CPR, AED & First Aid | Mackenzie Thompson | Skillshare
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54 Lessons (1h 31m)
    • 1. First Aid

      3:59
    • 2. Breathing Problems

      2:04
    • 3. Allergic Reactions

      2:03
    • 4. Heart Diseases

      1:51
    • 5. Fainting

      1:50
    • 6. Low Blood Sugar

      1:46
    • 7. Stroke

      1:17
    • 8. Seizures

      2:25
    • 9. Shock

      1:23
    • 10. Controlling Bleeding

      3:20
    • 11. Teeth Injuries

      1:10
    • 12. Nosebleeds

      1:18
    • 13. Punctures and Impaled Objects

      1:25
    • 14. Eye Problems

      1:48
    • 15. Head Injuries

      1:15
    • 16. Spine Injuries

      1:39
    • 17. Bone and Joint Injuries

      1:32
    • 18. Burns and Electrical Injuries

      2:18
    • 19. Bites and Stings

      3:27
    • 20. Heat Related Illnesses

      2:19
    • 21. Sunburns

      0:52
    • 22. Frostbite

      1:43
    • 23. Hypothermia

      1:35
    • 24. Toxin and Poison

      1:44
    • 25. Adult CPR

      1:45
    • 26. Compressions

      2:38
    • 27. Giving Breaths

      2:17
    • 28. Mask Use

      1:05
    • 29. AED for Adults

      2:08
    • 30. Activating EMS

      1:57
    • 31. Choking in Adults

      0:56
    • 32. Relief of Choking

      1:57
    • 33. Child CPR

      1:16
    • 34. Chest Compressions in Child CPR

      1:53
    • 35. Giving Breaths in CPR

      1:29
    • 36. Mask Use in Children

      1:11
    • 37. AED for Children

      2:06
    • 38. Activating EMS for Children

      1:26
    • 39. Choking in Children

      1:02
    • 40. Relief of Choking in Children

      1:54
    • 41. Introduction to Infant CPR

      1:53
    • 42. Chest Compressions in Infant CPR

      1:21
    • 43. Giving Breaths in Infant CPR

      2:20
    • 44. Mask Use in Infants

      1:05
    • 45. Activating EMS for Infants

      1:09
    • 46. Choking in Infants

      0:54
    • 47. Relief of Choking in Infants

      2:27
    • 48. Skills: Adult 1 Person CPR

      1:35
    • 49. Skills: Adult Airway

      0:29
    • 50. Skills: Adult Choking

      0:40
    • 51. Skills: Infant CPR

      1:31
    • 52. Skills: Infant Airway

      0:21
    • 53. Skills: Infant Choking

      0:43
    • 54. Who is NHCPS?

      1:08

About This Class

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Knowing how to deliver Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), AED & First Aid is critical in responding to common emergencies. This course will prepare you to perform CPR, First Aid, and use an automated external defibrillator (AED) in accordance with the latest guidelines.

This course will cover how to provide care to simple and complex injuries, respond to common medical problems, perform high-quality CPR, basic airway management, and safety and prevention. Populations covered include infants, children, and adults.

The course package includes:

  • CPR, AED & First Aid Lectures and Video Presentations
  • CPR, AED & First Aid 2015-2020 Provider Handbook
  • CPR, AED & First Aid Knowledge Assessments and Review Questions
  • Optional FREE Certification: This course is for training in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), AED & First Aid. If you would like to be certified please visit https://nhcps.com/mooc-life-saving-course/.

If you want to stay up to date on my newest classes, be sure to click “Follow” below. I also share resources, and my followers are the first to hear about these opportunities!

