Bread Baking 102: Master Sandwich Breads, Ciabatta & Bagels | Shubranshu Bhandoh | Skillshare

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Bread Baking 102: Master Sandwich Breads, Ciabatta & Bagels

teacher avatar Shubranshu Bhandoh, Baker/Pastry Chef - Le Cordon Bleu

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

25 Lessons (2h 43m)
    • 1. Introduction to the Class

      2:45
    • 2. Class Project

      1:05
    • 3. Tips to Improve Bread Baking

      3:15
    • 4. Tools Required for the Class

      5:24
    • 5. Bagel: Dough Percentage and Dough Temperature

      7:15
    • 6. Bagel: Understanding Ingredients and Making the Dough

      7:02
    • 7. Bagel: Preshape and Final Shape

      10:18
    • 8. Bagels: Proofing the Bagels

      3:08
    • 9. Bagels: Baking the Bagels

      6:43
    • 10. Bagel: Cream Cheese and Salmon Sandwich

      3:03
    • 11. Japanese Milk Bread- Understanding Ingredients and MakingTangzhong

      5:03
    • 12. Japanese Milk Bread- Mixing and Developing the Dough

      7:14
    • 13. Japanese Milk Bread- Shaping, Proofing and Baking

      10:54
    • 14. Japanese Milk Bread- Japanese Egg Sandwich

      11:11
    • 15. French Brioche- Making the Poolish

      6:01
    • 16. French Brioche- Mixing the Dough

      7:36
    • 17. French Brioche- Shaping, Proofing and Baking the Loaf

      8:57
    • 18. French Brioche- My Favourite French Toast

      7:10
    • 19. French Brioche- Dinner Roll and Ham and Cheese Sandwich

      9:36
    • 20. Ciabatta - Understanding Dough Percentages

      3:47
    • 21. Ciabatta- Making the Dough

      11:41
    • 22. Ciabatta: Shape and Bake

      13:32
    • 23. Mozzerella Sandwich

      5:15
    • 24. Q & A- Common Mistakes and Solutions

      4:34
    • 25. Thank you

      0:30
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About This Class

Behind Every Delicious Sandwich Bread there is a Freshly Baked Homemade Bread. This Class aims to guide you through complete steps and techniques to make Artisan Sandwich Breads and Sandwiches at Home

It combines simple ingredients through techniques and precision and enables us to make something really beautiful for the ones we love. The satisfaction of making beautiful breads is so satisfying.This course is designed for you to learn and understand concepts like dough temperature, dough percentage, role of yeast, fermentation process etc and apply them to take your skills to the next level.

This course covers the essential techniques used in Sandwich Breads and also covers how to make Sandwiches with these Breads

This is a Course suitable for students just starting out in their baking adventure or have experience and want to improve their Bread Baking skills. In this course I have put together all aspects and steps in baking a New York Style Bagel,

We will be making all the recipes from scratch and we will follow the step by step directions of the whole process together. I will also explain everything about the ingredients we are using.

The course will help everyone from complete BEGINNERs who have never baked before to PROFESSIONALS who bake in professional bakeries.

The course will also make an amazing gift to your friend or a family relative who are aspiring bakers and want to pursue to become professionals or just want to have fun baking

Some skills you will learn:

  1. Understand the Tools required in Baking Bread

  2. Understanding Ingredients and their role in Bread Baking

  3. Essential Concepts to Build a Strong Foundation such as Dough Temperature, Fermentation etc

  4. Techniques used in Making Different Breads

  5. How to Measure Ingredients and prepare before Baking

  6. How to Make A New York Style Bagel and Salmon and Cream Cheese Sandwich

  7. How to Make Japanese Milk Bread

  8. How to Make French Brioche

  9. How to Make An Italian Ciabatta

  10. Master Concepts such as Folding,Shaping,proofing and Baking

Who this course is for:

  • "Bread Baking 102- Master Sandwich Breads" is a Class is for people passionate about Baking Bread

  • Beginners who havent baked before but aspire to learn how to bake at home

  • Seasoned Bakers who want to improve their skill

  • This Course makes an excellent gift as well for your friends

Meet Your Teacher

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Shubranshu Bhandoh

Baker/Pastry Chef - Le Cordon Bleu

Top Teacher

 

 Shubranshu loves teaching and mentoring aspiring bakers and pastry  chefs. He is a Professional Baker and Trained Chef from the prestigious Le Cordon Bleu in Sydney, Australia.                                                       

