I'm not getting my opponent to lose one of his pieces. In fact, the opposite, I'm losing my develop piece. Where's my opponent? Keeps all of his developes is right? So take a look. I have two developed minor pieces, and my opponent also has to develop my own pieces. If I make this trade, let's say I go there, I go there. Then I still have my one developes, but my opponent has both of his developed pieces left, right? So it's almost as if I got rid of one of my pieces for one of his undeveloped. In fact, that's exactly what happened right now. I have only one developed piece, whereas my point has both of them remaining, right? And obviously he has a lot more control over the center of the board. He's a lot more active in the game. He's even occupying two of the central scores. I'm only occupying one overall. It's not, not a great look over here. And that's because I made a trait that was not worth, worthwhile for me right now would have been much better for me to just make a move like this, for example, ground threatening some other stuff. And I'm actually threatening a piece that has been developed, right, that's a lot more worth like this trait is actually more worth it for me because if I do end up making the straight, Let's say my opponent does some other move over here. If I do end up making the strain, I'm not saying you should, but I'm saying if you do, at least you're still, you still have one developes your point has wonderful piece, the minor pieces that we're talking about, and of course a queen. We don't want one to be outsourced early. We don't want the king to be like out in the open so early. So the opponent some things to worry about, right? So even though we haven't gained any material, we didn't give up any, any of our developers is for undeveloped pieces. And we also caused some positional anarchy from her opponent, right? So we're actually gaining something here. We're actually gaining a little bit of an small advantage because our upon his king is out in the open. It can be attacked from anywhere. They can be attacked from there, it can be attacked from here. All sorts of stuff. The queen is out in the open. We can start threatening this queen later on. And of course, our rook as out in the open. We can use this rock to do all sorts of things. So we have a lot of stuff that we can do and we actually have a small little positional advantage here, even though we didn't really gain any material, right? So it's always important to be aware of that, be aware of what you're trading. If you're gaining material, then go for it. If not, then first of all, make sure you don't give up your developer uses for undeveloped pieces from your, from your opponents. And also look to see if the trade benefits you in any way positionally. And of course, we still haven't developed, we still haven't delve too much into how to set up the best positions and what we want to look for. And we'll get into that a lot more later on in the course. But I just want you to be aware that when you're making a trade, you need to be mindful of how beneficial that traders for you, whether as far as the material that you're gaining goes, or as far as the position that you're going to end up with. All right, so hopefully that made sense, will obviously go a lot deeper into that later on in the course. But for now hopefully that made sense and I will see you in the next video. 13. Keep the Game Closed If You Are Behind In Your Development - Chess Opening Principles: All right, the next main opening principle is to keep the game closed if you are behind in your development. Now. These are all called files. Start a, b, c, d, e, f, g, and h, right? And these files are determined to be open or closed depending on how many palms are remaining on each of them. Alright, so as you can see, me and my opponent, we each have one pond on each of these files to start with. Right now, obviously throughout the game, a lot of things can happen. Let's say we start playing and I capture, he captures and stuff like this happens, right? All of a sudden you start seeing some of these files don't have pawns in them anymore. Well, this is how we define an open file. And it closed file. And a closed file is a file where both in my pond and my opponent's pollen are still remaining in the game. And open file as a file like this one right here, where both mine and my opponent's ponds have been removed from this file, right? Whether they've been captured or they have captured other pieces, it doesn't matter. The point is that in this file, I don't have any pounds of my opponent, doesn't have any ponds left. So it's wide open for all kinds of things to happen. Now, let's say I play a move like this. My opponent does that. Now in this file over here, this is what we call a semi-open file. And in the semi-open file, we only have one pond, or I should say, one color of pawn left. So this would also be a semi-open file. All right, because take a look at this 32 pounds left, but both of them are black pawns, right? I don't have any ponds of my own left in this file. And same over here. In this file, we only have my one white parent remaining and my opponent doesn't have any pause here. So this is a semi-open file. Now what the difference is between the semi-open file and close the file is that a semi-open file? It could easily turn into an open file if my opponent does captures this piece, right? So let's say I play a move like this, for example, I'm a poet, it goes ahead and captures that pond. Now all of a sudden this file has turned into an open palm or an open file, I should say. Whereas taking a look at the file like this one, right? And a file like this one. Even if I do capture my opponents pawn, it's still not an open partner or an open file because guess what would my own pod is so here, right? And because of that, just by capturing one piece, this file is, and all of a sudden open up. That's the difference between a close file and a semi-open file. And of course, an open file is a file that is completely open, wide open for anyone to do anything, right? And the more open the game is, meaning the more open files that are in the game, the more it's going to benefit the side that has developed most pieces, right? So again, let's take a look over here. Let's go back a little bit more. And let's say I started developing my pieces, whereas my, my opponent doesn't do that, right? Let's say my opponent is making a mistake, is playing other stuff. I just developed this piece, let's say. And then my opponent does some other stuff over here. I made this move, my opponent captures, I captured back. Now, all of a sudden in this scenario where we have one open file and we have this semi-open file over here. As you can see, a much further ahead than my phone. Look at this. First of all, I can just cancel if I, if I choose to e11 mover as my opponent, he can't really cancel it because are all these undeveloped pieces blocking his way? So I can cancel anytime, which would mean that my rope comes out. Let's say my opponent starts playing. Let's say a place like this or something. All of a sudden, I have access to this file with my work. And not only can I threaten the king, but I can also do a whole bunch of other stuff. And let's say my opponent keeps making bat moves. I can check. If my opponent blocks to check, I could add up the pressure. I could always start attacking with these pieces. I could go forward with this piece or with this piece, I could start developing this piece so I can start attacking this bishop right here. Maybe I make it move like this and then bring my bishop over here so I can keep attacking. I could always bring my queen over here. So we have two pieces on this file attacking that bishop over there. And then if my own bishop is here, we can basically put so much pressure on the opponent and just start causing lot of problems for them, right? Whereas from my opponent, because he didn't have many developed pieces, it was really tough to do anything, right? He couldn't castle and time he couldn't start putting any pressure on my king who was wide open. So basically, what I'm trying to say is that the more open files there are, the more it will benefit the side that has evolved more pieces. So the important takeaway from this is that if you are behind in your development for whatever reason, you want to make sure you don't let too many files to open up and you want to make sure you keep the game as close as possible. Because let's take a look at another example where the game doesn't quite open up that much. Let's say we make this move, sorry. My opponent makes dot move. I just move up and lock the structure as you can see. And then let's say my, my opponent keeps making conservative moves. I do the same. This move over here. There we go. And then let's say we start developing pieces. So my, my opponent does something like this. I do something like this. My opponent moves that piece. I maybe move this piece. And all of a sudden, even though we're starting to develop pieces, it doesn't really matter who was developed more because there's nowhere to go, right? Like we have all these pieces. We have this incredible pawn structure that is just commanding so many squares and just making it very hard for us to do anything same with the opponent, right? He's taking charge of so many squares, not letting me go to so many places with my own pieces that it's just, it looks really tough. Like what am I gonna do with development pieces, right? Like there's not much to do until we start trading off some ponds and opening some files. My rocks basically are not doing anything because there are just no open files. And my other pieces also can't do much because I mean, there are so many squares are blocking off all of my opportunities basically. So even if I start getting ahead in my development until the game opens up, that doesn't really bother me all that much. So if you ever fall behind in your development early on, It's very important that you try to compensate for that by making sure the game keeps closed. And you do that by not trading ponds, locking positions, for example, look at this position right here that is locked down, meaning that these ponds cannot capture each other, right? Unless the adjacent palms come and do something, right? That these bonds cannot do something. And as long as these two ponds don't push up the opponent, the white ponds also can't really do anything. They're just locked in their position and same with the white, the nice doll push up. There's not much that these guys can do and they're just going to be locked in that position. And you want to be doing that a lot. If you start falling behind in your development, you want to be doing that a law. You want to make sure you're closing off structures. You want to make sure that you keep the game as close as possible and they do not open files unless you absolutely have to. All right. So again, another pro tip right there. If you are behind the development, keep the game as close as possible. Hopefully that made sense, and I will see you in the next video. 14. Develop Your Queen Behind Your Pawns - Chess Opening Principles: All right, The next opening principle we're going to learn together is developing your queen behind your own ponds. Now, the reason why we do this is because as we alluded to earlier in an earlier video, when you take out your queen way too early on in the middle, the reaction, what's going to happen inevitably is that the opponent starts attacking your queen with every single piece they got. Basically, you paint a target behind your coins back. And the reason for that is because remember, when we talked about trading, queen is the most valuable piece, right? So no matter what the opponent traits for your queen, it will be a worthy trait, right? If they trade their bishop for your queen, if they trade upon for your coin for sure, if they trade Arno to tonight's for your queen, any of that would be worth it, because your queen is worth nine pounds, whereas there are no other pieces that are worth nine pounds, right? Row, he's worth five bonds. The minor pieces of worth 3.5 bonds and obviously worth just a single pond. So really, if the opponent can trade your queen for anything, it will be worth it for them. So that's what they're gonna do an on top of that because they keep threatening you. You have to keep moving your queen, which is another thing we talked about. Don't make multiple moves with the one single piece early on in the game. Because what's going to happen is let's say you get out of this threat. You're pulling threads and see you again. And then maybe you get out of that threat and then the opponent threads you again, this ones are discovered attack on your queen. Remember that we talked about this and we're going to talk about this a little bit more later on in the middle again, tactics as well. But here basically by moving this palm forward, this bishop is attacking the Queen. Now you have to get rid of that threat. So maybe you'd like to move somewhere else. Let's say, let's say you move here, for example. Then the opponent threatens you again. And as you can see, the appointing just make you move them. Maybe you move there and then the pollen threatens you again. And basically you just keep running around with your queen. And your queen just needs to keep dogging everything. Let's say move here, then the opponent threatens you again and you have to move out away again and again. Look at this, look at the situation. Your opponent has developed three minor pieces. We have a nice pond structure going here. Even if they wanted to. He could even develop his bishop over here and have this diagonal. And basically it like at this position, right? Your opponent has done like so many different things already. Whereas you have done what? One pond and your queen has been running around all, all around the stoke, the board basically. So you can see why this is such a big problem because now we're so far behind. None of our pieces are developed. All the minor pieces are staying here. Whereas the opponent, they've developed three minor pieces already. And of course, he could castle with two moves, right? If you wanted to cancel it this way, you just need to move out his queen and the unions castle. Or if he wants a castle in the other direction over here. He can just move a specialized way and then just castle. Whereas for us, we haven't developed any of our pieces, so we can't even castle anytime soon. So as you can see, there's a lot of problems here with this kind of open-ended and all started with us moving our queen out in the middle of the game and letting it be threatened constantly by the opponents pieces. So what we should do instead, let's go back to the beginning. What we should do is, like we talked about before. First of all, your minor pieces, maybe the opponent, those the same. Then maybe develop this piece over here. So he put on plays that we start connecting our palms together. And we'll talk about pawn structure a little bit later on as well. And then let's say your opponent does something like this. And then once we're actually starting to get in the game and we're making some moves. Let's say the opponent goes there. And let's say we also caseloads. Well, in this situation, we can start developing our queen and we can develop it behind our own pond. Because when we do it behind her own ponds, the opponent can't really throw us right? Like he could threaten our queen if he moves his night over here. But that's the only way I knew even then, we are protecting out square with our own night as also we could always just trade nights if that happens. Right? So this is a much safer way because first of all, other than that knights move that he has, which we already have covered anyways, there's no other way for the opponent to keep constantly threatening us because we are developing the queen behind our own pond structure, right? And this part is kind of what kind of using upon as one layer of defense. So that's our queen, doesn't keep getting threatened over and over again, so that our opponent can use that to get ahead in developing their pieces. And leave us just wondering around with our queen, not really developing anything, right? So that's why we usually do it behind our own ponds to start with. Of course, later on in the game, when we get into the middle game, you're going to use your queen a lot more. You can get out of the ghetto behind your own first-line of defense and start actually going, going, they're attacking, doing all sorts of things. But to begin with, we want to make sure we keep it behind our own ponds, right? And also one other thing that you should be looking for is to see if you're upon, is doing the same as well. Because if your opponent doesn't do that early on, Let's say they just take their night and bring it out like somewhere here. Like obviously they can't do that right now because this as blocking their way. But if earlier on in the game, let's say in like the first couple of moves. Like somewhere around here, the opponent starts taking out their queen and doing all sorts of things. So let's say, let's say we make this move. And let's say the point of those there. If, if your opponent starts doing this thing, you want to keep attacking that queen as much as possible so that you can get ahead in developing on pieces, right? So for example, here, I just bring up my bishop threatening this queen. Obviously he can't capture because my night is protecting my bishop. So he moves somewhere else, like let's say over there. And you just want to keep doing this, right? You just want to keep barraging this, this queen with threats and attacks if you can. And if you can't, just do other things. So for example here we could maybe look at attacking with this bishop. It's a little bit tough because we can't just go over there because we don't have any support. But we could maybe start bringing out our night if we don't have a valid attacking them, attacking it later on, right? Because this queen is still out and about is still being protected by this pawn. But from these areas, books, it is not there. There we go. From these, these diagonals, it is very easy to attack this queen. And also, if you can get your night in these positions, you could also start threatening this coin. And that's what we wanna do, right? We wanna make sure that we take advantage of this mistake that the opponent has made in bringing out their queen way too early. And we want to just start using that to get ahead in developing our own pieces. All right, so I guess two tips and one in this video. Number one, develop your own queen slowly and behind your own line of defense with the pons. And the second tip. If the opponent doesn't do this and the opponent brings out the recording way too early. Make sure you keep threatening their queen so that we can start getting ahead in developing our own pieces. Because one, we are threatening the opponent queen. We are basically developing our own pieces and not letting the opponent develop theirs. For example, look at here, right? I developed my bishop, but my opponent that I have time to develop their bishop because they had to worry about getting a queen out of this threat that they were facing from my bishop. Alright, so very two important tips. Keep those in mind and I will see you in the next video. 15. Castling Kingside or Queenside? - Chess Opening Principles: Alright, in this video we're gonna talk about whether you should castle king side or Queensland. And obviously King side means on the side where King is closer to the rook. And quartzite is decided that the queen is closest to the rook, and the king is not basically closer than the queen to the rock, right? So should you castle king side or coincide? Well, first of all, let me just start with saying that counseling is very important. And the reason why it's very important as because it's the best way for you to protect your king during game. So when this king is in the middle, what is going to eventually happen is that eventually some of these files is going to open up. And once one of these files open up, well, what happens is that attacks are going to come from every single direction, right? Especially if the opponents develops their pieces. Like they're going to have a bunch of minor pieces here. Maybe they bring out the rooks, maybe they bring out their queen. Then it's going to be very, very dangerous to be in the middle with your king. So what you wanna do is you want to, castles. Are these possible, especially if you're a beginner, right? Like more advanced players might be able to get away with not canceling or doing some other crazy stuff. But for beginners, and if you're watching this course, I'm assuming that you're at least a little bit more of a beginner and at least you're not a professional watching this. If you're a beginner, it's much better that you just play it safe. As I always like to say, safety first, just Castle as soon as possible. All right, and now let's talk about whether you should do at Kickstarter point site. Well, the king side, it's the easier council to perform and it's a lot quicker. And the reason for that is kinda obvious. It's because you only have two pieces in the way that you have to remove, right? You have to develop, once you develop these two pieces, like let's say you make this move with your night and a move like this with your bishop. And then you can just go ahead and cancel, right? You don't need to make any other moves. Whereas on the clean side, it's a little bit trickier because you have those two pieces, the night and the bishop, but you also have a queen that you have to deal with. And as we talked about in earlier videos, you gotta be careful how you start out with your coin. You can't just go ALL OUT guns blazing with your coin early on in the game, right? Need to make sure the tread lightly. You go behind, you're on the fence and you don't put a target on your coins back right away, right? So it's a little bit trickier. You have to do a little bit more prep work. And not only do you have to move more pieces out of the way here we only have two pieces that we had to move out the way here we'd have three pieces that we have to move other way. Also, you might need to do some other prep work like making a move like this, for example, to give you a queen a little bit more safety if you develop it to a square like this one, for example. It's just a lot more hassle, right? And another problem that you have with counseling on the clean side is that your king ends up being closer to the middle, right? So take a look at this one. When I castle king site, my king goes from A1 to G1. Whereas when I castle coincide, my king goes from E1 to C1. Now, obviously c1 is closer to the middle, then G1, because it's third from left, whereas g1 is second from right. Which, well, what this means is that when there is a gap opening up in the middle, and usually in most of the action in a chess game is centered towards the middle. What is going to happen is that your king is going to be under threat a lot easier when it's on a square like g1, right? Because if it's on C1, Like all you need is to just remove this line of defense over here. And you have this diagonal that you can attack from. And of course, all other avenues as well. Right? Whereas on the G1, you're a little bit more protected and it's a little bit more of a solid defense. You have these three palm in front of you, and it's just a lot more safer. So what I would recommend to most beginners is just to castle king site. Now, of course, there's a lot of merit in counseling coincide. But at least for this stage of your game, where you're still a member of a beginner and you need to play a little bit safer. It's just a little bit trickier and a lot more stuff to worry about, right? So for that reason, for you guys, at least right now, I would recommend to castle king side, whereas counseling coincide is definitely a good play. And there was definitely a right way to do it. And there's definitely a lot that you can gain from it. But at this stage, I would just recommend sticking to the safer option for now, castle and King side. Unless this is the one exception. This is a onetime where I would say, don't castle king side, as if the opponent is developing all their pieces to attack your king side, right? So let's say they develop this over here. They develop this pawn over here. If you have this kind of a structure where, let's say the point is Queen comes over here, the bishop goes, there. May be some night action threatening these palms. Maybe the pond structure is leading that way. Leading this way, I think. And we're going to talk about palm structure a little bit later on. But what you don't want wanna see is a pond structure that is leading to your defense. We'll talk about this later on as well. But what I'm trying to say is if the opponent is just throwing everything at your king side and attacking everything in developing everything to your king site. That's the only time I would say, you know what, it's better not to CASEL there because the opponent is already ready to attack there. So it's much better to avoid canceling, canceling the other side where the phone is probably not attacking quite yet, right? But other than that one scenario, I would just say stick to Castle in kink site at least for now until you're a little bit more comfortable dealing with all the other stuff that you have to deal with when it comes to preparing the castle on the coincide. Alright, so hopefully that made sense and I will see you in the next video. 16. Prevent Your Opponent From Castling - Chess Opening Principles: All right, So we just talked about how important it is to Castle early on in the game, as it will enable you to have a lot of safety when it comes to a king because you get it away from the center where all the tasks are going to be flooding K2. So you get a lot more protection for your king and you also get to bring out your rook. So it's, it's just a really good thing to have the castle and use it early on in the game. So you've got to realize that it's just as beneficial a tool for your opponent. So if you could go ahead and remove the canceling privileges from your opponents toolbox, then there'll be very good for us, right? Because if the opponent cannot castle, well, the king is going to be left in the center. The rooks might not be able to get out in time. And it's just going to be a little bit of an advantage that we gain if we can prevent the opponent from tussling. And there are a couple of different ways that you can prevent your opponent from canceling. Obviously, in order to castle, you need to make sure that your king hasn't moved prior to that. So if you can get the appointed king to move, for example, let's say this file opens up and we get rid of these two ponds. And then we'll just go ahead and capture the opponent's Queen. And the opponent has no choice but to capture back with their king. In that case, well, their king has moved so they can no longer castle for the rest of the game. And that'll be something even though we are training like for, like we're actually gaining something with that trade. Remember we talked about trading with purpose only. Well, there is a purpose and that trend. The purpose is that we get the appointed king to move so that the polling kink is no longer able to castle. So that's one way we go about doing this. And another way we could go about doing this is by blocking the way with a check. Now, this is something that we didn't really talk about too much. So let's explore what is happening here. Let's say we have a opening and Lemmy, I want to make sure I show this. Let's put it this way. This will be a nice way to show their real. And let's say I'm doing this any point to make plays this MOOC, right? So now I have cleared the path because I developed my bishop over here and I developed my night over here. So you'd think that I can just go ahead and cancel here, right? And it's my turn. Well, not quite, because what this bishop is doing is it's threatening this square. And even though my king is not moving to that square, it's moving from A1 to G1 because this square and the way has been checked by the opponent or it will be checked. Well, in that scenario, I'm actually not allowed to perform a castle, right? So some of you might not know this, but in order to perform a castle, you need to make sure that every single squared that the king is traveling. So all the way from y1, F, F1, and J1, there we go. Let's go in wartime E1 and F1 and J1. There we go. Because we're starting from 11, we're traveling to G1. We need to make sure every single square on the way is not checked by an opponent piece, right? So for example, over here, we need to play this move first and then cancel. Look at what happens if I try to cancel. If I try to do this, it doesn't happen, right. Even though it's my turn and it's a counseling is perfectly fine because I haven't moved my king. I'm actually not allowed to do it because of this threat over here. So I need to play this MOOC first, blocking off this threat. So this threat no longer goes all the way to F1. And then once he put in place something else now I can go in and castle, right? So we saw what happened over there. Because of this threat. I was not allowed to cancel right away. And that's another way that you can go about preventing your bone from counseling is by threatening the squares that the king would have to travel. And in order to basically prevents the castle. And I want to also add that you just got to be aware that it's not only the squares where the king starts in the Qing finishes, it's also the squares in the middle, right? For example, F1 over here, or if you're canceling, coincide. Again, it's going to be E1, D1, and C1 because you're traveling from E1 to C1. So even if D1 is under threat, well, you're still not allowed to CASEL there. Alright, so that's another way that you can go about preventing your opponent from canceling. All right, so first one was forcing the Poynting came to move by their counseling or sorry, by either checking or not, by canceling, obviously by canceling the opponent of our dazzling. The first way was to prevent the apart from gasoline, but it checking them or training a piece where the appointed king has to capture in order to basically stay level on material, therefore moving the king. And the second way was to threaten the squares that the king would have to travel to in order to perform the castle, for example, here were threatening the F1 square. Therefore, canceling was on allowed before the threat is removed. Alright, so hopefully that makes sense, and I will see you in the next video. 