Transcripts

1. First Aid: Chapter one first aid. Welcome to the lesson on first aid. In this video, we will learn about the basics of first aid, seen safety, hand washing and personal protective gear and the first aid kit. First aid refers to the emergency or immediate care you should provide when someone is injured or ill until full medical treatment is available. Now let's discuss the first date basics. The first step is to recognize the problem and call for help. Activate E. M. S by calling 911 The operator will ask you a series of questions to determine the seriousness of the illness or the injury. Remain on the line until more advanced help arrives, or until the operator instructs you to hang up. Emergency system dispatchers can guide you through the steps of delivering basic care, performing CPR or using an A E D until additional help arrives. Always know where the first aid kit is kept and be familiar with its contents. Know how to activate the emergency response systems and be aware of any policies within the workplace. Regarding medical emergencies. The best way to determine responsiveness is to tap their shoulder and shout. Are you okay. If the individual does not respond, then yell for help. Also look for medical identification ins, such as necklaces or bracelets, which may provide clues that caused the situation. Next, assess the scene for safety. Look for potential dangers. Removed the individual from any dangers of water. Present and be alert around automobile accidents. Hand washing is essential in prevention of disease and illness. Completely wet your hands and generously apply soap. Rub vigorously for at least 20 seconds and then rinse your hands with water. Dry your hands with a towel or air dryer. If a sink is not available, then use hand sanitizer as substitution. Awasthi. Individuals hand at the first opportunity and your own hands after each removal of gloves and or first day care. Personal protective gear is an important strategy to minimize the risk of blood or bodily fluid Exposure. Gloves, eye protection and a pocket mask should be utilized. Be cautious of latex allergies when taking off the gloves. Avoid touching the outer contaminated surface, slowly pulled one glove off while turning it inside out, placed the glove in the palm of the other gloved hand and then remove the second glove while turning it inside out. Now let's discuss the first aid kit. You can purchase a commercially available for state kit or make your own. Some of the common items found in a first aid kit are bandages, gauze, antiseptic wipes, sent swabs, burn ointment I shield and I Wash and First Aid Reference guide that includes local phone numbers. For a more detailed list, please refer to the manual. This concludes our lesson on first date. Next, we will review breathing problems. 2. Breathing Problems: welcome to the lesson on breathing problems. In this video, we will discuss causes and signs of breathing problems, as well as techniques for using on inhaler. Breathing problems can arise from underlying lung diseases such as asthma, emphysema or pneumonia. Other medical conditions, such as a heart attack, stroke, seizure or anxiety, can cause breathing problems as well. Signs of breathing problems include fast and shallow breathing, noisy breathing, inability to talk due to breathlessness and unusual sounds. Individuals with asthma often make a musical sound when breathing, which can be heard as wheezing. High pitch sounds during inhalation may suggest a partial blockage of the upper airway. Individuals who have asthma or chronic lung disease are generally familiar with how to use their breathing medications, such as inhalers. To help an individual use an inhaler first tapped the inhaler canister, then placed the opening of the inhaler into the spacer. If available next, instruct them to fully exhale, place the spacer or inhaler into their mouth simultaneously. Have them inhale slowly and deeply while pressing down on the top of the inhaler canister. Instruct the individual toe, hold their breath for up to 10 seconds. If possible. They should be prepared to repeat if respiratory problems persist, stay with the individual until the symptoms improve or until emergency response arrives. This concludes our lesson on breathing problems. Next, we will review allergic reactions. 3. Allergic Reactions: welcome to the lesson on allergic reactions. In this video, we will discuss causes and signs of allergic reactions, as well as instructions for using epinephrine pens. Allergic reactions can arise from insect stings from adverse reaction to foods and medications or from environmental triggers such as pollens, dust or chemical fumes. Common food triggers include nuts, eggs and fruit. Also be wasp or hornet. Stings can produce rapid and potentially fatal reactions. Symptoms may be mild, such as itching and hives, where they may be severe, causing life threatening swelling of the airway. Lips and tongue Anna histamines, such as Benadryl, are important and treatment of severe allergic reactions. In addition, epinephrine can be a life saving medication and should be given at the first sign of a severe allergic reaction. Epinephrine pens are simple to use. First form a fist around the pen and remove the safety release cap. Then place the orange end of the pen against the outer mid thigh, with or without clothing. Next, push down hard until the click is heard or felt, and hold the pen in place for 10 seconds. Remove the pen and massage the injection site for 10 seconds properly dispose of the used advice in a Sharps container. Be sure to note the time of the injection and seek medical care. Epinephrine will wear off and the individual receiving an injection should be evaluated at an appropriate medical facility. This concludes our lesson on allergic reactions. Next, we will review heart diseases. 4. Heart Diseases: welcome to the lesson on heart diseases. In this video, we will discuss causes and signs of heart attack and how to care For someone having a heart attack. Heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the United States. Your prompt actions can mean the difference between life and death during a heart attack, when blocked blood flow to the heart tissue results in muscle death. Chest discomfort can be described as a pressure. Squeezing or crushing. Women in diabetics are less likely to have classic signs of a heart attack. They may simply experience nausea or unexplained fatigue. Shortness of breath can be the only sign of impending heart attack. For some individuals, aspirin is the most important medication for an individual having a heart attack. In addition, when caring for someone who may be having a heart attack, follow these steps. Keep the individual and yourself calm. Have them sit or lie down. Activate the E. M. S by calling 911 Give 2 to 4 baby aspirins or half to a full adult aspirin tablet. Make sure the aspirin is not in trick coated. Be prepared to administer CPR. Heart attacks can become fatal quickly. Individuals with symptoms of a heart attack should be transported to the hospital via M s. Do not let someone suspected of having a heart attack drive themselves to the hospital, encourage them to wait until E. M s arrives. If they refuse than have someone else go with them to the hospital. This concludes our lesson on heart diseases. Next we will review fainting. 5. Fainting: welcome to the lesson on fainting. In this video, we will discuss causes and signs of fainting and how to care for fainting individuals. Fainting is a common reaction to a variety of conditions. Individuals may faint at the sight of blood or during periods of intense emotional stress. More serious conditions, such as an abnormal or erratic heart rhythm, can also cause fainting. Also, severely dehydrated individuals may faint when standing up. Suddenly, the body's reaction to the decreased blood flow to the brain causes the individual to pass out by lying down. Blood flow to the brain is improved for additional care. For a fainting individual, do the following. Ensure the safety of the scene. Help the individual lie down, elevate their legs if possible. If there is no rapid improvement or if the individual becomes unresponsive, call 911 on individual can also faint while seated in a chair. In this case helped them to the floor. Be aware of the potential injury if they have fallen. If they do not quickly regain consciousness immediately, call 911 Keep in mind that fainting can be caused from a wide range of problems, some of which can be life threatening. This concludes our lesson on fainting. Next, we will review low blood sugar in individuals with diabetes. 