Checkmate in Chess: From Beginner to Intermediate | Matt Nunbhakdi | Skillshare

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Checkmate in Chess: From Beginner to Intermediate

teacher avatar Matt Nunbhakdi, National Chess Master and filmmaker

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

8 Lessons (40m)
    • 1. Introduction

      0:48
    • 2. Project

      0:25
    • 3. How to Checkmate

      6:35
    • 4. Visualization

      6:11
    • 5. Discovered Attacks

      6:50
    • 6. Sacrifices

      8:28
    • 7. Checkmate Patterns

      10:17
    • 8. Conclusion

      0:32
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About This Class

Description 

In this class, I'll be guiding you through how to checkmate in chess! Along with introducing you to other important chess concepts:

What this class covers

1) How to Checkmate in Chess

In this lesson I guide you through the basics of checkmate and the 4 questions you need to ask yourself when determining checkmate.

2) Visualization in Chess

In this lesson we go over the skill of visualization and looking ahead in chess. I cover how to accurately visualize positions, how to calculate ahead, and exercises you can do to improve your visualization abilities.

3) Discovered Attacks

In this lesson we go over the tactical theme of discovered attacks in chess, which is an important concept that is a necessary tool in any competitive chess player's arsenal. 

4) Sacrifices

In this lesson we go over sacrifices in chess, including how to look for Forcing Moves, using your imagination, and double checking moves before you play them.

5) Checkmate Patterns 

We end the class by going over 12 important checkmate patterns in chess. All of which incorporate the themes covered in the previous lessons. 

About Me

I'm a National Master in the United States Chess Federation! I started playing chess seriously at the ancient age of 15 and within five years achieved the National Master title, largely through self-study and playing online. Although I've also had the immense privilege to train with several Grandmasters including GM Gerhard Schebler from Germany and GM Avetik Grigoryan from Armenia.

I only started training with GMs once I reached expert but before then my road from beginner to 1900 elo was almost completely through self-study. Because of this, I'm very familiar with the obstacles a beginner can face when first learning the game. I also coach extensively online, and have helped both kids and adults improve their game.  

You can find my US Chess Federation profile here: http://www.uschess.org/msa/MbrDtlMain.php?16598044 

I'm always happy to help others improve their game so you can contact me here with any questions: [email protected]

I hope you enjoy/enjoyed the class! 

Meet Your Teacher

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Matt Nunbhakdi

National Chess Master and filmmaker

Teacher

Hey! My name is Matt Nunbhakdi I'm a National Master in the United States Chess Federation (USCF), but representing Thailand in the World Chess Federation (FIDE). I currently coach chess part time and have taught students ranging from kids to adults at all levels. In addition to chess I am also very passionate about filmmaking and photography!