17. Forking - Middlegame Tactics: All right, Now in this video we're going to start learning about some middle game tactics that every chess player should know. And the first tactic that we're going to talk about in this video is forking. Now, what is forking? Forking is basically when you use one of your pieces to threaten two separate pieces of your opponent at the same time, right? So for example, let's play this out right here. Let's say we have a really normal opening. We have our night coming out over here. Let's say the appointment or something like this. We go over there threatening this pilot, Let's say our opponent makes a mistake. All right, Our point and removes the defense of this pond. Thinking about his own plans and not really paying too much attention about what we're doing. And we go over and capture this. Now, what we've done here is we've forked the ROCC against the king, right? So what we've actually done is that we are checking the King, which means that the King has to move, right? When the king is under check it has to move. Which means that this rock that we are threatening has no escape, right? Because, well, the opponent has to move their king. They have no other choice, and there's only one place they can move it, right? And there's no way for them to capture our piece. So the only way to remove the, by moving the king, and once you point and moves the king, we'd just go ahead and captured the rook, right? So once we played this move and forked the opponents rook, there was basically nothing the appointing could do to save their work, right? Because we are forking by checking the king at the same time, right? So a fork is basically a double attack where you're attacking two pieces at the same time. Now this doesn't have to be a check necessarily. It could very well be something like this. So let's say we didn't make them move. Let's say, Let's say this piece was over there. We keep on playing. So even now, even though the point does this, we can no longer go for this, right? Because it causes the point can just captures, right? And let's say the play goes on. We are doing our thing. Expand over here. Or maybe not that move. Let's move that over there. Perfect. Then maybe we counsel on the point Gaussians right? Now. Let's say we're just doing our thing and the opponent makes a mistake, right? The opponent moves the queen over there. Well, what we can do here is we can now fork between the queen and the rook, the two very valuable pieces right? Now in this, in this instance, we're not checking at the same time as we're attacking another piece. But what is happening is that we're attacking to highly valuable pieces at the same time, right? So even though we're not attacking the king, It's that, that's not the point of it. Random point of it is that it's a double attack. And we're basically forcing the opponent to sacrifice one or the other, right? Because right here there's no way for the opponent to save both of them, right? And obviously, since the queen as the more powerful piece, that the opponent has to save their queen, which means that we can just go ahead and capture the rook. All right? Now, this does mean that we don't really have an escape. Because no matter where we go the point I can just capture us. But, but that's okay, right? Because Iraq is more valuable than a night. So that's where it would be fine. And that's a very good trait for us. And if we just managed to get to the end game without losing any material to the appointment. We're in a better shape obviously. So That's how a fork works. It's always between two different pieces that we're attacking at the same time. It doesn't have to be with the night, but it's just that with the night. It's the most, it's the most deceptive because the nights movement is so hard to see and so hard to watch out for, especially when a night is developed and is in the center of the board. So many different combinations that the knights Google for. And there are a lot of different tactics that come with this, where you force your opponent into a position where you can then later on fork them, right? So there's definitely a lot that we can unpack here. But in this video we're just want to, just want to learn the basics of how forking works, right? Obviously you could do it with a, any other pieces. Well, let's say if you had your queen at a position where it could check the appointed king at the same time as attacking and another piece that is not defended, that would also be sort of a way to fork the opponents rain, so it doesn't have to be with the night. It's just that it's very common in the night where we see a lot of forking happening with the nights and a lot of games. And this forking of the rook is actually probably the most common types of forecasting that you're going to be seeing in your games. So definitely always be aware of this, right? This happens a lot, especially with the night going after the rook in order to folks that work against either the appointed king or another highly valuable piece like the Queen for example. But that's basically what a fork for it is. In general, we'll get more into specific types of forking and different tactics that come with it in future videos. But for now, that's all, hopefully that all made sense and I will see you in the next video. 18. Pinning Down Pieces - Middlegame Tactics: Alright, in this video we're going to learn about pinning down pieces. Now, pinning down pieces is when you force and piece of the opponents to half to remain in the position of the RNA. So how would that work? Let's take a look over here. So for example, we're going to just make an easy move here. Let's say we splay normal opening and the opponent develops their night to F6, which is a perfectly fine move. What we can do later on is, let's say 10 plays a limp like that. What we can do is we could just bring our bishop over here. Where we're actually doing is we're pinning down in this piece to the queen, right? So what does that mean? Imagine this piece wasn't here. Well, what happened? We would be threatening the opponents queen with our bisher, right? But because the species here we are not, right. However, what we're actually doing here is we're saying basically that this piece is unable to move. Because if it does move, let's say the opponent makes a move like this or whatever. Or we can do is we can just go ahead and grab that clean, right? So basically what this means is that the opponent is not able to move this piece, right? And let's say if I was ending it with another pond, let's say the opponent plays something like this. I do this over here, captures and I go here, right? What happens here is that now I am attacking this night. But the point is not able to get rid of it, right. Because he's not able to just move this out of the way because I will just capture the queen. So that's why pinning down businesses actually very powerful. You can use an unlocked a lot of different ways, but one of the ways you can use that as you can use it. So you can pin it down so that while the pieces pin down, you can attack it with a lower value piece like it pawn, for example, where you can just try to capture it without pawn and not enabling the, the opponent to get out of the way and protect the piece. Or what you could do is if this piece was protecting some other piece over here, let's say the opponent had a piece over here like their bishop or something and they were protecting it with their nights will. Now they are no longer able to protect it because once we capture that piece and this piece goes to recapture, we can just capture the queen, right? So that's how pinning down it works. We just look for a very highly, highly powerful piece, like a queen or a rook, or even the king, right? We could also, and pieces down to a king because of the move that piece, they will be under check, which means that they cannot move that piece, right? But in this case, we're putting it down to the queen, which is a very valuable piece. At what you wanna do is you want to pin these pieces down. So that later on you can use that to your advantage, right? Whether it is to just threaten that piece with a lower value component like a pod. Or to take advantage of this and avoided this piece from being able to defend other pieces that are involved in the game. And then you can maybe attacking those pieces in step 9. So we'll basically pin your opponent pieces down to more valuable pieces in order to exploit that in other areas, whether it's to capture that piece or to capture other pieces. Alright, so that's the basics of painting stuff down again, it will go much deeper into how we can implement this into our game. But this is just an introductory video where we just discover what paying down is and the fact that this is actually very commonly used in chess tactics in the middle games specifically. So that's pending pieces. Now, hope you guys enjoyed it and I will see you in the next video. 19. Discovered Attacks - Middlegame Tactics: All right, The next tactic that we're going to learn together is called the discovered attack. Now at discovered attack is when you attack at peace indirectly, alright, so you're not doing it directly, you're doing it indirectly by moving in another piece that was blocking the attack in the first place. So for example, let's just start out very normal game. Nothing too crazy here. Let's open it up and we'll go from an early castle. All good. And let's just have some pieces removed from the board so we can make this a little bit easier. And just go for, what should we do here? Let's go for that. That should be good. Okay? Here's what we're gonna do. Let's say the opponent plays a move like this. We move there. All right, so what we're gonna do here is we're going to see how it discovered a tag is going to work. Alright, so we can make this move, point, makes this move. Now, here's where it gets very interesting. All right, let's say actually let's go back here. And let's just think this moved over here, right? And this happened, this happened right. Now. Here's what's going to happen here. Look at this, look at where my rook is positioned, right? This Rocha would be attacking the king and checking the appointing kink if it wasn't for this bishop in the way right? Now because of the fact that this bishop is on the way, this king is not on the check. But what this means is that anytime I remove this bishop out of the way, we have a discovered attack on the King, right? So let's take a look at what happens when I do this. When I make this move, the king gets checked, even though that piece that I moved is not doing anything to the king, right? It's the fact that because this block has been removed, this rock is now threatening the appointing King, which means that we're actually checking the opponent. But we're doing it in a discovered attack, incident attack, where I wasn't attacking that opponent king directly. And I wasn't attacking with the move that I made, right? I was doing it indirectly through removing the block. All right, so it's very important to spot discovers attacks and to anticipate them as well, right? So you get a spot how you can create a discovery type. For example, you spot that you have a bishop here. You place a rook behind it. And when you do that, you actually are able to, later on create a discovered attack, right? But it's also very important for the opponent to be able to anticipate. Like for example, in this case, they did not anticipate this. And that's why they're going to pay a very hefty price. Because when I made this move. What's happening over here? I'm now actually attacking this queen with my bishop, which means that and of course, the opponent is under other checks, so they have to remove the check so they can't really protect the queen. The only way that they can get out of this queen being threatened by the bishop is to come over here and blocked to check, which doesn't help them because they're still being attacked by this rook. So no matter what this guy does, this queen is going to be under a lot of trial and it's going to be taking basically captured in a second because there's nothing that you pointing can do, right? No matter how blogs this check or if he moves that I can just capture this guy. Or if he tries to block the check with the queen, I can just capture with my rook. And basically because of this discovered attack, we were able to get rid of this particular get this right. So here it was probably the best move for the appointment to just capture like this so that this cover is still here and then do something like that, right? But because of the fact that or actually, yeah, that was probably the better movie, even though he's going to go down a bishop, he still gets to keep his queen. But because of the fact that the opponent was not anticipating This discovered attack, he fell for it, right? So when I made this move, he wasn't paying attention that I have this Iraq on this file, which could end up threatening the King later on. Alright, so it's very important that we just keep an eye on the material that we have behind other material, right? Because at any stage these material could be wiped out and we need to be cognizant of what that could mean, right? When you have a rook on this file, that means that anytime the material on the way, like for example, this pawn and this bishop is, take it out of this file. Then there is discovered attack on the King. And that's exactly what happened here, right? We had the opponents basically remove that for us because he was not cognizant of what was going on over here. And that will remove this one ourselves. And just like that, the opponent wasn't a lot of trouble and now the queen is about to fall because the point was not able to anticipate this discovery tech and he paid the price for it, right? And we're going to have a very easy winning game from this point onwards because we are up queen for iraq, which means that we have a pretty hefty advantage and we should have a pretty easy game from this point outwards. So that's what it discovered attack is, as you can see, it's a very powerful tool that you can use, and it's actually used a lot in games of chess. And it is definitely something that again, we're going to discuss a lot more depth later on. But hopefully this was a nice introduction and it kinda showed you how powerful that discovered. In fact, guess so that you can kind of see why it's such a useful tactic. Alright, so that was at Hope you enjoyed that and I will see you in the next video. 20. Double Check - Middlegame Tactics: Alright, in this video, we're going to go over another middle game tactic that you must know that can come in very handy in specific situation and that's the double-check. Now, a double-check is when you check the appointed king with two separate pieces. And you usually do that by making a discovered check on the appointed king, will also checking with the PC you are removing. So what does that mean? Let's take a look over here, right? So in this position that I've put together for you, as you can see, my rook is threatening this file. So if this bishop has been, if this bishop gets removed from this square that it's in right now, we're going to have a discover check on the opponent king. So for example, if I take this bishop and move it here, now we're going to have a discovered check on the appointed king because I basically cleared the pathway from Iraq to the appointing king and my rope came out, threaten the appointed king and check it. Now, what if I take this bishop right here and I moved through square like this. We're also checking the appointed king with the bishop, right? What happens here is we're actually checking the appointed king with two separate pieces. And because of that, this is a double-check. Now, what a double-check happens? The cool thing about it is that the opponent cannot block this check in any way, right? Like FTP want to move this, move this over here. It's actually not blocking the check because guess what? My bishop is still checking the opponent. Or if the opponent moves the bishop over here or something. Well, guess what? Yeah, as you can see, the chessboard is also indicating that, look, we're still being threatened by this rock over here. So we can't do that, right? Like if I do this, it's going to tell you no, no, no, no, no, not so fast. I remember this piece is also threatening you. So what you need to do when you're double-check is to move your king. There's no way about it, right? And obviously we can't move to either the squares, so we have to move over here right? Now. Sometimes this will be very important, right? So sometimes we really want to make the appointed king move. And if that's our goal, double-check is the best way to make it happen because usually the opponent will block your cheque, especially early on in the game and not move the king because, well, maybe he wants to Castle later on, or maybe because he just doesn't want to move to that square because it's just doesn't look like a great move. Well, if you double-click the appointment, then the opponent has no choice but to move their king, right? Because there's no way to block two separate threats on the kink right? Now. There are a lot of different examples where double-check would be very useful into in winning the game. A lot of times in the middle game, sometimes even the end game, the smothered mate, which is an endgame we will cover later on in this course, is a type of Endgame that uses the double-check in order to enforce the opponent to basically go in a position where it's going to get checkmated. And that's basically what the idea of it is, is that we have discovered attack coming and the piece that we're removing, when we remove it and take it to another square where we're also adding the opponent kink with that piece as well, right? So both the pieces, the piece that I was performing, the discovered check on the opponent and the pisa we removed from here to create this discovered attack is also threatening the opponent King, which leads to us basically having two different pieces that are threatening the appointed king. And therefore a double-check rather than just a normal check with the discovered attack. Again, remember, the difference is that if I had just one piece checking the appointed king, we could just block it, right, and we wouldn't have to move king out of the way. Whereas if I perform to double-check, Let's go back over here. When I perform double-check, the opponent cannot block this. Can I block this? There's nothing you can do, right? He just has to move the king. That's the only illegal movie hands. Alright, so hopefully that made sense. I get it. We will talk a little bit more about how to use double-check and specific scenarios later on in the course. But it's a good thing to learn and to learn the implications of a double-check, which is that you have to move your kink if you are double-checked. Alright, so hopefully that made sense and I will see you in the next video. 21. Pawn Structure - Pieces Working Together: All right, In this video we're gonna talk about pawn structure. And as you may have noticed by now, ponds can interact with each other, form a chain with each other. And they can also be very good in defending our pieces, specifically the king. So that's why the pond structure is very important. And potentially destroying the opponents pond structure could also be very useful, which is why we want to always be aware of it, right? So let's take a look at a normal game. For example. Say we have a standard opening over here. And let's say we play that move. So let's take a look at the structure here, right? So what do we what do we mean when we say pond structure? Well, there are a couple of structural benefits that I am using right here as white, and a couple of things that black may want to target in order to make the game a little bit easier for them and a little bit tougher for me. So first of all, this is a really nice structure here, right? We always want to make sure we try to at least develop a real nice pollen chain where look at this, this one is protecting that one, that was protecting this one. And obviously if, for example this one false, this part over here is not going to be left hanging because there is upon right before it that can come over here capture and as a result, keep this chain going right? So that's one of the benefits of the chain is that if one of the pons and medulla gets captured, the other ones don't, are not left hanging because another pond will come there and basically do the same job as before. Also, they are really good because, well, first of all, this part over here is very powerful because almost impossible to get rid of it. You basically have to trade and other ponds somehow. And because ponds are that I don't want to say the most useless, but the least value, let me put it that way. They are the least valued piece, right? So if the opponent trades there, let's say their night for a pond, that would not be a worthy trade. Basically, when you structure them like this and you always want to try to point them towards the place you want to attack. So if the king, for example, castles on this side, then this pond structure is even more significant because looking at the point in the direction it's pointing towards, it's pointing towards the opponent king. If the king decides to Castle on that site, right? Whereas if the king castles on the other side, sure, this is not going towards a king, but then we can use this as an avenue to start our attack on the other side and maybe tried to grab some pieces or just put some pressure on black. Or we could even use this pond structure to force black to Castle on the queen side. And if we can just go ahead and ruined the pond structure here, then that could be really good too, because then the black has to basically pick it's poison and doesn't go to a place where the structure is damaged or does it go to a place where our pond structure is leading towards n is basically supporting any attack that we have on this slide. On top of that, another important ponds structure that you can see is right here. This is, as you can see, I'm about to Castle on the kink site. That's why I cleared everything here. And in fact, that's my next, next move. Let's just say the opponent plays. What should the point and play. That seems like a good move. And then let's say we castle over here. Alright, so here, these three ponds that we have, the structure of these three pounds is very important because if this, these three ponds are in here, my king will be open to attack. But because of these pollens, first of all, my king is protecting all of them. Right on top of that, my rook is here protecting this one. But basically, what's happening is that I am supporting my king with this pond structure. And if this pond structure gets damaged in any way, let's say for example, we play a move like this. Let's say the point blase I play a move like this. Now this structure is damaged. That means that you tack could come pouring in from this side, right, with any, any valuable piece. Whereas from before, this, this thread has minimized because first of all, these ponds are all protecting these squares. So no opponent piece can come to these squares without getting captured for free basically. So the closest they could come to my king are these squares. Now of course, my night is protecting this monster, not even that one. At this moment in time. It's really only these two or this one. And on top of that, already, my king is supporting this, my night of supporting this. So it's going to be very tough for our opponents to attack my king because of my pond structure. But if this pond structure gets damaged or if it was damaged from before, then obviously it's a lot easier for the opponent to start attacking my king. So there are a couple of different ways that pond structure can be beneficial to you. And also another thing I wanted to point out is that sometimes we end up with double ponds. And I just wanted to quickly mention why that's not such a great thing. So let's say we have this move over here. Let's say the point please that played this. And let's say the palmy comes here, right? So what we don't want to do is we don't want to capture on here because what ends up happening is that we end up with double bonds. So they can look at this, right? We have two ponds on this file. This is terrible, right? Sometimes you have no choice, sometimes you just have to do it and have double ponds on the same file. If you have no choice, then go for it. It's definitely better to recapture material, not go down in material. But if you can avoid it, definitely try to avoid this, avoid the double bonds because first of all, the first problem is that this pond up top is blocking this pawn from going to the last line, right? It's basically blocking its way. And that's not what we want, right? Especially when we get closer to the endgame. We want our ponds to be able to have a free run at the opposition. Also on top of that, as you can see, because this pawn has moved over to this file, now we can no longer protected with this pond, which only protected with this point, and that can be protected with that pond, then this point is now going to be predicting this one, right? So it caused a lot of structural problems. And it's just much easier too. Have your ponds on different files and never have double bonds. Again if you have to go for it, it's not the end of the world. You can definitely make it work, but it's best to avoid it, right? So for example here it's best to just not take maybe or actually even if you take with the night, this is what happens, right? So if you capture it with the knights point capsules back and now you have to capture back, right? Because you don't want to go down at night. So you end up with a double bond. So right here, the best move is just to not worry about this, right? Because this point is protected. You can maybe even add more protection to it if you want with either this move, this move. But what you don't want to do and you already have some protection from this night as well. What you don't want to do is you don't want to capture here because that ruins your own pond structure. Whereas if the opponents were to capture, let's say we play something else to play that the point in captures and then we capture back. This is perfectly fine, right? We haven't ruined our posture. And in fact, the great thing about this and why this was a mistake for black is, and now our rook has a free run at the opposition king, right? Because once we remove this night from this, from this file, we have a semi-open file that we can attack and we can potentially at some point to grab this pond because guess what? We're attacking with the night and will soon be attacking the rook as well. Whereas the point only has one defense on it, right? And that defense is already being pinned down as well. So they have to play this before they can defend. So it's actually a lot better for us in this instance, right? So these are just a little thing is you need to pay attention to when it comes to your pond structure. So making sure that you have a pawn chain that are all defending each other and making sure that its leading towards the direction you want to attack. Preferably the, if the king has canceled there, it's even better, but sometimes that just doesn't work out and that's totally fine. Just be aware of what direction is pointing towards because then that's, That's a side that you can attack easier towards, right? Because first of all, it's opening all your pathways for the diagonal attacks. And also on top of that, it's going to basically help you exert control on these squares. And it's really hard for new potent to get rid of this problem because if you point and captures this pond, you can just replace it with this one, right? So, very, very important to have the pawn chain. Also very important to have a line of defense in front of your kink. Have a real good pond structure, either in this formation where they're all over here or maybe like a formation like this, It's totally fine to bring this one up, but you don't want to bring this one up ever because that just opens this diagonal up for the appointment bishop to attack your king. Let me just put that. There you go. That would just open this diagonal line. Whereas if you go up here, that doesn't really cause any problems, right? Because there's no piece that go like this. I like it That's right in one move. So there's no immediate threat if you play a move like this. Whereas if you had, let's say, move this night out of the way and played this pond. That would have been problematic because the queen or the bishop could come here and just throw your king and cause a lot of problems, may pin some species down, do all sorts of things, right? So you ideally want to have this in place. It's best to have this in place. Whereas even though this is not the worst thing in the world, but it does open up some problematic future plays from the opponent, right? So it's best to not move this one either. Whereas this one is, is totally fine if you move that up one space. In fact, it does help you exert a little bit more control over the squares. And yeah, that was the defensive pons structure and of course, some things to avoid or the double ponds, if you can avoid them, it would be best because it just leads to a much better pos structure for yourself. And if you could cause some disruption in the opponents pond structure in either of these, right? Like if you could just make, maybe make an exchange here, for example, look at this. If I exchange here, the opponent has to capture back with the palm users. No other piece defending that, that night over there. You see when this night was over here, there was only being defended by this part. So if I go ahead and capture, the point has to capture back with a plan. Now the pond structures ruined because look at this giant hole. So if the appointment cancels on this side, we always have this diagonal that we can attack from. And which means that the opponent has to probably consider canceling on the king side, which is perfect for us because guess what? Our upon structure is leading towards the king side of the opponents. So if the point castle on the king side, that's actually quite good for us as well, right? So this is, these are the things that we need to pay attention to when it comes to the pond structure. All right. So hopefully that made sense. And I will see you in the next video. 