6. Low Blood Sugar: welcome to the lesson on low blood sugar in individuals with diabetes. In this video, we will discuss signs of low blood sugar and how to provide care for individuals with low blood sugar. Diabetes affects an individual's ability to regulate blood sugar. Fluctuations in blood sugar in either direction can produce symptoms such as agitation, confusion, loss of consciousness, excessive tiredness, weakness and even seizure like activity. Individuals with diabetes can experience low blood sugar due to illness, stress skipping meals or taking too much insulin to care For an individual who has low blood sugar, give them a sugar containing beverage, such as fruit juice, milk or a soft drink. Encourage them to sit or lie down. If they're symptoms, improve, encourage them to eat. Also, be sure to call 911 Glucose gel and tablets are available and a good way to quickly increase blood sugar. Alternatives to gels and tablets include packets of sugar, honey or jelly from restaurants, which may be readily available. Consider keeping any of thes in the first aid kit. If a Nin Div Egil with diabetes is unable to speak, were safely swallow. Call 911 This concludes our lesson on low blood sugar in individuals with diabetes. Next, we will review stroke 7. Stroke: Welcome to the lesson on stroke. In this video, we will discuss signs of stroke and steps to take to care for someone having a stroke. A stroke, sometimes called a brain attack, is a medical emergency caused by a blocked blood vessel or bleeding in the brain. Individuals experiencing a stroke will have noticeable neurological deficits. Such a slurred or unintelligible speech, facial droop, numbness, weakness on one side of the body. Difficulty walking or maintaining balance, loss of vision, severe headache and or loss of consciousness. Stroke is a neurological emergency, so time is critical. If you suspect someone having a stroke immediately, call 911 healthy individual. Sit or lie down, Retrieve and E. D. And of her state kit record the time that the neurological symptoms were noted and the last time the individual was free of symptoms. Be prepared to perform CPR if needed. This concludes our lesson on stroke. Next, we will review seizures 8. Seizures: Welcome to the lesson on seizures. In this video, we will discuss signs and causes of seizures as well as what to do when taking care of an individual experiencing seizure and steps to take after the seizure is over. Seizure. A sudden surge of electrical activity in the brain or seizure like activity is caused by epilepsy, low blood sugar, head injury or trauma. Heart disease, Ingestion of a toxin or heart related illness. Seizures result in abnormal body motion due to an irregular electrical discharge. In the brain. Seizures can involve one or both sides of the body. Many seizures result in rhythmic jerking motions, but some seizures may result in a blank stare type of behavior. An individual having a seizure may fall to the ground, bite their tongue and lose control of their bowel or bladder. Seizures are often accompanied by a brief period of unresponsiveness. When caring for an individual experiencing a seizure, help them to the ground. If needed, clear the area around them. To prevent injury, Place a small pillow or towel under their head and call 911 After the seizure is over, feel for the individuals pulse. Position them on their side to reduce the chance of choking on vomit. It is possible for them to throw up after a seizure, stay with the individual until help arrives. Do not attempt to restrain an individual having a seizure. Also, do not try to open their mouth or put anything between their teeth. Someone experiencing on absence or staring type seizure will have their eyes open but will not respond to you. Thes episodes are generally brief and not associated with jerking body motions or loss of consciousness. This type of event should be treated like any other seizure and be evaluated medically. This concludes our lesson on seizures. Next, we will review shock. 9. Shock: welcome to the lesson on shock. In this video, we will discuss causes, signs and symptoms of shock and how to take care of individual experiencing shock. Shock could be caused by overwhelming infection, blood loss, severe allergic reaction, severe die dehydration or heart problems. When blood flow is significantly reduced, the body does not receive an adequate supply of oxygen and shock occurs. Individuals experiencing shock may lose consciousness or failed to respond. Signs and symptoms of shock include poor skin color that is pale grey or blue ish, dizziness and lightheadedness, nausea or vomiting. Behavior change such as agitation, confusion or unresponsiveness and clammy skin. When you are to take care of someone suffering from a shock, you should first call 911 then help the individual lie down and elevate their legs. Cover them with blankets to keep them warm. Be prepared to perform CPR and stay with the individual until help arrives. This concludes our lesson on shock. Next, we will review controlling bleeding 10. Controlling Bleeding: welcome to the lesson on controlling bleeding. In this video, we will discuss various ways to control bleeding. Blood loss often gets the most attention from all of the traumatic injuries. Many times the amount of bleeding is overestimated and draws attention to wounds when more serious injuries should be dealt with First. Whenever you are confronted with bleeding, first, perform a quick overview of the individual to make sure something more serious is not being overlooked when caring for a bleeding individual. Always use personal protective equipment. The individual can be instructed to perform some self care while you put on your protective gear. Very small wounds. Such a scrapes can heal more rapidly by using an antibiotic south. Ask the individual if they have any allergies before applying the antibiotic south thoroughly wash minor scrapes and abrasions with soap and water before bandaging. The most effective way to stop bleeding from a wound is to apply. Direct pressure, use addressing and your gloved hand to apply. Firm and direct pressure toothy injured area. Continue holding the pressure until the bleeding stops. If there are multiple wounds, apply pressure dressings to the worst injuries first and then to the lesser bleeding injuries. The injured individual may be able to temporarily assist by holding pressure on some areas when direct pressure does not control bleeding. A tourniquet, maybe required. Understand that the application of a tourniquet It is painful but may be necessary to prevent life threatening blood loss. Tourniquet. Use is difficult and can be dangerous if done incorrectly. Always start with applying direct pressure first to apply a tourniquet. First, put on personal protective gear, then apply tourniquets approximately two inches above the wound. Tighten until the bleeding stops. Record the time the tourniquet was applied. Call 911 Stay with the individual and do not release the tourniquet until advanced. Help arrives and assumes care. Certain situations may produce massive internal bleeding that is not visible when examining the individual. This may occur from trauma falls from a height, car accidents or crush injuries. Penetrating injuries caused by a knife or gunshot may produce devastating internal bleeding with very little external blood loss. Any time you suspect these injuries immediately, call 911 and help the individual lie down and remain still. Check for signs and symptoms of shock. You may need to cover the individual to keep them more. Stay with them until advanced help arrives. This concludes our lesson on controlling bleeding. Next, we will review teeth injuries. 11. Teeth Injuries: welcome to the lesson on teeth injuries. In this video, we will discuss how to handle teeth injuries. Firstly, always use gloves when handling teeth. Sometimes teeth can be re implanted and should be transported with the individual to the dentist or to the medical facility. A tooth can be transported in milk. Saline solution were under a cooperative. Individuals tongue. Always handle teeth gently and avoid touching the roots. Gently wash the tooth with clean water, but never scrub it or its roots. If a tooth iss simply loose, have the individual bite down on a piece of gauze and call their dentist. Chipped or cracked teeth can be quite painful if blood is visible at the crack. Prompt dental care is required to prevent loss of the tooth. Injured teeth may later begin to turn color, which can be an injury to the nerve. This concludes our lesson on teeth injuries. Next, we will review nose bleeds 12. Nosebleeds: Welcome to the lesson on knows, pleads in this video. We will discuss how to handle nosebleeds. Nosebleeds can be quite dramatic and are often messy When attending to nosebleeds. Be sure to wear personal protective equipment and eye protection. Individuals with nosebleeds often swallow a fair amount of blood, which can result in vomiting. Therefore, you should prepare for the worst after ensuring that the scene is safe and protective equipment is on. Press both sides of the nostrils just below the bony portion of the nose for a minimum of 5 to 10 minutes. Make sure that the individual does not tilt their head backwards while holding during a nosebleed. If bleeding continues, try holding pressure for an additional 10 minutes. If bleeding still continues, seek further medical care. If the individual has trouble breathing or if they show signs of severe distress, then call 911 This concludes our lesson on nosebleeds. Next, we will review puncture and impaled objects 13. Punctures and Impaled Objects: welcome to the lesson on puncture and impaled objects. In this video, we will discuss how to handle cases of punk, shires and impaled objects. Puncture wounds and impaled objects pose special risks. Toothy, injured individuals. Puncture wounds may penetrate deeper than is apparent and injure sensitive structures such as nerves, muscles, tendons or blood vessels to control bleeding from puncture wounds. Applied direct pressure and seek further medical attention. Puncture wounds may carry germs deep within a wound and may result in serious infections. Therefore, any serious puncture wounds should be evaluated by a professional as soon as possible. Impaled objects must be left in place. It is important to understand that the object may pinch off a blood vessel, and removal of the object may result in massive blood loss from an injured blood vessel. Stabilize impaled objects with gauze and dressings and transport the individual to the emergency department. This concludes our lesson on