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: My name is Matt. No Packy and I'm a national master in chess. I've taught Justin schools as well as online and have competed in tournaments around the world and have had the pleasure to train with several grandmasters. In this class, you learn how to checkmate the king and also important themes such as discovered attacks and sacrifices. All you'll need to know before the lessons is how the pieces move, how much they're worth and how they can protect and attack each other. This class is geared towards chess, beginners and amateurs who want to improve their check mating and tactical skills. Chess can improve critical thinking and decision making skills, as well as provide a mentally fulfilling activity that can be played anywhere. By the end of this class. You'll be better equipped to spot not only fundamental checkmate patterns but also winning chess tactics when they occur in your games. 2. Project: Each lesson is accompanied by PF of puzzles related to the lesson. Solving puzzles is one of the best ways to improve it. Chess. Since it's all about pattern recognition, make sure to follow the key points off the lessons as they'll come in handy. When you do the puzzles, all you will need to know before the lessons is how the pieces move, how much they're worth and how they can protect and attack each other. 3. How to Checkmate: in this lesson, I'll be taking how to checkmate in chess. So firstly, we have to define some terms. The first this check. So check is defined as when the king is attacked but can escape. The second term is checkmate. Checkmate is defined as when the king is in check but cannot escape. Both of these terms are very important in understanding what checkmate is so for. Check me toe work. We have to ask ourselves four questions. The first is is the king and check the second is can the king move out of check? The third is cabinet piece giving check be captured and the fourth is Can the Chechnya blocked if the answer is yes to the first question and no to the last three than it is. Checkmate. So whenever you check the king and chest, you always have to ask these four questions in order to determine whether checkmate works or not. Let's take a look at this first position here. So here, Why can play a move light queen to f seven. Check. Now we have to ask ourselves the questions. The first is is a check, and the answer is yes. It is checked because the queen is attacking the black King. And I want to note with this first question that it's very important if the answer is yes or no. Because if it's not check, then there's no point asking the rest of the questions because it's not check. But in this case, it is check. So now we have to ask ourselves the next questions. So the next one is Can the king move out of check? And the answer is yes. The blacking has an escape square on D eight. So in this case, this is not checkmate because the king can escape to the square on D A. So here White could play a move like queen to you. Seven. Check with this move we have to ask ourselves the questions. So the first is is the king and check. The answer is yes. The king is in check. The second question is, can they came? Move out of check so the king cannot move out of check. All of these squares are controlled by the White Queen. Can the peace giving check me captured? So in this case, the peace giving check can be captured. The queen is not protected by any peace. Therefore, the king can eat it in the following position. White can play Queen T seven check, and this is check because the queen is attacking the king. The king cannot move to any square since the Queen control of D eight d seven F seven and eight And at first glance, it may appear that black not captured a queen since the night is protecting it. But actually blacks night on C six is also controlling the square on the seven, which the white Queen is currently on. So black and play night takes you seven. So, in fact, 27 does not checkmate because black can capture the queen, which is giving check. This means that you should be aware of what squares the opposing sides pieces control in the following position. White can play move like broke t six check and this is check. Since whites Brooke is attacking blacks king and at first glance it may appear like black skin cannot move anywhere. So black skin cannot go to d eight. The rook on D seven and the knight on F seven are controlling that square. The Black King cannot capture the knight on F seven, since the 27 is protecting the night but actually black and move and capture a piece at the same time by playing King 67 on black and capture the work on D seven. Since it's not protected by any white pieces. So in fact, the work on the seven is a piece that is not giving check but happens to be a piece that black can capture and get out of the way at the same time. In this next position, White can play a move like queen to G a check. So again we have to ask ourselves. The four questions is a check? Yes. The kings in check can became move out of check. No, the king cannot move out a check because the white King controls all of these squares. And the King has checked along this eight. Frank, Can the peace giving check be captured? No, the Queen cannot be captured. There was nothing controlling that square. Can the check he blocked? The answer is yes, because actually the work can swing down to this square by playing looked at F eight and therefore, this is not checkmate because the rook can block the check. So here. Why? It can play a move like queen T seven is a check. So yes, it does. Check. The King is being attacked by the White Queen. Can the King move out of check? The answer is no, that the queen is controlling all of these squares. The third is can the King capture the queen? So in this case, No, because the night is actually protecting the queen and the fourth is can the check he blocked in this case, it cannot because the queen is right next to the Black King. Therefore, because