22. Double Bishop Advantage - Pieces Working Together: Alright, in this video we're going to talk about double Bishop advantage. As you can see in this game. We've had some pieces traded off. Let's go back and take a look at what happened. So we just, we're developing our pieces. And all of a sudden we have these attacks from black. And what happens here is that we have some like for like trade-offs, right? So the bishop and the night are obviously worth the same. So what happens is that we have a night for nitrate and a bishop for nitrate over here, right? So we are down to two nights as white, whereas the opponent is down one night and one bishop, right? So this is what we call a double Bishop advantage in this position. What white has a double Bishop advantage because we are two minor pieces remaining, are both bishops, whereas the opponents to pieces remaining, or two minor pieces remaining, I should say, are the bishop and the night. So why is this advantageous for, for white? The reason for that is because tonight's or two bishops is always better than one bishop in one night. And the reason for that is because one bishop is not as good as it would be if it hadn't partner Bishop. I know that sounds a little weird, but the reason for that is first of all, because think of it this way. We have, as we discussed earlier, a light square bishop and a dark square Bishop, right? So what that means is that each bishop only has access to half the squares on the board. So for example, if the opponent, the opponent only has their dark square Bishop left, they don't have a light square Bishop left. So later on in the game, when it, when we get closer to the end game, let's say this mission is active. It's basically trying to make life really hard for us. Well, There's a very easy way to not let this bishop affect our plan. That's to just move. All are important pieces on light squares, right? So for example, right now my, my queen is on a light squared, which means that this bishop cannot do anything to threaten my queen, right? Same with my rug right now. And I could even place my king on a light square so that the opponent bishop is nullified in a lot of its threats. And for that reason, once you get rid of one bishop, the other bishop becomes a little bit less, less worthy, if that makes sense. Like, it's like you're almost taking away a tiny bit of the other bishop worth as well. So for that reason, it's always better to have two bishops left than to have a bishop and a night left. All right, so that's what we call a double Bishop advantage. And all else being equal. If the positions are all equal, if the material Laura are all equal, it's better to have two bishops than to have a bishop and a night. Alright, so that's just something that it's good to know so that you know what you want to go after. So It's always good to know that it's a worthy trade to maybe get rid of Napoleon bishop for one of your nights. If that means that you gain a double Bishop advantage over the opponents. And of course, right now, as you can see, we have a main thread over here. So if, if the opponent doesn't do, doesn't do anything properly, we just made it right here. So let's say the points w and then boom. All right, I just thought I'd point that out, but anyway, that's neither here nor there. It's very important to have a two Bishop advantage because of the fact that it can help you access all the, all the squares on the board. And whereas if you only have one bishop, it's actually a lot not as good as having the other bishop with it as well. All right, so that's double vision of advantage. Hopefully that made sense. Hopefully will look, take a look at this a little bit more inaction later on. But for now, I just wanted to let you guys know what the double bisher advantage is all about and why. That's actually slight advantage. Keep in mind this is not a huge advantage. It's all like night and day difference, but it is a slight advantage, right? All else being equal, you'd rather have two bishops of different light square and dark square basically, rather than a bishop and night. Alright, so hopefully that makes sense. And I will see you in the next video. 23. Doubling Up Rooks - Pieces Working Together: All right, so in this video we're going to talk about doubling up your books. Now, obviously, rooks are a very powerful piece and just, we discussed that they're each worth five ponds. But when you double them up, they get even more powerful, especially later on in the game when you get closer to the end game. It's a very powerful tactic to double up your ox and usually it's a very good idea to do so. Unless there are some really mitigating circumstances, you can't do it. It's always an ideal goal to strive towards, to try to get your Iraq's double up. Am I double up? We mean putting the rocks on either the same file or the same row. So right here you see I put my rooks on the same file. Now there are much more powerful because look at what happens here, right there, both on the same file attacking this pond. And this part only has one defender which is the king. So if I didn't have to rooks on the same file, the step one rock wouldn't be able to do anything because if he captured the pon, it would just get captured back by the king. But now they have, we have the both of them. I'm down this pon, it's actually a lot better, right? So in this situation, black has no choice but to play this move protecting the pond. Because no matter what what else like, no matter what other movies he comes up with, that pond would be falling. Right. So let's go back to the previous move. If, let's say the opponent played something like this, then we would just be able to go ahead and capture because we have a defender for our rock, right? And if that happens, the king has to move either direction. And another great thing about having two rooks on the same file and doubling up the rocks is that the point we can get right Next? And they appointed king with our OK. And there's nothing to appointed king can do about it. For example, in this instance we can, uh, when Iraq, by playing this move, because the point can't just capture back yes, to move over here. And we can win the rook over there. Alright? And the doubling up just enables you to do that a lot and do a lot of different things. Also, if the opponent tried to block us with his rook, there is no way that he can get like in-between the two rooks, right? Because let's say opponent plays something like this. We go back to doubling up, let's say captures that. And we're coming over here preparing to check the opponent or something along those lines. There's nothing he can do to hurt either of our rocks, right. There's nothing This can do to interact with either of them, right? And he can't go to first of all, it can't go to any of the rows or the files that the books are covering. Because if this rule goes to any of those would just capture it, right? The only place it could go is in this square right here, the D5 square because it's being protected by the pond. But even in that situation, we just trade off our rocks and finish off the game with the other remaining broke, right. So there's not much you can do if he goes to either of those either of those rows for the fifth row right here, the first row right here, or this GIF file. This disrobe, chaotic access, any of those, right? And as soon as we play move like this, for example, he could go ahead and block over here. But obviously we would just capture him and he will be out, right. So he can't really do that. So he just has to keep on moving. And obviously when you have a rock and you're attacking the kink, if you can, what you want to do is to get on the other side of the king in order to win some material, right? So they can look at this. This is a very common tactic. Let's say our opponent is not paying intention. We get on the other side of the king, and our plan is to get over here on this square, on the other side of the king compared to the, the rock that we're trying to capture, right? Even if it's just a backup, even if it's just trading off. Because in this instance, if you look at it, the way this end game has been set up is that I can get this down to a single rock against a single king end game. And we go over End Games in quite detail in upcoming videos. But it's obviously if I go to that end game and I have an entire rook advantage, that should be pretty easy win for white. So obviously that's what we want to do and want to force a trade here. And obviously, black has no intention of allowing us to trade. So we have to force it by playing this move and then we just go for the train, right? So the doubling of the, doubling up of the rocks, I should say, enables us to go for a lot of different maneuvers that without the double up we would not be able to do. All right, so let me just go ahead and put up another rook over here and take a look at some other maneuvers we can do with a double, double-dot Brooke. And also let's take a look at what the opponent could do with the double-dot broke, right? So the apparent in this instance is eyeing down this, this pond right here. So now we're gonna talk about how we should be wary of the opponent having a doubled up rook and trying to hurt us, right? So obviously right now he could go ahead and do that. And if we don't protect this square immediately, and we're going to be a lot of trouble because the point could just capture here. And then after that word trapped, right, there's nothing that the king could do. I mean, we could escape this square. But even that's not going to help us to often, right? And another good thing about having two rooks is that you could try to set up in a way where you can capture things. So for example, What's disrupt comes here. Let's say our king goes there. This rook over here could just move to the B6 square i ng down this pond and obviously the other rock being here and the C2 square could be eyeing down the same pond. In effect, IEEE down a future double up after capturing this right, and of course checking us in the same time. So sometimes the double-up isn't really just putting them on the same row or the same path. It might also be threatening the same piece from two different directions, eyeing a future double-up once you capture that piece, right? So in this instance, we have to just basically defend, however we can, because. We can't let this, this palm fall over here. And obviously the opponent is going to try whatever they can to hurt us over here. We're going to keep pushing this pawn, trying to put some more pressure over here. Here, it's probably best to just play this move, denying this move right here. And obviously we're going to have a lot of back and forth. It's a pretty even situation here because we both have a doubled up, Brooke, but keep in mind, the first-person to break up the double-up could lead to a lot of trouble coming their way, right? Not necessarily. It doesn't mean like if black plays this move, for example, that doesn't necessarily mean, oh, they lost the game or anything like that. But now all of a sudden the pressure on this square is gone. Right? Now what that means is that now my books are free to go about their own business. Because before this, let me put this back. Before this. Look at this. I have, I have a lot of pressure on here. I have to keep my king right here to defend, have to keep my rook over here to defend. And because of those double-dot Brooks and the power to be enable the opponent to have, I have to just keep defending this square relentlessly. And even this rook is more or less tied down because I have to put it here so that if the important it makes this move I can capture, right? I do have this MOOC. If the opponent moves forward, I could go up there, but in that case, the opponent, we just shift the rocks over here trying to eye down this square instead. So either way, it doesn't really make too much of a difference. I have to defend over here. And of course, in the game of chess, it's very important that you're aware that you could have a lot of material advantage. But if you get checkmate it, you lose. It doesn't matter how much material Europe, right at the end of the day, safeties first and King safeties first. So you've gotta make sure if there is a double rook, you always worry of that, right? And you got to be cognizant of this when it gets to at least close to ending, you should always be aware of where the rocks were your opponents rooks are. You should try to double up yourself, but also just be wary of, are they trying to double up the rocks? Are they trying to coordinate their two rocks together? If they don't have two rooks remaining, then you don't have to worry about that obviously. But a lot of times we get to this stage and both the rooks of both players are remaining in the game. In that case, you have to be very careful, right? And obviously, I do want to come over here and attack, but first of all, I need to make sure that I have some solid defense and I can afford to stretch myself, right? So if the opponent makes a move like this, allowing us to get out of this situation over here because we don't have to defend the square. And then we can start thinking about, right, he is threatening to come down here and check us, but that's fine because we can just escape to this square. So here you probably wanna make it move like this. He's probably going to go for a check, which is a pointless check really. Like there's not much that he gains from this. And again, because he only has one rook. I'm now on this, This paan are at this moment, and I have enough defenders for a moment. He might try to come over here to have, again trying to get that double rock action going. But with a check, I can just take care of business right there. And he might try to escape over here. In which case, it's probably a good idea to go back here and again, protect, right? And you see what's happening here. We have a double, we have a potential double up happening on the square, on black. And we have a double up ourselves trying to protect the square, right? So doubling up Brooks happens a lot in the game of chess, especially towards the end game. It's very common. And you got We always very careful because you always should be aware that two rooks are far more powerful than each of them alone on their own, right? And you have to always be aware of each of these pieces have enough defenders on and each times because right now they have to attack her. So I need to have at least two defenders. And of course we do, right? And sometimes it might not be easy to see because you might think, Oh, wonderful there, where's the other Defender, right? You gotta remember the guy right behind that. This rock is also defending because defending both of them basically. So hopefully that makes sense. That's a little bit of insight into how doubling up your rooks and can affect the game, especially towards the end game. It does happen quite often, and I'm sure you will see a lot once you play a couple games, you actually end up experiencing it. Doubling, doubling up your books and the opponent doubling up the rocks and trying to make some maneuvers. You will see that a lot happening throughout the game, so just be careful of it. Okay, That's all I'm saying. Hopefully that made sense and I will see you in the next video. 24. How Games End in a Draw - Offering a Draw & Forced Draws: In this module, we're gonna talk about how games can end in a job. Now there are a couple of different ways that a game can end in the drop. And in this video, we're gonna talk about the first two ways, which is if you offer a drawing, you report on exempts it. And when you're forced into a job because of what's remaining on the board. So let's start with the first one. When can you offer a job? You're allowed to offer a drive any stage of the game, as long as it's your own turn. And look at the situation. You look at the board and you decide you don't want a draw would be a good enough results for me. Then you can go ahead and offer that draw. And of course you were pointing can choose to accept or decline that offer depending on their own situation. So sometimes you might want to do this is if the game is super even and you just feel like there's pretty much no way that the game Kip and any other weight then a drop. You can go ahead and make that offer. Or if you just feel like, you know, if the jaw is enough for me to let say when this tournament or whatever, if you're playing in a tournament, you can go ahead and offer the jaw, kind of just get it all done with if your opponent accepts, of course. So that's how you can offer your jaw and get games basically finished by just offering a drug to your points. And the other way is if you haven't enforced drop because of the situation on the board. There are some end games that are pretty much impossible to make the opponent, right? Let's say you only have a knights left with your kink and the appoint only has their king left. Well, in this situation, there is no possible mate. And because of that, the game is just drawn. Same with if you only have a bishop left and the opponent has nothing but the king, basically. That's also a forced drop. And the game just automatically hands in and join. The time really doesn't matter if you're playing a time to game. Because there's just no, there's not even a few radical meat possible. So there's just doesn't matter whether you're up in time or whether you're low on time. However, there are some other situations where it's pretty much impossible to force a draw or force a mate, I should say. But it is theoretically possible. For example, if you have a king and a bishop, let's say light, swear by ship. And your opponent has a kink and a different type of Bishop, for example, a light squared. But if you have a dark square of a ship or a dark square root, if you have a light square bishop. Now, why this is theoretically possible is because their own piece could be used to block their way so that you can go ahead and check make them. So theoretically, there is a possible board that you could put together where the opponent is made it. But it's probably not going to happen, right? It's probably, we're assuming that the opponent is at least aware enough to not make that such a huge mistake. That said though, because a theoretical made as possible, time actually does matter in those situations. So if you're in a position and an end game where you can't force so for some mates, what made this possible theoretically? Then the player who has low on time is under a lot of pressure because if their time runs out, they lose the game regardless of the fact that there's no forcible made possible. So it's very important to be aware of that as well. So don't just go ahead and say, okay, the game is going to draw because you cannot make me. Well, that's not exactly how it works. You've got to make sure that if a theoretical made as possible, then that your time doesn't run out because of it, does you lose the game regardless of the fact that maybe you're appointing cannot make you. So just be aware of that. That those are some of the ways that games get handed a drop. And we'll take a look at a couple of other examples in the upcoming videos. So stay tuned for that. 25. Draw By Stalemate: In this video, we're going to go over another way that you can end up with the drought in the game of chess, and that's a stalemate. Now, a stalemate is when you, it's your turn to make a move and you don't have any legal moves. So the game ends in a draw because of a stalemate. So for example, let's say we're white and black. And we make this MOOC, right? Which is a mistake by the way, but we're going to see what happens. So I moved over here to be four. Now this game ends in a draw right here because of a stalemate, because look at black. Black has no legal moves. The pon is unable to move forward because it's being blocked by another opponent piece. This poem is also not able to move forward because it's being blocked by another opponent piece. So these two, these two pieces have no legal moves. So what about the kink? Well, over here is being blocked by this rook. Over here as being blocked by both these rooks. And over here is also being blocked by this rock. So this king also has no legal moves. It cannot go to this square, cannot go to that square. Can I go to that square? So it's stuck right there. But notice that it's not under check. If this king was under check and it didn't have any legal moves, that will be checkmate obviously, and we would win the game. But because the king is not under check, so the king is not under threat at the moment. But it doesn't have any legal moves and no other piece for black has any legal moves. This is what we call a stalemate because black is out of moves. He's not under check, but he has no possible moved to make. And that's how the game ends in a stalemate, which means the game ends in a draw. So if we are white, we need to make sure we don't make this move because look at this. We were up so much, right? We're up a lot of pieces, obviously two rooks and, as well as some ponds. And also our position is much better like we should really just win this game, right? In fact, isn't made into, and we're just making this move and then that move, it's a checkmate, right? No matter what black does. And because of that, we should be careful to not make this mistake and just hand a draw to black because at this stage, black is pretty much as good as lost. As lost. The schema is only trying to make us make a mistake and give him a stalemate, right? So that's what we should be always aware of when you're a head in an, in an endgame. For example, in this one where you have a lot of material more and you can easily check me at the point. You should be very careful to never caused the opponent to rod of moves. You should always make sure that the opponent has at least one legal move. For example, right now Here's this legal move, which is perfectly fine, that you should make sure that you don't block that. Because if you do, the game ends in a stalemate, which means that you don't win the game, you only get a drone. Also on the opposite side. If you are black, you want to make sure that you make your appalling, making mistake to give you a stalemate because there's nothing else you can get out of this game, right? He can't win this game and you're probably going to lose it in a couple of moves. So the best thing you can do is to somehow tried to make the point, I make a mistake and just hand you a jaw by stalemates. Now, notice one other thing. If these pieces were not blocked, this would not be a stalemate, right? The only reason it's a stalemate is because none of the pieces have any legal moves. It's not just the kink. Any piece that black owns should be out of all legal moves. So for example, if this pawn wasn't here, let's say this pond was over here, right? And this black pawn hat had the ability to move forward. This would not be a stalemate, right? Even though the king is not able to move, the opponent has a legal move, which is this, right? He could just move that. So this was obvious stalemate. So another way that you could avoid stalemates is to leave one piece for the opponent. Maybe like a pawn, loan pawn over here, which is not threatening its own close to your last line. And just let that be there so that the opponent never runs out of legal moves. That something else that you could look at as well. Or if not that then you can just make sure that you always leave at least some space for the king. So let's say this wasn't here. You can always leave some space for the appointed king so that it never runs out of moves. And then you can just go ahead and check made it properly. Okay, so that's how a game can still meet, which leads to a draw. And the fact that you should be very careful if you're a head, you should be very careful not to give away a stalemate. And if you're down pieces and you're going to lose the game, then you might want to just try and see if he can somehow make deep on making mistake and get a stalemate out of it and just basically at least get a draw out of a lost cause, right? So that's what a stale meatus. And we'll go over some other ways that you can end in a jaw in the upcoming videos. So I'll see you there. 26. Draw By Constant Checking: And the next thing that we're going to look at as far as the ways that a game can draw is what we call a constant checking. Now, a constant checking is when you keep, constantly checking your opponent without the ability to actually go ahead and check with them. But the opponent is also not able to get out of this constant checking that you're going to put them upon, right? And there's just no escape for them. So let's take a look at an example here. Here let's say your white and your opponent's black obviously are far behind. And if black, if this was black's turn, your polygon, lose the game, right? It's pretty easy for black to go ahead and have a winning game from here. But if it's your turn and you're white, you actually have the chance to grab a draw out of here without allowing your opponent to take advantage of their material advantage. And just go ahead and check me you. So what you could do is you could just go over here, check your opponent. Now, obviously the appointing kink, this square is being blocked by their own pond. A6 is being blocked by their own pond. A B6 is also being blocked by our king. And same thing about B7 being blocked by our king and of course the rock as well. So the point King really only has two possible moves, and that's both on this eighth row, right? Eight NBA, it's one of these two. And it really doesn't matter which one it goes to. Because either way, what we're gonna do is we're just going to go up and check them over there. Now, obviously, when we go over there, the point only has one legal move because these scores are being blocked where King, and of course the rock is taking care of all the scores over here, right? So the opponent only has one possible movement that's back to A7. Now when they go back to a seven, we can check them again. Over here. Again, they only have two legal moves. So once they go to one of them, which activate again, they only have one legal moves. They come back to A7 and then we check him over again. Obviously, as you can see, this cycle will keep on going and there's just no stopping it, right? Because there's no way for black to block this check or for their king to get out of this predicament that they're in, right? So they're always going to have to deal with this. And obviously white is now going to make any other loops because anything else? If we do anything else, literally we lose the game. Because as soon as we don't check the opponent or we check them in the wrong spot. Then now it's the opponents turn and they're going to absolutely smash those because they have so much better material compared to us. So for this game is just going to keep going forever. In this state of us checking the opponent, the opponent going to the same squares, right? So this is what we call a constant checking. And obviously there is no escape from it because we can't checkmate them and they can't get out of this predicament. They can't block the check or get their king out of the situation. So what's going to happen is that this is going to be a forced draw right before. So drop by constantly checking the opponent and obviously the point has no escape from these checks. So after like two or three times of doing this, it's going to be game over and it's going to be a draw for both sides if you're playing online and it is going to happen automatically, but if you're playing in person, you can just call it with the person you're playing and you say, well, this is a job because this is a constant checking. And there's just no escape from this predicament. And, you know, if, if you're playing in person and the deploying disagrees with you, you can always call it a clover, like a referee or something, and just explain the situation and they can see what's happening in rule in your favor. But if you're playing online off to worry about any of that, obviously you can just say do it a couple of times and the software will detect that that's what's happening and the jaw will be given to both both sides. All right, so That's another way that you can then know what to draw. And obviously this is a really good thing to be aware of and a really good escape for you. If you have a much worse position compared to your opponent and you're pretty much looking at a lost game. This is a very good tool to have in your toolbox to see if he can somehow make this happen. Somehow find a way to keep constantly checking the opponent so that the opponent can't actually get on with their game and they can't finish you off, right? And the game ends and the draw. So if you have that option and you're behind in material and the end game, definitely go for it and try to grab a job because at least it's better than losing the game, right? So that's a draw by constant checking. We're going to look at another similar way of drawing, which is a little bit more, It's a little bit more comprehensive than this, right? This was specifically just for checking, but there's another way as far as repeating moves goes that you can achieve a draw and we're going to talk about that in the next video. But for now, just be aware that if you can constantly check the opponent, the game is going to end in a job. So just be aware of that and I'll see you in the next video. 