punk, shires and impaled objects. Next we were review eye problems 14. Eye Problems: welcome to the lesson on eye problems. In this video, we will discuss causes and symptoms of eye injuries and how to handle them. Common eye injuries can result from direct blows, foreign bodies or inadvertent scratching of the eye. Symptoms of eye injuries include immediate pain, tearing, changing a vision and redness. Bruising and bleeding can also occur. Simple irritants such as dust or debris can be flushed using water. Any chemical exposure to the I should be flushed with copious amounts of water. Special equipment can be required to adequately irrigate the I, so you should seek professional care. If a more serious injury to the eye is suspected, call 911 Protect both eyes with a bandage or eye shield because the eyes work in pairs. Leaving one I uncovered causes both eyes to move. When the good I tracks objects, covering both eyes minimizes the movement of the injured I. However, doing so leaves the individual effectively blind, which can be dangerous and frightening. Never leave an individual with both eyes bandaged alone. They will require verbal cues and reassurance about their surroundings. Seek help from an eye care specialist to evaluate these injuries. This concludes our lesson on eye problems. Next, we will review head injuries 15. Head Injuries: welcome to the lesson on head injuries. In this video, we will discuss signs and symptoms of head and traumatic brain injury and learn how to handle them. Head injuries can accompany any traumatic event. Signs and symptoms of a head injury or a traumatic brain injury include confusion, headache, nausea and vomiting, memory loss, seizure, loss of balance and coordination and loss of consciousness. Any individual demonstrating any of these signs or symptoms should be evaluated by a physician. If you come across an individual suffering from a head injury, protect them from further injury by manually stabilizing the head and the neck and preparing them for transport to advanced medical care. Observed them closely for changes in condition. Be prepared to start CPR if the individual becomes unconscious. This concludes our lesson on head injuries. Next, we will review spine injuries. 16. Spine Injuries: Welcome to the lesson on spine injuries. In this video, we will discuss causes and increased risks of spine injuries. Spine injuries can occur from a fall car accident, sporting event or almost any other physical activity. Head injuries may accompany spine injuries. Ah high index of suspicion must be maintained and efforts must be made to protect against further injury to the spine and the spinal cord. Increased risk for spying injury include age of 65 years or older. Bicycle or motorcycle crash pain in middle of neck or back. Overlying the bony prominence is intoxication or substance abuse and numbness, tingling or weakness. Injuries to the spine can be unstable and unstable. Movement can result in spinal cord injury and permanent paralysis. When performing first aid in someone with a suspected spine injury, be sure to avoid bending, flexing or twisting their head or neck. If they begin to vomit, stabilize their head and neck by placing both hands on the side of the head and neck and assist them to their side. Maintained stabilization until advanced, help arise and call 911 as soon as possible. This concludes our lesson on spine injuries. Next, we will review the bone and joint injuries 17. Bone and Joint Injuries: welcome to the lesson on bone and joint injuries. In this video, we will discuss first aid, care for sprains and broken bones and special circumstances of bone and joint injuries. Bone and joint injuries are common occurrences in daily life. Physically active people are more likely to suffer these types of injuries. The elderly and the infirm are also at high risk for all full related sprains, strains and breaks to care for sprains and broken bones. First, ensure that the scene is safe and where personal protective equipment then apply gauze to any open wounds. Apply an ice pack to the injured area for up to 20 minutes, then have the injured individual be evaluated by a health care provider and avoid use of the injured part. Additionally, call 911. If there's an open wound over a joint abnormal position or bent extremity or obvious joint dislocation, please refer to the full CPR guide to learn more about caring for open or compound fracture , for using splint to protect uninjured extremity and for amputations. This concludes our lesson on bone and joint injuries. Next, we will review burns and electrical injuries 18. Burns and Electrical Injuries: Welcome to the lesson on burns and electrical injuries. In this video, we will discuss how to treat small and large burns. Burns can occur from direct contact with any hate source, electricity or certain chemicals. Burns can vary from minor superficial burns, two very deep burns that damage muscles, tendons, nerves and even bones. High voltage electrical injuries can produce devastating injuries and can be fatal. Any electrical injury requires an evaluation in the emergency department to treat small burns. First, ensure that the source of the burn has been dealt with and the scene is safe. Make sure toe wear personal protective equipment and get the first aid kit. Rinse the burn in cool or cold water. Apply antibiotic or burn cream. If no allergies exist, cover with a clean, dry, non sticking dressing. Lastly, had the individual follow up with a health care provider. Do not apply ice to a burn. It will result in a cold injury on top of a burn and cause further tissue damage. Call 911 if there's a large burn. If there are burns on face, hands or genitals. If individual is having difficulty breathing, if there's a fire or If there's a possibility of carbon monoxide exposure, the stop drop and roll technique is the best way to put a fire out. Also, you can smother the individual with a wet blanket to extinguish flames. Removed the blanket after the fire is out. To treat large burns. First, ensure that the scene is safe, then call 911 Put on personal protective equipment and get the first aid kit removed. The individuals, clothing and jewelry, if possible while you wait for advanced care, This concludes our lesson on burns and electrical injuries. Next, we will review bites and stings. 19. Bites and Stings: welcome to the lesson on bites and stings. In this video, we will discuss signs and symptoms of bites and how to care for specific cases of bites and stings. Insect bites and stings air a comin and an annoying occurrence. Most bites or minor, but the potential for a serious allergic reaction does exist. Signs and symptoms of a serious reaction consists of nausea or vomiting, severe pain at the site, abdominal pain, difficulty breathing, muscle rigidity, headache and decreased responsiveness. If any of these signs or symptoms occurs immediately, call 911 The Black Widow spider bite is known to cause severe abdominal pain that can mimic appendicitis and Children. Signs of a tick borne disease include fever, headache, joint pain and skin rash. To remove an attached tick, grasp it by the head with tweezers and pulled straight out. Clean the area with soap and water or an alcohol swab. If the tick bite occurred in a geographic area where tick borne disease occurs, seek medical treatment for possible prophylactic antibiotic therapy. Seek medical treatment for bull's eye rash produced by Lyme disease for bee stingers. Remove it by scraping it away. Awasthi area with cold water and apply ice. Stay with the individual for a least 30 minutes as some allergic reactions can be delayed in onset. A bite from an animal such as a raccoon bat, skunk, fox or kylie carries the highest risk of Rabies. Always make sure that the scene is safe when providing first aid to someone with an animal bite. Contact the emergency response system as an animal control officer may be able to capture the animal and determine the risk of Rabies. To care for the animals, bite clean the wound with soap and water and control bleeding by applying direct pressure. Animal bites are prone to infection and can cause further injury due to the puncture nature of the world. Seek medical care by a qualified health care professional for any bite that breaks the skin or if there is concern about Rabies or other infection. Snake bites also require medical attention. As the pain gets worse, swelling occurs. Bruising develops were systemic signs, nausea and vomiting developed in case of a snake bite. Call 911 immediately and do not delay medical attention. Make sure the scene is safe and the snake is no longer a threat. Keep the individual call and try to avoid moving the extremity that was bitten. Removed any constricting clothing and jewelry from the affected area. Gently wash the affected area with soap and water. If available. Do not apply a tourniquet. Additional care should be sought in a hospital setting. This concludes our lesson on bites and stings. Next, we will review temperature related illnesses. 