With over 7 years of Baking and Pastry experience working in some of the best 3 hatted fine dining restaurants as a Baker/Pastry Chef in Sydney. He has also trained and mentored bakers/pastry chefs in some of the best bakeries and restaurants during this journey                                    ... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction to the Class: Behind every delicious sandwich, there is a freshly baked homemade bread. This class aims to guide you through complete steps and techniques to make artisan sandwich bread and sandwiches at home. Hi, my name is [inaudible], and I'm a professionally trained baker and chef from [inaudible]. I started my bread baking journey more than 10 years ago. I want to share my experiences and knowledge with you in this class. The first recipe we learned how to make New York Style Bagels. Bagels are definitely a little tricky to make at home, but this class will cover all the steps in developing the dough, shaping techniques, proofing, and baking the bagels. We will also learn how to make a delicious Salmon and Cream Cheese Sandwich. The second recipe, we will make a light and airy Japanese milk bread. This bread uses the traditional Tangzhong method to make the dough and is extremely soft and my favorite to make sandwiches with. After mastering this recipe, we will learn how to make a Japanese egg sandwich, with a creamy and delicious egg filling. The third recipe, we make a classic French brioche, richen butter and eggs. This will be the most indulgent bread you've ever made. I will explain in detail how to develop a smooth dough and how to shape, proof, and bake a beautiful loaf. We will also learn how to make a French toast and ham and cheese sandwich with this loaf. Final recipe, we learned how to make an artisan Italian bread called the ciabatta. This bread is super high in hydration. I'll be showing you and explaining you some advanced techniques to develop the dough as well as shape and bake the bread with steam in the oven. After we make this beautiful bread, we will learn how to make one of my favorite sandwiches, which is [inaudible] and basal sandwich. This class also comes with detailed recipe notes. You can master the recipes easily at home. After you bake this sandwich bread and sandwiches from them, you won't be buying it from a bakery again. I can't wait to get started, let's begin with this class. 2. Class Project : Thank you so much for enrolling in this course. Before we begin please feel free to download the Resource Book, as all the resources and recipes are in there. To download the recipe book, just go on Projects and Resources, and then click on this link here, so when you click on this link, you should be able to get the PDF file downloading. I like to do this before I start this class so that I have all the notes and all the recipes with me. After it's downloaded, just open it and you'll see all the recipes here [NOISE] along with the class notes. [NOISE] Perfect. The class project for this class will be able to share any one picture of the recipes highlighted in the class. If you want to make a bagel or a ciabatta, anything, just share a picture with me so I can help you out and I can also critique it. If you have any questions, feel free to ask me as well. Let's begin with the lesson. 3. Tips to Improve Bread Baking: In this lesson, I'm going to be sharing with you some tips, as well as some common mistakes I see my students making so that you don't make them and you can improve your bread baking skills. The first one is to always use a scale. I cannot emphasize this enough. Baking is such a precise art, especially when you bake bread. Everything has to be precisely weighed out. Even in bakeries, when we're making bulk breads, everything has to be really precise. If you want to get really consistent results, make sure to get a scale and measure everything really accurately. The second one is to not use a lot of flour when you're shaping the dough and handling the dough. When you're baking bread, what happens is if we use a lot of flour on our workbench, the flower gets absorbed by the dough, and then that leads to really dense bread and it doesn't taste nice. Try to use as minimal flour as possible. The third one is to not open the oven door when you're baking the bread. I see a lot of students get super excited when the bread is rising in the oven and they open the oven door to check on the bread. Don't do that because a lot of heat escapes in our home ovens because they're really small as well as the bread tends to deflate a little bit. You want the bread to rise so give it time in the oven and be really patient with the bread. The next one is that always measure the dough temperature and always keep it in a range between 25 to 27 degrees. Dough temperature is super important to get consistent results and in professional bakeries, as well, we always measure the dough temperature at every stage of dough development. Get in this habit and measure the dough temperature when you make the bread. I'll be showing you how to calculate the dough temperature when we make the bagel dough but just keep that in mind. The next one is probably the most important one, that always maintain a diary with all your baking results as well as what went wrong or what went right just to keep a record of everything so you can keep improving. I, till date, actually maintain a diary for myself just to keep improving myself as a baker as well. I would definitely advise you to do that because it'll really help you improve. Last one is to use steam in the oven when you make the bread. If you want really professional products, you have to use steam in the oven. What steam does is that it prevents the crust from setting and it helps the bread to rise just a little bit more. In professional ovens, we have steam injection, which is already installed in the oven but in our home ovens, we don't have that. There are a few ways you can generate steam. One is to put a cast iron pan and put ice on it when you load the bread. The second one is to just spray water in your oven. I'll show this to you when we make the Shea butter dough. Make sure to create steam in the oven when you make the bread. I hope all these steps and techniques help you improve your bread baking skills. 4. Tools Required for the Class: In this lesson, we'll just go through some of the tools which are really useful as a baker and which will really help you throughout this class to make these recipes. Let's have a look at them. The first one and the most important one is a dough scraper and a dough knife. This is like an extension of the bakers hand and we use this the most as a baker. This one is really good if you want to scrape dough out of a bowl and this one is good if you want to portion the dough out because this is quite sharp and it cuts it very neatly. I use both of these really often and we'll be using this a lot in the class as well. Definitely get both of these. The next one is a thermometer. This is super important, just to check the temperature of the dough and just to maintain a good temperature. Also, really important, if you're making caramel or any type of sauces in which temperature is important, so definitely get a thermometer. In professional bakeries, we always keep using it at every stage of the dough development. If you mix the dough, we check it, if you're proofing it, we check the temperature. This is one of the most useful tools in a baker's kit. The next one is a chef's knife and bread knife. These two are super important because this is really useful if you want to just cut anything, any fruits or nuts or chocolate. The bread knife is surely really important if you want to slice bread because you can cut the bread really neatly because it has serrated edges. But be very careful when you use this knife because it's really sharp. Next one is a palette knife. A palette knife is nice if you just want to spread something. If you have a filling, if you are making cinnamon buns or chocolate babka, you can just spread the filling through the palette knife. It's really nice for that. The next one is a rolling pin. This is really useful if you're stretching the dough out, if you're making laminated pastry or if you're just stretching the dough out to shape the dough, which we do in the Japanese bread. This is also really useful. The next one is a silicone spatula. I really like using this over others spatulas just because this is heat resistant and also it prevents wastage because you can scrape everything out from a bowl. It's really nice like that and really nice if you want to make caramel or any pastry cream because it'll just scrape off everything. The next one is a blade. I just like to use a skewer. Just put it like that and it becomes a lame. If you want to score bread, this is quite useful because sometimes I see people doing it with a paring knife but you don't get that opening. But when you do it with this skewer, it's quite nice. This is just a shaving blade. It's fairly cheap. You can get this anywhere. This is really nice if you want to score breads. Next one, which we'll use a lot in this class, is this baking tin. If you see this baking tin, it's slightly different than the normal bread tin because it's more deeper. This is very nice because what happens is that the bread is quite large in size. It bakes quite deeper and it rises as well. It's really nice to make sandwiches when you make breads in this. This is about 22 centimeters. I'll put the link of this in our resource book so you can have a look at that. The final one is a baking paper. This is just some nice baking paper because I can actually compost it. But you can get any baking paper as long as it has a coating on top of it so that nothing sticks on it when you bake it. This is also really useful because you can bake anything on top of it and it prevents the bottom from burning as well. The next set of tools we'll be using when we bake the dough. I like using a baking steel. What I do is I just put it in the oven and I preheat it. It just recreates a deck oven because it traps a lot of heat and then it just, basically, transmit it to the bread and it rises really well. If you can't get this, you can also get a baking stone. Super-useful when we're making bagels as well as shea butter or any other bread which has to get direct heat from the oven. The next one is a tray and a cooling rack. If you don't have a baking stone or baking steel, you can also use a tray. Just put it and let it preheat and get really hot when you load the bread on it. It will not work the same way exactly, but it will also work well. The most important one is a cooling rack. This is super essential so that when you bake the bread, when it cools down, all the moisture can evaporate from the bottom of the bread so it doesn't get soggy and it becomes really light and nice. These three tools, I would say, are really important when you're baking the bread. 5. Bagel: Dough Percentage and Dough Temperature: [MUSIC] Welcome to the first recipe of our lesson. In this lesson, we're going to be learning how to make bagels, and as well as a salmon and cream cheese sandwich. The only things you need to be careful about when you make the bagels, is that you don't over-proof the dough, because sometimes when we over-proof the dough, it just tends to deflate in the oven. Also do not over-poach the dough as well. Sometimes people say poach it one minute, but don't do that, poach it for 15,20 seconds on each side. The third one is that when you bake it in the oven, make sure the oven is super hot so that it rises really well. Let's begin with our recipe. In this lesson, I'm going to run you through one of the most important concepts which we need to learn as a baker, which is dough percentages. I'm going to discuss the dough percentages of a bagel dough because that is what we're going to make next. Why do we need to learn this? It makes it really easy to develop recipes and also make different bread recipes when you know the percentages of the dough. Let's understand this concept. Whenever as a baker we think of percentages, the flour is always 100 percent. All the ingredients are calculated based on the flour. In our recipe, the flour is about 450 grams. Now, this recipe makes six bagels. If I say, for example, when I double it, I can just double this and then calculate everything accordingly. That's why it makes it super easy when we understand this concept. The hydration in this dough is roughly about 58-60 percent. Total will be 60 percent or 58 percent of this. Now we can calculate the water content. That's about 260 grams. This makes it really easy to think, for example, if you're making a pizza dough or if you're making other breads, the hydration might be about 65-70 percent. When you think of hydration, you think of how the texture of the dough will turn out when you make the bread. In this case, the hydration is actually not that much because some of the doughs we make, hydration goes to about 70 percent, 75 percent as well. This is slightly more drier dough. The next one is yeast. Yeast usually is in the range of 1-2 percent of the flour. In our recipe, it's about one percent. That will be about 4.5 grams. Salt is about two percent of the recipe. This is a standard measurement. Usually, in most of the recipes, you will find this measurement. Two percent of 450 grams is about nine grams. In this recipe, if you're going to be seasoning the bagel when you bake it, I would reduce the salt maybe about 1.5 percent because otherwise, it will get too salty. Adjust it based on that. 1.5 percent would be roughly about seven grams. If you want a little bit more saltier, nine grams is good, but if you want a little less salty, you can use seven grams. It can be in the range of 1.5-2 percent. Honey is about three percent of the recipe. Three percent would be roughly about 15 grams. You can also use malt syrup if you can get access to it, you get a better color actually, in the bagels. This is what we use traditionally. Now, we know all the percentages of how to make the bagel dough. If you want to scale up or scale down the recipe, you look at this and not the grams. You look at this, and then you calculate the recipe based on this. As bakers, we always maintain this framework whenever we're working with different recipes or developing different recipes. I hope you could understand this and learn a lot from this explanation. In the next lesson, we'll be going over the dough temperatures and how you can calculate them, and their importance as well when you make different doughs. In this lesson, you're going to learn how to calculate the dough temperature for our bagel dough. Why do we need to learn this concept? It's because as bakers it's super important to calculate and to basically, maintain the correct dough temperature just to maintain a good fermentation in the dough as well as the flavor. In professional bakeries, we always check the temperature of the ingredients and calculate it based on the temperature in the bakery. The ideal dough temperature is 27 degrees Celsius. If you can get the dough between 25-27 degrees, that is great. You get a really nice fermentation around this area. To calculate the temperature, what we know is, we know both of these, which is flour temperature and room temperature. These two are mostly equal because we store the flour at room temperature. For example, today in my kitchen, the room temperature is about 21 degrees Celsius, the flour temperature will also be the same. Now, I need to calculate the water temperature because this is unknown. To calculate the ideal temperature, which is still 27 degrees into three, we get 81 degrees Celsius. Now we know that the sum of these three should be 81 degrees Celsius, and we know both of these. To calculate the water temperature, I'm going to add both of these and subtract it with 81. That's 81 minus 42, that comes out to be roughly about 39 degrees Celsius. Now, because my kitchen is slightly colder, I'm going to be using liquid which is slightly warmer in temperature. Now, in your case, say if it's 30 degrees Celsius, the water temperature will be much lesser in that case. Just calculate the water temperature based on your conditions of baking. That is why I wanted to just clarify this because a lot of times people say that you need to use warm water, but that's not actually true. In situations of tropical weather, you might actually have to use cold water, but because in my kitchen it's slightly colder today, that's why I'm using warm water. I hope this helps you understand how to calculate the dough temperature. 