27. Draw By Repeating a Position 3 Times: All right, Another way that the game could end in a draw is if you repeat a specific position three times in successive fashion, right? And what do we mean by that? And it doesn't have to even involve checking the opponent. It could just be the threat of capturing a very massive piece. For example, the queen, which leads the opponent just having to repeat the same position over and over again. And that's where you could use to get a job at the game, right? So for example, in this position, white is behind a night, right? And the opponent, really, they've only lost out one Pon, to make up for our night, right? So we are behind quite a bit. And if you think of it, as far as our trading, we traded a night which was worth 3.5 pounds for upon which is just worth 1 obviously. So we are behind 2.5 pounds worth of material. So this is not a good situation for us. So a draw would benefit us as white more than it would benefit black, obviously, because black is going to have an easier game going forward. Now, let's say from here, from this position, the black queen sees this pond. And it looks like a free pond because it's all being defended by anything. So blood can make a mistake here and just go ahead and capture it. Like the best move here for black would be to, let me just put that back at the best move for black would be to start developing their own, their own bishops. Maybe going for a castle over here and just stuff like that, right? To get their pieces involved in the game. And since they are ahead, as far as number of pieces is concerned, they should have a rather easy game. But let's say the opponent just thinks, oh, I have some free material that I can grab here. And he goes, I had encaptures that, well, what could happen here is we could actually force the opponent into a draw here. Because first of all, look at the way my, my position has been setup, right? So look at all the escape squares this queen has. These are all the legal moves that he has. Now let's take a look at all of them, right. So these are all the legal moves. Over here. It's being blocked by my bishop. Over here. It's being blocked my other bishop. Same thing over here. It's being blocked by my, by my rook. These two as well, logs from Iraq and of course my queen, meaning that if he goes to NAD squares, I just captured him. Write this over here, obviously also being blocked by the spaceship. This pon is being protected by this night so he can't go ahead and just capture, capture that one for free. So if we threaten this queen specially with our rook, because look what happens if we end with our rook. Now, obviously, all of these squares are under threat by Iraq, so he can't move to any of those scores. He can't go here because we will just capture him. He can't go there because we were just capture him. He can't go here or here because of our rook. So he really only has two moves where he can avoid getting captured, right? It's either going to a2 or capturing this pot, right? And let's say he goes to A2. But before that, just take a look at this position, right? So this is the first time we're going to see this position. All right, now, let's say he goes to A2. Now from here, we can just go ahead and thrown him one more time. And again, look at this. He can't go there because you would capture and with the rook, he can't capture our work because we would just capture it back with our queen. And obviously, his queen is worthwhile more than Iraq, so that will be beneficial for us. He can't go there because he gets captured. Can't he could go there. We'll talk about that in a second. But he can't go there and captured this pond because it will just capture bank. You can't go there because he gets captured by the pond. He can't go there because he gets captured by the bishop. And obviously this has his own piece, so he can't, he can't just go ahead and capture his own piece, right? So really he only has one possible move where he doesn't get captured for free and that's B2. So let's say it goes back to be too, well here we could go ahead and check him again. Right now this is the second time we're seeing this position, right? Remember I told you to take a look at the position before. This is the exact same position right now again, he only has two possible moves anywhere else his queen gets captured. Now let's say this time he decides to go ahead and capture that pano over there on A3. Well, we could just go ahead and check him one more time or not check, I guess, were threatening the queen, that we can go ahead and threaten the queen. Let me say one more time. And this time. Same thing, right? He can't go to any of these squares. Can't go there. He can go to this square, but not there. So this is the only place he actually has. Can't go here because of the upon. He can't go there because of our Bishop. And he can't go to any of these squares either. Because look at all these squares. They're all being defended by one of our pieces. If he goes to any of those squares, he gets captured by one of our pieces. So again, he only has one possible move and that's B2. And we could go ahead and end the Queen one more time. Now, this time, notice that this is not the exact same position as the last two that we saw. Because the last two also had a pot over here, right? So this is not actually repeating the same position. That's what I wanted to get to when we say repeating the same position three times. And that's what we're talking about here, right? It's draw by repeating position three times. What we say repeating a position three times, we mean the exact same position even upon somewhere on the board. Even that counts, right? The whole board has to be the exact same thing three times in successive fashion in order for the game to be declared a draw. Now here, obviously, he captured the pond, so the palm isn't here anymore. So this is not the exact same board as the last two times that the Queen was here on a rock was here. So we have to count all over again, right? So this is the first time we see this position. Again. He only has two possible moves. Let's say he goes there, we just go ahead and end threaten him. He has to come back here. We go back threatening him. And this is the second time we have this position setup. Let's say he goes there, threatened him, he comes back with random again. And this is the third time we have this exact same position setup. And at this stage, the game will be called a jaw, right? So whether you're playing online the software, we'll just call it a draw. Or if you're playing in person, you can just declare it a draw at this stage because this is, this Board has been repeated three times and let's be honest, just going to keep repeating itself because the parent doesn't want to give away their queen for free. And you would rather take a draw then just let the point when, right, because you're behind in material and you want to just make sure you get something out of this game. So this is probably going to go like this forever. Now, notice that the difference between this and the last thing that we talked about is that I'm actually not trailing deepen a king. I'm not, I'm not checking the point came, right. So it doesn't That's why I said this is a little bit more comprehensive, is that this rule refers to any position that is repeated three times exactly in successive fashion. And it doesn't have to involve checking. It doesn't have to involve threatening like the opponent king, or doesn't have to involve threatening checkmate. It doesn't have to involve any of that, right? It could be just as simple as you threatening one of one of their highly valued pieces and potentially getting one of your opponents highly valued pieces for free. Which could lead to this repeated moves thing happening. Obviously, it could also involve checks. That would be fine too. But anytime that you have the exact same position and the exact same board, repeated three times in successive fashion. That's going to just end up in a draw. Because, well, at that point, obviously there's, the game is kind of in a state where there's just no moving forward for either side. It's just going to be stuck there and there's nothing neither side can we do to get out of this predicament. So that's why it's going to be called a draw. So that was the draw Bye. Repeating the position in three times in successive fashion. Law. And there's one more way that again could end an, a drawing we're going to discuss in the upcoming video, but hopefully these aren't making sense so far. So again, the last video we talked about drawing by threatening to two, just checking the appointed forever. And this time we are drawing by just threatening anything, causing the same position to happen three times in a row and successive fashion. All right, so hopefully that made sense and I'll see you in the next video. 28. Draw Due to the 50 Move Rule: Now another way that games can end and draw is if for 50 moves, there is no capturing of any pieces and none of the pons of each side's MOOC. Now, this is a little bit more of an edge case scenario, and it's not a drawing scenario that you're going to see every day by any means. But it is, it is a rule that you should be aware of. And it's, it does happen once everyone's once in a while because the reason for it that really the only way he could happen, let me put it this way, is if you have such a locked pond structure that really no move is allowed to happen in either direction. Like other than that, there's really no scenario where this would happen, right? Because it's just very unlikely that for 50 moves, remember most games don't even make it to 50 moves there. They finish way before that. So for, for the fact that fifth 450 moves, none of the pieces have been captured and no pons move at all. It really does require some prerequisites. For example, this kind of a logged part structure for, as we can see here. So I've set up this board to look like a game that could plausibly end in this way. Because a look at this, right, everything has been locked into each other, right? This pawn structure, we have some pond chains going on here, which is all good. Don't get me wrong. But the problem obviously is that now we both have locked ourselves into this position and there's really no breakthrough for each, for each side. Because really what is Black gonna do? Like black cannot do anything with any of the pons. And the pons can move unless one of our ponds fall. And how would they fall, right? Like I look at this, these are the basis of our polymer chains. These cannot be attacked by anything like the bishop can't attack this font. I know the bishops can attack those bonds because they are blocked by other ponds that are protecting them. The nights. I mean, there's no way that I can get here because this square is already full. And there's really no way to get to this square because none of these squares are square that the knight could go to, to make it to the square. Like he can't just come here from there because guess what? You will just get captured by this by this part over here. He can't go there from here. You can't go there from here. Because again, he would just get captured in those squares. And also there's nothing really the rook or the queen can do. So really there's no breakthrough for either side and same for white, right? There is nothing to white can do to break through to the other side. And the position is locked significantly. And if it remains this way and no, uh, no side is willing to sacrifice one of their, one of their minor pieces, or maybe even the rooks are Queens. If neither side is willing to sacrifice, which most often, more often than not, they're not going to be willing to sacrifice. Then it's going to be declared a draft or 50 moves of nothing happening, right? So you could be just making random moves like you can move there. He could move there. The knight could go there, for example, maybe this guy, the sides I want to play my night there. Maybe move your rook, doesn't matter what you do, right? If 50 moves go by and you are making your moves, whatever they are. But in those 50 moves, there is no capturing of any pieces. As, as we just discussed, disgust. There's no way that you could capture without losing material, right? And if this goes on for 50 moves, nobody makes a sacrifice and nobody's willing to go down and material just to keep the game going, then what's going to happen? And of course not a Ponzi scheme move unless one of the other ponds are captured. So that's already satisfied as well. If this keeps going for 50 moves, then it's going to be draw because of the fact that for 50 moves, it's, it's not that this is a stalemate. Remember, stalemate was when the appointed king couldn't move. But this is kind of a situation where we're just down to no options are open to us for us to continue to skim, right? Because no matter what we do, we can't get the scheme to get going and lead anywhere specifically right at 50 ohms. Again, as I described, is a lot of moves That's too many moves to go by for nothing to happen, right? For no peace, to get captured, for no pond to make any moves. That's a lot of moves for nothing to happen. And if that's happening, then obviously that's a sign that the game is just not working out. It's the game is way too locked and there's no breakthrough for each side. So if that is happening, then the game comes to draw after 50 mils and it could be 50 moves at any stage of the game. It could be like from the 20th move to the 70th move. It could be from the 30th move, the ADF move. It doesn't matter as long as there are 50 moves in a row where no pieces being captured and no pawn makes any moves, then the game ends in a drop. All right, so again, this is not a scenario that's going to happen every time you play by any means, you might not even encounter this at all anytime you play chess, right? Because maybe you always breakthrough or you may always make sure you point and doesn't get a nice polished chain going or whatever you do, maybe you never like locking too many pounds into each other. But so yeah, it's very possible that you may not even encountered this, this rule at all. But just be aware that this is there as well. So if you are ever in a position where the game gets super logged and there's nothing either side can do to break through. Just be aware that there is the smaller that after 50 moves of no capturing and a no paan making any moves, the game ends in a drug. So that was the last scenario we're going to go over as far as how games can draw. Hopefully, these are very instructive and hopefully you guys were able to learn how games can enter Joe, so that if you are after a drop because maybe you're down pieces or maybe you're looking at a losing game. You know how you can try to get to a draw rather than losing the game. And also if you are in a winning position, then you can know how you can go about making sure you don't just hang easy draw to your opponent by making a mistake. Okay, so hopefully that makes sense, and I will see you in the next video. 29. Queen & Rook Endgame: All right, Now it's time to talk about the end games and all the gains that we need to know. And obviously the endgame is the end stage of the game where you're just going to try to convert your material advantage or your positional advantage into a win, right? And usually the end games or stage where there are not many pieces left. And it really is just about killing off the game. The player that has the upper hand and is a head is usually just looking to kill off the game by checkmated the king as soon as possible obviously. And over gonna do is we're going to start looking at some common and games. Because usually in end games you end up in a very similar situation more often than not, because of the fact that you get down to very limited number of pieces left. And basically what we're gonna do here is we're going to learn the main and the easy and games so that we can implement those whenever we are in this iterator so we can kill off the game and convert the wind. Right? Now we're going to start with the easier ones. So this one is probably the easiest endemic in have you have your queen, the most most powerful piece in the game. And your rock, which is the second most powerful piece in the game, you have bottom and the point has nothing, right? The opponent only has their king left. Which basically means this is the, pretty much the easiest end game you can come across. We're going to start with this one. We're going to learn the foundations of how you kill off a game and how you go about finishing off in a specific end game. And from this point on, we will gradually go into more difficult and gains, right? So we're going to start off with an easy one and then gradually go more difficult, more difficult. And then we also kind of look at a couple of games that are not easy to pull off and we're going to cover them so that if you're ever in those positions, you know exactly how to convert into a win. Because especially specifically for the maze by two bishops. One, it's one that if you don't know, it's really hard to figure out how to do it, right? So you need to know it. So that's why we cover all these n games here. So let's start with this one, which is a pretty easy one. Hopefully. It's the one where we have our queen and Iraq. And he pointed only has their game. So what we want to do in this situation, because we have two pieces that can move forward, backwards, left and right. In this case, what we wanna do is go step-by-step and just limit the rows that the king can move past step-by-step, right? So we limit the rows one by one. I'll just keep limiting up, which causes the king to just push back, push back, and we just keep limiting the rows until the king has nowhere to go. And it's basically check mentors. So for example, right here, my rook is covering it, this row, which means that the king cannot go past it. And basically what I wanna do is I want to go to the next step. I cover row number 5. Now, the king cannot go pass from a number 5. So the kink can go in one of these directions. But it cannot go in this direction obviously, right? So let's say the King makes this move right here. Well, you wanna do is you want to look at another. This means that we're also checking the king right here. Right now. Let's say the king moves Here. We go over and we check the king over time. Now, obviously, the king has to move to row number eight because rule number 7 has been covered by the queen and row number six has been covered by the rook. So the king has nowhere else to go but rule number eight, which means we'll just go off and kill off the game by check mating the opponents. Alright, so when we move over here, we cover the last row. And obviously this row, which was the king's escape, has already been covered by our queen, which means that the King has no escape and it is checkmate, and we have won the game. Alright, so this is the easiest end game they come across. And we will talk about little more difficult and games in future videos. But now you know how to finish off a game if you ever have your queen and your rook left, and the opponent has no piece of value remaining at the game. So that's how you do that. And I will see you in the next video for more complicated AND gates. 30. Two Rooks Endgame: Alright, in this video we're going to talk about an endgame. Well, we have two rooks and our king, and the opponent only has three King left, right? So in this end game, it's actually quite similar to the one that we talked about in the previous video where we had our rock and our queen. It basically we're going to be doing the same thing, right? We're gonna make sure first we're going to come over here because we want to keep pushing the king this side. So we need to first make sure all of our pieces are on the other side of the king so that we can keep going step-by-step and pushing the king in that direction. Now, let's look at how we're actually going to do this. So first of all, what we wanna do is we want to make sure our two rooks are not on the same line. Because if they are on the same line, who can't, they can't overlap right in and cover different rows one at a time. So first we want to make sure one of them is like over here. So we want to get it away from this king as well. Because if it is too close to the king, the king might come and try to threaten our piece. And, you know, we don't want that, we don't want any household. So, alright, now the kink makes the move, move this guy over here as well. The king makes a move, and we just basically go the step-by-step route. We check the king. The king might make a move like that. We go ahead and check one more time. Now, the king might play something like this and you have to be careful here because if I move this rook up here to B7 to check the king, Well, that's not our agree as the king can do is capture me, right? Because there is no support for this, unlike in the previous one when we had the queen that were supporting the rook. Here we don't have a support, so we have to be careful, right? So one thing that you could do is you could just make this weighting move. And by waiting move, we mean a move where basically changes nothing. It's just enabling us to carry out our plan, right? It doesn't really threaten the king. It doesn't limit it any further, but it does allow us to then make this move where we bring this rook up there to keep the step-by-step check gone. Now the king might try something like this, again, threatening the stroke and be careful. Don't just play your check right here because it can capture this rock over here. So just play another waiting game. Move the stroke to the other side. And now the king has an absolutely no hope because we can just check over here. We close on another row. The king has to retreat to the last row. And then we just go for the jugular with this move. Now, as you can see, the king is checked, cannot move in this row, and this row is already covered by the other rock because we are going step-by-step. And as a result, this king has been checkmated. And there's nothing, there was nothing he could do at any stage of this to prevent what was coming, right? So we were able to convert our material advantage into a nice and easy win. And that's all we can ask for, right? So again, this is a little bit of an easier and game, but it's important to know these, right? If you don't already know these, it's very important to cover them. But again, will progressively get into tougher and tougher and games and cover those as well. So I will see you in next video for the other ones. Hopefully this all makes sense. 31. Queen & King Endgame: Alright, in this video, we're going to go over the end game where we have our queen and her King left and the opponent only has their kangaroo. So in this case, obviously, we only have one active piece of King left. So we can't quite do the step-by-step method that we were talking about in the previous Endgame, because we only have 11 very powerful piece. Basically, the king can support and it's going to be involved in this mate. But for the most part we're going to be using our queen. Two limits are the appointed king as much as possible. And then when we are in a position where we want to just finish off the game, we use the king as support so that we can go ahead and check me the opponents. So one thing to just be aware of and be very mindful of, and this end game is to be careful not to stay stalemate the opponents. Because, well, guess what? If you limit the opponents options and they don't have a legal move that they could possibly make in their turn. While the game ends in a stalemate and you actually don't win the game, right? The, the game ends in a draw. And when we are in an end game where we are this far ahead, right? Like this is a perfectly reasonable and game. We should be converting this into a weapon, right? We shouldn't let this slip out over hands and just given given easy tie to our appointment. So it's very important that we notice and game perfectly well and we don't make any mistakes to let our opponent get an easy stalemate out of us. So the way you want to do this is you first want to limit the appointed king to kinda the sides or the corner, or somewhere around here, or in each of the corners, doesn't have to be over here. But in this example, I'm probably just going to push it over there because I mean, that's how unboxing this king right now, as you can see, my, My queen over here is kind of boxing this king towards that corner. So I'm probably going to just keep limiting this king until it gets somewhere around here, right? And then when it's trapped in the corner and he can't get anywhere. I'm just going to bring my king forward to use it as support in order to finish off the game while still being very careful not to ended in a stalemate. Okay, so let's see how that works. So first thing that you need to know is when you want to limits and appointed king with your queen, the best thing to do is to move to a square where you are a knight's move away from the appointed king, right? You see the knights move, the L-shaped move. That's how far away I am from this king at. Once you are in such a position, look at what happens. I'm limiting as many squares as possible around the skin, right? So basically I'm limiting this square, this square, this square, this square and this square, right? So the appointed king only has three legal moves right out of the possible eight that it could have if there wasn't any piece of limiting it, right? So this is the best of any. Where else? Here I could have moved to a square over here because the king is here for support. But let's say the king wasn't here. The king was like off here somewhere. Then in that case, I obviously can't come right next to the king. But the best way to limit the appointed king is to be a knight's move away from the appointing, which means we are an L-shaped move away from it, right? And once you do this, the appointed king will start turned to have to make a move. So they only have these three possible squares and can go to, so let's say the king goes there. Now this means, and we've limited the king to the last three rows now, or we should do that basically because now the king has retreated to these last three rows. So we can make it move like this where again, we are a knight's move away. And now this appointing king can no longer go in this direction, right? Because we are locking this entire row now with our green. Again, the appointed king has three illegal moves, nothing else. So let's say they make a move like this. Again, I just go to a place where I'm L-shaped away. And again, I'm just limiting this king further and further now, this king who could that couldn't go past this line, also cannot go past this line anymore. So let's say the kink makes them move like, like let's say they're just keep closing on again, just a knight move away. If the king mix and move like that again, I just closed down, make sure I'm on that move away and just keep boxing it in until the king gets to a place like this, a box and then one more time, and now the king only has one legal move, right? And then from that square and other legal move back here. So now I'm in a position where I can just leave this king, just wander around. And in the meantime, I can just push my king towards the appointing kings for basically to use it as a support. So I just keep pushing. King comes over here. And now what I want to do over here is to basically keep on this pressure. And because my king is in this position right now, if my queen wasn't here, this king would already be covering these three squares, right? So the appointed king, you wouldn't be able to make you move this way anyways, which means that thinking of the step-by-step method, It's almost as if I've already blocked this row with my king, right? Because I mean, it doesn't really matter that I haven't blocked over here because the boating king can't just run around and come over that, right? Disappointing king cannot move from this row if my queen wasn't even here because of my king. So what I can do is I can just move over here and push the appointed king towards the last row. And just be careful that you move over here. Because if you move your queen over here, that is a little bit problematic because then the king only has one move to make. And if you push your own king up, then that results in a stalemate, right? Because then the appointing king doesn't have any legal moves. So that's why I'm making this move over here and sort of just coming over here. Because over here again, I'm limiting the appointed king, but the appalling King has two possible scores that it can go to. And that's what we want, right? So let's say