we asked these four questions, we can determine that this is checkmate. Stalemate and chest is when one side has no legal moves. And this can usually occur when the king has no legal move in the following position. If White would have played queen to see seven, White would be controlling a seven b seven and B eight. All of these squares around the Black King. But the Black King himself would not be in check. And so since Black has no legal moves, this is still mate. And you'll notice that the pond on H four also has no moves. It can't go to H three because the white pawn is there. Stalemate is a draw because in chest you can't pass a move. You always have to play. And if you can't play any moves that the game has to end and if it still made, that ends in a draw in the following position. If why would play the same thing queen to see seven. This may appear at first to be still mate. It's the same position of the queen, and the Black King has no legal moves. But Black, in fact, has one move black and moved upon on H five to H for. And in this case, if need be white can checkmate black with Queen A seven. Checkmate. So we've still made it supported to be aware off all of the pieces on the board and their possible moves With checkmate, you always want to ask yourself the same four questions before you make the move is a check can make a move out of check. Can the peace giving check be captured? And can the Czech people up To test your knowledge, you can download the corresponding pdf, which contains a series of puzzles designed to test your knowledge on check mating and chess. And at the back of the pdf, you will find the solutions to the puzzles. If you feel like something's air so not clear, you can always we watch the video and then do the puzzles in order to reinforce your knowledge. Once you're comfortable with how to checkmate in chest, you can move on to the next video. 4. Visualization: in this lesson are becoming the skill of visualization and chest in chess. Visualization is ability to imagine the position of pieces on a chessboard. An important part of visualization and chest is the ability to name the squares on a chessboard. Since this gives the game context, Chess is played on an eight by eight board. The squares, running vertically are known as files on the ones running horizontally are known as ranks. There are eight ranks and eight files. Files are called by letters in the English alphabet, so running from the A file to the H file and ranks or called by numbers. So this would be the first wreck, and this would be a frank to name a square and chest, you call it by the filed letter, followed by the rank number. For example, this square would be E four, since it's on the e file, and the four frank on important skill and visualization and chest is being able to imagine the chessboard in your head. A good exercise is a start off with the four squares in the center of the board before D for D five and E five, and then slowly expand those squares until you feel the entire chess board, and being able to distinguish which squares are light and dark is also a good step towards improving your visualization. For example, before is a light square and D for is a dark square. Being able to close your eyes and visualize this in your head is an important skill in chest visualization is essentially imagining the piece on a new square in the following position. Whites Queen is on F two, but once White takes the queen on F five, the Queen on F two will now be on F five and blacks Queen will no longer be on the board, and white screen will no longer be on F two. So context at five. And being able to see this position your head while you are actually looking at this position on the board would be an example of visualization. It's also important to note what squares apiece used to control and what squares and now controls, for example, why it was controlling the second rank in this case. But since White captured the Queen an F five, the blacking can now go to a two and B two so blacks came can escape off the first rank. Also, when white captured the queen on F five white put the black King in check. Since the white Queen is attacking the blacking. So now the difference in the position of that black now is obligated to move out of this check. In this position, the White Queen is attacking the night on e six and the RUK on C two. If the white Queen captures the look on c two, you might notice that the White Queen is no longer defending the D foursquare. So now that the White Queen captured the work on C two, this opens up the opportunity for Black to fork the white Queen and King with 90 d four check, Then after Kindy five, the night can capture the queen on C two and the game is the draw. So being able to see this position and following tactic in your head while you're actually looking at this position on the board is an example of using visualization to reduce your blunders in chess. You also want to be aware of what squares are safe and what squares are not safe. For example, in the following position, there were gonna be seven controls, a seven frank and the be file. So if it's white to move, white special can't really go to be three and f seven, since the work is controlling both of those squares. So in deciding where the bishop could move, we can determine that the bishop probably doesn't want to go to the squares. But squares like E six see for a two are are safe. In addition, the blacking controls G eight, so G A could also be determined as a square That is not safe for the bishop to go to, however, think that's white. To move White can just capture the work on B seven, being able to ask yourself what changed in the position? What squares I now controlling what squares used to control is an important skill and visualization. So here the work was blocking the bishops control of the square on a eight. But now that the bishop captured the work on the seven, now the bishop controls a eight. Being able to be aware of this change