6. Bagel: Understanding Ingredients and Making the Dough: In this lesson, I'm going to show you how to make the bagel dough and also briefly introduce the ingredients we'll be using and also substitutions if you don't have these ingredients. First one, the most important one, is flour. So if you want really chewy bagels, use bread flour. If you want a little bit more softer bagels, you can use all-purpose flour. So it's completely fine. You can use either one of them. But just make sure that the protein content is at least 10 percent so that you get a nice texture when you make the bagel. I'm using bread flour today because I find that gives a better texture. Next one is salt. Make sure that this has fine grains. I'm using just sea salt here which is really fine in texture. If you're using big crystals, just dissolve that in water first before adding to the dough. The next one is instant yeast. With instant yeast, you can just directly add to the flour, you don't need to bloom this. It's really convenient as well as it works really well and we use instant yeast in bakeries so that we save time. The next one is honey. I'm just using one tablespoon of honey. You can also use barley malt syrup here. That is what we traditionally use when we make bagels in bakeries to get that really nice and dark color. But I know that it's not really easily accessible, that's why I'm using honey in this recipe. The final one is water. As we calculated, the water is about 38 degrees Celsius based on my temperature. Now you'd have to calculate the temperature of the water based on your conditions so just make sure of that. To begin with the recipe, it's really easy. I'm just going to add the salt [NOISE] and add the yeast in a separate corner on the side. The yeast and the salt shouldn't really touch. [NOISE]. Just mix it together. [NOISE]. Now with the honey, what you can do is just add the water in it [NOISE]. Just dissolve it really nicely [NOISE] and just pour it on the dough [NOISE] and pour the rest of the water as well [NOISE]. At this stage, I'm just going to develop a really rough dough and then I'm going to show you how to develop it further by stretching folds. Also, I wanted to say if you're going to use a stand mixer, you can just develop the dough in the first stage itself. You can mix the dough for about 5-7 minutes to give the final consistency. But because we're making it with hand, it's a slightly more slower process. [NOISE]. Just make sure that you get all the dry flour and there's no dry flour remaining. Initially, the dough will feel sticky but don't worry it will come together [NOISE] slowly. [NOISE]. So as you can see a little bit of flour is left, you just put it on the workbench [NOISE] and we're going to start moving this for roughly about 2-3 minutes and then we'll see how it develops. [NOISE]. So just push it and pull it back. Our dough scraper is super helpful at this stage. [NOISE]. So I will keep everything together. After your dough comes together and there's no dry spots left. So I'm going to show you how I knead it. You stretch, pull it back, then you see other hand, stretch, pull it back. You just keep repeating this and you'll see after 2-3 minutes you get a more smoother dough. If you want to develop the bagel look quite bigger because we're going to botch it and then we're going to bake it. So it has to form a good structure to get a really nice texture and size. [NOISE]. I've been kneading this for about three minutes now and you can see that it feels more smoother. You can see that the gluten is developing and it's getting more stronger. So I'm going to knead this for about one minute more and then I'll show you the texture of the dough. After four minutes, I'm going to stop kneading now and just knead this into a smooth ball. [NOISE]. Perfect. So what I'm going to do now is just cover this for about 15 minutes and then I give it the first done. Before I do that, let's check the temperature of the dough. It's roughly about 26.4 degrees, which is really good. That can be round it to be in the range of 25-27 degrees, so that's pretty good. Just take a bowl and cover your dough so it doesn't get any dry spots. [NOISE]. It's been 15 minutes. Now I'm going to give the dough a done to develop strength in the dough. [NOISE]. You'll see that the dough will become more smoother and it will feel more stronger as well. Just stretch the dough and pull it back like that. Stretch the dough again pull it back. [NOISE]. So we're going to do this about six times. Just stretch it like that and pull it back and the last time. So now you'll see that the dough will be really smooth and nice, that's perfect. Just shape it into a ball. [NOISE] Now we're going to start the bulk fermentation stage. In this stage, we'd be developing the dough strength as well as gases in the dough. So we get a really light texture. So this can take anywhere between 1-2 hours. Usually, it takes about 1.5 hours and you'll be able to see it when the dough really doubles in size. That would be a good stage in which we start pre shape stage. So I'm going to cover the dough and I'm going to check on this after 1.5 hours then I'll show you the dough. 7. Bagel: Preshape and Final Shape: It's been one-and-a-half hours and let's have a look at the dough now. It's almost doubled in size and it's really nice and fluffy. What I'm going to do now is portion it into six equal pieces, and then we pre-shape the dough. Divide the dough. I'm going to use a bench scraper and a scale. One piece of bagel is roughly around 115 grams, 120 grams. Just divide this. Slightly a little bit more. Perfect. Then I put this dough. I'll take it. I'll flip it over. Put the dough here and just pre-shape it really gently because you don't want to degas it too much as well. Make sure that it's something like this, it's not a circle, because we are going to be stretching it out like that, so keep it like this. Similarly for the next one as well. Same thing here. Take it at the center, and third one is fun. Just shape it into a slender type shape. Something like that. After you've reshaped the dough into equal size, what I'm going to do is I'm going to cover this with a wet cloth so that it just relaxes a little bit, the gluten. It will be really easy to shape them. Just cover them with a wet cloth. I'm going to set this aside for about 20 minutes, and then I'll show you how to do the final shaping process. After preshaping the dough, what we're going to do is we're going to cut baking paper into six squares. Just make it maybe 15-centimeter into 15-centimeter each. This just helps us to be ready before we actually shape the dough. [NOISE] Perfect. This is ready. Now I'm going to show you how to final shape the dough. It's been 20 minutes. Let's have a look at our preshaped dough. It's nicely relaxed. It's proved a little bit. That's okay. I'm going to show you two methods of shaping. The first method of shaping, what we do is, we take a rolling pin, and just flip the dough, just stretch it slightly. Then take it like this so you have this side here folded once. Then again. Then for a final time, just drag it like that. Now we're just going to seal this here. It's nicely sealed. You see that? Perfect. Now we're going to flip it, and start from the center and move outwards. Perfect. You see, that it's really even. Now, the first shaping what I do is I just extend one side, keep the rest intact. Let's make it thinner. Then I just take it here and I just press it down in my hand like this. Then just seal it like this. Perfect. You see? This is what we do in bakeries, and it's probably one of the most commonly used way of shaping the bagel. It's super easy as well. Let's have a look at the same method again. Just stretch the dough like that. Then flit it so it's [inaudible]. Fold it like that. Seal it. Repeat the same thing again. Seal it again. Then just fold it like that. Seal the ends very well. Then flip the dough and now start from the center, go outwards. The center in this case will be a little thick. [NOISE] Now I'm just going to make this side a little bit thinner. [NOISE] Then the seam side has to be done. Just take it like this, and diagonally, just stick it there. Press it with your hand so it seals it. Then just seal it like this. Done.That's a bagel. Perfect. Now we've got this first step. Now I'm going to show you another way of shaping it, which is a little bit more advanced. The second method, we do it the same way. We stretch the dough. Now, just seal it again like that. Seal it like that again. We start from the center. [NOISE] Perfect. Make it as even as possible. Now the seam side comes up. This is the seam. Take your rolling pin, and I'm just going to spread this one side here like that. Then what I'm going to do is stretch it. Don't worry if it tears badly. Don't worry about it. Now, this goes here. Just watch closely. I'm going to do it super slowly so you can do it with me. This goes right in the center. Now, we're going to fold this and seal it like this. Seal it here and here as well. Make sure to seal it really well. You see, that looks really nice. Looks really even and much better than the previous one. I'm going to show it to you again so you can do it easily. Let's see the second shaping method again. I've rolled the dough like I did previously. Now, make sure that the seam comes up. This is really important. The seam should be here. Take one corner and just stretch it like that. Just stretch it here as well. Now what we need to do is put it here. So you see that? Then wrap it around and seal it. This is my favorite shaping method because the final product comes out really even and nice. A seam here as well. Make sure everything is nicely sealed. Perfect. That's really even, and it's got a really nice edge here. When you actually bake this, it comes out really nice as well. It rises well and it looks very even. This is a really good shaping method, and if you really want to push yourself, learn how to do this. Now, after I've shaped all of them, I'll show you how we set up the tray for proving the bagels. 8. Bagels: Proofing the Bagels: Take your shaped up. I'm going to put it on a baking sheet that we had cut before. This I'm going to arrange in a tray. [NOISE]. After you've put your final shaped bagels on sheets or baking paper. I'm going to take four of them and put it on a tray, and these two, I'm going to actually proof overnight. This is what we do in professional bakeries, we actually proof them overnight and then we cook it the next day. But this is a more quicker method of doing it. If you want to make it the same day, you can follow this method. The first method of proving is cold proving. What we'll do is just put two sheets of paper here. This does not get proved at room temperature. It goes in the fridge and it gets cold proved overnight. Just put two of your bagel doughs. I've got a sheet of plastic wrap here. I'm just going to spread some oil on it so that it doesn't stick to the dough when it's proving. You can also brush it with oil if you want. That's completely fine. The reason I'm doing cold proving is because you'll get a really nice flavor, and really nice texture on the bagel. This is exactly how we make it in the bakery, we always cold proof it in our walk in fridge and that just gives it a really nice texture. The other method I'm going to show you is a more quicker way of doing it, if you want to make it the same day of making the dough. Put this in the fridge for at least 12 hours. But you can also put it up to about 15-24 hours as well. [NOISE]. Perfect. I'm going to prove this for roughly about 45 minutes to an hour. I just want them to become maybe 1.5-2 times in size. But I don't want to over proof them. Because if you over proof them, what happens is when you pouch them. Sometimes they actually deflate too much. You want the dough to have an ability to rise in the oven. When you put them, make sure you cover it with a plastic wrap or a wet cloth. Let's check this after about 45 minutes. It's been one hour and so the bagel is the fact. They're nicely proved. They're not super big, but they're still quite puffy. How do I check if it's proved? Just press it. It should not spring back immediately, it should just leave a dent on the side. [NOISE]. You see, now that leaves a dent there. That's nicely proved. Now I'm going to show you how we pouch the bagels. 9. Bagels: Baking the Bagels: When the bagels are almost proofed, I'm going to prepare the poaching liquid. Just pour hot water in a pot [NOISE] and make sure it's coming at least at half [NOISE] and add a tablespoon of honey in the water. This will give the bagels a really nice color. [NOISE] When we put the bagels, it's important that the water is not boiling, but it's simmering. I'm going to put this on the heat and we're going to check on the bagels. You can see our water is simmering now, and that's perfect to make the bagels. I'm going to lower the heat slightly. I'm going to show you how we cook the bagels. [NOISE] Just take your sheet of paper. I'm going to put it down gently like that, flip it and it goes in and I have a fish spatula and [inaudible] like that. You can use anything honestly to flip it whatever you prefer. What I like to do is gently put this below that and give it some weight here and just flip it like that. You see it's expanded really well. You can see that it's nicely risen and this is usually good consistency. I'm going to take it out really gently from the water. Just give it some weight here and just lift it like that. [NOISE] After I finish the first one I'm going to repeat the same process for the next ones as well. I'll show it to you again, just immerse it like that and then flip it. I like to do one at a time because I don't want the pan to be crowded too much. [NOISE] Support it like that and just take it out. I'm going to put it back on the baking sheet. [NOISE] After putting the bagels, you have to be really fast. Just egg wash it and I'm going to put sesame seeds and poppy seeds on top. [NOISE] Our bagels are finally ready to bake and you have to do this really fast,. Put them in the oven at 220 degrees Celsius for 20 minutes. [NOISE] These are final bagels and they look so nice. If you see, if you lifted, it should feel really light and it's got a really nice shape and they rose really well. I'm going to show you the difference between a good bagel and an all proofed bagel. This one you see, your bagel will look really flat if it's all proofed or if you cook it too long in the water. I've seen some videos online would say that you need to cook it for like a minute each side or 30 seconds but that's too long. Don't wait more than 10 to 15 seconds because what happens is that the bagel rises too much in the water and when you bake it, it just completely collapses. You want your bagel to have a lot of structure just like this. I cooked this for 10-15 seconds each side. Just make sure to follow that. See your bagels don't come out flat like this. These are bagels from yesterday and I proofed them overnight for about 15 hours. [NOISE] You can see that they've become really nice and airy. If I press it, I can feel that it's really nicely risen. I don't need to ferment this anymore. I can actually just pouch it and bake it just like how I did in my previous batch. I'm going to pouch this and then bake it for about 20 minutes at 220 degrees Celsius. This is what a pouched bagel looks like. I pouched it to about 10 seconds on each side. You don't want to over-pouch it because sometimes it just deflates it. You can see it's still nice and airy. It's not deflated yet. I'm just going to finish this with some sesame seeds and poppy seeds. [NOISE] In this one I did a combination of both the seeds. I'm going to bake this for 20 minutes at 220 degrees Celsius. [NOISE] These are the bagels to be fermented overnight and you can see that they rise so well and you can also see these blisters on the side. That's really nice bagel. This is my preferred way of baking it. If you can spend some time do definitely ferment it overnight. It's got a better shape as well and it rose really well. Let's cut the bagel and see how it looks like from the inside. Just keep your knife from this end, hold this ready tight and just keep dragging it. [NOISE] That looks really nice. You've got really nice and open holes. When you ferment it overnight, it develops some better flavor as well as a better texture. I'm going to show you how to make a cream cheese and salmon sandwich. 