the opponent king goes over there. Now just push up one more time. Again. Just blocking this row with my king and sort of with migration. Even if my queen wasn't here, this king would not be able to make it move this in this direction. And now obviously the appointing only has one legal move. And once he makes them move, I can check mates. And like three different or four or five different places, right? Any of these are checkmate. If I move over here, checkmate, checkmate, checkmate, checkmate, checkmate, right? So for example, I make this move that is checkmate because I am limiting all of the opponent's moves over here and the opponent is checked and has nowhere to run two, just like that. There we go. Alright, so that's how you go about chick mating the opponent. If you only have a queen and your king left. Obviously in other end games where let's say you have no queen and your bishop, but a porn also has their bishop. You just trade that bishop to get down to this specific end game, right? So as you can see, we're covering the basic endings because a lot of the times after you just treat the pieces of weight, you arrive at these basic and games, right? So let's say if I had another rook and the bishop, and the point also had a rook in a bishop would still arrive at the same end game, right? So this is an endgame where we have basically a queen advantage over our opponents. Not necessarily just an endgame where it is literally this specific thing, right? Anytime that you have material advantage over your opponents, you can just trade off all the pieces and arrive at that specific end game, like we did over here. And then once you arrive at an end game, hopefully you already have learned how to finish off the game and converted into a one, right? So we covered this over here. And in the next video we're going to talk about how we go about delivering the mates and Endgame where we have, again only one powerful piece left. But this time the rook queen, where we don't have as many dynamic moves. It's a little bit different, but kinda similar. So I'll see you in that video. Hopefully this made sense so far. 32. Rook & King Endgame: In this video, we're going to learn how we finish off an end game where we have our rook and our King left against the point GEC. So this one is going to be a little bit more difficult than the last one, because obviously they're, Brooke is not as powerful as a queen and it doesn't cover diagonally. So we can't make the same L-shaped moves towards the king to keep limiting it. So we have to give it a different way, right? We can obviously limited by just limiting it by rows or by files. In this case, we're going to limit it by rows. And what the appointed king is gonna do is it's probably going to not allow us to limit further. It's not going to make a voluntary move to the last rules because they know that if they make that move, I can just move, move up and keep limiting them, right? So they're probably going to move in this direction, which is okay. We want to make sure we involve our king and love more in this specific end game. Just because the rock itself is not able to limit the appointing king on its own. And what we're gonna do is we're going to hope for the appointing thing to mirror OS, right? So look at this line I'm creating with my ROCC. It's like I'm splitting the board into two. Like it's a, it's an area where the appointing king is and the area where my king is. Alright? And what we wanna do is we want to force the appointed king to mirror us because what happens when the opponent Kynars us? Let's say my work was over here. For this example, let's say this opponent makes a move that ends up with miking, mirroring their king. What happens here is that my kink on its own, without the help of the ROCC, is actually blocking this kings way as far as going out of this box goes, right? So even if my rock wasn't here, this king would still not be allowed to make any move Towards the fifth row because of my king, right? My king is blocking all three of the squares that this king could escape two, which means that we can just take our rock and make this move right? We are checking the opponent. The opponent has to retreat to the role prior to that one and has to get limited further because there's just no where else you can go, right? It can't make it move over here because of my kink. And it can't move in these two squares because of my rock and obviously can't stay here, so it has to move back to the previous row. And once that happens, we again would go up and we just wait for the appointing king to mirrors one more time, right? If it doesn't do that, we can just say waiting game just like that. Let the opponent king basically force itself into that, enter that are predicament. Once they move over there, we can just move over here. They might make him like that, in which case, we don't want to do is we don't want to be the one mirroring because if we mirror, they can just keep moving, right. We want to make sure we allowed them to mirror us, right? And if they tried to get away, we just forced their hands. So for example, over here, I'm just going to play a waiting room, right? Again, awaiting move as a move where I don't really change anything. I'm just forcing the opponent to play. And in this case, if the point comes here, they're in a situation where I'm mirroring them, which means I can just move up. So we're probably not going to do that. They're going to move over here, which is fine because I come over here and again, I'm forcing their hand. They have to move in this direction or keep limiting them themselves. If they just limit themselves voluntarily, I can just move up. That's perfectly fine if they come over here. Well, again, there are in a situation where I am mirroring them over this line. And guess what? I am covering all three of these squares with my king, which means that I can display this MOOC and the opponent has no choice but to again retreat one more row. I wanted to go over there and I can keep doing the same, right? I just move over here again. Just look at how on not the one mirroring the opponent right? And move over here to the side to let them mirror me. So I haven't moved once we are mirrored together because if they marry me, then it's my turn to make it move. And we are already in a situation where we are mirrored, so I can move my ROCC further up. And this is the plan here, right? That's how we're going to check mates. We're going to limit row 7 with our kink. And again, obviously, we can only limit three squares, so we have to get this perfectly. We have to let the opponent mirror us to block the opponents entry to row seven. And then we make a move with our rock to row 8 to checkmate the point, right? And again here, they move over here, I'll just move up checkmate. So they're probably gonna go over there, which is fine. I'll just move over here, forcing the opponent's hand. The only have one legal move, so they have to make them move. And once that happens, again, I am blocking their entryway into row 7 with my king because we are mirrored. And I just move up and deliver checkmate. Alright, so hopefully that makes sense in this endgame. Basically we're just after forcing our opponents to mirror us, right? And that's the key takeaway, is that when you only have a row cleft, you have no other choice than to use your king as support. And basically forced to you pulling king to mirror your king in order to block their own way. All right, so hopefully that makes sense. Definitely practice this one because it's a very important concept to get down to make sure you're not the one mirroring, but you're forcing the opponent to mirror you. So definitely practice it. Very important concept. And I will see you in the next video. 33. Two Bishops Endgame: All right, So now it's time to learn the two bishop and game, which is a little bit more of a complicated and game. So pay close attention to this one and make sure you learn it right away from this point onwards. Because if you don't know how this made us perform, this is really tough to come up with on the spot. So especially if you're under time pressure, it's going to be really tough. So make sure you learn those right away. So the way we want to do this, and I'm just going to first explain what we're trying to get accomplished here because this is a little bit more of a tougher and game where we have to use all of our pieces. And what we have to eventually do is to push the appointing to one of the corners, right, where we can finish it off. But first we need to make sure we get our king to a central square. And then from there we bring our bishops. We always keep our bishops close to each other because when they're right next to each other, they block off two diagonals right next to each other. Which means that we're basically limiting the space because anything that is inside of the space cannot get out of the space. And as we keep pushing our bishops closer and closer to people and King, we keep closing down the space and limiting where the kids can go and eventually want to use this to get the king to move to one of the corners. So let's see how that works. Let's start with pushing our king to the middle appointed king estimate if we push it over here, say the point was there, that from here we can come here and check. Obviously the appointed king cannot come here because of our king, cannot go there because of our bishops. So let's say he goes like there's somewhere. We come here again, make sure our bishops are right next to each other at all times. Because right now, take a look at this, right or not? Not there. There we go. There, there we go. I'm having tough times here. There we go. Perfect. So at these two diagonals with these mashups and these two diagonals over here are being covered. And of course, our king, the reason why we wanted to push it up here is because it's helping us out with this one square. So the king cannot escape out from that as an opponent's King has to stay somewhere around here. Alright, in this space that we've created and cannot get out of the space. Now we're going to keep limiting the space and pushing the king closer and closer to that last line and then closer and closer and closer to the corner. So let's say the point King moves there. We go ahead and make this move over here. And then let's say the pointing goes there. Again, we close out the space. Again, we have the two diagonals over here. So that's the limited space. This is the only space that the king can move these for now. And what we're gonna do, let's say a king moves here. You can move to the backline as well, but that would just make our life easier. So he's probably not going to make our life too easy. It's probably gonna move there. Now what we're gonna do is we're going to push up our king. So that right now we're trying to block off the appointed king as much as possible. And remember, our eventually our goal is to get the appalling King to go to the last line, right? And we want to end up mirroring it. So let's say the point King moves here. We keep pushing up, chasing it. And of course, deep-linking has to move to the back line now because we bought this square with our kink woman, pushed it up. And now from this point, the appointed king can really go anywhere. It really doesn't make a difference. Either way, he's going to be in a lot of trouble. Because we're going to make this move over here. And once he's checked, he really has these two moves. And neither one is going to be great for him because if he moves here, we're just going to keep doing the same thing. We're going to keep learning space, pushing into the corner. And if he moves here, we're just going to go ahead and check the opponent. And because we are now in a space where we are mirroring, the appointment can just keep mirroring. So if the point goes there, it would just keep layering. Of course, it can't go back because we're closing down that space and our own king is closing down this entire rank in front of him. So again, he has no choice to go there. We keep marrying him. Again, he can't get out of here. He can only go to one of these two squares if it goes to the corner. Would just closing the space, eventually checking and checkmated. Right. So he probably doesn't go to the corner, it go somewhere around there, but that's totally fine too. Because again, remember, we're closing down these three squares. We're closing down these with our bishop. And now we're in a great position to just finish off the game because we take this bishop and there we go. Right? Now the opponent has no escape because we've blocked the seventh rank with our own kink by just mirroring the opponent King when he got to the last line. Then when the opponent king goes there, we keep again checking just like that. Again, the opponent has no escape, has to move to the corner. And once you most of the corner, just go ahead and check mates. Just like that. Alright? And of course the king is done and buried. So that's how you go about check mating. You born with two bishops. So you start by getting your king to the middle. Then you close down the space little bit at a time by pushing the two bishops right next to each other and limiting the space and making sure the king is always inside that space and never has a wait to get out of that space, right? And then you just keep pushing the polling king, keep limiting it. When we get over here, we also use our Kinga little bit to block off a square root two. So the deep-linking has to move to the last rag and doesn't just hover around on the seventh rank. And then once he pointing against the last row, then we want to get into a position where we are just a mirroring the opponent over and over again, therefore, preventing the opponent to get out of that last rank by our king only. And then once we get into that position, we can just keep checking and eventually check mating the opponent in the corner using R2 bishops. All right, so hopefully that makes sense. Definitely practice this on your own because This is a tough endgame to, first of all understand and then even tougher to actually execute, right? So even if you understood perfectly what I was talking about this whole time, I guarantee you you need to practice at least two or three times before you actually are able to perform it like just like that, right? You need definitely into practice this one. So if you have a chessboard, go ahead and practice it. If not, go online or on some chess application and just practice it a couple of times and just try to execute it. Okay, So you have both your bishops and your kink and you appoint only has their hand grant and try to execute this mate price and a couple of times, okay, so hopefully that made sense and I will see you in the next video. 34. Rook & Pawn Vs Rook Endgame: Now the next end game that we're going to take the MCAT is kind of a setup like this where you have, let's see upon and then you have some other piece, for example, a rock in this case, which the opponent also has, right? So the aim here is to either trade off these pieces and force a trade so that you can be left with just upon the, you could promote or to make the opponent sacrifice the rock for your POS. You can't promote your pond, but you still have your rock remaining so you can go ahead and finish off the appointment with your rock, right? So we know both end games for this. We know the end game where you have a rock and a king in the opponent he has recurring. And we also know the end game where you have a queen and king. Andy upon only has three king. So either way, no matter if we get the opponent to trade off their ROCC, or if the point of sacrifices or look for our pawn over here. Either way, we should be able to finish off the game based on the other end games that we've already learned together. So what you wanna do here is to be very careful and very carefully push this pawn forward and try to get it to that last line. So we go here, we go here, and then we'd go there, right? And then once we get here, we can a queen instead of our palm, right? So that's, that's the aim of it. And there's one specific tacky that I want to share with you, but to start with, let's just make sure that we are protecting our upon here. We're just putting our rook over here. So that we're saying, hey, if you want, you can trade, but guess what? We're just going to capture Beckwith upon and then we can protect upon with our own king. Not they're actually over here after the pollen goes over here, right? So if the opponent wants to, they can do that, but then it doesn't matter because I'm we're going official if the game so they're probably not going to go for that move. They might make a move like this, which is fine. We just keep pushing upon, might try to check us, which is fine, we just get away. Um, I tried to shake again. We can always just go back and there's nothing they can do. They can try to come here, but we could always just again blocked or move. By making this move. They might try to come over here and not let our pawn move because it's been pinned down to the, to the king, I should say. And we can just move up our king. They could go down here to the last drank. And this is a tactic that I wanted to talk about, right? So our king is actually right here protecting the square, but let's say our king wasn't there, let's say, or king was over here, right? Let's say there was another setup where our king was not close to the bone. The tactic that I wanted to mention is that you can always make this move if the rock is protecting this backline or not that moved. There we go. Let me put this back here. There we go. Okay? So if the opponent rook is protecting this black line and basically preventing us from just pushing up the pond and getting a new queen for ourselves. What you can do is you can just push up with rook. And again, doing the same thing. We're saying that, hey, if you want to capture a rook, That's fine, But we just captured back and we get our queen anyways. And if you don't want to, then we're just going to promote this pond the next move and get our queen, right? So over here, the point there's nothing they can do, right? So you can do that. You can do this tactic if they are presenting the back line. Now, if they were not protecting the back line, let's say they were like over here, there were trying to I down our pond from this side saying that, Hey, if you move up, I'm just going to come here and capture it because if you move up, you're not protected by this rook anymore, right? I will. Obviously the king couldn't be there because you'd be checking that. But let's say this was the setup, right? And they were saying, Hey, if you move up, I just come over here and capture you. Well, what you could do is you could just go ahead and get your king involved in the game and also keep their king away from our pond, right? Because guess what? Over here, this king cannot pass this line because our rock is essentially creating this barrier where the point can count pass through, right? Because it will be checked. So our own king is able to come over here, protect those Po1 and of course the polling, they can move their ROCC data hit because if they move their ROCC and let's say check over here, I can just dodge the check. They might check again, I'm going to skip dodging. And they might check again. I'm I can just keep dodging if they check it again, I'm just gonna go back here and now there's no way they can check me anymore and there's nothing they can do because now my king is protecting the score as well. So I could just go ahead and push up the pond. And if they tried to do anything else, if they tried to come by here, say I push up and they capture, over here, I can just capture back with the king. And now we have an endgame that we already know, which is the ROCC and King and game against the appointed king. All right, so that's the two ways that you could end this end game, either by making the appointment broke, sacrifice themselves for that pond to avoid you getting a queen. In which case you just have this end again and we already know how to finish off. Or you can just make the point and make the trade, trade off your rook and then just promote your pond and obviously protecting your palm with your own king. So the appointed king cannot just come here and capture your palm, right? So hopefully that makes sense. It's a pretty easy end game. It's an, it's kind of an end game that transitions into the other two and games that we've talked about before. And it's very important that just be very careful that you don't make a blunder and just give away one of these pieces for free. You want to make sure that if you lose either one of these pieces, you're also taking the opponents ROCC and you're basically simplifying the end game to one of those 21 games of all already learned together. And we already know how to perform, which was the rock and king and the queen and king end game. And no matter which one you end up with, you should be able to finish off the game because we've already learned how to tackle these acronyms. So hopefully that made sense and I will see you in the next video. 35. Smothered Mate: Now another engineer we want to take a look at is what we call a smothered mate. Now, a smothered mate is a very interesting economy that has a really different kind of idea. And the idea behind it is that if the king isn't a square where there is no escape from, let's say king is over here. There is, there are two ponds over here. And then let's say there's another piece over here. I basically the king has nowhere they can move. The idea is that if the king isn't such a position, then just any kind of night on a square like over here or over here. If it cannot be captured by the opponent, could lead to just the CheckMate right there. Because guess what happens there? The king is checked, but it cannot move anywhere. And if your piece is not able to be captured, then it's just going to be checkmate. So let me show you what I mean. So the way this works is like this. This is the first move. The king was checked, so it has to move over here. And in this area we're going to use a middle game tactic that we learned together, which was a double-check, right? So if my, if my night over here moves to the h3 squared, guess what? It's going to be checking the point King. And also the same time we haven't discovered attack from our queen, checking the appointed king as well. So we're going to have a double check because once the knight goes there, this pathway opens and also the night itself is checking the opponent. So we're going to have a double-check from the Queen and from the night, which basically means, and here let's take a look at it. The path reopen here and the night itself is checking, which means the pointer has to move their king. They can't just capture nights because, well, guess what? The queen is still checking the opponents. So they have to move their king and the king. Well, they have two available squares. One of them is basically not a legal move because there is the square over here threatening that square, and also the night is threatening their score as well. So there's really only one legal move for the, for the white player to play. And that is to take their king to the S1 square. And that's exactly what we're gonna do. And now here, remember what we talked about. If we can get the square root to be filled up by an opinion piece, that means that you pointing king is not able to go anywhere, right? And once that happens, if we take, our night's over here, and let's say this rook wasn't here to capture us. We could just check my deployment. So how do we go about accomplishing that? Well, this is the idea behind the smothered mates. The way it works is that we basically sacrifice our queen on the square so that by sacrificing it over there, the opponent has to capture with their rook. Because guess what? They're check, they have to remove that check. They have to capture with the rook. And then we'll just go over here with our night. Especially since the rock has already moved. We can go over there and check mates. So this is the idea is that we move over here. We check the opponent with our queen. And once this happens, the opponent is going to capture back with the rope does that's the only legal move they have. And because guess what, they can't capture with their king because our queen is being protected by our nights. So if they go ahead and capture us back, which they have to do with the rook, like this. Well, we can do now is look at this. This kink is trapped over here in the square. There is no escape for it. So if it gets checked, it's checkmate. And guess what? This rock had to move from that square so it's no longer threatening anything that goes over there. So what we can do is we can take her night, go to this F2 square and checkmate the opponent in this nice, beautiful way which is called the smothered mates, right? And obviously there's nothing white could do about any of this, right? So let's go back to the beginning of the smothered made. It started with this check over here. Again, there's nothing like you do. They only have one legal move to go ahead and make that a legal move. We move over here, the double-check. Again, there's nothing we can do. They can only move one space that's available to them. And then once we make this move, again, there's nothing else that can be half to capture with the rook because they're being checked and there's no other way to remove the check. And once I do that, you can just go ahead and finish off the game by taking her night to the F2 square. And as you'll see throughout this tactic, there was nothing you could do, right? So it's a very important tactic to learn, and you probably will see this a lot and puzzles. It might happen once in a while in the games. Obviously it's not a common end game, but it's a very cool and interesting and good to know about. And obviously it employs a lot of the tactics that we've learned together. Tactics like double checks, Like discovered a tax. And also we learn that, hey, if the bad, this idea that if the appointed king has no square that I could escape to, we could always go ahead and check the opponent with our night and just achieve checkmate, especially if our night cannot be captured by the opponent pieces. Alright, so that was a smothered made. Hopefully you guys enjoyed that one. And I will see you in the next video. 