in the position is an important step in improving your visualization and chest. A good exercise to improve visualization and chess is to calculate how many moves it would take a piece to reach a square. For example, A good question asked in this position is how moves would have take this night of H one to reach eight square and then setting into something aboard and trying to imagine how many moves it would take is a great exercise. So, for example, it would say 12 three for 56 moves for the night to reach eight. But being able to see this sequence on the board in your head before you actually playing out is an important exercise for improving visualization. Another useful exercise for improving visualization is to set up pieces on a chessboard, for example, like a disposition, and then remove those pieces, then try to place those pieces where they used to be. Maybe you can take a picture of the board or take a screenshot, and then with the pieces off the board, and with the empty board, you can start placing the pieces where you remember them. We're visualization. You want to be able to imagine a piece on a new square. You want to consider what squares are safe to be on and what squares were not safe. Ask yourself what squares apiece used to control and what squares it now controls and how that changes the position. Some good exercises for improving visualization is to practice naming the squares on the chessboard. You can also close your eyes and visualize the chessboard in your head, and you can set up a position where you can think about how many moves. It may take a piece to reach a particular square, and you can also try setting up pieces on a board from memory. To test your knowledge, I've created a downloadable PdF, which contains a series of puzzles based on visualization and chest. And at the back of the pdf, there will be this oceans to the puzzles. If something's air so not clear, you can always we watch the video and then take a go with the puzzles. And then, once you feel comfortable enough, move onto the next video 5. Discovered Attacks: in this lesson, I'll be going over discovered attacks and chest. A discovered attack is when a piece is moved to reveal an attack on another piece or square in the following position. White has a discovered attack. Why can play move like bishop to be six Check. And even though the bishop is not checking the king itself actually the work on the one is the one checking the king. So the bishop is opening up the attack for the RUK when before their work was obstructed by the bishop on e three. Since the bishop moved to be six, this opens up the works attack on the King. However, why can also attacked the King with the bishop as well. So why can play Bishop to C five check and this is known as double check. Since both the bishop and the work are attacking the king in the following position, why can play double check as well by playing bishop to C five Check. So here both the bishop on C five and the work on the one are delivering check and you may notice that the night is attacking the RUC. Anyone and the bishop on C five but can also swing T five to block the check. But it actually can't do any of these moves because the check is coming from two directions . So in cases, a double check the king has to move out of the check. The pieces giving check can't be captured because you can't capture two pieces in one move in chess, and they're coming from two directions, so there's no way to block a check, which is coming from two directions. So the only choice for double check is to move the king, for example, two d seven. In the following position, White can use a discovered attack to win material and defend a piece. Why can try to win the Queen by playing bishop to D to check. And now this opens up the attack for the work on the one on the King on E eight and also attacks the Queen on a five. And there's no way for Black to save the Queen Black and play queen. The five check but the work and just captured the queen on the square. However, if White were to try a different way of trying to win the Queen by playing bishop to be six . Check in the following position. Actually blacken. Just capture the work on anyone. So here, Black and get out of the attack from the bishop and also capture the peace giving check at the same time accomplishing two tests. So it's very important that White played bishop to D to Because here the bishop is blocking the connection between the queen and the work, revealing the check on the king by the work on anyone but also attacking the Queen. And the Queen has no opportunity to capture the bishop because the King is in check and the queen cannot capture the 21. So say black plays came to D seven and then we can just capture the Queen 85 and then win material in the following position. You may notice that the white king is under checked by the queen on e five, but White has a very nice counterattack. You may notice that the queen would be checking the king if it wasn't for the work on G four. So this presents the opportunity for a discovered attack. So here, why can block the check by playing look t four check revealing the attack on the King by the Queen on H three and black cannot capture the work on the force since the Black King is in check. So black has to move. The queen cannot block the check by playing queen to have five. Because the work is actually pinning the queen that the King. So the king has to move to say King D five and then we can just capture the Queen and we would have a queen versus work and game, which is winning for the slide with the queen. In this case, we can use a discovered attack as a defensive, toured a block, a check and also win material at the same time. The following position is an illustration of how discover attack can be used as a defensive tool and to counter attack. So here you may notice that the Black Queen on D one is checking the White King on B one, and black has two queens here, So black is up material, but white actually