10. Bagel: Cream Cheese and Salmon Sandwich: These are the ingredients to make salmon and cream cheese bagel. I've got some red onions here, capers, cream cheese, which is softened and this is just some cured salmon which is smoked. What I'm going to do, is I'm going to cut this in half, apply cream cheese on both the sides, put the salmon and put the capers and the onions. If you want, we can do different combinations with this as well. If you don't like salmon, you can even make a ham and cheese sandwich. There are endless possibilities to make sandwiches with bagels. The first step, we're just going to cut the bagel in half, so that everything easily spread our fillings inside. Just keep your knife downwards and keep your hand up so it doesn't touch the knife. You see it's got a really nice texture inside. It's got these open holes. That's really good bagel. I'm going to apply cream cheese on both sides and I'm going to apply what we call a schmear of cream cheese, which is like a lot of cream cheese because it tastes really nice in the sandwich. Don't skimp on the cream cheese, add as much as you want. After you've applied cream cheese, I'm going to add a layer of salmon on top. After putting the salmon, I'm going to put some capers. You don't need to put a lot because they're very strong. To finish it, I'm just going to put some red onion, which is really thinly sliced. That's perfect. Just add a generous layer of cream cheese on the other side of the bagel as well. Now I'm just going to put a little bit of lemon juice on top and then put the slice on top of it. Adding a little bit of lemon juice, what it does is just cuts the fat from the salmon and cream cheese as well, and it gives a really good flavor. This is our final sandwich. It looks so nice. Let's cut the sandwich in half and see how it looks like on the inside. You can see really nice layers of cream cheese and salmon. If you want, you can even put more salmon in this. For me, this is good. I hope you enjoyed this lesson and I hope you could learn a lot. 11. Japanese Milk Bread- Understanding Ingredients and MakingTangzhong: In this lesson, we're going to be learning our second recipe, which is a Japanese milk bread. Now, this milk bread is actually is really soft. But there are a few techniques and tips you need to follow when you make it. The first one is that when we make the roux which is your tangzhong, you cool it down. You don't put the hot roux in the dough when you mix it. Just be careful of that. The second one is that you knead the dough really well because you need a strong gluten formation for the bread to rise really well and you get that really soft texture. The third one is that when you're baking the bread in the oven. Sometimes what happens is that just at the end, make sure that it's not getting too dark. If it is getting too dark, just put a layer of oil on top when you're making it so that it doesn't burn. Just take care of these things and you'll get a really good bread. Let's begin with our lesson. Before we begin making the dough, let's understand the ingredients we'll be using. For the flour, I'm using bread flour because it has a higher protein content and you get a more fluffier bread and really airy bread. You could also use all-purpose flour but I would suggest if you can use bread flour used that one. The next ingredient is milk powder and salt. The milk powder, what it does is it gives a really nice and soft texture to the bread. Usually, milk powder is not used by home bakers as much, but in bakeries, we use it all the time. If you're making any enriched dough, such as brioche, or croissant dough or milk bread dough, we always add a little bit of milk powder because it gives a really nice and soft texture. The next one is caster sugar and instant yeast. The sugar actually gives a lot of flavor to the dough as well as it acts as food for the yeast. I'm going to use instant yeast in the recipe because I can directly add it to the flour. Just add it separately to the salt. You don't want to use the yeast to touch the salt. This basically is the dry ingredient mix for the dough. I'm just going to mix this together. I'm going to set this aside and our roux is cool to touch then I'll show you how to make the dough. The first step when you make the Japanese milk bread is to make the roux. To make the roux is really easy. All we need to do is basically combine the flour with the milk, and cook it together until it gets a really thick paste. What I'm going to do is take a saucepan and put the milk in it. Now the roux actually results in a really soft bread because it traps all the moisture, the milk, and it actually retains it when you make the dough. Even though we're not putting a lot of fat in the dough, we'll still get a really nice enriched dough. When you make the roux, it's really important that you mix the flour really well in the milk before we start cooking it, because we don't want it to form clumps. I'm going to take a whisk and whisk it together until it's totally combined. When you see that it's nicely combined, I'm going to put this on medium flame and I'm going to show you the consistency. When we cook the roux, it's important that we keep whisking it and slowly use starch and that'll become more and more thicker. We want it to just get evenly heated. After 30 seconds, I can already feel like it's getting more and more thicker. Keep whisking it so that it doesn't form any clumps. When you get this consistency and it starts to come to a ball. That is perfect. I'm just going to set this aside and let it cool down. Perfect. Cooling this down is really important. Because if you just add this right now in the dough, what will happen is that the dough will get really sticky and it won't be nice to eat. Make sure to cool this down really well until it starts to get solid and it feels quite cool to touch. We're going to set this aside for about 10 to 15 minutes and then I'll show you the consistency of the roux. 12. Japanese Milk Bread- Mixing and Developing the Dough : It's been 15 minutes and our roux is now cool to touch. You will see that it will form this clump like that so that's really nice. Before I knead the dough, I'm just going to check the temperature of the milk. It should be about 36, 37 degrees, so that's perfect. That's based on my temperature. It will be different based on your room temperature, so you'll have to calculate that. What I'm going to do is put the roux in the dough and put the milk. The milk, I'm going to keep maybe about a tablespoon left in the glass just so that I can add it later. Because if you add all of the milk straight to the dough, the dough might become too wet, so it's always good to just reserve a little bit and add it at the end. Just add the egg as well. [NOISE] Perfect. Now, I'm just going to mix this dough for two, three minutes maybe until it forms a really rough dough. We're just going to mix the dough until all the flour gets hydrated. I also wanted to say, when you're mixing the dough, make sure you have a pan scraper with you so that you can just keep scraping everything from your hand. If at this point you want to use a stand mixer, you can do that. Just make sure to mix the dough until it forms a rough dough on medium speed for maybe about 4-5 minutes. For the first time, I would recommend make it by hand so you know the texture of the dough, so then it'll be easier for you when you make it in the stand mixer. [NOISE] Then you see that all the dry flour is hydrated. I'm going to put it on the workbench and start kneading it. At this point, we want to hydrate everything and just form slight amount of gluten because we are going to be kneading it later as well. Initially, your dough will feel a little bit sticky, but don't worry about it. It will come together really well once the roux is nicely mixed. I've been kneading the dough for two minutes now and I can feel that it's becoming less and less stickier, and it's getting more structure. I'm going to keep kneading this for another two minutes and then we'll assess the gluten structure of the dough. After four minutes of kneading, you can see that our dough feels more smother. It's not perfect, but it still feels much better now. What I'm going to do is I'm going to rest this for 30 minutes, cover it with a cloth, and then I'll show you how to develop the dough further then we add more butter to it and develop more structure in it. Just make sure the cloth is wet and just cover it for 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, let's check the dough. You see that it feels a little bit more smoother. I can see that it's absorbed the liquids more, so that's great. At this point, I'm going to add the butter to it and show you the consistency of the dough. Take your butter and just put it on the dough like that. Now, we're going to keep kneading it. Initially, you'll feel like the dough will not come together. It feels really bad, but as you keep kneading it, it'll become more and more smooth. The reason we don't add butter in the first stage is because sometimes what happens is that the dough isn't developed enough and it just splits out of the dough. But now the dough feels more stronger, so it will get absorbed much better. What I've also liked doing is I just like pressing the dough like this so that it absorbs the butter. [NOISE] It's important that the butter is softened, because it's just more easier to absorb from the dough. I'm going to keep kneading this roughly for about two minutes, and then I'll show you the consistency of the dough. After one minute of kneading, you can see that now the dough starts absorbing the butter and it starts to feel more stronger. I'm going to knead it for three minutes more and I keep showing you the consistency of the dough. At this point, we want a slightly smoother dough because it's important to develop the gluten in this dough because it helps to get a really airy bread. [NOISE] After three minutes of kneading, you can see that now the dough actually starts feeling much better. I'm just going to pull and stretch it like that. [NOISE] Perfect. You see the consistency of the dough. Now, I'm going to rest this for 30 minutes, and then I'm going to give the final series of stretching for this to develop the gluten. Just cover it with a wet cloth and set it aside. It's been 30 minutes and it's time to give the final dome to our dough. You feel it's become more airy now. Feels much nicer. Use your pan scraper and just flip it like that. Now what I'm going to do is stretch and fold it within itself, about 8-10 times. This will develop more strength in the dough and help the dough to rise really well and improves. Just stretch it and fold it. Stretch it and fold it like that. Now you can see that the dough is so much more smoother than we first started when we were making it. It feels much more stronger now. This dough, if you make it nice and strong, what happens is that when you bake it, it expands really well. It's really crucial to develop gluten structure in the dough. Perfect. That's good. I'm going to shape it into a ball. Now, we're going to start our biofermentation stage. I'm just going to let it be like this for roughly about one and a half to two hours so it doubles in size, and then we can finally portion and shape it. Just cover it with a wet cloth, and just set it aside. 13. Japanese Milk Bread- Shaping, Proofing and Baking: After one hour of bulk fermentation, this is what a dough looks like. It's super airy. It looks really nice. It's got a really nice [inaudible] structure. Really happy with this. What I'm going to do now is divide this into three equal parts. To check how much the part weighs, I'm just going to weigh the dough. Take a scale and put the dough on top of it. This is roughly about 712 grams, so I'll divide that into three. One part of dough will be about 240 grams roughly. To divide the dough, I'm going to use a steel band scraper because it just cuts more cleanly. Put your scale on tare so it comes to zero. That's roughly about 240 grams. Perfect. Now I have three parts of dough. At this stage, what I'm going to do is I'm going to really gently pre-shape it. Now, pre-shaping, what it helps us do is that, when you finally shape it, your structure of the bread would be much better. I don't want to de-gas it too much at this stage. Just a couple of times. Let's press it out and just gently set together like that. Perfect. Similarly for this one as well. This pre-shape, I usually rest it for roughly about 30 minutes after I pre-shape the dough. The dough feels really nice and airy. It's really nice, actually. Perfect. What I'm going to do is set this aside for anywhere between 20-30 minutes. Then I'll show you how to final shape the dough. While our dough is resting, I'm going to show you how to prepare the baking tin. This baking tin, if you see, it's slightly more deeper, and it's really nice to bake Japanese bread in. Slightly narrow as well. Super easy to prepare. What I'm going to do is I'm just going to spray some spray oil in it. You can also brush butter. Just makes it easier for the bread to come out when it's baked. Just [inaudible] easy. Perfect. Now our baking tin is ready. It's been 30 minutes since the dough has been resting. Now I'm going to show you how to final shape it. To final shape it what we do is flip it like that, and you have to take a rolling pin and just stretch it out. This is like the traditional Japanese way of doing it. Press it like that. You get this flowing shape. Now what you do is you take one half to the center, like that, and the other half as well. Then you seal it. You turn it, and you just roll it like that. Press it. Roll it again. Then you just seal this part. That's our shape like that. You don't seal it. You just let it be like that. I'm going to show it to you again. I'm just going to put a little bit of flour this time. If you're just starting off, putting flour can make it a little more easier. It won't stick to the surface. I'm just going to