20. Heat Related Illnesses: welcome to the lesson on heat related illnesses. In this video, we will discuss symptoms of heat related illnesses such as heat cramps, heat exhaustion, heat strokes and sunburns. Hate related illnesses can occur due to extremes of temperature, particularly in the elderly, and during vigorous exercise. He cramps result in painful muscle spasms of the extremities. The back and the stomach. Sweating and headache may accompany the cramps. Symptoms of heat cramps, usually resolved with resting, cooling off and drinking water or a sports drink. Light stretching and massage can also be helpful. Heat exhaustion is more serious than heat cramps. Signs of heat exhaustion consists of dizziness, vomiting, muscle cramps, fatigue, increased sweating and lightheadedness to care for someone dealing with heat exhaustion. Immediately move them to a cooler environment. Have them lie down and loosen or remove as much clothing as possible. Use cool water to spray them and fan them. If possible, encourage them to drink water or a sports drink. Remain with um until advanced help arrives. Heat strokes, on the other hand, are life threatening and require immediate action. Signs and symptoms of heatstroke consists of confusion, loss of consciousness, dizziness, muscle cramps, vomiting and seizures. If you think someone is having a heat stroke immediately, call 911 to care for someone with heat stroke. First assess seen safety where personal protective equipment and get the first aid kit and a e D. Then use a spray bottle filled with cold water and a fan to cool them. If the individual is able to do so, have them drink water or a sports drink. Continue to cool them until their behavior returns to normal or until advanced help arrives . This concludes our lesson on heat related illnesses. Next, we will review sunburns. 21. Sunburns: Welcome to the lesson on sunburns. In this video, we will discuss causes and symptoms of sunburns and how to care for sunburns. Sunburns air caused by exposure to the UV radiation from sunlight. Sunburns can be minor or result in blistering and sloughing of skin in case of sunburn. Have the individual avoid additional sun exposure, have them hydrate and drink extra fluids. Topical Talavera can provide symptomatic relief if they are not allergic. Ibuprofen can also help alleviate some discomfort. This concludes our lesson on sunburns. Next, we will review frost bites. 22. Frostbite: welcome to our lesson on frost bites. In this video, we will review causes symptoms and care for frost bites. Frost bites are result of exposure to cold and are most common in years, knows fingers and toes. Windchill increases the risk of frostbite. In severe cases, ice crystals form in the tissues and destroy cells, causing permanent damage. In case of frost bites, the skin appears waxy and white and yellow grey. The frost bite area is cold and numb and may feel like a block of wood. The frost bite tissue is firm and does not move or compress easily when squeezed. However, do not try to rub. Squeeze were slapped The affected extremity as this may increase tissue damage to care for frost bites. First, get the individual to a warm place, then call 911 Remove any constricting clothing and all jewelry from the affected body part . Remove all wet clothing as well. Redress them in dry, warm clothing and cover them with a heavy blanket. The frostbitten extremities should be quickly re warmed in hot water. 104 F, however, do not rewarm of frozen extremity. If there's a risk of re freezing. Seek further care from a health care professional. This concludes our lesson on frost bites. Next, we will review hypothermia. 23. Hypothermia: welcome to our lesson on hypothermia. In this video, we will review the signs and symptoms of hypothermia and how to take care of hypothermia cases. Hypothermia is a potentially life threatening condition when the body temperature falls dangerously low. Hypothermia can even develop in non freezing temperatures. Signs and symptoms consist of behavior change, confusion or lethargy. Paradoxical undressing, shivering stops as hypothermia worsens. Muscle stiffness, cold skin, decreased respiratory effort and progression, toe unresponsiveness and death to care. For someone with hypothermia, rapid action is required. Start by removing the individual from the cold and get them toe a warm environment. Remove any wet clothing and dry the individual. Redress them in dry, warm clothing and cover them with a blanket. Cover the head as it is a source of significant heat loss. Be prepared to perform CPR. Stay with the person until advanced help arrives. This concludes our lesson on hypothermia. Next, we will review toxin and poison exposure 24. Toxin and Poison: welcome to the lesson on toxin and poison exposure. In this lesson, we will discuss how to provide care for situations of toxin and poison exposure. The list of toxins and potential poison exposure is extensive and beyond the scope of this video in the C P R Handbook, a material safety data sheet, or M s DS, is required where chemicals are in use in business and institutions. The data sheet provides information about the composition of various chemicals and are useful when contacting poison control to provide first aid care for toxin and poison exposure. First call 911. Tell the dispatcher about the chemicals involved. Ensure seen safety and wear personal protective equipment. Get the first aid kit in the a E. D. Remove the individual from the toxin or poison and seek a well ventilated area possible. Remove saturated clothing it present. Follow any recommendations from the 911 dispatcher for the MSD a sheet. Stay with them until advanced. Help arrives. If CPR is required, Insure mask is used if possible. When treating any toxin and poison exposures, the eyes should be flushed with copious amounts of water. Acids and alkaline solutions are particularly caustic and can lead to permanent vision impairments or loss. This concludes our lesson on toxin and poison exposure. Next, we will review adult CPR. 25. Adult CPR: welcome to the lesson on adult CPR. In this video, we will go through the steps of adult CPR. CPR is comprised of chest compressions, airway management and rescue breathing. To deliver high quality CPR, begin with high quality chest compressions. Compressing the chest circulates blood to the brain and the heart chest. Compressions should be delivered at a rate between 100 to 120 beats per minute and depth of 2 to 2.4 inches. That is 5 to 6 centimeters. To provide CPR to any adult, the first thing to do is to make sure the seen and the area around the individual is safe, then tapped um and talk loudly, asking if they're okay, yell for help. Use a cell phone to call 911 and send a bystander to get an A e. D. Check the individuals breathing. If the individual is not responding, breathing or only gasping, start CPR. Give 30 compressions at a rate of 100 to 120 beats per minute, and at a depth between 2 to 2.4 inches. That is 5 to 6 centimeters. Let the chest rise back up before the next compression. Open the airway to give two breaths. This concludes our lesson on adult CPR. Next we will discuss compressions. 26. Compressions: welcome to the lesson on compressions. In this video, we will review the steps of giving chest compressions. Compressions should always be given at a rate of 100 to 120 beats per minute and at a depth of 2 to 2.4 inches. That IHS 5 to 6 centimeters. Compressing the chest slower than 100 beats per minute is less likely to provide enough circulation to the brain, heart and other vital organs. And compressing faster than 120 beats per minute doesn't provide enough time for the heart to fill between each compression, which reduces the output as well. Similarly, pressing the chest deeper than 2.4 inches, that is six centimeters increases the risk of injuring the individual, and not pressing deep enough will not squeeze the heart enough to provide adequate blood flow. CPR always begins with compressions and then breaths. Rescuers, who are uncomfortable performing mouth to mouth and do not have a mask, may perform hands only CPR and give compressions for high quality chest compressions. First position the individual on their back on a firm flat surface, then remove or open up clothing at the neck and chest area. Feel for the end of the breast bone or the sternum. Place the heel of one hand on the lower half of the breast bone. Avoid pressing down on the very end of the breast bone as the bony tip known also as the Seif oId process may break off and slash the liver, resulting in internal bleeding. Put the other hand on top of the first hand. Press straight down at a rate of 100 to 120 beats per minute and at a depth between 2 to 2.4 inches. That is 5 to 6 centimeters. Let the chest rise up completely between compressions. Your hands should remain in contact with the individual without bouncing or leaning on them . Proper CPR can be tiring. Asked to switch positions when tired if another rescuer is available to help, this concludes our lesson on compressions. Next, we will review giving breaths 27. Giving Breaths: Welcome to the lesson on giving breaths. In this video, we will review the steps of giving breaths. Giving breaths during CPR can help maintain a supply of oxygen in the lungs. Oxygen, in turn, is circulated to the brain and to the vital organs by chest compressions. The preferred method is to use a mask. However, mouth to mouth can also be performed. A correctly executed breath will cause the individuals chest to rise. To open the individuals airway first, put one hand on their forehead. Place your fingers on the bony part of their chin, then gently tilt the head back while lifting the chin. Next step is to give breaths. To do so, hold the individuals airway and pinch their nose shut. Then take a deep breath and seal your mouth around their mouth. Blow into their mouth for one second and watch their chest rise. Repeat with a second breath. If the chest doesn't rise, reposition the airway. Let their head go back to a normal position and then repeat the head tilt chin lift maneuver. Then give another breath and watch for the chest to rise. Performed chest compressions without interruptions. It should take no longer than 10 seconds to give two breaths. If the chest fails to rise within 10 seconds, begin chest compressions again. If the individual is suspected of trauma, the jaw thrust maneuver should be performed to open the airway instead of the head tilt chin lift maneuver to perform the jaw thrust maneuver. Placed the index and middle fingers to physically push the lower jaw upwards while the thumb is used to push down on the chin to open the mouth. This concludes our lesson on giving breaths. Next, we will review mask use. 28. Mask Use: welcome to the lesson on mask use. In this video, we will review the steps of using a mask. CPR, including giving breaths, is generally safe. If a mask is available, you should use it. The mask fits over the individuals, mouth and nose. Most masks have appointed end, which should go over the bridge of the nose to use a mask. To give breaths. First, place the mask over their mouth and nose, then open the airway by performing the head tilt chin lift maneuver. Ensure a good seal between the mask and the individual's face. Give a breath for over one second and watch the chest rise. Deliver the second breath. This concludes our lesson on mask use. Next, we will review E. D for adults. 