36. How to Solve Puzzles - Prep for the Class Project: Alright, in this video, we're gonna talk about puzzles. And we're actually going to solve the coupled together. So you kind of get an idea of how we go about solving puzzles. Basically, the idea behind puzzles is that it's a way for us to practice the tactics, specifically the middle medal game and Endgame tactics that we learn together. You can go ahead and practice it a lot. And also any new tactics that you learn are any specific end games or any specific mental game scenarios that you might want to know about or learn or get used to. You will encounter them a lot and puzzles and just solving them on a regular basis will help you develop your tactics skills. So let's take a look at how we go about solving puzzles. We're going to solve a coupled together. This is a puzzle rush on the chess.com website that I'm doing right now, where it basically gives you a set of puzzles in a series. And it starts from easy puzzles and it gradually gets harder. So let's take a look. So this is the first one that we get. We are white. It's our move and we have to find the best one. So the basically the way the puzzles work is that you have to make the best move with every move. And if you make anything but the best move, then you lose. You get the puzzle wrong. And if you get three wrong, the game ends. Basically, that's how puzzled rush works. So this is the first board that we're given and we have solved for the best possible moves. So here I can immediately see that my queen is threatening this piece. And of course I have a backup with this rook. So to attackers, one defender, so we can go ahead and capture that rook. That should be the best move it is. And now again, we can just capture the stroke and that would be a bad crank meets over here, which means group basically check mating the opponent because they are in the last track and they have no escape because of their own pump structures in this case. So we just move up the rook capture. And so that was the first one. We already have one on the board. And here you can see that was a really easy on, that was a 159 rated puzzle, which is pretty easy, right? That's super E is anything below a 1000 is like super easy. And then from 1000 and starts getting a little bit tougher, a little bit off, a little bit tougher until it gets to very tough puzzles later on. But for now, we're just taking like an easy ones. Hopefully this helps us ease into the harder ones. So again, we take a look at what's going on here. Our queen is threatening this rook. We are also backed by this rook. However, this bishop is protecting the stroke, meaning that if we go ahead and capture the road with our clean, the bisher, recapture those. And of course, Queen is worth a lot more than rock. But here's the thing though. Remember, in the game of chess, what matters is that you check me deployment. So if you can checkmate the opponent, even if it costs you a lot of material, it doesn't matter because you checkmate maybe point in the game is over. And that's exactly what's happening here. If you look at this right here, we have the opportunity to checkmate the opponent and finish the game. Because once we capture and get captured back, Well guess what happens? Take it look at this scenario, right? Once we capture and we get captured back, these two pieces are eliminated and the bishop ends up in the square, right? So just imagine that, imagine a board where these two pieces I've been eliminated and the bishop is over here. In that case, we can go ahead and capture with our rook, maybe the opponent on the background. So that's exactly what we're gonna do. Okay, so we have to do a little bit of mental calculation as, as far as what's going to happen when we make certain moves, and that's how we solve the puzzle. Now here we have two rooks on this rank. So I can immediately see, and hopefully you can see as well that we can just check the opponent. And here's the idea behind this check as well. And this is why this is the best move, is that once we check the opponent, the opponent has to move to one of these three squares. But guess what's happening over here. Those three squares are blocked by this rook. So the opponent basically get checkmated. There's nothing they can do. Now over here. And we'll take a look here. We have two rooks, we have a night, but the opponent has a queen. And Iraq, which means that we are behind in material. So we have to just find a quick checkmate somehow somewhere or somehow tried to get back in material. Otherwise, there is no other moves that we can make that we can survive in the scheme. So again, we take a look at this, and my ninth year is actually in a very useful position because if you take a look at what it's doing is that it's actually controlling these two squares. And obviously this square is a black piece, so the king can't capture that, right? So the king cannot go to any of these squares. So it's almost as if there is a wall over here where the cannot go anywhere else. So this kind of is like a back rank meet where the appointing King is kind of stuck on this last rank and there's nothing they can do to get out of this rank. So for that reason, I'm just going to go over here where it's being. It's being protected by the stroke, but we also have another rock protecting us. So once we trade rooks, we can just go ahead and check made the appointment like so. Now the next one, again, we take a look at what's happening here. I can immediately see, and hopefully you can see this two, that we were attacking this point with two different pieces. And once we're attacking this problem, two different pieces. And there's really only one defender, which is the king. That means I can go ahead and capture and also get the added bonus of CheckMate any point. And if we capture with the queen, which is why we're going to capture with the queen rather than just capturing with the night. So we'll just go ahead and check my deployment. So we're five out of five so far, we're gonna keep going a little bit more. And then in the next video we're going to solve puzzles together. Okay, so for this one, you can just watch me go through these so you kind of get used to how puzzles work. I will walk you through them as clearly as possible so that you see exactly what my thought processes when I'm solving these puzzles. All right, so over here, the first, and this is very important in puzzles. You want to first see what can we realistically achieve like what is the target, right? Sometimes the target is checkmate in your opponent. Sometimes the target is, maybe the reporting queen isn't a vulnerable spot. So you always have to be cognizant of what is our target. So here, I think it's pretty obvious that our target is the point King. Given the situation that we have with our rook controlling this file, and it's an open file. And also this night over here isn't a very good spot. And I can immediately see that if I go over here, I'll be checking the opponent and guess what? The opponent can't capture me over here. So the king has to move and the king can't go over here because once I move my night, I am controlling this file with my rook. So this move will check maybe opponents. Now over here, first thing I see is that my, my bishop over here, is there any deployment rock and the rock is hanging. There is no defense for it. So that looks like the right move. But let's do also some calculation just to make sure we don't mess up here because this pond, remember if this pollen gets to this last square, it turns into a queen. And that will be very problematic for us because we don't have enough stuff to cover a queen. Thankfully, though, we have this point over here where if this pond gets to the eighth rank, which is only one move away from this pond, then this pond can go ahead and turn into a queen as well. So that could be our serving grace. So we have to do some mental calculation. So if I capture, let's take a look at this. So if I capture over here, what happens is that the pointer moves over here. So they are one move away from becoming, from getting their queen. And then I can go ahead and get my own queen and check the opponent. This is the key here. I could check the opponent when I turn to queen, which means that I make my own pawn, a queen. Check the appointment before the opponent does that. And once I check the opponent, they have to move their king. They can't move the pawn and go ahead and got their own queen. That gives me enough time to go ahead and use my own queen to avoid thereupon from taking and turning into a queen. So that's exactly what we're gonna do. We're just going to capture the ROCC and pull the puzzle just ends there. We don't even have to do the rest. So that was, that was the idea behind that puzzle. All right, so let's take a look at this one. This is again, what does the first threat that you can see? The first threat that we can have on the opponent is going after their king over here. And this is obviously a weakness because it's only being defended by the king and there's no other piece, not the queen, not any of the knight's, not the bishop, not the rook. No other pieces even helping defenders. And we have two pieces attacking this, one of them being our queen. And we can actually capture it with a check. So obviously that's what we're going to go for. And what's the pointer moves there. Now, again, we have another background. Again, we can sacrifice our queen in order to get a rook to go over there and check me the opponents, right? Because again, take a look at this. If it's hard for you to imagine, just think of it this way. When I go there and I check the opponent, the opponent has to capture back as the task. The only way to alleviate the check, in which case they're rook will be here, let's say my coins out of the game. The rock will be here and the rook will be hanging because there's no piece defending the square. So I can just go ahead and capture back with my own rook. Basically, these two are out of the game and then my own rook ends up in the DH square where I will be checkmate in the opponent. So that's exactly what we're gonna do. And just like that, alright, lets off two more and get to the lucky number ten. And then we'll finish this video and go to the next video where I will give you a chance to solve along with me. But let's do two more before we move on to the next video. So here again, I can see that I have these two on the same file and it's an open file. And again, the king is very nearby. So what's our, what's our main target? What we're, what should be our main target? I should say. Obviously we should go for the king and see if we can check me at it. So this square, it looks amazing for our attack because again, it's not being defended by ni square, this square obviously, it's being, being defended, I should say not attacked, being defended by the opponent Queen. This squares being defended by two pieces. But this square, this square over here, it's not being defended by anything other than the King obviously. So since we have two attackers attacking that, that square, we can just go ahead and check the opponent. The opponent moves over here. And again, we can go for a background mate where we were deported, is trapped in this back rank. They can't get out of this row. And we can just go ahead and get sacrifice our queen. Same idea. You see a lot of, lot of similar tactics get repeated a lot. And this is one of the good things about the puzzles is that it really makes sure that we get used to the different tactics and then we can just spot them immediately in the games. So let's take a look at this one. Now. The first thing I see is that hey, if we can somehow check the point, because look at this, they're, the rook and the king are on the same row. And if we can check the appointment with our own rook, like over here somewhere. What happens is that the, obviously the appalling King has to move to a different rank and a different row, which would let us capture the rook. So that's exactly what we're going to do. We're just going to move down here and we're being supported by a king sort people linking can't capture us. We can just move down here, check the opponent, and then what's the point moves away. We just go ahead and capture the roof for free. And now over here, we can obviously just drop down here and defend this part over here and basically stop the opponent from grabbing our pond for free. Alright? So that was 10. We're going to stop right there. So again, hopefully you kind of understand what's going on with these puzzles. Hopefully also you can see that a lot of times we have some similar tactics repeating over and over again. And the reason for that again is because we want to make sure that we learn these tank is kinda like a practice, right? We're practicing these tactics in a game scenario. And we are basically trying to spot them right? For every scenario that we're given, we're trying to spot what's the target that we're going after? What kind of tactic can we use? How can we check my dipolar? How can we wouldn't material in this case? And we're trying to use those to find the best. Okay, so Hopefully that makes sense. And if you enjoy that one, follow me in the next video where I will be leading you, solve along with me. So see you next video. 37. Solve Puzzles Along with Me 1 - Prep for the Class Project: Alright, in this video, we're going to solve puzzles together. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to give you a couple of seconds for each puzzle so that you can pause the video and then you can take a look at the position on the board and see if you can find the best move for the piece that we're playing gas. Okay, So I'll give you a couple of seconds. Just pause the video and definitely do this. Definitely pause the video and try it on your own. It's okay if you can't find that, just try. Okay. I promise you just looking for it and trying to find it that on its own is good enough practice, and I promise you it will improve your game if you do this regularly. So pause the video each time I tell you to pause it. Just try your best. And then if you can't find the best move, that's totally fine. I promise I will explain it in as much detail as possible so that you can see exactly my thought process for solving each puzzle. Okay? So we're gonna start with this one. This is the first one, so it should be pretty easy. So just go ahead and pause the video and see if we can find the vessels. All right, so hopefully you were able to spot that the best move is actually pretty easy because look at this, where this rock over here is controlling all of these squares. So the point is kinda back crank made kind of situation. So if we just take this brook, bring it over here and check the point where basically checkmate in them because once the opponent tries to block our check, we can just capture bank and that will be checkmate. So that was first one. Go ahead and pause the video and try the second one out on your own. All right, So the second one is also another background meets, obviously we are threatening the point rook with our queen. And we can just go ahead and capture. There is no defense and we check me the point, and go ahead and pause the video and see if you can find the best move for this situation. All right, so let's take a look at this one. This is kind of interesting. So first of all, we should worry about what is our target for this puzzle. Now, you could think of, oh, we're attacking this pawn with two different pieces, but this point has like three different defenders, right? Like there are two rooks and another, and the king Odyssey, they're all protecting that piece. So what else is there? Well, we have this, we can just capture this bishop for free with our rock. That looks pretty good, but it's always a good idea just to look around, make sure there's nothing else. Because we're not just looking for a good move, we're looking for the Bessel's. But in this situation there's really no other best move. We can't really do much against the pointing King. We can't really do much against any of these pieces because none of them are hanging. There are protecting each other like this. This rock is protecting the queen, the queen splitting things. Rook. This, the coin is protecting that rook. So there's a lot of protection going on and on. These pieces are going to be free or up for grabs really. So we're just gonna go ahead and capture that and that will be our best move. Alright, so go ahead and pause the video and see if you can spot the best move for this one. All right, So you were, hopefully you were able to see that we are basically blocking that square and controlling it with our bishop. Which means that again, we have a background commits kinda scenario. So we can just go ahead and Iraq to this rank. And the only thing you can do is to basically bring back the ROCC, try to block the check, but we can just go ahead and capture the rook and checkmate the points. Alright, so go ahead and pause the video and try this one out. Alright, so this one's pretty easy. Obviously. These ponds and for the king or the most vulnerable pieces in the game. And if they are captured in a way where we have protection with another piece, obviously the king can't do anything if you have protection from another piece. In this case, our coin could go ahead and grab that piece because we are also have another attacker on that pond in the form of our night. So once we go ahead and capture, there's nothing you can do the uterus get checkmated because there's no other defense on this part. So that's exactly what we're gonna do and that's the solution for that one. Alright, so go ahead and pause the video and see if you can solve this one. Alright, so this one also refers to another weakness in the power structure of the opponent. And that's this spawn in this case, which is being, it's basically defended by no other piece than the king. And we have two attackers on, and we have the queen and the rook, both IN and down. So we can just go ahead and capture that piece on once the kingdoms there. Now it's an a background situation. We can go ahead and sacrifice our queen over here. And once he pointed captures back, we can just go ahead and capture the pawn rook and checkmate deployments, and that's exactly what we're gonna do. We check sacrifice or queen, and then we captured back and check my data points. Alright, so go ahead and pause the video and savings off this one. All right, so hopefully you were able to spot that this is actually very similar to the last one that we solved. Again, it's this pond, that's the weakness. There's no other defenders other than the opponent kink. And we'd have to attackers. So the first MOOC will be to go ahead and capture with a check. And what's the point in King moves over there. Again, we have a background scenario. Again, only one rook in the last rank. So we can just go ahead and sacrifice or queen and capture back with our rook, checkmated the points. All right, go ahead and pause the video, see if you can solve this one. All right, so this was a little bit more interesting. In this scenario. Let's take a look at the, basically the squares around this kingdom. What's happening, right? So these squares are occupied by their own rooks. So the king can't escape to those squares because it's their own pieces. And these squares are all being controlled by the stroke. So this rook, if we can get this rock to a position where it's, let's say controlling these squares and still maintaining control on this square. Then in that case, that will be checkmate because we already have control over these squares. And these two squares are occupied by their own pieces. So if we can, for example, move this rock over here, then we have a checkmate because there's nothing you can do it. And obviously these, these rocks are protecting each other. Whether they're here or if the rock ends up here, there's still protecting each other, right? Because take a look at it. They're still on the same row. So that's exactly what we do and we checked me the point. All right, two more. Let's take a look at this one and see if you can solve it. So just pause the video and see if you can solve. All right, so you've probably noticed that we can just go ahead and grab this piece for free. But again, we're not just looking for a good move, we're looking for the best move, right? So even though we can go ahead and grab that piece for free, here, look at this. We have a background scenario and if we waste time, let's say grabbing up free material, well, the opponent has an extra moved to maybe push upon and get out of that situation. I'd like if they push this palm forward, then there's no longer a back rank, right? Because then they have an escape route for their king. So we need to take advantage of that right now and not get distracted by the free material. So even though this might look like a good move, it's absolutely not the best move. The best move is to grab the Queen, go over here and check the opponent. Then the opponent has no other way of defense and then just blocking our way. And if they try to block our way with these pieces over here, well then we can always go ahead and just capture those. Because if they, let's say if we go here with our queen and a block away with their own queen, we can just kept me, just trade queens. And then once he pointed roof goes there to capture back our coin. We can just capture their rook with our own broke. Check manning the opponent. And if they do the opposite, Let's say we go over here and the opponent rook comes to blocket. Well, again, we can just capture with our queen. Once they capture, we can just capture back with our ROCC. Alright, so we just move over there, the first block with that, but that's okay. That's just free again and we'll just catch it with our queen wants to capture with the rook, we just capture and checkmate the points. All right, Last but not least, let's take a look at this one. Pause the video and see if you can solve it. All right, so hopefully you were able to spot that this pawn is the weakness in this pond structure. Because again, there's no other defender except for the king. And we have two pieces of attacking it at the same time. So we can just go ahead and capture with our queen, checking the opponents. And that's the end of that puzzle. So that was it when you stop right now we don't have to solve this one. 10 was good enough. Hopefully. You guys at least we're able to see the way I at least my thought process of how I go about solving these puzzles and hopefully damage sense. And hopefully you were able to solve a couple of those on your own. And if not, that's totally fine too. I promise you the more of these you do, the easier it will get for you. Okay, so hopefully you enjoyed that video and I will see you in the next one. 38. Solve Puzzles Along with Me 2 - Prep for the Class Project: All right, We're going to solve some more puzzles together. This time. Let's go for the number 15 and see if we can get to 15 puzzles. Again, try to pause the video before I get to solve each of the puzzles. And let's try it out on your own. I want just keep saying pause the video here and try it out on your own. I keep saying that a lot in the last video, so just, I'll just pause for a couple of seconds each time a new puzzle comes. Just go ahead and pause the video yourself. Give it a shot, try it out, see how I feel about it, and then I will ofcourse, explain how the puzzle can be solved. All right, so this one is pretty easy. You can obviously see we have two attackers on the opponent rook over here. And ultimately kingdoms no defender for the stroke. So we can just go ahead and capture and checkmate the opponent. In this one we have a free-running paan, which means it's upon, that can easily just go ahead and turn into a queen. And of course, this is a huge asset for us because if we could turn this into a queen, then of course you have the upper hand in this endgame and it's going to be very easy game for us to win. And of course, the appointed bishop can't do anything because it's our term right now. So once we push here, even if he tries to attack us by coming over here, we can just push forward and get our coding. So that's exactly what we're gonna do. All right, so this one, there are a couple of interesting ideas. But the first one that jumps to, at least to my view, is the idea of the night going there and checking the opponent. But let's take a look at if this is a good idea or not. Well, if I check my opponent, work in this kink go, it could go here, go here, go there, could go there, right? And my books are not active, right? I can't keep attacking this king and keep checking it with my rooks. So maybe that's not such a great idea. What else do we have available at our disposals? Well, this rook seems to be a little bit trapped here because, I mean, it can only go in these directions, right? It's kinda limited by these two ponds. Obviously, he can't capture its own pond. And he can't capture my pond because my palm is being defended by a lot of pieces. So what I can do is you can go into one of these squares. But let's take a look at these, right? He can't go there because I just capturing with my king can't go there because I just captured with one of my books. He can't go there because I would just capture with my pawn. And he also can't even go there because I will just capture with my night. So if this rock gets threatened on this square right here at only hasn't this square to run two. Which means if we can find the movement that threatens both these two squares, then the pawn rook will fall. And guess what, We have exactly that. So we'll just move over here and his rookie will fall. All right, hopefully you spot at this one. This is a pretty easy one. We have two attackers eyeing the square. And of course, if we get our queen to that square, look what happens. We not only check the opponent will be also close all of their escape routes. So easy checkmate. All right, so the idea behind this puzzle is where an end game, and we want to make sure we promote one of our ponds before the opponent gets to promote one of their funds. Now they have a free-running paan, which means that in four moves they're going to grab a queen. So we have to find a way to basically either stopped or which we don't have the option because it takes us more moves to get there. Or we have to promote earlier. So let's take a look at the two. If I start running, right, I go there, he goes there. I go there, he goes there. Then I can go there and catch up, right? But the pointing king can just come over here, capture this piece, and then go over there, capture that piece. So even though I can't technically catch up, I end up losing both my pons and then this pond is free to just march forward, right? So the better idea here is to see if I can promote one of these ponds. And remember, I only have four moves, right? Because once I move, the opponent gets to move. Once I move again, the point it's moving again. So if I'm four moves, I don't get a queen. Somehow. The poll is going to get their queen and I'm going to be left with a lot of problems basically. So the best thing that I can do is to push. It takes me two moves to get here. And again, it's very important for me to count how many moves it takes me to accomplish this. Because remember, I have limited number of moves and I have to make sure the pollen doesn't get to move this pond four times, right? I at least have to make them make other moves if I want to take more than a four moves. So I can do these two moves, force my opponent to waste one move here by capturing, I could capture back. So, so far, this point has moved twice because I moved once, the spawn moved, once I moved again over here, are actually the polymorph has upon, upon, has moved only once because this force move was there too. So let's count together. I moved once, he moves, once I move again, he captures, I capture back. He moves again. So he's moved twice. Then I move here because guess what? This, this pawn has been captured so far. He moves again. But now I can just promote with a check on the appointed king. So that's exactly what we're gonna do, a push up. And of course the opponent decides to do something else because he probably calculated that that doesn't work out for him. But that's okay. We just stick to our plan. We capture, we push. And now here, this is very important. We can't just push right here because of what the opponent played. Because if you just push the point King captures back, but there's an easy fix, we just move up our king and then the opponent is a lot of trouble. All right, so let's take a look at the threats that we have here. Obviously we have to attackers on the square, but there is a defender. And the defender is worth less than either of our rooks are either of our rock or our queen, I should say. Which means that if we capture on this square, we're going to be sacrificing some material. So let's take a look at if it is worth it or not. It definitely is because once we capture with the rook, he captures back and we capture back. We're going to have, basically all these three will be out of the game. Are queen will be on this square. And basically it will cut out all the circulation, all the escape routes for the opponent king. So it is absolutely worth it. So we're just gonna do that. All right, so hopefully you can see the biggest weakness in the structure of my opponent. I can just go ahead and capture that pond, checking the opponent and simultaneously attacking the rook, which means that the rock will fall. And of course, if I capture, that is also, this is also a background situation. He can only block for one move with his queen, but then I just capture that queen as well. So that's exactly what we do. All right, so here the idea behind it is then we need to find some sort of a counter play. Because look at this. The opponent has so much more material nouns, right? They have a queen more than us, they have a rook more than us. It's not looking good. So we basically have to find a counterclaim first. We have to get our king to a place where the point can keep checking us. And basically the best escape route is to just go over here because if I move anywhere else, the pointing queen can just keep checking the right. If I go here, they just dropped down. If I go let's say I don't know if I go there and come back here. They just dropped down and come back up, right? I have to use this, did this escape route to get my king to a place where the point queen cancers keep checking me, so I'll just move over here. And of course he sacrifices his queen because he sees what's coming. This is the threat that I'm imposing is that I move up my rook and because of my bishop supporting it, I will check maybe opponent, which is exactly what we do here. All right, hopefully you were able to spot the weakness the spawn has to attackers on it, but only being defended by the point King, which means that we can just check mate. All right, hopefully you spot the weakness again. This pawn here, only one, the funder from the appointed king. Well, we have two attackers eyeing it down, which means that we can just go ahead and capture what the check. And then after that, let's take a look at what to do here. There are a number of different ways that we could look at maybe going after this king. But the best way, remember, we want to keep checking them so they don't get to have any counter play. They don't get to check us and start to go for their tax of their own. So we just want to capture with our night checking the opponent wants more. And now we can just go for the CheckMate because we are, I am the square with two pieces and it's an easy checkmate. All right, so this one, it's trying to trick you a little bit because you see this, right? Your bishop is looking at this free rock over here and you're probably thinking, well, free material, Let's go grab that. Remember, we are not looking just for a good move. We're looking for the best possible move. And the best possible move is that, is recognizing that this square is a very weak square because we were attacking it with two different pieces. We're attacking it with our bishop and our queen. And guess what? If we get there with our queen? We're also checking the opponent, which, and of course we're blocking this score as well, which means that the opponent has to retreat to the square. And once the appointing retreats the square, they're in a background situation. So we can just go ahead and capture this rock with our queen, which is in this square. And we can just check by the way. So even though we were able to just go for some free material, obviously checkmated the opponent is much better than just getting some free materials. So that's why this is the best MOOC. So we go there and check mate. Alright, so very interesting situation here. Let's take a look at what's going on. So first we need to identify our targets, right? Obviously we have the chance to capture back this bishop for free, but it's very important that we don't, just don't rush to what's the most obvious. We first need to take a look around, see if there are any other areas where we can attack. One thing that you might notice is that if I move my queen over here, I am looking at this, this kind of a weak pawn over here. But the reason why this is not a great move is because the point can just respond with one of these two countermeasures so that, that's not looking like a great move. We could take it Look at this point. It seems like, again, another week pond because it has no defender. And let's say your queen can get there. That's a free rook. But again, no easy way because I can't just come here because that scores being defended by the poem bishop. So, and of course, my bishops are kind of trapped in because this bishop is trapped in by this pond and this bishop is trapped and buy this bond. The only way I can really develop my bishop is by either making this move or one of these moves. And neither of those look like that. Great. A move of obviously overhear my mission will be blocked with this part over here, and neither are these moves is really accomplishing much, at least nothing better than gaining ups, gaining some material, and capturing this bishop. So we're just gonna go ahead and capture the bishop. All right, hopefully you were able to spot this one. This is one of those n gains and we talked about, remember, when our King is mirroring the pointing king, It's creating some sort of backtrack scenario where basically the appalling can, cannot get out of this row. So we can just go ahead and check the opponent. They will try to block, but we just keep capturing and check mating the opponent. Right? So a couple of interesting things going on here. First of all, this is obviously a week pot, right? Right now I only have one defender on it, but any moment I can push up this rook and have two different to attackers, I should say on this, this rock over here. The problem you might think is that the opponent can just move up the rock, but that's actually not a problem because remember, if and if they do that, they still only have one defender on the rook. And if I have two attacking works on this row, I can just go ahead and capture that. That would work as well. So this immediately looks like the best move. And also we're also getting out of this threat by the pole as well. So we're just gonna go ahead and do that. Of course the opponent tries to defend, but that's an vein and we can just capture that. Look, right, last one. Go ahead and try this one. Hopefully you've been able to do well so far. And if not, again, that's totally cool. Just try your best. Try this one out. All right, very interesting puzzle. So obviously deployment is offering up their own queen for a trade. But again, remember we want to find the best possible move. Is there any better move than trading the query and training your queen is not necessarily a great move anyways, right? Because a lot of times your queen is actually very useful. Well, what I immediately see is if I move my queen over here, I am checking the point and look at the way my bishops are setup. This bishop is eyeing down all these square so the pointing actually count escape over here. That's that square root being controlled by my mission. And this other bishop is controlling the score. So the opponent getting Kansas scape there either. So if I can check over here, the point has no choice but to try to alleviate the pressure by blocking. And look, let's look at what they can block with. If they block with the bishop, I can just capture back. And there's nothing else that can block with. So that's an easy made into. So they go over there, they tried to block and we check made the appointment. Alright, so that's 15. Hopefully you guys enjoyed it, but hopefully you were able to keep up at least with some of those. Again, I will see you in the next video where we will go over some other stuff together. All right, hopefully you enjoyed it and I'll see you next one. 39. The Ruy Lopez Opening - Chess Openings: Alright, in this video we're going to go over the rule you Lopez opening, which is probably the most common opening that is taught to beginners. This is usually the first opening. A lot of chess players learn when they're just starting out. So obviously we're going to start with that one. And it's a pretty simple opening. So let's take a look at it. It's also called the Spanish game, which is good to know. And as you can see, the stats are broken down here. As according at least to this database. As we can see, white wins about 38% of the time when this opening is played. 