has a very strong counterattack. So what I can do is why can capture the queen on D one and at the same time, attack the queen on the one and check the Black King on the six with the bishop on. See a Now the blacking has to move, say, to F six. And now why could just capture the Queen on E one and win the game? This position went from black having to Queens to having no queens. And this goes to show how powerful discover attacks could be as a told it offend and to counter attack. Discovered attack is not only limited to the king, it can also be used to win material. In the following position, you may notice that Black has an extra queen, so there are up material. But White can level the playing field by playing Bishop takes a seven by playing Bishop takes a seven white reveals attack on the E six night by the RUC on e two. And there's no way for Black to move the Queen and defend the night at the same time. So blacks best move is probably to capture the bishop. And after black captures the bishop, we can capture the right on e six. And here, even though Black has a queen and upon we have three ponds and night in the work for those pieces. And that's considered pretty good compensation in the chess game. Not to mention the fact that our king is also pretty safe on this square being shielded by thes ponds. The following position shows how discover attack can be used to threaten squares and checkmate. So here you may notice that the bishop on D two is blocking the Rooks attack on the black work on D eight. So what White can play is white can play bishop to 86 and here White is threatening. Checkmate on G seven with the queen, since the bishop is controlling that square. But what is also threatening to capture the work on D A, since it's only protected once by the work on aid. But it's attacked twice by the rook on D one and the Queen on F six. So now Black is not able to deal with both of these threats. Black can try to stop mate with Queen to a one, but here white can play looked 68. I'm look tasty eight and then queen takes ta checkmate, and this is back rack mates. Since the King cannot go to G seven Because the bishop on 86 controls that square note that Queen G seven check doesn't work because the black Queen is still controlling that square. So the black you just captured the Queen Bishop takes and then King takes. And in this position, black is up material. Another try is black and played queen two D four to still try to control this square. But the rook is controlling the square. So the working just captured the queen. And checkmate is unstoppable here because if night takes, then we can still play Queen 87 mate. So Bishop Page six is an example of how discover attacks can be used to threaten squares and check me if I discovered attack involves a king. It is also known as discovered check. I discovered attack is an important part of double check, which is when two pieces check the king at once. In cases of double check, the king has to move. Discovered attacks can also be used for defensive purposes. Discovered attacks don't always have to check the king, but can also be used to win material and to threaten squares and checkmate. To test your knowledge, you can download the corresponding pdf, which contains a series of puzzles related to discover the tax and chest. And at the back of the pdf, there will be the solutions to the puzzles. If you're still not clear about some things, you can always we watch the lesson, and then once you feel comfortable enough ticket, go of the puzzles and then you can move on to the next lesson. 6. Sacrifices: in this lesson will be going over sacrifices and chess a sacrifices when you give away a piece either twin material for a checkmate and or a better position in a chess game. You always want to be on the lookout for forcing moves, forcing Movsar checks, captures and attacks in that specific order in the following position, White has a very nice forcing move that can lead to checkmate. White can play Queen takes h six check. And now the only option for Black to get out of this check is to capture the queen. Night takes 86 and then right takes h six Checkmate. And this is checkmate because the rook on G one is blocking the King's escaped off the H file and the work on H six is the one delivering mate. So in this following example, white sacrifice their queen in order to achieve checkmate. Imagination is very important in chess. That's why we do puzzles to train ourselves, to look for moves that would otherwise remain invisible to the naked eye. In this position, White has a very nice sacrifice that can lead to forced checkmate. So here, why can actually sacrifice their queen with Queen A G A check. And now this is a forcing move because it's a check and the king can't capture the queen because the night on H six is protecting it. So the RUC cast to capture the queen. This is the only way for Black to get out of check. But once they were captured the queen. Now the work no longer controls the square in F seven. So what I can do is why can play night to f set and checkmate, and this is known a smothered mate. And it's called that because the king is smothered by their own pieces on G 787 and G eight . So the following is an example of how a sacrifice can be combined with knowledge of a check mating pattern. In this case smothered mate. In a chess game, you always want to recognize weaknesses in the opponent's position. That way you can identify what tactics you may have at your disposal in the following position. Black has a week. A prank. The king is not able to escape to F seven G seven or 87 because it's ponds are there. So actually, this presents the opportunity for right to deliver. Checkmate. So the square on E eight is controlled twice, but a queen on E two in the work on the one, we say that they form a battery on that square, and it's only defended once by the RUC on B A. So actually, this presents the opportunity for White to checkmate black by playing Queen THX. And this is a forcing