stretch it with the rolling pin. Perfect. Now, take it to the center, press it down, overlap it like that, seal it. Then take this, seal it like that, and seal the bottom. Perfect. That is shaping. You just leave this like that. You don't seal that, so it opens up very nicely. After you've shaped it, I'm just going to arrange it in our baking tin. Perfect. Just going to cover this with a plastic wrap and let it proof anywhere between 1-2 hours. I'll show it to you after one hour, how it looks like, and I'll also show you the correct proofing stage to bake in. I will just spray a little bit of oil on the plastic wrap and I'm going to cover the tin. Spraying the oil just gives a protective layer so it doesn't stick to the dough when the dough rises. That is proof. It's been one hour and I want to show you how the bread looks like. So it's not completely proofed, but it's risen quite [inaudible]. I want to prove it a little bit more until it maybe comes till here. I'm just going to set this aside for half an hour more and then I'll show you the bread. It's been one and a half hours. Let's check the bread now. That looks really nice. It's really nicely proofed. How do I check? You just press it. Your indent should stay in. It should not spring back immediately. That is nicely proofed. Also, I can see the size. It's expanded really well. You see, that's perfect. Also, if you see any air bubbles like that, I like to just pop them so that they don't expand too much in the oven. It doesn't expand well, so that's why. Before I bake this, you have two options. Either you can egg wash it, or you can just wash it with some milk or cream. Now because the dough itself is quite rich, I like actually putting a milk wash on it so it doesn't get too dark in the oven. Just drop some milk on top. If you like really dark color, you can also do an egg wash. Just one egg with one tablespoon of milk. You can put that as well. I just prefer to put milk on top of it. Our oven is nicely preheated. It'll expand really well when we put it in the oven. I'm going to bake this for about 25-30 minutes. I'll show you after it comes out of the oven. This is how our bread looks like. It's got a nice color and it's risen quite well. You see on the side, it's risen really well. It should feel quite soft. It's super hot right now and I cannot take it out of the tin currently because it might still be stuck here. I'm just going to let it be for about 5-10 minutes and then it'll be easier to take it out. While we're waiting for the bread to cool down so it releases from the side, I'm just going to brush some butter on the top just so that it gets a really nice shine. This is optional, but I really like doing this. It just looks much better. It just glazes it. Perfect. I also wanted to say that sometimes when we bake this bread, the last 10 minute, what happens is that the top gets really dark. What you can do is you can just put a foil on top. Just lightly put it on top, you don't have to press it down, so that it doesn't get too dark. Just check in the last 10 minutes when you're baking this bread in you're oven. It's been about 10 minutes. Now let's take the bread out of the tin. How I like doing this is just turning this on this side and just shaking your tin. Now, if you've greased the tin nicely, it's should just come out easily. But sometimes if it gets stuck, you can just put a palette knife on the side and gently take it out. What you do is just wobble it slightly. You'll be able to see that it's coming out. Then just do it like this. Perfect. It comes out really nicely. You can see that it's risen so well. Literally, when we put it, it was just still here, and then it's literally become thrice the size. If I lift it, it should be really light. This bread, you need to cool it down for at least one hour because you want the moisture to evaporate. After one hour, I'll show you the texture inside the bread. Our bread has been cooling down for one hour now. If you touch it, it shouldn't feel warm. Let's have a look at the texture of the bread. A good Japanese bread should have a really stringy texture. Let's see. If I break it, so you see the strings there, that's really nice. It's beautiful. You see the crumb? That looks really nice. You should be able to take it out like that. That's really good Japanese spread. I'm super happy with that. It feels really light as well. If I press the bread, it should just spring back really well. Let's see. Completely squeeze it. Then you'll see it should come back. That is really nice bread if it springs back completely. Let's learn how to make a Japanese egg sandwich, which is the perfect sandwich to make with this bread. 14. Japanese Milk Bread- Japanese Egg Sandwich: In this lesson, I'm going to show you how to make egg sandwich. This is a really classic Japanese egg sandwich, and it goes really well with this bread. I'm going to go cut two slices. The thickness of it depends on your taste. If you want thicker, you can cut thicker as well. For me, this thickness is good. Something like that. You see the crown, it's so nice, and it's got such a nice height as well. After you've cut the slices, what we're going to do is we're going to boil a couple of eggs. These are the ingredients to make the Japanese egg sandwich. We've got a couple of eggs, mustard, butter, and this is really important. You need to use this Japanese mayo. It taste really good with it. You can use normal mayo as well, but I think this has a really nice flavor and I really like using it. The first step, what we'll do is we're going to put some boiling water in a pot and put the eggs in it and cook it for roughly about 8-10 minutes. You want to cook it to a hard boil, but not to over boil it as well. If you're using small eggs, I'll cook it for eight minutes and larger eggs will get for 10 minutes. Let's begin with the first step. Fill the pot with boiling water. You can do this on the gas as well, but I find easier if you just use a kettle to boil the water, and submerge both of your eggs in it. Now I'm going to cook this for roughly about 10 minutes. I'm going to put it on the gas and set a timer. While our eggs are boiling, I'm just going to prepare an ice bath so I can submerge the eggs when they're cooked so that it doesn't overcook when it's resting. Also it's easier to actually take the shell out when they're really cold. Just put some water. Make sure the water is cold. Just make sure the water fills up to here so that the eggs can completely submerge when they're cooked. It's been 10 minutes of cooking, so I'm going to put them in the ice bath. Just take the egg with a sieve and goes straight in the ice bath. Similarly for the other egg as well. I like doing this step because it just stops the cooking and it stops the egg from overcooking as well. But if you don't want to put ice, you can actually just wash it on your tap with cold water as well. That would also cool down the egg. I'm just going to let this be here for like five minutes, and then I'm going to crack it open and we prepare the sandwich filling. It's been about 10 minutes, and now I'm going to just crack the eggs open. I find it easy just to dip it in water, so when the water goes inside the space here, it just comes out really easily. Basically this skin, if we just take it out, the whole thing will just come out super easily just like that. Just going to set this aside and the next one as well. After I removed all the shells, what I'm going to do is I'm going to separate the yolks and the whites. With the yolk, we basically going to form an emulsion with the mayonnaise, the mustard, and a little bit of cream. That'll be the base of our sandwich filling. Then we'll fold egg whites into them, which we'll cut very finely. Just cut this into half and similarly for the other ones as well. Yolks, I'm just going to put it in this bowl. Yolks actually are really good to form an emulsion because they have a lot of fat and they make it really creamy, the filling. Let's get everything in. With the egg whites, I'm just going to cut it into strips first. This doesn't have to be perfect, but if you can, just keep it as thin as possible. After cutting the egg whites, I'm just going to dice it quite finely. Doesn't have to be too small, but as fine as you can get it. Perfect. The egg whites are ready. Now let's move on to making our filling. To the egg yolks, I'm just going to add about one tablespoon of mayonnaise and just a little bit of mustard in it. Now, it's up to you how much mustard you want to add. Then I'm going to just take a fork and mash it slightly. To this, I'm just going to add a little bit of milk so that it becomes a little bit more smoother, just about a tablespoon. If you want to use, you can use a whisk as well. If I'm making maybe four or five sandwiches, I'm going to use a whisk because it bit better and be faster to make it. Because I'm making a really small quantity, it's fine. You can use a fork. Perfect. Now you've got this, I'm going to fall in the egg whites. Just mix it through. Once you get something like this, that's really good. Now, if you want, you can make it more creamier. You can add more cream to it. You can add a little bit more milk. It's up to you how you want the texture. But to finish it, I'm just going to add a tiny bit of salt. Just a little bit because the mayo is quite salty. You don't want to salt it too much. Little bit of pepper and just a pinch of sugar. Just mix it together. Perfect. Actually I'm just going to add a tiny bit more milk to it just to make it little bit more creamier. Perfect. That looks good. Let's start assembling our sandwich now. To assemble the sandwich, we're going to apply soften butter to both the sides just to keep the moisture in it and also form a layer so that the bread doesn't get soggy. Also it gives really nice flavor. Perfect. That's good. Here as well. Perfect. That looks good. This sandwich is actually so delicious because of all the butter and the mayonnaise. It's not super healthy, but it's really nice. Put your egg filling in there. What I like doing is, I like to keep it in the center because when you put the other bread, we are going to be cutting the sides so it tends to spread a lot. If you put it on the side, what happens is it tends to come out, so that is why I just like to keep it in the center. Maybe you can spread it just a little bit. Something like that. Then you put the other slice on top and press it really gently. Now, take a bread knife. I'm just going to get rid of the corners because they don't really taste that good in this sandwich. Don't press it too much, just be quite gentle with it. Similarly, this one as well. This sandwich, you can make it ahead of time if you like. Sometimes I just make it overnight and just take it in the morning. Even the filling actually, if it's colder, it's more easier to spread. It's totally up to you. Perfect. To cut it, it's going to cut it from the center here into a triangle shape. Perfect. Let's see. That looks really nice. It's got a nice layer of filling and bread. I think this texture is pretty good, this thickness of bread. I'm going to finally taste this, so excited to have it. That is so delicious. The bread is so soft and the filling is so creamy. I hope you make this at home, and I hope you enjoyed this recipe. 15. French Brioche- Making the Poolish: In this lesson, we are going to be learning our third recipe, which is a French brioche. Now this is the most classic French brioche recipe and this is a same recipe which I learned when I was in pastry school. I just modified it a little bit. I added a polish to it, which makes it even more softer. Now the only thing you need to be careful about when you make this is to knead the dough really well and to make this dough, you have to use a stand mixer. Because if you use your hand, it'll take too much time and the dough doesn't come out that well. Just use a stand mixer for this recipe. If you don't have a stand mixer, you can even use a food processor. Just knead it well. The second tip I would give you is that when you add the butter, makes sure that the dough is developed well because sometimes what people do is they're very impatient and they add the butter in the beginning. Because when you do that, sometimes the butter splits from the dough and you don't get that stringy consistency. Just make sure that you add butter in parts as well as when the dough is slightly developed. I'm going to show you all the steps to develop the dough, as well as how to make the dough. Don't worry about it. We're also going to be proofing the dough overnight because the dough is much easier to shape when it's cold as well as it gets a lot of flavor to the dough. After you've made the bread will learn how to make a French toast, as well as a ham and cheese sandwich. This bread is perfect for both of those things. Lets begin our lesson. The first step when you make the brioche is to make a poolish. Poolish is basically a pre-ferment which will give a lot of flavor to the brioche dough, as well as give a lot of nice texture to the dough. It's super easy to make the poolish, but I'm going to do is add the yeast in it. In this poolish, this one is a quick poolish. Which is going to add a lot of yeast to it and ferment it, but if you make a baguette, we usually put rarely little yeast and ferment it overnight. But because this is an enriched dough, that's why you can add more yeast to the flour. Mix the yeast properly and then I'm going to add the milk in it. The milk is at 30 degrees Celsius and that's based on my temperature. Let's mix it very well so that there's no dry flour left in the bowl and this poolish usually takes about maybe 30 minutes to 1 hour to prove and you wanted to double in size and become really airy [NOISE]. Perfect, That looks good. Everything is come by. Now I'm going to cover this with a plastic wrap so it doesn't get any dry spots. Let's cover it with the plastic rap, and I'm going to set this aside for about 30-45 minutes. I'm just going to have a look at 30 minutes and check, if it's ready but in your temperature, just assess, you just want the poolish to become very airy and double in size. Value bearing for the poolish to ferment. I'm just going to briefly explain you the ingredients for the brioche dough. I'm going to use some bread flour in this recipe, but you can also use some all-purpose flour if you like. If you use all-purpose flour, you get a slightly more softer bread. If you use bread flour, you get a more chewer bread. Is totally up to you which one you like to use. The next one is sugar. Using some cast for sugar here. This will give you a really nice flavor, [NOISE] to your brioche, as well as, give nice sweetness, and nice texture as well. Sugar is really important to the brioche dough and the next one is the fats. What's brioche known for, it's a super enriched bread, and it's enriched with eggs and butter. This is when I first made this dough and I was in Catholic school, I was so surprised like you could actually put so much eggs and butter in a dough but the French just managed to do it and it makes the bread so delicious. When you make this though, it's important to use a stand mixer because it's really hard to incorporate so much eggs and butter in the dough. I'm going to use 4 eggs in the recipe. I've already crack them and I like to bring it up to temperature while my poolish is fermenting because if you add eggs straight from the fridge, sometimes it drops the temperature of the dough too much and is why just like to leave them outside. Even the butter. I just dice them from the fridge and now I'm just going to rest it so that it becomes soft. Because if the butter is soft it incorporates more