37% of the time it's a draw, and about 25 percent of the time it's a black when. So let's take a look. So basically the odds are in your favor if you're playing this opening as white. And let's take a look at it. So the way it starts is with the e4 and nothing too crazy there. Of course the opponent responds with the E5 would bring out our nights. Remember we want to develop our nights before our bishops, so it makes perfect sense. The opponent has to obviously defend this pawn that we're attacking with our night over here. So they appoint and brings out their own night in support of the E5 palm. And then we make this move, and this is what we call the slope is opening. Now if we brought our bishop over here, it will be the Italian game to S4. It would be a little bit of different game, but because we're bringing it to be five, that's what gives us the Rui Lopez opening. Now, the most common response, lowpass opening from black is to bring this polymer here. As you can see, this is the most common response, is A6. The second most common is night to F6, right? So these are the two most likely responses and we're gonna take a look at these, right? So first let's take a look at the most common response, which is the A6. I'm just gonna jump in here. There we go. Once the opponent plays this, they're trying to get us off of this square so that we don't keep threatening this night over here. Because what we're essentially doing is that we're saying, hey, if you move this part over here and let's say you bring it up and this is the central palm, right? It's going to be very useful for black to use this pawn later on in the game. Because he wants to put some pressure on these central squares. Or essentially saying is that, hey, if you remove that Po1 and play it like two, Let's say D5 and D6 are somewhere, then your night is going to be pinned, which means that we can just go ahead and capture over here, right? And because of that, black has to respond with some sort of threat against our bisher to get our bishop to move, right? And that's why this is the most common response. Now, from here, the best move is to just drop back to A4. Because what we're essentially doing is that we're still keeping the same pressure on this night over here and also on this pond because if this pawn moves, then the notch is going to be in trouble. And this point is also going to be in trouble because this knight can no longer defendant because as you remember, we talked about pinning down pieces in the middle game strategies. If this pawn moves, then this night would be pinned to the kink, right? And for, in order for that not to happen, because if that happens, then this pond will be hanging because it's no longer supported by the night because the knight is pin down. And in order to prevent that from happening, black is going to try to get us off here right now. Black could play this move over here, threatening our Bishop one more time. But again, as you can see, the breakdown over here, that's not the most common move and there's a good reason for that. Actually, Let's see, where's B5? B5 is the fourth most played move, right? So there are three other moves that are played more than B5. And the reason for that is what B5 does is that it essentially destroys the foundation over here, right? Like the pond structure is going to be really weird. Let's take a look at what happens over here. If you play that. First of all, you can never castle on this site now because there's just absolutely no defense for your king. So your king forced into canceling on the king site, which is not the worst idea we talked about. Counseling and Akin side might be better for beginners. But the problem for canceling on the kink site is that the bishop could just draw it back over here. And now the bishop has a lot of pressure on this kink site. And of course, kinky no longer castle on the queen site because of this destroyed pond structure. It's going to be very tough for black because they have to Castle on the king side, but also there's going to be a lot of pressure on the kick-start. And if black tries to turn my bishop one more time, like making moves like this, for example, to eventually come here on threaten me. I can just make you this move where if the opponent does threaten me, I can just drop back over here to a2 square. So I'm still keeping the same pressure on this pawn over here. So that if the black king decides to castle king site, I always have some pressure over here. And if my queen gets involved in the game later on, I can maybe look at some movies where I can start attacking this part over here and also look in my knights, my night is also two moves away from that, from that palm, right? So there's a lot of combinations that I can create because of this bishop and the role it's playing over here on this diagonal, right? And it's very hard for black to block this off, right? Like he cataloged enough with either of these ponds. This pon is far away. It's got to be really hard for that pond to get all the way over here and it's also currently being blocked by this night as well. And for this pond, I guess this pawn could come over here and try to block it, but then there's the smooth, right? And then what is Black gonna do, right? So when you look at it, there's just a lot of different possibilities that I gain when this moves plate. So for that reason, it's probably not the best idea to play this move. And it's best to at least preserve your prompt structure over here and look at other moves. So the most common move that you can see either at this stage or after this has been played. The most common of the AUC is night to F6 over here. And at least among beginners is the most common and it might not be the case in the database. Let's see what's the most common database. Yeah, it's not the most common database. However. So this is the most common move in the database tonight to A5, which is a really good move because you're also putting some pressure on the bishop. The bishop has to move out to the bishop could move over here, but there's always a defense over here. So that's a very good move. But a lot of times beginners tried to play this move because this is also a really good move. What you're essentially doing is that you're essentially putting some pressure on this pond that is unprotected over here. And also your protecting this square. Shall you ever need to let say, develop this Po1 and bring it over here and try to command the central squares. Now, if this is being played, the best move for white is to just cancel. Because when you castle, it's true that you're leaving this pond hanging. But looking at what happens if, if the opponent decides to go ahead and capture the spawn. You always have this MOOC where you just move the rock over to Y1 and Y2 are basically again threatening this this file because I look at it, this is a semi-open file, right? And if the opponent decides to remove their night, you can just go ahead and capture over here. And of course, if the opponent recapture is, you can just capture it with a check. Alright, so if you play this, then the plant has to go for a move like this, for example, in order to make sure that doesn't lead to this palm falling. And then you can just go ahead and throw in with your palm. And then the opponent nine has no choice but to leave the square. All right, so this is basically the crux of the slope is opening is that we start with the E for Pon, Pon response with the E5 pon, we respond with night to F3, threatening the E5 pawn. A opponent defends the E5 pon, with their own light. And then we bring out our bishop threatening to pin this night. She should this D7 pollen move. All right, so that's the root locus opening. Go ahead and try it out. I suggest finding a couple of games where you open with this opening and just keep those things that we talked about in mind about the different avenues that the slope is opening could take with the kind of ways that you could respond and the kind of ways that you could go ahead and respond to those responses. So hopefully that made sense and I will see you next video. 40. The French Defense - Chess Openings: Alright, in this video, we're going to talk about the French defense. Now. The French defense is an opening for black, and it's actually my personal favorite opening for black because it's just such an annoying game to play against when you're white. It's a really good defense that really closes down the opponent's abilities in the middle and also gives you a lot of potential attacking from the coincide of the opponents. So let's take a look at how it goes. So the French defense requires your opponent to start with the e4 pond, which is perfectly fine because as we discussed earlier in earlier videos, that's the most commonly played first move for white. By far, right? The, you're going to see this move a lot. So you will have a lot of chances to play the French defense as black. Now once the opponent plays that, you're probably wondering, like what is the most common response that comes to your mind? You're probably thinking about E5 coming here and blocking this ponds way and just having, grabbing up basically one of those central squares and exerting control on the other one. Well, that's a really good move. But the French defense DO something a little bit different. And that's why it's such a cool response in such a cool and different way to play the game is that it just moves this font to ES6 rather than y5. And what's essentially happening here is that we are paving the way for d5 to come forward later on. So if the opponent decides to play one of the other central, central ponds and grab up one the other central squares. We can play this d5 move. And because of the fact that we've already played E6, we already have some support for this D5, so D5 can't be captured immediately. And also look at what's happening here. We have grabbed one of the central squares. We're trying to exert control on another one and threatening to capture it basically. Because at the time, right now in this moment, This part is hanging, right? There is no defense for it. And of course, we have the option of playing C5 later on, which it also threat and this part over here. So it's actually a very cool and different way to try to grab these central squares. Because if you look at it on paper, you might think, well, white has two ponds in the central squares. It's exerting control on the other two, and you only have one pond in those central square. So what's going on? Black is not doing so good here, is, are they? But in reality, there's actually a lot of potential here. And for that reason, it's actually not as bad as it might seem at first glance. Now, the most common. Actually let's talk about this first. This is called the advanced variation. The variation that we're to looking at because this is the most commonly played and the reason why it's called the advanced variation as that from this position, this pond decides to advance forward to E5 and basically lock this position over here so that the pond structure cannot change from this unless one of the ponds are captured, right? Because neither of these ponds can move forward at this point in time. And this is again, the most common. French defense variation that you will see. There are some other variation, but we don't have to talk about those because this is the most common and also the most interesting to analyze. So let's take a look at it a little bit further. And the most common response from black, and the response that you should be making is C5 right here. Let me just show you that. I'm just going to click on it so I can take control and show you where we go from here. So this S5 move is easily the best. First of all, because it's supported by the Bishop, this dark square Bishop resting on F8. So the pony can't just capture us right here, right? And if the patient decides to capture, look what happens in this situation. We have developed our bishop, we have upon in the central squares I tried to exert control and another one, whereas the opponent, they have one of the central squares, but they're not exerting control on any other central squares. Also like this where a head and our development and also look at the pond structure over here. So in every way imaginable, this is much better for black because white is behind in their development. Which white really shouldn't be because while it has the first move right and white is always ahead one move. So white should never be behind in development if you're white and you're behind development, that means that you've made a mistake somewhere or you should be very careful where you're doing basically, because you're, you're not abiding by opening principles. And take a look at this, right? If, if the opponent doesn't make this move, It's a much better, much better scenario for white because neither of us have developed anything. And the central squares are a lot more, a lot more evenly split than before. So white cannot capture over here, which would be problematic because white is being threatened by this pond as well. So widen to figure out how they're going to defend this pawn over here. And obviously the best move is C3, and that's the most common move as well. By far you can see 50000 moves. 15000 people have played the move S3, and only 800 people have played the second most common mood, right? So by far the most popular move and the reason for that is pretty clear, right? Because you need to defend this part over here. And you also need to start establishing your own pond structure over here in order to prevent black from doing too much damage to you. Now, from here, you want to play nights to C6. And the reason for that is because again, you're putting more pressure on this part over here. And you're essentially trying to essentially eventually get around to attacking this pond. Maybe you can later on, bringing some more support with either your queen or with the bishop or something like that. And just try to put so much pressure on this pond that it will eventually fall. Now from here you might see a move like this. The bishop coming to B5 trying to pin down this night over here and essentially prevent it from attacking this part over here. Which looks like a good move on paper. But it's, it could be problematic for white. We obviously want to just Respond with the bishop coming to D7 because first of all, we're removing the pen. There's no longer a pen. The nighters free to move from this point onwards. And also, of course, were defending the, the night over here. And of course, if the knight moves, we are always attacking or having discovered attack on the bishop as well. And of course this bishop is hanging in the moment, right? There's no defense for it. Now, I move like night to F3 might be played by the opponent, but this would be a mistake. And the reason why that would be a mistake is that, remember that discovered attack we were talking about on the bishop. If the knight moves, well, we can take advantage of that and go ahead and capture this part over here, right? If we go ahead and do that, well, what's happening is that basically we are, we are implementing a discovered attack on the bishop. And the bishop decides to capture us first. We can just capture back with our night instead of capturing back with any other pieces. So basically we just got a free pawn in this transaction because we lost our bishop, but nothing else. Whereas the opponent, thus a bishop and their pollen over here. And if they decide to capture this, this piece over here this night over here, we'll just go ahead and capture the bishop instead, right? So either way we gain a free Po1. And it's just, It's a very bad move to make as white over here. All right, so if, if a player moves like this has been played, you should be aware of this thread over here and try to either provide some support for your bishop or just tried to do something else over here. And just maybe, maybe not even play this move in the first place because it does lead to some, some problems here and there's a very easy the fence for it, right? Like this would have been a good move if it really caused problems for black and if blacks had trouble getting rid of this pen, but it's so easy for black to get rid of this pen by just playing the bishop, that it's almost not even worth it because you're not really gaining much from this MOOC, you'd be better off playing anything else. And also, another problem with this is remember what we talked about. You want to always develop your nights before you develop your bishops, right? And of course, not going by that rule. You see how that can be problematic, right? So it's best not to play this move at this stage. It's best to either try to worry about developing your nights or just worry about what you're gonna do about the pons. And you can definitely try to also, for maybe a little bit more of a conservative play where you just try to eventually clear out all the stuff in front of your, your king and essentially go for it king side castle here because again, the lumber looking at this power structure pointing towards the queen side. And also we have a lot of attacking potential on the coincide. So what we wanna do is we want to get the king away from their last thing we wanna do is to Castle on the queen side, because obviously there's going to be a lot of attack from the opponent pouring in from the coincide very shortly. So it's best to just castle on the king side and avoid all that, all those problems basically. All right, so that's the French defense. Hope you guys enjoyed it. Definitely try it to check it out, play it maybe once or twice, and see how you feel about it. And of course, remember the stuff that we talked about, about what you want to do. Well, you don't want to do in this, in this position. And if you ever encounter it, the French defense, when you are playing whites, then you already know what mistakes to avoid. Mistakes like bringing out the bishop over here and trying to like put, put a pin over here and get, get advantage out of that. That's not the best move. And we discussed why. And it'll be much better off playing and move like not if three, which is actually the most popular move in this stage as well. And for a good reason, right? Because that's actually move them makes a lot of sense. It's giving you a lot of stability when it comes to defending these ponds in the middle. And of course, you're developing your nights before your Bishops, which is what we aimed to do. And that's one of the main opening principles, right? So just remember those things that we talked about. Go ahead and try it out and I will see you in the next video. 41. The Queen's Gambit - Chess Openings: Alright, in this video we're going to go over the quiz gambit, one of the most popular openings. And also now a TV show is named after a quiz gambit. So that's pretty cool. But the, basically the way the Queen's gambit works is I, let me just first actually talk about what the word gamba means. The word gambit refers to any opening where we give up some material in order to get some sort of a positional advantage. And while queens gambit is technically speaking a gambit because we do offer up upon for free. It's not a true gambit because in most variance we can just capture back that upon rather easily. And if the opponents tries to hold on to that upon that they've gained and try to defend their pond from being captured back. They're going to end up in a lot of trouble. So we'll just take a look at that right now. The way the coins gambit works is that we actually don't start with the y4. This one is actually a D4 start. And of course the point of response with D5. And here, this is what the Queen's gambit basically starts with, is that we go ahead and play this move, C4, and basically attacking this pawn on the fiber at the same time, if you look at it, we're offering up this pond for free because the opponent could just go ahead and capture that pond. And if appointing captures lot upon, they've basically gained upon for free and we can't capture back immediately. However, there is a lot of things that can happen. So let's take a look at that first. And as you can see, the capture bag variation is actually the third most commonly played, right? So in this position, black, the most commonly played move for black is this move, basically protecting this pond. The second most common is the other pollen coming in to protect the spawn. And then the third most commonly played is the capture. So let's just go ahead and take a look at the capture to see why this capture actually doesn't end up with you gaining material. Once this happens, a white has a very beautiful move Of plan to E3, right? And what happens is that we basically open up this room for our bishop to attack this pawn on E4 or a C4, or I should say. And once this happens, black could either just let us capture this and just basically develop their own stuff. And as you can see, the most common played move in this position is night F6, right? This is the most commonly played move. And that's because black can just realize that if we go ahead and capture this, that's perfectly fine because we're already, we've already offered up upon. And also, if black tries to hold onto this pawn, there was a lot of problems that are going to rise, as I will show you in a second. So you might just think, well, we could just defend the spawn with by bringing all of that pond, right? But the problem is that we can just respond to that with Ponto A4, basically a tagging the spawn. And once we attack that part and we can just go ahead and capture over here, right? Or if this pond go, it goes ahead and captures us again. Same thing. We can just capture this point over here. And once this plant is captured this, we can also capture that one as well with Outlook. So either we're getting that pawn back. And of course, this also leads to our rook being unleashed because this file has opened up. And then we can do all sorts of damage with that Brooke. Alright, so it's pretty good for us, but Here's what happens. If the opponent makes a mistake. The opponent could make this mistake of saying, well, I could just bring up this part and this will protect this Pon. Pon will protect the spawn. So that if we go and go ahead and capture with this part over here, the point could just capture back and still be defending as POME, right? Well, if you polled tries to do that, the problem is, then, now we have this move queen to F3, where we are basically i ng now on this rock. And there's really nothing black can do to avoid going down some serious material here because, well, this attack, first of all, the point is not able to move the rook because there's just no avenues for them. They can't block with their queen because we will just capture it. They can't block with their bishop because again, we're just capture it. If that goes there, we're going to capture that. So the only move that black has an inhere to avoid losing the rook is to move night to C6. And once we capture, they can just move the bishop over here and basically protect the rook with their queen. And this is the only way that they would avoid losing the rock to us. But guess what? We still gained a night in this process. So we still are up massively. And yeah, we gave up upon early on, but that led to us grabbing a night pretty much for free, right. So and in here we can just either retreat or go over here. And there's, there's not much of the black can do here to attack us, right? And of course, we've opened up the space for our rock. A rock can get involved in the game if we wanted to. And yeah, it's just going to be a very, very good game for us because we're up quite a considerable amount of material already. So that's why if the opponent tries to hold on to that ponder going to be in a lot of trouble. Right? So now let's go back to the original setting of the coins gambits. There we go. And let's take a look at the other options, right? So the most commonly moves are, most commonly played moves are these two, right? And they're pretty much the same. So we'll just take a look at this one. I guess. Either way, what's happening is that the opponent is saying, okay, I'm just going to defend this pollen rather than go ahead and capture because at the end of the day, it's now going to make a difference because we can just capture back later on as I just demonstrated. And if black tries to avoid letting us capture back, it's going to cause a lot of problems. So again, it doesn't matter which pawn you bring up. They both pretty much do the same thing. And once black does this, we can just go ahead and continue with our own development. In fact, let's take a look at what is the most common. Yeah, this is the most commonly played move. Well actually, this is the most common played move over here this night, over here to S3. And of course, the point and respond with their own development, again, protecting their own, their own pons. And as you can notice, we were actually attacking with this, with this night development over here. So some extra defense is always, always nice to have. And of course we can just continue with our own development. Black is probably going to continue with their own development. And here we have this move of Bishop. The G5 are where we are pulling down this night to the, to the Queen. Basically, meaning that if this knight moves, for example, to go over here and capture back on this square, then we can just capture the queen, right? So basically this, this knight can move without giving up the Queen, basically meaning that it cannot move. So in this position where basically forcing our opponent to play bishop to E7 in order to avoid this pin. And from here we have, we have a good game because we've developed all our pieces. And if you look at it here, we are slightly in a better shape because we've developed three pieces, whereas the opponent, they have developed, I won't say 2.5 because this is not really developing the bishop. It is sort of, but it is kind of trapped behind this. Over here. This move is possible, but the problem with this move is that we will just drop back. And if the opponent keeps pushing them, they don't have any defense for the King later on if they want to Castle on this side, right? So it's again, it really depends on from this point onwards, how you want to play, how the port and wants to play if you want to be a little more aggressive or a liver more conservative. And the same goes for your opponent. But this is a very nice setup to take you into the middle game so that you can continue and battle out against your opponent. Alright, so that's the Queen's gambit for you. Hopefully you guys enjoyed this video and I will see you in the next video. 