29. AED for Adults: Welcome to the lesson on a E. D. For adults. In this video, we will discuss the steps of using an A E, D E D. Or automated external defibrillator is a portable unit that has a computer that analyzes the heart rhythm and determines if a shock is needed on a E. D can deliver a shock to help restart the heart. Starting CPR immediately and quickly using an A E D improves the chances of survival. The E. D is very simple to use. Just follow the diagram or voice instructions given by the E. D. It should be used any time someone collapses, fails to respond, and his only gasping were barely breathing. First, turned the power on. Expose the chest and apply pads on the chest. If they have a medication patch on their chest, remove it before applying the E D pads. If there's a bulge under the skin of their chest, a pacemaker may be present. Avoid placing the E. D over the pacemaker and adjust placement accordingly. Connect the pads, analyzed the rhythm, follow the prompts on the E. D. The prompts include shock advised, no shock advised and check connection. If you were giving a shock. Make sure no one is touching the individual. Resume CPR with compressions. If the A E d malfunctions or does not work, continue performing CPR until additional help arrives. If an E d is not quickly available, begin CPR and send someone to locate in a E. D. This concludes our lesson on E. D for adults. Next, we will discuss activating E. M s. 30. Activating EMS: Welcome to the lesson on activating E. M s. In this video, we will discuss the importance of calling 911 and what to do. Meanwhile, immediate activation of VMS or emergency medical services by dialing 911 or the appropriate emergency number is the first step in the chain of survival. Use a speaker equipped cell phone to activate TMS so you don't have to leave the individual who needs care in situations when a cell phone is not available, send the second rescuer worry bystander to call 911 so the ill or injured individual is not left alone in case there is no one around to help and you don't have access to a speaker equipped cellphone, then go call 911 and get one a e d. Yourself. Make sure the scene is safe when approaching, the individual tapped their shoulders and ask them that they are okay. If they do not respond or react, they are considered unresponsive. Yell for help and immediately call 911 Stay on the phone until the operator tells you it's okay to hang up. The operator can help you make decisions and will not delay the arrival of additional help . Check the individuals breathing if they're barely breathing or only gasping. Begin CPR if they are breathing normally but not responding. Role. Thumb onto their side. This can help keep their airway open and prevent them from choking on their own vomit. Monitor their breathing and be prepared to start CPR if the condition worsens. This concludes our lesson on activating E. M s. Next, we will review choking in adults. 31. Choking in Adults: welcome to the lesson on choking in adults. In this video, we will discuss choking in adults and signs of choking. To look for choking is a preventable cause of death that occurs when food or another object gets stuck in the throat. The airway gets blocked and immediate action is needed. A choking individual typically only has a few minutes before they pass out. The universal sign of choking is holding the neck with one or both hands. Refer to Table one in the CPR manual for details on degree of obstruction, signs of choking and actions you should take depending on the situation. This concludes our lesson on choking in adults. Next, we will review relief of choking. 32. Relief of Choking: welcome to the lesson on relief of choking. In this video, we will discuss the steps of the abdominal thrusts and chest thrusts, Abdominal thrusts or the Heimlich maneuver is used in adolescents and adults. To perform the Heimlich maneuver, stand behind the individual and wrap your arms around their waist under the rib cage. Then put your fist above their naval in the middle of the belly with your other hand. Hold the first fist and press forcefully into the abdomen and up toward their chest. Continue performing thrusts until the obstruction is relieved or until the individual becomes unresponsive. If they become unresponsive, then begin CPR. Very large individuals or pregnant women can be treated with chest thrusts. To perform chest thrusts. Wrap both arms around the individual as you would in the Heimlich maneuver, Then pull your arms straight back to deliver the chest thrusts. If the individual has passed out due to choking, help them to the ground and immediately begin CPR. If there's a bystander, send them to call 911 If there's no one around to help, then perform CPR for two minutes and then go get help yourself when opening the airway to give breaths during CPR. Check for the obstruction in the airway. If you see it and can easily remove it, then remove it with your fingers. If you can't see it or it cannot be removed, then continue CPR. This concludes our lesson on relief of choking. Next we will look at introduction to child CPR. 33. Child CPR: welcome to the introduction to child CPR. In this video, we will discuss what to do when giving CPR to a child that is one year to puberty. Children have breathing difficulties more often than they have actual heart problems. Therefore, it is important to begin CPR quickly and perform five sets of CPR before going to get additional help. One set of CPR consists of 30 compressions and two breaths. When giving CPR to a child, make sure the scene is safe. Tap the child shoulders and ask if they're OK and yell for help. Check their breathing. If the child is not responding and not breathing or only gasping, then give five sets of 30 compressions and two breaths. The term unresponsive were not responding. Includes any child who does not move, blink, speak, make a sound or otherwise react to your efforts to awaken them. This concludes our lesson on introduction to child CPR. Next, we will review the steps of chest compression in child CPR 34. Chest Compressions in Child CPR: welcome to chest compressions in child CPR. In this video, we will discuss the steps of how to do chest compressions in Children. The steps of CPR in Children are similar to those in adults. The main goals are early administration of CPR and pushing hard and fast on the chest and giving breaths. Children who appear adult sized can be treated as adults for the purpose of CPR as a rescuer. If you were untrained in CPR, then give the hands only CPR. The hands only CPR is when you give continuous compressions, but no breaths to do CPR on a child. First position them on their back on a firm hard surface. Move any clothing away from the chest. Place the heel of one hand on the lower half of the breast bone. Push straight down approximately at least 1/3 the depth of the chest. In most Children, this is about two inches. That is five centimeters. Compressions should be delivered at a rate of 100 to 120 beats per minute. Let the chest recoil to its normal position after every compression. Either one or two handed compressions can be used in child CPR. performing CPR can be tiring if someone else is available to help change roles every two minutes and work to minimize the pause in between compressions. This concludes our lesson on chest compressions and child CPR. Next, we will review the steps of giving breaths in child CPR. 35. Giving Breaths in CPR: welcome to giving breaths and child CPR. In this video, we will discuss the steps of how to give breaths in Children. Most Children who need CPR have had a breathing problem that caused the heart to beat irregularly or to stop beating altogether. Signs of ineffective breathing include slow breathing, very shallow or sporadic breathing and absence of any breaths altogether. Give rescue breast to Children who appear to be struggling to breathe. A good breath will cause the child's just to rise before actually giving breaths. First opened the child's airway by putting one hand on their forehead and placing your fingers on the bony part of their chin. Then gently tilt the head back while lifting the chin. Now you're ready to deliver breaths. First, hold the child's airway open as described previously, and pinch the nose shut. Take a deep breath and seal your mouth around the child's mouth. Gently exhale into their mouth for one second, using enough force to cause the chest to rise. Repeat