easily in the dough, when needing it. It's super-important to leave it out and soften in the butter, because you don't want to drop the temperature of the dough too much. The final ingredient is salt. Salt basically helps us make the gluten structure stronger as well as maintains a fermentation and the dough as well, and also gives flavor. These other ingredients we're going to be using. I'm just going to add the sugars and the salt as well to the floor. [NOISE] Perfect. We're not going to add yeast to this cause we've already added yeast to our poolish, which we will be adding to the dough. Lets mix them together. That's it. We're going to set this aside and after maybe 30, 40 minutes, we'll have a look at the poolish. It's been about 45 minutes. Let's have a look at our poolish. [NOISE]. You can see that. You can see these holes here, which is a good sign. That means it's fermented well. This is ready to use. Now I'm going to assemble all the ingredients and start mixing it together. [NOISE] 16. French Brioche- Mixing the Dough: Add the flour mix in your stand mixer bowl. Then, add the poolish as well. Perfect. Then, I'm going to add the eggs. We're going to start mixing this. We want to develop a slightly developed dough, it shouldn't be too fine, but at the same time, it should be slightly strong. We don't going to add the butter at this stage. Now in traditional brioche, we always add the butter later because what happens is, if you add the butter now, it will definitely split from the dough because the dough has to be strong when we add the butter. Let's develop this first and then I'll show you the texture of the dough when we can start adding the butter. I'm going to start the stand mixer now at about medium speed. I'm going to mix this for about 4-5 minutes. [NOISE] It's been five minutes. Let's have a look at the dough now. It's the required sticky. I want to develop it little bit. I let it go for another five minutes, and then after that, we start adding the butter. [NOISE] It spinned to five more minutes. Let's check the consistency of the dough. You can feel it's quite stretchy and it should feel more stronger as well. If you stretch it, it should feel something like this. You won't get a proper window pane, but you'll still get a quite a lot of structure. At this point, I'm going to start adding the butter. The butter, we're going to add basically in two parts so that it emulsifiers really well. If you add it straight away, the whole thing, sometimes it doesn't emulsify that well. Let's add half the butter now. I'm going to knead this roughly about 5-7 minutes until the butter is completely emulsified, then we'll add the rest of the butter as well. [NOISE] You see the dough is nicely combined. The butter is nicely combined with the dough. I'm going to add the next amount of butter and then knead it for another 5-7 minutes until it's combined. Now, you can actually knead it at a higher speed so that it combines well. I'm going to increase the speed slightly. [NOISE] Let's check the texture now. You can see that it's absorbed the butter well and feels really nice and light but we want to develop it a little bit more so that we get a nice and open window pane. Now what I'm going to do is knead it for like five minutes more at super higher speed so that it just takes away all the butter from the side and comes together really well. [NOISE] The dough is finally ready. You can see that it's taken all the butter from the sides and the bowl is now clean. I'm going to take it on the workbench and then we're going to shape it into a round ball [NOISE] You see how stretchy that dough is and it's really nice. That's really good brioche dough. Now you'd have to use your [inaudible] scraper to scrape off everything. It should fall quite easily, just break it at the end, the remaining. Perfect. I know it takes time for kneading, but you need that time because you want to develop that structure, so you get that ready stringy texture when you bake it. Now what you do is you just basically shape it into a ball. If your brioche dough is nicely developed, it shouldn't stick to the surface without the flour. The dough to kneading time is roughly about 25-30 minutes. This is like one of the most traditional recipes which I learned in pastry school and also which we make in bakeries as well. [NOISE] Just stretching for maybe about 8-10 times. Perfect. That dough, it just feels like a pillow. Actually, it's so soft because of all the fat we gave it. You see the texture. That's really nice. Now, we're going to bulk ferment this for about 1-2 hours until it's double in size. Just put the dough in a clean bowl. I'm just going to cover this with plastic wrap [NOISE] so it doesn't get any dry spots. Now, I'm just going to ferment this. I'll show you how the dough looks like after one hour. After one hour, let's have a look at the dough. It's nicely fermented. It's almost double in size. That is good. Now, it might take you maybe more than an hour, maybe less than an hour for this stage to happen but as long as it's double in size, that's really good to move on to the next step. I'm just going to put it on the workbench. Then, just pre-shape it and do a round ball to see how smooth that dough is and how airy it is. Very nice dough. Smooth your bench quicker so it doesn't stick to the surface. Just fold it. Shape it into a ball [NOISE] and this goes in the fridge to ferment overnight. I'm going to put it back in the bowl. There are two reasons why I ferment this overnight. The first one is to develop structure and flavor in the dough because overnight fermentation, it's still going to ferment but at a slower rate. The second one is that because the dough has so much fat on it, it's really hard to shape it right now, but when it's cold, it's really easy to do it. Traditionally, we always refrigerate the dough overnight when we make French brioche. Let's have a look at the dough tomorrow and then we'll learn how to shape it, proof it, and bake it. 17. French Brioche- Shaping, Proofing and Baking the Loaf: This is that dough from yesterday? So nicely proofed, you can see that it's risen, so well. This is perfect. Now let's move on to the stage of dividing it and shaping the dough. I'm going to show you two ways of shaping the dough. The first one we're going to be using a loft in. For this, I'm just going to basically portion it into 80 grand pieces and then roll it together into small balls and just put it in the loft in. The second shaping method, what we'll do is we'll try some different shapes, which will be on a tray and not enter baking pan. Let's start dividing the dough. Just take your dough out. I'm going to be using a metal scraper to divide the dough [NOISE]. This dough it's easier to shape when it is cold, but it's quite hard when it gets warm. We won't be pre-shaping the dough will just be directly final shaping the dough. Just a little bit more [NOISE]. That's fine. [NOISE]. I'm going to be cutting about eight pieces of 80 grams each. I've got eight pieces, which is 80 grams each. I'm going to shape it into really tight round balls. To do that, what we are going to do is just deflate it slightly. Pull it back. Just like that. Just put onto itself and you can do it with one hand as well. If you do it with two hands it will be tighter. What am doing is just using this and these two finger and just making like a cup here. It builds surface tension and it really tight. If you want, you can even do it in your hand. Just make it like this and you can just tighten it. It's important to make a really tight ball because it just bakes better and it proofs better, that's why. That's great. See that's really smooth. That's perfect. Let's start doing the others as well, [NOISE] put in the center, and then you use two hands. Then we do it together like that. If you want to practice this, you can do that as well. In bakeries we usually do it like this because we need to make so many of these. We have to learn how to use both the hands when you're shaping it. Perfect. I'm just going to set this aside and finish off the rest of them [NOISE]. Perfect. That's eight equally ball of 80 grams each and now I'm going to put it in the loft in. Before we put it in the loft in, I'm just going to grease it with some spray oil. Just spray the oil on the side and if you like, you can also use butter here, that's completely fine as well. Just arrange them. Just a little bit tightly, so that they maintain their shape and then the proof they'll just like buffer up really nicely. Perfect. That looks great. I'm just going to cover it with a plastic paper and this should take anywhere between 1-2 hours depending on your proofing temperature. We just wanted to become like double in size just like I make bread. I'm going to show it to you after one hour and then I'll show you when it's really proofed as well. Let's move on to learning how to shape the other remaining part of our dough. This is that proof dough after one hour, 15 minutes and you can see that it's proofed really well. I'm quite happy with that, but I'm going to proof it a little bit more so that it comes just a little bit to the top so that it bakes much better. I'm going to set it aside for another half an hour and then I'm going to show you how it looks like. It's been about two hours and our bread is finally ready the bake. You can see that it's risen so well. It looks so beautiful. Before putting it in the oven, I'm going to egg wash it so that it gets a really nice color and shine under. Just take a baking paper [NOISE] and similar to how we did the previous one. Just make sure that the egg wash glazes all the spaces and it gets a nice color. [NOISE] Be quite gentle with it because you don't want to deflate it[NOISE]. We're going to be baking the bread at 200 degrees the first 10 minutes and then I'm going to reduce the temperature to 180 degrees Celsius. Initially you bake it at a higher temperature so that the bread rise as well. This is brioche bread and looks so beautiful. This is like the architecture of a classic brioche bread that it opens really well from here and this one actually went a little bit crazy and open to much. This looks really nice. I'm super happy that that texture and I can already feel that it's surely light. I'm going to brush this butter as well, just like I did the previous bread. Just to give it a really nice shine and when I let it cool down in this baking temperature for about five minutes, and then I'll take it out. [NOISE] Our bread has been cooling for 10 minutes now. You can see that it's starting to come out from the sides. That is great. Just do your baking pan and your bread should come out really easily. Just like that. This bread looks so amazing. It's raisen so well and if you lifted it should feel really light. It is the reason we don't put it down in the baking pan is because you want the moisture to evaporate as well and you want the bread to be really light and not soggy from the bottom. I'm going to cool this down for at least one hour but if he can push it, do it for two hours so that all the moisture is evaporated and after it's cooled down, we'll have a look at the texture inside. Our brioche has been cooling on for about one and a half hours now and it shouldn't feel warm. It should be very, very light and so a nice. Let's have a look at the texture. The texture for good brioche should be like a little bit stringy. Should be like really nice, you see that stringy texture. You see that, strings inside. That's really good brioche. Beautiful though. That only comes if you knead the dough for super long and then that's how this texture builds up and the butter is nicely mixed in the dough. Let's tear it. That's really beautiful and already feels so delicious. Let's have a taste. [NOISE] This is by far my favorite bread like even then I made it in primary school, I really loved eating it. It's such an amazing French bread. Beautiful. Look at the texture inside the bread that is so nice and light, beautiful. If you press it. It just spring back immediately. Super amazing. What I'm going to do is cut into slices and show you how to make a French toast, which is the best if you use a brioche bread to make it, is just amazing. 18. French Brioche- My Favourite French Toast: In this lesson, I'm going to show you how to make a French toast with a brioche slice. So this is one of my favorite recipes to make and it's super easy to make. The ingredients I'm going to be using is two eggs at room temperature, just about 30 ml of milk. So I usually use one table spoon of milk per egg so that's two tablespoons of milk. I'm also going to put a tiny bit of sugar in the egg mixture and to finish it, I'm going to add some maple syrup, right at the end. I'm also going to be using a non-stick pan here and you can also use the cast iron pan, that's completely fine. To make our egg custard, to dip the brioche, I'm going to crack two eggs and make sure to get a wide bowl so all the parts of the bread are covered nicely. To this, I'm going to add the milk, and just a pinch of sugar, and a tiny bit of salt as well. Just whisk it through and the egg mixture is nicely combined. I'm going put the saucepan on the heat with some butter. Put the gas on really low heat. Put the saucepan on top and put a tiny bit of butter on it. So while it's slowly melting, let's soak our brioche bread. Put the bread in the mixture and you want to do nicely. So maybe about 30 seconds on each side and make sure the gas is already low so the butter doesn't burn. Let's turn it and you'll see that it's soaked really well and feel quite heavy and this bread is actually really nice to make French toast because it's so soft and it soaks the egg really well. Flip it again. You can already see that it's soaked up so much of the liquid. Just one more time and now I can see that it's completely soaked it out. So that's perfect. So let's see our pan now, let's see if it's hot enough. Now you see the butter is sizzling now. So that's great. Just spread the butter nicely. I'm going to put my French toast on it now. Perfect. You don't want the heat to be too aggressive. You want to cook this quite tenderly and slowly. It's been about 15 seconds. I'm just going to check the bread, see if it's got good amount of color. Just gently check it and I want to just do a little bit more. Just about 10 seconds more. It's important that the butter is sizzling, but you don't want the heat to be too high as well. Let's flip the bread now, beautiful, that looks really nice. So you don't want it to be too dark, this color is really nice. It's formed a nice surface on top. So the other side as well you put for like 15-20 seconds. Keep swirling the butter so it nicely caramelize this. I'm just going to add a tiny bit more butter on this side just to give it more flavor. Let's check the color. So it needs just a little bit more color , just a tiny bit. At this point I'm just going to add a little bit of maple syrup, so that it forms a nice caramelized sauce. Just about a teaspoon. Perfect. Now, I'm going to flip the French toast. Perfect. That looks very nice. For the butter, I'm going to let the maple syrup combine and just give it this nice fluffy flavor. Just about 15 seconds on each side so that it coats nicely. Flip the side again, here you can see that it's shining now. It's really nice. You can also put a little bit of cinnamon sugar if you want, that also tastes really good and just make sure that the heat is really low. This looks really good and its smell is also really nice. So let's put this on a plate now. Pick it with your spatula. Perfect. Let's transport to the plate. Beautiful, it looks really nice. I can already feel that it's got a nice