42. The King's Gambit - Chess Openings: All right, In this video we're going to go over the kings gambit, another very common opening that is very important to learn because this is one that actually a lot of people are not aware of. And it's one of those opening is that if you're not familiar with, especially, especially with the common lines of it, you could be caught out and you just end up making a lot of mistakes early on in the game. So it's very important to know this. And of course, you can incorporate this into your own game if you learned as well. And you can maybe try opening couple of times with this and see how I feel about it. So again, taking a look at the stats over here, the win rates are pretty even, right? So it's a very interesting opening and it really depends on how familiar you are with it. If you're not too familiar, familiar with it, you might have a little bit of a tougher time playing this opening, but if you are familiar with it, you could probably take advantage if your opponent is not too familiar with this. So the way the king's gambit opens is a and E. For Paul, the most common first move upon a response, with E5, the most common response to most common first move. And then this is where we end up with the king's gamba, is that we push up this pond to F4 over here, basically offering this pawn up for free as a sacrifice. That in return, we can get the appointment pond to move out of the central square. So that's the aim that we have with this move, is that even though we're going down a material, what we're doing is we're causing the opponent if they decide to capture. That is, even though we go down and material were causing the opponent to lose grip of the central squares for a moment because one, they go out and capture. Capturing is the most common move. And the move that we're going to take a look at, if they don't capture, obviously, have a lot of initiative going on here because we've grabbed up a central square, we're exerting control and other central square. And we're also threatening to take this one over here. So if they don't capture it, this is already a very good opening for us. If they do decide to capture. And we're going to take a look at how we can actually take advantage of that as well. And that's actually the most common move them. Let's just go ahead and take a look at it. So just click on it and take over here. So go ahead and capture what we've done essentially is that we have gained at least for the moment, full control of these central squares because our pod is here, it's exerting control over here. So anything that comes on this square we can capture. And of course, these other two squares are completely empty right now. And the important part is in no man's land kind of situation right now because over here it's not really doing anything and it's in danger of being captured any second because any moment I could just decide to move up this pond, clearing the way for this bishop to throw in this pond. I could always bring up my queen for extra support if needed. I could always bring out my night to one of these two squares where I can just keep on threatening this pond, right? So the pond isn't such a bad position that there's just a lot of attacking potential from my side towards the spawn to go ahead and get that piece back. And of course, for the moment there is nothing in the center. Now, most common mode from here is night to F3, which is over here. And the reason for that is because it's probably the best move. As I mentioned before, you want to make sure you develop your nights before your bishops. So even though it moves like this, could be a good development move as well. And in fact, Bishops C4 is the second most common move, as you can see over here, bisher to C4. But this is the better move, and that's why it's played more often as well, three times more as you can see with the data over here. The reason for that is because it is just a better move. Because remember, we want to develop our nights for we develop our bishops. So let's go ahead and take a look at that move, night to F3. And of course, from here, the most common move that you see and move that makes sense on paper for black to do is to move up this pawn defending this other ponds so that they don't lose it. Because remember what we talked about any point we can just move this up, threatened to capture and just get that material back right. And a lot of times, black is going to want to keep a hold of that material again, because guess what? They've lost control of the central squares. They want to at least be able to get some material in return. And if they don't even get to hold onto the material that they've gained and they lose this pond and everything goes back to equal, then this wouldn't have been worth it for them, right? Because they've essentially given up control over here. And with this move, what I've also done is that I'm also exerting control on these two other squares. Basically they've given up control of all the central squares, right? Because right now I am exerting control and all of them. And the plant has nothing going on here. So the very least they can do is that they can try to keep their advantage going for as long as possible so they don't give up the material that the gain in return for me getting this advantage early on. So that's why they make this move a lot, but this is not the greatest move at all, even though it's the most common move. And the reason for that is because there's so much weakness behind this MOOC that we're going to take a look at it together. And the reason why it's played so much as memorable, I want to talk to you guys about a lot of people don't know this opening that well. So they end up making mistakes that on paper it looked like good moves. But when you really look at the situation and analyze the board a little bit more, you start to see there's so much weakness behind us move because look at this, I can, this is actually the most common move as you see, H for Ponto, H for it just destroys this idea. Because look at this. If you'd go out and capture here, I could obvious, obviously always captured back because I'm threatening this, this square with two pieces, whereas the point is only defending with their queen. So I can just capture back over there if they capture my, my palm. And of course, I still have this threat. This is not going anywhere if this pond gets removed because they capture my, my palm over here and I capture back, Guess what? I still have the opportunity to push up this bond anytime I want and go ahead and capture that piece back. So this will lead doesn't accomplish that much for them, right? Which is why from this position, the most common moved that people play or black plays, I should say. And he has, he by far, this is like 403 to two for the next one. So by far the most common move, and again, it's because I've moved that looks like a good move on paper again, right? It doesn't look like a bad move. And that move is pond to G4. And again, it looks like a good move because you're pushing up, you're threatening this piece. You have two ponds real deep into my territory and you can always bring out more defenders for these. You could always bring out your night to maybe control the square. Try to hold onto this part over here. You could always bring out your bishop to try to hold on to this part over here, you can always involve your queen. Again, I'm on paper. This looks like a good move. But the problem with this move is that there is this response right now. The most common fate move is night to E5 because there's also a move that looks really good for white because guess what? When I go there, I am threatening this pond with two different pieces. Also I have grabbed on the central squares. I'm also over here. I can look at a number of different things that I could do. I'm obviously threatening these two squares I can't capture quite yet, but I could combine later on with other pieces. Maybe take out my, bringing out my bishop. And there's a lot of ideas that I can accomplish here, right? And that's why this is the most common played move. But they move that. I'm going to walk you guys through a little bit. And this is the second most common and paid move, is a little bit of more of an aggressive move, which is night to G5. Now the reason why this is a little bit more aggressive is that what the idea behind this is to destroy the fence in front of the King, get the king involved into the game, and just keep attacking key bits. I can keep attacking and not letting go, right? Like we want to put our foot down on the opponents neck basically and just keep pushing, keep pushing, not, not lifting it at all. And now let the opponent do anything. Because the idea is that we're gonna go ahead and capture here sacrificing our own night so that we can get the pointing out there. I'll use the important kings would have had to move, which means they can't castle anymore. And look at this once they come over here, there's absolutely no defense in front of him whatsoever and there's nothing they can do to get out of that situation, right? Because, and again, from here, as you can see, the most commonly played move is another move that looks good on paper, is pond to H6. Threatening my, my piece over here and basically saying, Hey, where are you going to go now? You can't go there because I capture. You can't go there because I capture you can't go there because I capture you. So you're, you're trapped. But what black did not anticipate is that I'm going to go with their sacrifice my piece. And once this happens, Look at this. There's absolutely no The fence around this kink, right? And this king is just caught out in the normal no-man's land again. And what we can do over here is we have a number of different ways you can attack. We can always looking to this move if you wanted to. We could always look into this move. And obviously, going for the queen move is more important because if I make the bishop move first, what the appointing can do is play this move, which opens up this bishops way to defend this pawn so that I can no longer capture with my queen. So that's why I would like to capture with the queen first, right? This is the better move over here. And once this happens, that the possibilities are endless because look at this. It's just absolutely crazy. The king is out in the open. It's so easy to attack. The opponent has no develop pieces whatsoever. There is no defense whatsoever. My queen is right here, and at any point I can go ahead and capture over here. And if that is not an option that's available to me because let's say the opponent tries to defend that piece somehow and maybe move like this. Well, I could go over here and capture if I wanted to, I could go over here to catch or check, I should say not capture, but I go over here and check the opponents. There's just so many different ideas. I can always bring up my bishop. I can look out doing other things. I could always look at pushing this Po1 and maybe attacking this other pon with two pieces. There's a show many different attacks that I can build upon. And the opponent is going to have a very tough time because the king is out in the open and I have just so much possibility here. And it's so easy for me to develop my pieces, whereas for the opponent, it's going to be really tough to develop pieces because they have, the point has to just keep defending their king at all costs and seriously, whereas this kid gonna go, there's literally no difference whatsoever. It's going to be very tough for the opponent to get out of this predicament even though we're down upon and and night. The problem is that, or actually we're not down upon, I should say the opponent is down upon and we're done nights. Even though we're down at night. The attacking threat that we have over here is just so massive that it's going to be very tough for the opponent to get away from this, right? So this is a little bit more of it. An aggressive opening and an opening there. You just got to be where if you go for this opening, you just got to keep the tax coming. You can't let go because if you let go of the Etags or lead the opponent reorganized or the fence, obviously, you are in a worst position because you've given up so much material, right? But if you do keep the tax going and eventually get to a place where you can challenge for checkmate. Then obviously it doesn't matter if you're down pieces, right? If you can check made the appointment, the game is over. And that's all that matters. And as you can see from the games that are, are in this database that have got to this point. They all end with a victory for whites because again, this position is just so much superior for whites, even though white is down in pieces. So that was the king's gambits and very interesting opening and an opening that you can definitely utilize if you want to be a little bit more aggressive. And if even if you don't want to be a little more aggressive, there are some other avenues that we talked about that you could take and some other places that the game could go depending on how the port in response to your moves. But in general, very strong opening in a very interesting opening to try out and experiments. So definitely go ahead and check it out. Try it a couple of times in a couple of games and see how you feel about it. Anyways, that's all I have to say and I'll see you next video. 43. The Fried Liver Attack - Chess Openings: Alright, in this video we're gonna talk about the fright liver attack, which is a very aggressive opening for white. And if you are a little bit more of an aggressive player or you just like a little more of an aggressive game. And if you find a little bit more appealing, then this is definitely one that I think you guys will enjoy. So this one is actually an extension of the Italian game. And as you remember, the Italian game was very similar to the Rui Lopez opening. It's just that the bishop move was a little bit different. So the way the Italian game works, and as you can see the stats, white is victorious more often than not in the Italian game, which is pretty nice to see. But the way you tell him game worked was again, the most common opening E4 response to E5 from black over here. And then after that we have the night coming over here. Of course, black response by night to C6. And we have the bishop move member. If the Bishop moved to B5 over here, then it would have been the really Lopez opening. But because it moves to S4, it's the Italian game. Now in the Italian game, the most, the most common response I should say to this move is C5 Bishop CCR5, which basically mirrors our movement. And it starts a very different road down the line. But which is we're not going to go over a little bit of a different opening. The one that we're going to focus on is the second most common response, which is night to F6. And this is where we end up with the fright liberates x. Let's jump right into that one, and I will take over here. So this is the tonight defense against the Italian you. And we're going to respond to this with the fried liver attack. So the way the fried liver attack works is that when this night over here is played to F6, what this enables us to do is to basically move our night over here to G5 without the threat of our opponents pond coming over here threatening males, right, because of this night moving over here. And the opponent has basically taken away their own privilege of using this pond as a defense mechanism against our night occupying the G5 square. Because if we go over there, the opponent is no longer able to play this move, which would help stabilize this piece over here and throw an hour night over there. So that's what we're going to go ahead and use. We're going to go ahead and use that weakness that this move creates. And of course, what we're also doing is we're attacking this paan, which cannot move member because of this night over here, we're taking the spawn with two different pieces, right? We're tagging it with the bishop and with the night. So right now in this moment, even though this pond is protected by the king, this pon is a freebie because guess what? We can just go ahead and capture it and the king cannot do anything about it. And even worse than that is that if we go ahead and capture with our night, guess what? We're going to be forking the queen and the rook over here. And we're basically going to go when some material pretty early on in the game. So the opponent has no choice but to stop this attack immediately. Because if they don't, we're obviously going to win some easy material over here. So really, the only have two options here. One would be to basically stop this attack with the pond, stop this bishop from supporting the night in capturing the F7 pond. Or play a move like, let's say Queen to E7 where we're protecting this pond, right? It's gotta be one of these. But here's the problem. Even if the queen move is played, we can still go ahead and capture with the night. And there's nothing you can do other than just move the rock to the G8 square, which is not really a great setup for black. It's going to be a very weird setup and they're not developing any pieces. And on top of that we have one upon, which is pretty nice still, it's not that bad, right? Which is why you really don't see black played this move too often because it's a very clunky move. It does lead to some real weird setup. And it still doesn't stop this attack, right? Because we can still go ahead and capture. It does stop the fork and the upcoming moves, but it doesn't prevent this attack from happening. So really the most common move they can find, and the same is true in the database. I mean, take a look at that 2400 compared to 200, which is the second most common mode, right? It's gotta be this one. It's gotta be distMoved where you bring up the pond to stop this attack, right? Because it's just the most effective way to block this threat right here. And of course, the response to that is we're going to just capture back with our pond. And of course, the most common response to that. And again, as you can see, 1900 compared to 200, the second one. So clearly the most common response by far is to go ahead and play a move like this where you take this piece and you move it away to the A5 square. And this is clearly the best move because you're getting away from this thread over here. And you're also threatening the Upon a bishop. Well, we're, the fried liver attack happens is if the opponent makes a mistake here and it's actually quite common that this mistake happens. Because take a look at this, right? This is a very strong foothold for white in the middle. And what black could say here is that, well, I could just go ahead and capture back with my night. Because if I do that, then I get rid of this part over here and my queen is protecting my night when I go out and capture. So the opponent can't just capture back. And this would be a terrible mistake and we will see how the leads into fright member a tag. But this is a very common mistake because on the paper this looks like a really good move. So once this move is played, this is what we call a fright liver attack is when we go ahead and capture and basically sacrifice our night over here. And as you can see, fried liver attack right there. That's what happens over here. So we're sacking our night in order to bring out this king, similar to what we saw in the king's gambit when I was talking about that opening. We're going to sack our night over here so that we bring out the king. And the king is basically a no man's land with no defense in front of it. And then we can just take advantage of that, right? So once the opponent captures bagging and they have to, because we were forking their queen and their rook over there. And the last move, as you can see, don't capture back, we just capture one of these pieces and we go up material which is still pretty good, and we should have a pretty easy game from there. So the point has no choice. They have to accept our sacrifice. And once that happens, we can just bring out the queen, checking the opponent. And from here really this king has really one move. I mean, there are other possible moves. But we'll just talk quickly about why those are terrible ideas. So if he moves over here, then we can just keep the, keep the tag going. If he moves over here, it's just going to be checkmate because we just capture over here. Let me show you what happens if he moves over there. We just capture. Of course, let's check. The king cannot go anywhere, so you have to either capture this bishop or block. And once he captures, we'll just catch it back with the queen if you blog so we can just capture back and that's checkmate right there, right? So you can't go over there. Obviously, if the king went over here, it's a very easy one for us again, we just bring it up, bring our bishop back. And again from here he could probably go one of these, one of these two ways, but it really doesn't matter either way. It's going to be a very easy win for us. And we could have even not brought this bishop out. We could have even done some other move where we, let's say do something like this. So when the opponent moves to one of these squares, we can just, oh, Alisha, this bishop, and just keep the attack going. There are so many different attack. So we can make once is here, we can also involve these ponds over here. It's just going to be devastating. Right? And over here it would also be the same. And it's over here also would be a real, real hard the fence as well, because again, we just capture, we keep the attack going. So really the only good play that the opponent has over here is to move over here. And at least for now, defend this night over here with both the king and the queen. So that we can't just go ahead and capture, even though we are attacking this, This night with two different pieces. Alright, but because there are two vendors on this night, the night is not going to fall. So what we're gonna do is we're just going to go ahead and add a third attacker to this night over here with our own night to S3 move. And now we have three attackers on this night and the night is going to fall if the opponent doesn't rush to defend it again. So a move that you might see very commonly here is this night before move, where black is doing two things at the same time. First, they are defending this night over here, they're adding a third defender. And now there are three defenders on it. So even though there are three attackers, because there are three defenders, we can't just go ahead and capture because we would end up losing material. And also what black is doing at the same time is that he's threatening to forecast by capturing on this pawn on C2. Because if he captures upon, then he's forked us and he can probably grab that ROCC for pretty much nothing in it gets our king to move as well. Well, what you could do from here is you can just go ahead and force that, that fork to happen. And the reason why this is actually good ideas, because look at this. We have so many, It's hacking and so many threatening pieces in the game. And we could unleash this bishop within two moves as well. That it really is not a bad idea to just go ahead and sacrificed I wrote because I rook is behind all this defense. We can't get an involved in the game for the foreseeable future. And right now we have just the super-strong attack going. And he appointed king is out in the nowhere. So. Really the sacrifice would be worth it if we can just get rid of this night over here, which is causing us problems because guess what if this night goes away? Now there are only two defenders on this night over here, so we can start capturing there and keep the ETag going basically. So once the opponent is forced to forecast and we move our king, he can go ahead and grab our rook over there, but that's all going to help them because now we can just capture over here with our night and of course were threatening at discovered attack and to discover check on the king once we move this night. And that's just a deadly, deadly force. In fact, we could even get a rock bank if you wanted to by moving over there and This discover check. But we're probably not going to, because the attack over here is just so strong. And of course we have the possibility of double-checking as well if you wanted to, that it's just, the attack is so strong. And obviously, if we can get this attack going, we always have this move over here with the queen as well as just devastating, devastating stuff. So really from here, black has no choice but to start moving the king to get a little bit out of this predicament that they're in. And from here, we can just go ahead and try to keep the tag going anyway possible. Whether that means getting our queen involved more off, more than this, or just trying to go over here exploring other options. And maybe we look at the ways we can get this bishop involved in the game. And maybe we play pawn over here. And to start getting the bishop in the middle, we could also look at just bringing out the rook and threatening this part over here. So we have a ton of different capabilities over here. And of course we also have this move here as well, which is the comment most commonly played moving the database that we have where we're basically trying to capture on this pond as well so that there's absolutely no defense left for this, for this king over here. So there are different, a lot of different ways where we can just keep the attack going and absolutely devastate the opponent here. But that's basically the fried liver attack. In a nutshell. Of course, you can go ahead and check it out for yourself. Try it, see, see how you feel about it, and see what kind of attacks you can discover from that position. And just, just try it out if you like. This type of more aggressive openings where you're just getting right into it. You're maybe sacrificing some stuff, getting you pointing, kick out and just unleashing all the attack upon the appointing king as soon as possible, then this is a perfect opening for you if you want to try it out. And usually black makes that mistake that I was talking about, this mistake over here where we talked about this is not the best one. The best move is to just move your night's over to A5 to basically threaten the opponent bishop. But the vast majority of times when you're planing is just normal players, average players. They actually make this over I. So this database is actually for, the more, the more professional players, let me put it that way. Who have analyzed this position before, but for those who haven't analyzed the fried liver or tag and are not familiar with the different lines of it. This just looks like it's such a good move and such an appealing move that the vast majority of average players just go for that. So just be aware that if you go through this opening, this is likely what you're going to get. And once that happens, then you know that you need to sacrifice over here and get the queen involved and get all the other stuff going as well. So just a little bit of, a little bit of a fun one for you guys. Hopefully you enjoyed this fried liver attack. Go ahead and check it out. If this looks like something that you would enjoy playing. And I'll see you in the next video. 44. You Made It...: Congratulations, you guys. You made it, you made it to the end of the course. Hopefully this was a fun experience for you guys. Hopefully you learned a lot of new material when it comes to the game of chess. And hopefully you're just a better chess player overall. If you ever have any questions, make sure to let me know. I'm always happy to help you guys out if you have any questions or any thing that you want to get feedback on. I'm always delighted to help us out, so definitely reach out. But other than that, make sure you follow me. Here on Skillshare, I actually usually put out a lot of courses are usually worked with a lot of professionals to make sure I create the best course is possible. And it's all here, right, so if you already have the Skillshare membership, It's all a no extra charge for you guys, right? You can always check out my new stuff for no extra charge right there for you to enjoy it at anytime you want. You can always watch at your own pace. And you can just check them out, see if there is stuff you're interested in, right? So definitely follow me to make sure you see what I'm up to. And yeah, that's pretty much it. Hopefully you guys enjoyed this course. Check out my other courses. Hopefully you'll enjoy those as well. And hopefully I'll see you in one of those ones actually. Just.