for a second breath. This concludes our lesson on giving breaths in child CPR. Next, we will review mask use and Children 36. Mask Use in Children: welcome to mask use in Children. In this video, we will discuss the steps of mask use in Children. Giving breaths in CPR is generally safe. However, if a mask is available, it should be used. The mask fits over the child's mouth and nose. Many masks have appointed end, which should go over the bridge of the nose. Make sure the mask fits properly. If it's too large, a proper seal cannot be obtained, and efforts to deliver breasts will be ineffective. To give breaths using a mask. First place the mask over the child's mouth and nose, then open the airway by performing the head tilt chin lift maneuver. Ensure a good seal between the mask and the face. Give a breath for more than one second and watch the chest rise. Deliver the second breath. This concludes our lesson on mask use in Children. Next, we will review E. D for Children 37. AED for Children: Welcome to the lesson on E. D for Children. In this video, we will discuss a D use in Children and go over step by step directions to use it on a E D can deliver a pediatric shock to restart the heart. The steps for using an A, E. D and Children are the same as those in adults. Always check the E. D when it arrives on the scene. If the child is younger than eight years, then use pediatric pads. If pediatric pads air not available standard that is, adult pads may be used. If you were using standard pads, make sure that the pads do not overlap each other. If needed. Put one of the pads on the child's back. Some A e DS have a switch that can be set to deliver a pediatric shock if available. Turn this switch on when using a E. D for Children younger than eight years. If the e. D cannot deliver a pediatric shock on adult shock should be given to use an A e. D on a child. First turned the power on, exposed the child's chest, then apply the pads. Ensure that the pads do not touch, connect the pads to the e d. Clear the child and analyzed the rhythm. Follow the prompts on the e. D. If the E. D prompts for shock delivery, then clear the child again impressed the shock button. Once the E. D has charged aftershock delivery, resume CPR, starting with chest compressions. If there is no shock to be delivered, then resume CPR, starting with chest compressions. This concludes our lesson on E. D for Children. Next, we will review activating AMs for Children. 38. Activating EMS for Children: welcome to the lesson on activating M s or emergency medical services for Children. In this video, we will discuss the steps to call 911 when attending to ill or injured Children. Always make sure that the scene is safe. When approaching a child, tap the child shoulders and asked them if they are OK. If they don't respond, they're considered unresponsive. Immediately yell for help and send somebody to call 911 and get in a e d. If you witnessed the child's arrest, are alone and must leave the child to activate. 911 You should call 911 and get an A e d before beginning CPR. If you didn't witness the child's arrest first give five sets of compressions and breaths before leaving the child. After determining that the child is unresponsive, check their breathing. If they are barely breathing or only gasping. Begin CPR gasping, maybe forceful or weak, but it is generally ineffective. This is abnormal and often occurs during cardiac arrest. This concludes our lesson on activating M s for Children. Next, we will review choking in Children 39. Choking in Children: welcome to the lesson on choking and Children. In this video, we will discuss choking in Children and signs of choking that you should look for choking can be mild or severe. If the child can make sounds and cough, the airway is mildly blocked in this case, stand near them and encourage them to cough. Call 911 if you are worried about their breathing. Severe signs of blockage include the inability to breathe coughing without making a sound inability to speak or the universal choking sign of holding the neck with one or both hands . Refer to Table two in the CPR manual for details on degrees of obstruction, signs of choking and actions you should take to help Children in choking situations. This concludes our lesson on choking and Children. Next, we will review relief of choking in Children. 40. Relief of Choking in Children: welcome to the lesson on relief of choking in Children. In this video, we will discuss the steps of the Heimlich maneuver to relieve a child who is choking. First asked them if they are choking and tell them that you will help stand behind the child and wrap your arms around their body right below the rib cage. Make a fist with one hand and place it just above the navel. Grab the fist with your other hand and deliver quick upward thrusts. Continue performing thrusts until the obstruction comes out and breathing is possible. Coughing or speaking is restored or until the child stops responding. Watch and feel for breathing to begin. If the child does not respond or begin breathing the lay them down and yell for help. Begin CPR and continue it until additional help arrives. After 30 compressions, open the airway and look for a foreign object. If you can see a foreign object in the child's mouth and can easily remove it, then do so avoid blindly sweeping the mouth with a finger as it may push the object deeper into the airway. Continue CPR until the child recovers more until more advanced help arrives. Large Children may require chest thrusts if you cannot wrap your arms fully around their waist. In this case, performed the Heimlich maneuver with your fist on the breastbone. Any child who has had a severe choking event should see a health care professional. This concludes our lesson on relief of choking for Children. Next we will look at introduction to infant CPR. 41. Introduction to Infant CPR: welcome to the introduction to infant CPR. In this video, we will discuss what to do when giving CPR to an infant that is 0 to 12 months of age. CPR for infants is almost identical to CPR. For Children, infants more often have a breathing problem than an actual heart problem. It is important to begin CPR immediately and perform five sets of CPR before going to get additional help. One set of CPR consists of 30 compressions and two breaths. If the infant is unresponsive and not breathing, were only gasping for air. Performed CPR on infant that does nothing when you tap or talk loudly is considered unresponsive. In the case of unresponsiveness, CPR needs to be performed when giving CPR to a Ninfa int. Make sure the scene is safe. Tap the infant shoulder to determine if there unresponsive yell for help. If the second rescuer is available to help, have them call 911 and get an A e. D. When the second rescuer returns, have them followed the E. D props, apply the E. D pads and help with CPR. Check the infants breathing if not responding and not breathing or only gasping then give five sets of 30 compressions and two breaths. Call 911 If the second rescuer has not already done so, resume CPR and give compressions and breaths. This concludes our lesson on introduction to infant CPR. Next, we will review the steps of chest compressions in infant CPR. 42. Chest Compressions in Infant CPR: welcome to the lesson on chest compressions in infant CPR. In this video, we will discuss the steps of how to do chest compressions in infants. CPR for infants is almost identical to CPR for Children, making steps for compressions just as similar in infants. Push hard and fast as you would in a child or adult receiving CPR. Position the infant on a firm hard surface to make giving CPR easier, then move any clothing away from the chest. Place two fingers of one hand on the breastbone right below the nipple line. Push straight down approximately 1.5 inches. That is four centimeters at a rate of 100 to 120 beats per minute. Let the chest recoil to its normal position after every compression. Performing compressions correctly is essential and can be physically tiring if someone else can help switch off every two minutes while minimizing interruptions during compressions. This concludes our lesson on chest compressions and infant CPR. Next, we will review the steps of giving breaths in infant CPR 43. Giving Breaths in Infant CPR: welcome to giving breaths and infant CPR. In this video, we will discuss the steps of how to give breaths to infants like Children. Many cases of cardiac arrest and infants are primarily due to respiratory problems. Giving breaths and administering chest compressions are important for infants receiving CPR . A good breath will cause the chest to rise. To give breaths. First, open the infants airway by putting one hand on their forehead and placing your fingers on the bony part of their chin, then gently tilt their head back to a neutral position while lifting the chin. Be careful not to tilt the head too far back. As this can block the airway. Be sure to press on the bony part of the chin and not the soft part under the chin as pressing on the soft part may also block the airway. To give a breath, hold the airway open, take a deep breath and seal your mouth around the infants mouth and nose. Blow for one second and watch the chest rise. Very little volume or force is required to inflate, and infants Luns blowing too much or too hard will damage the infants, loves Onley, a gentle. Exhale for a tiny puff of air is required for an infant. Repeat for a second breath if unable to cover both mouth and those entirely with your mouth used following method for rescue breathing, open the airway using the head tilt chin lift maneuver. Pinch the infants knows closed. Create a seal using your lips to surround the infants mouth. If the chest does not rise after the first breath, let the head go back to normal position and then re open the airway by tilting head and lifting the chin. Try to get a breath in while watching for chest rise. Do not interrupt compressions for any more than 10 seconds. While giving breaths, this'll concludes our lesson on giving breaths in infant CPR. Next, we will review mask use in infants. 