color and a nice coating of caramel as well. To finish it, I'm just going to take the remaining butter and maple syrup emulsion and just pour it on top of our French toast. It's got that really nice flavor as well. If you want, you can even put some wet cream on top. You put some berries as well. But I'm just going to keep it plain. So if you cut it, it's super moist. It's has really nice texture, it's absorbed the egg really well. It feels so good. Let's taste it now. That tastes so delicious. I really like the sugar layer on top. So tasty. I hope you really liked this lesson and I hope you make this at home as well. 19. French Brioche- Dinner Roll and Ham and Cheese Sandwich: It's our remaining dough, I'm just going to weigh it. It's roughly about 170 grams. You have two options here. Either you can make it into three pieces or you can even make it into two pieces. I'll just go ahead and make it into two pieces. For this shaping. We're going to do is just press it down, turn it and make it into ball first, just to get a tight shape. After you shape it into a ball, what we do is we flip it and then take a rolling pin. Stretch it slightly. This is a dinner roll, basically similar shape to dinner roll. Just that much and just make a seam like that. Again, just see it here. On the side as well. See get something like this shape. At the end we're going to see that. It just ferments better and it doesn't open and it ferments. Perfect. Let's have a look at the other one as well. Just flip it. [inaudible] the doughs that have come to room temperature, it's getting more harder to shape. That's why it's better to do it fast when it's still cold and it's quite easy to shape. Press it like that and then one small, just seal it nicely on the sides as well. Then just close the seam. [NOISE] Perfect. [NOISE] Something like this. When it proofs it's going to become much bigger and it's going to expand quite a lot as well. [LAUGHTER] Similar to the last one. I'm going to spray some oil on the sheet so it doesn't stick to the bread and just cover it. This usually takes lesser time with proof, then the loaf then, because this is a free from there. We're going to check on it after maybe 45 minutes to an hour to see the size of the bread. After one hour, this is what our brioche looks like. It's expanded really well. If I shake the tray, you can see that it should wobble that means that's really nice fermentation. I already set the oven do preheat about 10, 15 minutes ago at a 200 degrees Celsius. My oven is nicely preheated for this to bake. Before baking it, I'm going to show you two ways you can do it. One is I'm going to score it with a blade. The other one, I'm just going to let it be like that. Before baking, I'm also going to egg wash it because with the brioche, you always egg wash it. But if you don't want to use an egg, you can also use milk if you like. [NOISE] To apply the egg wash on the brioche, I'm actually not going to use a brush. I'm just going to use a baking paper. The reason I'm going to do this is because sometimes when you use the brush, you can actually disturb the surface of the brioche and the baking bit off. It's much better actually. [NOISE] You don't actually damage the crust. [NOISE] This is a trick I learned in pastry school. They used to basically glaze the croissant with egg wash. We used to use baking paper instead of a brush. You can use this for other breads as well. [NOISE] Perfect the second one as well. One of them, I'm just going to take a blade and score it. I'll show it to you. Just take a blade like that. This is like a shaving blade and just make two scores like that. [NOISE] Just take the top, just put your hand here and gently just do it. See here this incision here like that. You don't want to get it too deep just so that it just got slightly. Now our bread is ready to bake. This what a brioche looks like. It looks so nice. If you lift, it should feel really light and airy. It just feel so amazing then so soft as as well. To finish it, I'm just going to brush it with some softened and butter just to give it a really nice shine. This is optional, but I really like doing it because it just gives a nice glaze to the dough. This one also turned out so well. You can score it. That's up to you if you want to score it or if you want to just bake it without scoring it. That's really up to you. [NOISE] After you've brushed butter on the brioche, I'm just going to transfer it to the cooling rack. This is really helpful because you want the moisture to evaporate. Sometimes if you leave it on their back, the bottom can get quite soggy. Cool it down for at least 30 minutes. After it's cooled down, we're going to learn how to make a ham and cheese sandwich. Our dinner rolls have been cooling down for 30 minutes now. If you hold in the hand they should feel really light. Let's have a look inside how it looks like. [NOISE] So soft. I can already feel that it is really dried and soft, that's great. You see the texture. You've got such nice and open holes here. It's super soft. The first sandwich you're going to make is a ham and cheese sandwich. What I'm going to do is put butter on both sides and put a little bit of mustard here, little bit of mayo here, some ham and cheese, super easy sandwich, but really delicious. Just take your softened butter and a really thin layer. It just gives a nice flavor to the bread. [NOISE] On the other side I'm going to [inaudible] [NOISE] attend air of Dijon mustard here. Just about maybe one-fourth of a teaspoon and mustard and ham go really well together. But if you don't like mustard, you can totally skip it out. Just a really thin layer. Just goes through the fat a little bit and gives good flavor. Perfect. This side I'm going to put just a little bit of mayo on up to squeeze the mayo. Perfect. That's about a teaspoon of mayo. This also gives really nice flavor. I've got some smoked ham, which is super tasty. Just put the ham on the base. You can put as much as you like. I just put a handful. To finish it, I'm just going to put some Swiss cheese slices on top. I'm going to use two slices and just break it into half. Just roughly break it into half and just cover it like that. Now it's optional if you want more cheese, you can basically put a little bit more. Totally up to you. I'm going to put just little bit more here and then close the sandwich. Perfect. That's our ham and cheese sandwich. Now if you want to cook this, you can definitely bake it for about five, 10 minutes whenever you want to serve the sandwich. Then the cheese will melt and it will taste really good. But right now I'm just going to have a bite because its a cool sandwich. Just see how it tastes like. You can see inside that looks so beautiful. This time, just super delicious. I'm going to cut this into half and show you. This bread goes so well with the ham and cheese sandwich. That's looks so nice. See the inside. A such a nice layer of cheese and mustard and mayo. This bread is so nice and airy and soft, super squishy. This is one of my favorite breads to make the sandwich with. It's so delicious. I hope you make this at home as well. I'm going to have another bite. 20. Ciabatta - Understanding Dough Percentages: In this lesson, we'll be learning a final recipe, which is an Italian Ciabatta bread. This bread is super high in hydration. So you have to be really careful the way you develop this dough. I'll show you different techniques of developing it. Also, I'm using 77 percent hydration. Now you can use anything between 70 to 77 percent whichever you're comfortable with. Now, when you bake this bread, you have to make sure that the oven is really hot, as well as you have to use steam in the oven so that the bread rises really well. So I'll show you all these techniques, as well as I'll also show you how to make a Motorola and tomato and bases sandwich. I'm super excited to start this lesson. Let's begin. Before we begin with the Ciabatta butter recipe, let's understand the dough percentages so I can explain to you the concept of hydration in this recipe. Flour as we know is a 100 percent and in our recipe a 300 grams. So this recipe makes about three to four Ciabatta pieces. So you can scale it up or scale down depending on how many you want to make. The hydration in this recipe now this is really important. You can keep it anywhere between 70 to 77 percent. I'm going to be using 77 percent but if you're just beginning out with really bad dough, you can reduce the hydration to 70 percent and basically go upwards from that based on what you're comfortable with. I'm using about 230 grams of water. You can use lesser than this as well. Now salt as we know is about two percent. That'll be about six grams. Yeast in this recipe is really less like I'm literally going to use about 0.3 percent which is like one gram of yeast. Now, what happens when you use less yeast is that we can give more time to the dough to develop as well as develop more flavor in the dough. Even when we're making baguettes or any artisan bread, using less yeast actually really helps us because the dough ferments slowly and we can incorporate more water in the dough. Now, oil I'm using in this recipe because it just makes it easier to handle the dough when we use oil. Anywhere between three to four percent is good. So I won't be adding this oil in the dough. I'll just be basically when I'm stretching and folding the dough, I'll be just massaging my hands with oil so it doesn't stick to my hand. This would be anywhere between 10 to 15 grams. Perfect. I would highly recommend you use bread flour in this recipe because the bread flour will actually be able to absorb more water in it and it will result in a better texture in the bread and it will rise more as well. When we make this dough we'll be basically adding the water in parts. The first part, we basically hydrate the flour with the yeast, then second part we basically hydrate the salt and we add that later. The first part is called orderlies. Now the reason we do this is because we want to hydrate the starches in the flower and the second part we add the salt with the water because we want to actually develop the gluten in the dough. I'll explain to you the process and I'm running through the recipe. But I just wanted to describe this because I want you to be comfortable with the amount of hydration you use. So depending on any time between this will be really good. Let's begin with the recipe. 21. Ciabatta- Making the Dough: In this lesson, we're going to be learning how to make the ciabatta dough. Because the dough is really high in hydration, we have to add the water in steps. Also when we first hydrate the dough, we'll do it without adding salt, because salt actually soaks up a lot of water from the dough and you want the dough to get nicely hydrated. This step is called autolyse. We usually use this process when we make saddle because we have doughs of really high hydration. What autolyse basically means is that you're hydrating the dough without salt. What we'll do now is add the yeast. This is 1 gram of yeast. Mix it together. You can use this autolyse process for other doughs as well if you are using a lot of water in the dough. When we add the water, please reserve about 20 grams. That 20 grams, we put it in the salt container. Perfect. We'll be adding the water in parts so that the dough can actually absorb the water. We don't really overload it with too much liquid initially. Just mix this together until the flour is completely absorbed with the water. This dough is really high in hydration so you need to follow these processes to get a really nice dough. We use the same process in bakeries as well to get nice bread. Just keep mixing it until all the flour's hydrated. At this point, we won't be adding the oil because the oil we're going to be using to stretch and fold the dough. Because when the dough gets really wet, it just starts sticking to your hand so the oil will actually help us stretch and fold the dough nicely. I've been mixing it for about 30 seconds. Now the dough has completely absorbed all the water. The bowl doesn't have any flour. At this point, what we're going to do is we're going to cover it and rest it for 30 minutes so that the flour can absorb the water really bad so that it doesn't get any dry spots. Just set this aside for 30 minutes. It's been 30 minutes. Let's mix the salt and the dough now. Our dough is nicely hydrated. When you mix the salt, make sure the salt is nicely combined in the water so you don't have any grains of salt remaining, and add all the water in. I'm using pink salt here, but you can use any salt. That's completely fine. Make sure that you have your dough scraper at hand just so that when the dough gets wet, you can take it off your hand. To absorb all the salt, I'm just going to pinch it inside. Something like this so you want the dough to absorb all the water. Keep mixing it until all the water is nicely combined. You'll get a really, really shaggy dough at this stage, but don't worry, it'll come together as we keep kneading it. At this point, I'm just going to basically put a little bit of oil in my hand so I can just get it together nicely. When you put this salt, what happens is that it absorbs the water from the dough as well. Even though the dough looks quite wet now because of the salt and because when the dough sits, it will absorb all the water. Then you've combined all the water. Just like that. This is a technique in which we just develop the dough slightly. What you do is you just keep playing the dough like this. Do this for about two minutes. This will develop the dough as well as it makes the dough absorb all the liquids. Just keep doing like this. Just keep stretching the dough like this. These techniques you can use in sourdough as well. It's just the same techniques. We work with higher hydration doughs. It's just a little bit different how we develop the dough. As you keep doing this, you'll see that the dough will feel much, much better. I'm just going to do this for another minute then I'll show you the dough. It's been two minutes. Now you'll see that the dough will not be as sticky as before. This looks quite nice. Now I'm going to cover this and rest it for another 30 minutes. Then we'll start the stretch and fold process to develop the gluten in the dough. It's been 30 minutes. Let's have a look at the dough now. It's risen slightly. What I'm going to do is put a little bit of oil on my hands and also on top of the dough so it doesn't stick. I'm just going to take it to my workbench and show you a technique of slap and fold. This is a technique to develop the dough. Take your band scraper and scrape out all the dough on the workbench. Now what we do is we hold the dough like that and we slap and fold it. Slap it like this and you fold it like that. This basically develops the gluten in the dough as well as develops [inaudible]. We'll do this maybe about 50 times. You don't need to count it. I just do it until I feel like the dough is becoming stronger. If it's sticking to your hand, you can put just a little bit of more oil. Watch closely what I'm doing. I'm just basically using these two fingers, slapping it, and folding it like that. Slap it and fold it. This is a really nice technique to develop gluten. I use this technique as well in sourdough. It's super nice. If it's sticking to the workbench, just take your bench scraper, and just get it together. Perfect. Now you'll see that the dough feels more smoother now and it feels more stronger as well. Make this into a ball with your bench scraper. Perfect. Take your hands and oil. Let's put this back in our bowl. Perfect. I'm going to cover this and set this aside for 30 more minutes. Then we'll give it a round of turns. It's been 30 minutes and now it's time to give the dough the second stretch and folds. Just dip your hand in the oil. Put a little bit of oil on top of the dough. Now what we're going to do is take one end and fold it like that. We'll do this about 10 times. As the dough keeps developing, we have to be more gentle with the dough because we don't want to deflate it too much. This will just develop gluten in the dough. Just a few more times. You'll be able to see that the dough will feel more airy now as we keep fermenting it. Perfect. Just make a round ball. Just like that. Now I'm going to cover this and ferment it for another 30 minutes. After 30 minutes, it's time to give the last series of stretch and folds. Now if you observe the dough, it should feel less stickier to your hands. Also, it should feel like it should have more strength basically when you stretch it. It shouldn't break. That's great. Just put oil in your hands again. This dough is still quite wet. Don't worry if it feels wet. It is quite wet. Because it's wet, it will rise more in the oven because the water will evaporate and it will help the bread rise more. Similarly to the last time, I'm going to give 10 stretch and folds. Stretch it, fold it. Similarly here. Be quite gentle with the dough. Around five times. Perfect. Just shape it to a ball. Now you can see that the skin feels more smoother. That is perfect. That's really good. You want it to reach this stage. Now we can progress through our fermentation stage where want the dough to rise more, maybe till here. I would reckon this takes about anywhere between one to one-and-a-half hours. I'm going to show you the dough after one hour and then we'll assess if the dough is fermented enough. Just cover it and set it aside. 