move, since it's a check and it also sacrifices the queen. But after work takes E eight whites working, capture blacks, work and deliver background, check me in this example. By recognizing the weakness of the background, White was able to sacrifice their queen to deliver checkmate. Sacrifices can occur as early as in the opening. The following sacrifice and checkmate is known as legals mate. So White plays before you. Five night of three 86. This is known as the Philidor Defense 93 Bishop G four, pending the F three night to the Queen on the one bishop to C four a six. So after a six, we have to take a moment to look at the checks, captures and attacks in this position. The first thing we have to look at his bishop takes F seven and this may seem like it's plundering the bishop, but it's important to consider moves that may even seem impossible. After King takes F seven and might take C five, The pond can just capture the night. And after the queen takes the bishop on G for the Black King is kind of weak. But why? To still down a piece And white doesn't have enough pieces developed to justify an attack. So Bishop takes f seven doesn't really work here, However, with night take C five white sacrifices the night and the Queen on d one. But if the bishop takes the queen on the one now, White has a very nice checkmate. Why he captured upon it f seven. And now the King only has one square, he seven q 97. And now I can bring the other night into the game with Knight to d five. Checkmate and the blacking finds itself caught in admitting that constructed by the two nights and the Bishop Okay, so black can't really take the queen How bout of black captures the night. Then we can just capture their bishop And now white is up upon and is ahead and development . So white is winning in this position. So night takes E five is an example off sacrificing the queen in order to achieve checkmate . But the important thing with sacrifices is to make sure that they work because in the case of Bishop takes f seven, this didn't work, and why just ended up losing material. So you have to prove something by analysis before you commit to it. The following sacrifice actually occurred in a game played between Richard ready and severely tried to cower in 1910. The game started before C six. This is known as the karaoke on defense de four D five. Might see three. Do you take C four night takes you for a night of six and queen of the three. So developing the queen, uh, possibly hinting at castling Queen Side and Black Lady five. This appears to give away upon for free, but you'll see how black and win it back quite quickly. So after d take C five Black place Queen a five check which forks a king on e one and a pawn on e five. So black is able to capture the pond back Bishop T to blocking the cheque. Qui takes 35 Now Black is attacking the night on the four Where if their queen and there a knight on F six But now white actually castle inside, seemingly giving away this night for free. But this night is not really free Because of the Queen takes tonight on before than White can play works you one which skewers a queen to the king and forces the wind off the Black Queen. If black takes the night with their night, then white actually has a very nice sacrifice. Why can play Queen two D a check? And this is a forcing move. It's a check. And if the king captures the queen, which is the only move, then why complete Bishop G five check, which is a discovered attack for the work on the king and a double check as well. So in cases of double check, the king has to move, Say Black goes to e eight on White can deliver mate on d eight with Brooke D. A checkmate on the king can't capture the work and can't go to e seven because the bishop is protecting the RUK and controlling e seven and of the King goes to see seven than White can deliver mate with Bishop to D, A checkmate and the rockets protecting the bishop. And the work is also controlling the defile. And ironically, the black came Can co two be 78 or C eight, because they're obstructed by their own pieces. So in this case, Queen the D. A. Is an example of a sacrifice in order to lure the king to a specific square. Recall this a decoy and chest. But Queen a date is also forcing move. And by playing this forcing move, we can get black into a force check. Made sacrifices can also be used as a defensive tool. So in the following position, you may notice that White is up a queen and what is threatening Check made in many ways. Queen B 7 27 28 But it's black to move in. Black has a very important defensive resource here, black and actually play. Look to a six check, and now Black is attacking the King and the Queen, so whites only moved here is probably captured. The RUC. If white moves the king than the work and just take the queen, and this is the dead wrong. However, if White captures the work on a six, it's stalemate. The black king is not in check, and all of the squares around it are controlled by the white pieces. So black doesn't have any legal moves in this position. In this case, route to a six check forces a draw because it forces white to put black into stalemate. So worked a six is an example of fusing sacrifices as a defensive tool. And this goes to show that sacrifices can be used to not only attack but also to defend in any position you want to look for forcing moves, checks, captures and attacks in that order. Nothing is more important than checkmate, even if it means sacrificing multiple pieces. Would you have to make sure that the sacrifice works before you play it? Sacrifices can also be used for defensive purposes. To test your knowledge, you can dollar the corresponding PdF, which contained the SYRIZA puzzles related to sacrifices in chess and at the back of the pdf. There will be the solutions to those puddles if something's air, so not clear you can always we watch the lesson and then once you feel comfortable enough, you continue going the puzzles and then move on to the next lesson. 