44. Mask Use in Infants: welcome to mask use in infants. In this video, we will discuss the steps of mask use in infants. Giving breaths and CPR is generally safe. However, if a mask is available, you should use it. The mask fits over the infants, mouth and nose. Many masks have appointed end, which should go over, the infants knows. Make sure the mask fits properly. If it is too large, a proper seal cannot be obtained, and your efforts to deliver breaths will be ineffective. To give breaths using a mask first place the mask over the infants mouth and nose, then open the airway by performing the head tilt chin lift maneuver. Ensure a good seal between the mask and the face. Give a breath for more than one second and watch the chest rise. This concludes our lesson on mask use in infants. Next, we will review activating E. M s for infants. 45. Activating EMS for Infants: welcome to the lesson on activating AMS or emergency medical services for infants. In this video, we will discuss the steps to call 911 when attending to ill or injured infants. Always make sure that the scene is safe. When approaching an infant, tap the infant shoulders and asked them if they are OK. If they don't respond or react, they're considered unresponsive on unresponsive infant will not move when you touch them. They will not cry or make any sounds, and their body will be live. Yell for help and call 911 using a cell phone. If a cell phone is not available, send someone else to call 911 if possible. If you are alone, begin five cycles of CPR. That is about two minutes of CPR before calling 911. This concludes our lesson on activating AMs for infants. Next, we will review choking in infants. Welcome to the lesson on choking in in 46. Choking in Infants: welcome to the lesson on choking in infants. In this video, we will discuss choking in infants and signs of choking that you should look for choking occurs when food or a foreign object is stuck in the throat and blocks the airway. Infants often put small objects in their mouth and are at an increased risk of choking. Severe choking requires quick action. Immediately perform backslaps and chest thrusts. Refer to Table three in the CPR manual for details on degrees of obstructions, signs of choking and action she should take to help infants in choking situations. This concludes our lesson on choking in infants. Next, we will review relief of choking in infants. 47. Relief of Choking in Infants: welcome to the lesson on relief of choking in infants. In this video, we will discuss the steps of backslaps and chest thrusts to relieve a choking infant. First, hold them in your lap, put the infant face down and the head lower than the chest. The infant should be resting on your forearm. Put your forearm on your thigh. Support the infants head and neck with your hand. And be sure to avoid putting pressure on the throat. Give five back slaps between the infant shoulder blades with the heel of your hand. Using both hands and arms, Turn the infant face up so they are now resting on your other arm, which should now be resting on your thigh, using two fingers in the same spot. As for CPR, provide five quick chest thrusts. If the obstruction is not relieved, turn the infant face down on your other forearm and repeat the process. Continue until the infant begins to breathe or becomes unresponsive. Try to keep the infants head lower than the body when performing backslaps and chest trusts . If you can see a foreign object in the infants mouth and can easily remove it, then do so avoid blindly sweeping the mouth with a finger as it may push a foreign object deeper into the airway, watch and feel for breathing to begin. If the infant stops responding, position them on a firm flat surface and yell for help. Check for breathing and begin CPR. After 30 compressions, open the airway and look for a foreign object. If visible, remove it an attempt to ventilate with two breaths. If the infant does not respond or begin breathing, then continue to provide CPR until additional help arrives. You will know when infant has become unresponsive, as they will stop moving and squirming in your arms and the body will become limp. In this case, begin CPR immediately with chest compressions, followed by giving breaths. This concludes our lesson on relief of choking in infants. 48. Skills: Adult 1 Person CPR: If the scene is safe, approached the victim and assess their responsiveness. Send another person to call 911 and gain 80 of possible. If the victim is not breathing or only gasping. Begin CPR, starting with compressions. Perform 30 compressions at a rate of 100 to 120 compressions per minute at a depth of at least 1/3 the chest. For adults, this is at least two inches. Open the airway and deliver to breath, each lasting one second and watch for chest rise. Resume compressions is important to minimize interruptions and chest compressions to 10 seconds when the A. D is brought to seen. Begin by turning the device on. Remove any clothing from the victim and apply the 80 pads, one below the right collarbone and the other to the side of the left nipple below the armpit. Plug in the connector and clear the victim, while the A D analyzes the rhythm. If no shock is advice, resume CPR, beginning with chest compressions. If a shock is advice, clear the victim again before delivering the shock. Once a D has charged Hit the shock bud. After delivering the shock resume, CPR beginning with 30 chest compressions. Open the airway and deliver two breaths. Continue. At this rate, you have 30 compressions to two brust until the 80 prompts you to stop or further help arrives. 49. Skills: Adult Airway: After performing compressions, you can perform the head tilt chin lift maneuver. Place one hand on the victim's forehead and the other on the chin. Tilt the head back and deliver to breath. Make sure to wash for chest arise. 50. Skills: Adult Choking: let the choking victim no, you're going to help them wrap your arms around the victim and make a fist with one hand in place above the navel in the middle of the belly. Hold the fist with your other hand. Impress forcefully into the person's abdomen, end up toward the chest. Continue performing a Donal thrust until the obstruction is removed or the victim becomes unconscious over the victim becomes unconscious, lower them to the ground and begin CPR. 51. Skills: Infant CPR: If the scene is safe, approached the victim and assess their responsiveness. Send another person to call 911 and get in a D if possible. If the in vote is not breathing or only gasping, begin CPR, starting with compressions. Perform 30 compressions at array of 100 to 120 compressions per minute at a depth of at least 1/3 the chest. When the A. D is brought to seen, begin by turning the device on. Remove any clothing from the victim and apply the A D pads, one on the front of the infants chest and one on the infants back. Plug in the connector and clear the victim, while the A D analyzes the rhythm. If no shock is advised, resume CPR, beginning with chest compressions. If a shock is advised, clear the victim again before delivering the shock. Once the A G has charged, hit the shock button. After delivering the shock, resume CPR, beginning with 30 trust compressions. Open the airway and deliver two breaths, each lasting one second. Watch for chest rise. Begin again with 30 chest compressions and continue at this ratio of 30 compressions to two breaths until the E D prompts you to stop or further help arrives 52. Skills: Infant Airway: place one hand on the infant's forehead and the other on the chin. Tilt the head back to a neutral position and deliver two breaths. 53. Skills: Infant Choking: If in India is conscious but choking. Deliver five chest thrusts using the two finger technique. Addressing the infant against your forearm and thigh. Turn the infant over and deliver five back slaps. Continue alternating five. Chest thrusts in five backs. Lasts until the airway obstruction has been removed. Make sure to support the infant's head and neck when delivering the chest. Thrusts in backs. Laughs. If the infant becomes unconscious at any time, begin CPR. 54. Who is NHCPS?: Welcome to National Health care provider Solutions, the most trusted name in online medical certification. Today, our certification courses can be accessed 100% online and completed from any device designed by board certified physicians. Adhering to the latest H A standards, you can now join thousands of health care providers around the world who have received certifications completely online in less than an hour. Our A, C. L s, BLS and Pals courses are eligible for A M, a Category one credits and our CPR courses eligible for a. M. A Category two CMI partnered with the Save A Life Initiative. We seek to empower others to save lives by providing advanced healthcare education. Here's how enroll in the course you need. Review the online handbooks, watch the skills videos and passed the exam. Your digital provider card is instantly available, and your physical card will be mailed to you. Choose the certification you need and get started today and HCPs the Save a Life Initiative and you together. Let's save lives