7. Checkmate Patterns: in this lesson will be going over check. Mating patterns and chess pattern recognition is the conscious and or subconscious memorization of different tactical and strategical ideas and positions in chess. The following check made pattern is known as Swallow's tail mate. In the following position, White can deliver a checkmate by plane queen to G six. Checkmate, and the King can't capture the queen, since it's protected by the RUC on a six. But the most important thing is that the Black King can't retreat to Steph eight or two hh because its own pieces are there. So that's why this checkmate is known. A swallows tell May, since blacks own pieces obstruct its escape to the back diagonal squares. The next check made pattern is known as Anastasios made, and it's characterized by the use of the night and the rook to deliver check made. So the first move here for White is 97 Check and now the blacking only has two square to go to H seven and H A. If Lycos, too a J than White can play broke two h five checkmate, and this is made since the king is checked along the H file, and the king can't escape to G eight since the night on the Seven controls that square. And it's the same thing. If the black King goes to 87 White can deliver made All the same, we've looked Age five check and The Night on E seven plays a very important role by controlling G six and G eight. So this would be Anasazi US mate, and it's almost like a back crack mate, except that it's curing along the H file. The side of the board. The next check made pattern is known as Black Birds mate, and it's characterized by the use of the minor pieces to deliver checkmate, typically the two bishops and a knight. So in the following position, White can play bishop to H seven check mate, and this is made. Since the Black King can't capture the bishop. It's protected by the night on G five, and the squares on H A N G seven are controlled by the Dark Square bishop, and it's important to note that black can't go to F eight since their own Brooke is there. And also F seven has a black pawn on it, which prevents the Black King from escaping there. Not to mention that the night on G five also controls F seven. And this check made probably arose because blacks king side could be considered weak. Thereupon, on 86 is isolated, and we could say that they have weak, dark and light squares. The following checkmate is known as BoDeans, mate and is characterized by the use of typically two bishops to deliver mate. So here we can see that the position of whites king is quite weak. There are several weeks lights and dark squares around the King, and actually this presents opportunity for black and checkmate the white King biplane Bishop to a three checkmate. And here we can see that the darks Great Bishop is delivering mate along the A three to see one diagonal, and the lightsquared Bishop is controlling C two and be one. The only escape squares for the white King. And so the two bishops work together to deliver checkmate here, and the two bishops, otherwise known as the Bishop. Hair are very powerful combination in the chess game, since they can control both the light and the dark squares. The following checkmate pattern is known as Damien knows made, and it's characterized by the pond or a bishop on G six and the weak light squares around the king or a dark squares so here, White could deliver mate by playing Queen H seven check mate. But even though Black is up material, the combination of the pond, the weak light squares around the Black King and the Queen means that white can deliver checkmate. Here. The following checkmate is known as Greco's made, and it's known by the use of the bishop and the queen to construct a mate around the Black King. So in the following position, why can play queen to H five? Checkmate, and this is made since the Queen is delivering made down the H file and the bishop controls G eight, which is the Black Kings only escape square, so you can see that the bishop is obstructing the Black Kings escape and the queen is delivering mate, and it's important to note that the black pawn on G seven prevents the black came from escaping out of this check mate as well. Why could also play Quinta H for this would be the same result. It doesn't really matter where White puts the queen along the H file as long as it's not on a square like, say, Queen 86 where the queen could be captured and black here is up the exchange Black has a work for whites, Bishop. But the combination of the lightsquared bishop and the weak light squares around the black King and the Queen means that white is able to deliver checkmate. The following checkmate is known as more fees made, and it's characterized by the work and the bishop working together to deliver checkmate. So the following position is black to play. And if we look at all of the forcing moves, we see that black has a check and a capture in the same move with rook takes G to check. So now white on Lee has once credit go to H one and now Black has a discovered attack. The bishop would be attacking the king if the work wasn't there. So they're working. Move anywhere along the G files, say to G three and now the world can be captured by three pieces, but it doesn't really matter because the bishop is still checking the King and this is actually checkmate because the check can be blocked, the bishop can't be captured and the king cannot move out of the check. If there were moves anywhere else, say toe like have to, then this doesn't work because the king can still escape to G one. So it's very important for the right to remain along the G file when it moves out of the way in order to prevent the king from escaping to G one. The following checkmate is known as Pillsbury's mate, and it's very similar to more fees, mate. So here we begin with a forcing move. Rook takes G seven check. And now the blacking only has once credit go to. And now you may notice that white has a potential discard attack here so I can actually play. Look to g a check and this is a discovered attack and a discover check and also a double check. Since both the work and the bishop are checking the Black King so black can't capture the bishop because the work would still be checking the black King and Black can play f sex because again the work would be checking the black King so the only option for black and in the case of double check is to move out of the check. So here, black and move out of the check and captured the work by playing King takes G eight, but now the rook on G It was actually a D quite for the work on F one to swing to G one to deliver mate. So after King takes G eight white complaint, look to G one check and now this would be made but black and block with Bishop G two. But now the world can just capture the bishop, and this is actually checkmate, since the work is delivering made along the G file and the king can go to H it because the bishop on D four controls that square. And it supported to know that blacks pieces on F seven F eight and 87 are also obstructing the king's escape to those squares. The following checkmate is known as the hook made or the rook knight and pawn made, and it's known for the night, the pond in the work working together to deliver mate. So here white has multiple checks. So, for example, white could play Knight to f a check. But this doesn't really work because the king can escape out of this meeting. Net King G 8 96 Check discovered attack. But the king can just move. And then after White Place say, broke two F eight than the king escapes. And now why? It's gonna be in big trouble because black has a queen in this position. So White has to look for a made in one here. And actually, why does have a made in one white can play? Look th a checkmate. And this is made since the king can cohere or captured the RUC because it's protected by the night and the king can't captured the night either because it's protected by the pond on h five. So this is known as a hook made because the night almost hooks towards the rook to deliver checkmate against the King. The following checkmate is known as lollies made and lollies made is characterized by the PON or a bishop on F six, which controls a square on G seven. So here white can deliver mate of Queen G seven and this is a very typical checkmate where the King has checkmated along the back rank, and that queen is directly opposite from the king. So this checkmate was possible because of the weak dark squares around the blacking. And this usually is because there's usually Bishop on G seven, which is called a fee and shadowed bishop. And then black probably gave it away, which resulted in these long term, dark squared weaknesses, which allowed White the opportunity to checkmate black. The following checkmate is known as co CEOs made, and it's characterized by the king not being able to escape from the checkmate because of its own pieces. The first move White can play is Queen two h six check. And now Black only has once great ago to G three after King to G three, White can deliver mate with Queen th to check made, and the queen is creating this net around the black king and the black King can't escape to F three or G for it because its own ponds out there. So in this case, White is doing some geometry here. White is swinging the queen up and then back again, and these types of maneuvers where the queen checks the king to construct a mating that are very common. The following checkmate is an example of upon promotion, mate. When upon reaches the back, rank and chest, it could promote to either a queen, a rook, a knight or bishop. But in this case, White has to be quite careful because black has an extra queen. For example, if White captures the night on G eight and promotes to Queen Black and just capture whites queen and then the queen versus Bishop and game is winning for a black. So white has to look for a forcing move here like a check which black cannot respond to effectively. So in this position, why can promote the pond? But why can under promote it to a piece which checks the Black King, for example, if Whitewood or push F eight and then promote the pawn to Queen, the Black Queen could just capture the bishop. So why it has to look for a move which checks the Black King and puts it in checkmate. So what I can do is why can play F eight and then promote the pond toe a night? And this is actually checkmate because the night is checking the black king in the black King can't go to G seven or agent because those squares are controlled by the dark squared bishop and the blacking can code 86 Because the white king is controlling that square and promoting toe a night is the only piece which works in this case. So in positions where you may be losing or down material, forcing moves play a very important part in what you should look for. Because they can lead to very strong tactical counter attacks, like in this case with Knight to F eight and then checkmate. Chess is all about pattern recognition, feed off sacrifices, discovered attacks or a particular mating pattern. To test your knowledge, you can download the corresponding PdF, which contains a series of puzzles related to checkmate patterns and chess, and you'll find in the back of the pdf the solutions to those puzzles. If some things are still not clear, you can always we watch the lesson, and then once you feel comfortable enough with how to do these check mating patterns, you can take ago the puzzles 8. Conclusion: in this class. We went over how to check me, visualizing and looking ahead, discovered attacks, sacrifices and check made patterns with checkmate. Remember to ask yourself the four questions and always keep an eye out for forcing moves in a position. Checks, captures and attacks. Improvement can be made by doing puzzles, studying notable games and playing games and analyzing them afterwards. Feel free to post your solutions to the puzzles I've included as part of the class. I hope you enjoy this class and continue to play this fascinating game.