22. Ciabatta: Shape and Bake : After one hour of by fermentation, let's have a look at the dough. [NOISE] This looks perfect. You see it's risen really well an now it's ready to shape and cut it. It might take you longer to do this or it might take you lesser time. It's totally up to your weather conditions and your temperature. Today is slightly warm that's why it's fermenting faster. When we take this on the workbench, make sure to put a lot of flour because the dough is wet and it will be sticky. [NOISE] I wouldn't recommend putting a lot of flour for other doughs but this one you have to do it otherwise it will stick to the surface. We take the dough out. You have to use your band scrapper. [NOISE] Just gently put your band scrapper here on this side and it should fall off because it's so wet that it just falls off on its own. You don't need to pull a lot of pressure on it. [NOISE] If it's sticking somewhere, you can just guide it through. [NOISE] Perfect. [NOISE] Flour your hands as well. [NOISE] What I'm going to do is just take one edge and fold it along the other edge so that we get a smooth surface just like that. Just turn it, just pat it down a little bit so you get rid of these air bubbles. At this point, we don't want to deflate the dough, we have to handle it as less as possible because we don't want to disturb the fermentation. What I'm going to do is just stretch it a little bit. Now it's up to you if you want to divide this into two parts so you get a slightly larger ciabatta. I'm going to divide this into three parts. You can also divide this into four parts. It's totally up to you how big you want it. To divide the dough I'll have to use a metal scraper because you get more cleaner cuts. Just estimate it. [NOISE] You have to do this in one go. [NOISE] Perfect [NOISE] This one just stretch it slightly. If you have any large air bubbles, I like to deflate them because they don't really bake too well. Just stretch it, that is a good size of ciabatta. I'm going to set this aside and move on to this one to stretch it slightly. When we ferment this as well, this will spread. It's going to spread a lot when it ferments. This is a good size. This size is pretty good. Similarly, for the other one as well. [NOISE] Just stretch it really gently. You don't have to do too much. Perfect, that is great. What I'm going to do is setup a towel. You can use a linen cloth as well. That is what we use in bakeries. Flour it generously and just arrange it. Let's have a look how to do that. To setup the cloth from proofing, flour this very generously because you don't want the ciabatta to stick. I'm going to put a ciabatta on, basically, three of them here. You take the dough [NOISE] and you just flip it to shift it slightly and just pick it like that and you make a space here like that so it ferments nicely, it doesn't really spread that much and it's supported by the towel. Similarly, the next one as well. I just pick it and you just flip it like that. Perfect. Just arrange it nicely. Perfect. [NOISE] Just lift it so there's a space for it to sit. In professional bakeries, we use a linen cloth called couche and we do it the similar way. If you're making baguettes or [inaudible] you just put it like that and you do it like this. The reason we do this is because it doesn't spread that much. [NOISE] Spread the flour and the last one. [NOISE] Then you flip it like that so it sits nicely. Perfect. That looks really nice. What I'm going to do is cover this with a cloth and we're going to ferment this for anywhere between 20 minutes to an hour. When this is fermenting, we're going to set up our oven to preheat at around 230 degrees Celsius. I'll show you the oven set up as well when you want to back this bread. [NOISE] Just cover this with a plastic wrap so that the dough doesn't get any dry spots. Perfect. Just wrap it like that. If you have a towel, you can put that as well. That's completely fine. Let's see the oven setup to bake them. Let's have a look at the oven setup to bake the ciabatta. I'm going to put the oven to preheat at 230 degrees Celsius. This is add fan bake. Inside the oven I have a baking steel. You can also use a baking stone and if you don't have that, you can also use a tray which is inverted. The purpose of doing this is just to have a surface where a lot of heat can be transferred to the bread when we load it because you want a really nice oven spring when they put the ciabatta in the oven. This same setup can also be used for baguettes or even sourdough. It's completely fine to do that. Another tip I wanted to share with you is that to create steam in the oven, I put a cast and burn as well. When I preheat the oven for about 30, 40 minutes, then our bread is proving, what will happen is the pan will get really warm. [NOISE] What you're going to do [NOISE] is you're going to put ice in the pan when we load the bread inside. This is a really nice way to create steam in the oven. Also, it results in really airy loaf. [NOISE] I'm also going to be spraying some water as well when I load the bread. In professional ovens, we have steam injection but in home ovens we don't really have that. This is a good way to create steam to get a really nice and open textured bread. Let's leave the oven to preheat while we wait for our bread to prove. [NOISE] It's been 45 minutes and this is what a ciabatta looks like I can see that it's nicely proofed. [NOISE] What you need to do is press it and it should spring back really slowly, so that's great. I've also got three sheets [NOISE] of baking paper just so that it fits the ciabatta. I'll show you how you actually flip the ciabatta on that baking paper. You have to be really gentle here. [NOISE] In bakeries we actually use a wooden panel, really thin. I'm just trying to recreate the same thing here. [NOISE] We put it below the ciabatta and you use the t towel. You basically flip it from here. Put the baking paper below it slightly and then flip it like that. [NOISE] Just put it below and then you just gently flip it like this from here just like that. [NOISE] Then you can just transfer it a little bit here. [NOISE] Perfect. Let's have a look at how to transfer the ciabatta to the baking paper. [NOISE] What you do is you just put the baking paper below the bread so it flips nicely. What you do is you just flip the t towel on it. Just like that. That's perfect. You don't really deflate anything and it maintains its shape really well. In professional bakeries we use this really thin wooden panel to do it but I'm just trying to recreate that. You can also lift it with your hand and put it on the baking sheet, which I'll show you next. But this method, if you can master it, is the best way to do it because it maintains the shape really well. The easiest way to transfer it is you just lifted and just flip it over. Just lift it with your hand and flip it over just like that. I don't prefer this method a lot because it puts marks on it. But if you want, you can do it like this as well [NOISE] just to make it really easy. Let's have a look how to bake these. Our oven is nicely preheated. It's been preheating at 230 degrees for about 45 minutes. Your tray should be really warm also your cast iron pan should be really one as well. What I like doing is I like putting the ciabatta and just spraying some water as well as putting ice in the cast-iron tray. When you put ice or when you spray water, that has to be tame, you do it at the end because you don't want to injure yourself. Also you need to do this really fast. Make sure you have everything ready. You have your spray bottle, you have the ice ready as well. Let's do it. I'm just going to gently put it. [NOISE] You can also slide it directly from the board if you like but it's just easy for me to show it like this. Just arrange them so they have space to expand. I'm just going to pull out my cast iron pan, [NOISE] put the ice in it, [NOISE] spray the water, create steam, and close it. [NOISE] Done. I'm going to bake this for about 20 minutes and then let's have a look how it looks like. This is our final bread and it looks so beautiful. You want your ciabatta to look really rustic and really nice. I also wanted to show you that this one here, I baked for about 20 minutes and this one I bake for 25 minutes just to get more color in it. You can do it either way. If you like lighter color, you can do this color. If you want a little bit more darker color, which is what I like, I like to bake it a little bit more longer [NOISE] because I really like the taste when the color is a little bit more darker. It's totally up to you. To cool this down, what I like doing is [NOISE] just taking it off the baking paper [NOISE]. I do this because I don't want the bottom to get soggy and I want all the moisture to evaporate from the bread. I'm going to cool this down for about one hour and then we have a look at the inside and the texture of the bread. Our bread has been cooling down for an hour now so let's have a look inside the bread and the texture of the bread. [NOISE] That sound was really nice, it's a good crust. Look at the inside. That's a really nice texture. That's such amazing open holes and here as well. That's beautiful. If I just [NOISE] basically break it, you can see all the fermentation and the strands. [NOISE] That's really nice. Let's have a taste. That tastes so nice. It's got such an amazing flavor and the texture is so light as well. After you've made the bread, I'm going to show you how to make an Italian sandwich with some burrata, tomatoes, and basil. 23. Mozzerella Sandwich: To make the sandwich, the ingredients are as follows. We're going to use some fresh basil, and if you can't get this, you can use pesto as well. I'm also going to use some burrata. This is such an amazing cheese to use in sandwiches and it's super soft and nice. If you can't get this, you can use fresh mozzarella as well. I'm also going to use a tomato and our ciabatta. It's a super easy sandwich to make, and it has such amazing Italian flavors in it. Let's see how to make the sandwich. The first step in making the sandwich is to just cut the bread. Perfect. Next, what I'm going to do is I'm going to put some olive oil on the bottom, and I'll just start preparing my tomatoes. To prepare the tomato in the sandwich, now you can also use cherry tomatoes. I like using this vine-ripened tomato. What I'm going to do is cut it thinly and season it with salt and pepper so that the moisture is extracted from it and just let it be on the chopping board for about five to 10 minutes. Now the reason I'm doing this is because I don't want the moisture to come out and make the bread soggy. Doing this just helps preserve the sandwich and then you can store it as well overnight in the fridge if you like. Just cut really thin slices. It doesn't have to be super thin as well, just so that it's not super thick. Perfect. Let's just arrange it here and season it well. Put a little bit of sea salt, and some cracked pepper Perfect. Set this aside for five to 10 minutes, and then we assemble the sandwich. After five minutes, my tomatoes have released their water now so we can use them. Just soak one side of the bread with some olive oil just hope it gives a nice flavor to the sandwich. Perfect and I'm just going to arrange the tomatoes here. You can put as much as you like. If you like more, you can put more as well. I'm just going to put about four slices here and put a little bit of burrata on top and with the burrata, just be a little bit careful because it's got a nice curd inside. With mozzarella, you won't face this problem, with burrata you need to be a little bit careful. Just cut it and put the mozzarella here and then we'll spoon over all the curds on top. It's super rustic and nice. Take the curds and spread it on top just like that. That's actually one of my favorite parts, it's so delicious. I put just a little bit more cheese on it. Perfect. Let's crack a little bit more pepper on top Perfect. Let's finish this with basil. Now if you want, you can put a little bit of balsamic glaze on it. I'll just keep it really simple here, and close the sandwich. That's how beautiful and simple Italian cheese and tomato sandwich. Let's put the sandwich on our chopping board, and let's slice it from the center and see how it looks like. If you want, you can actually store the sandwich, like just wrap it and put it on overnight as well. That's completely fine, but I like making it fresh. If you like, you can even put some pesto chicken in it, if you like even some ham, chorizo, either of those things would be quite nice. Perfect. Let's see. That looks beautiful. It's got a nice little cheese, tomatoes, and basil. Simple sandwich but it tastes so good and actually, the bread makes the sandwich super delicious because it's so nice and airy. Let's have a bite. The sandwich is so delicious. It's so simple, but it's so delicious at the same time, and the burrata just makes it so good. I hope you make this at home, and I hope you really like the recipe. 24. Q & A- Common Mistakes and Solutions: In this lesson, we'll be covering some most common mistakes you can make when you make bread and also some Q&As I usually get from my students. The first one is that the bread is really dense in the center, is really heavy when you lift it. This usually happens because of three reasons. The first one is that the oven wasn't really hot enough when you put the bread in. The bread didn't really get that oven spring you need. When you put the bread, so just make sure that the oven is nicely pre-heated so that the bread can get the initial spring of heat when it has to rise. The second one is that the dough wasn't proofed enough. Usually when the dough is under-proofed, what happens is that the dough cannot build enough gases in itself, so it cannot rise that much. Make sure that the dough is proofed enough so the dough can expand really well in the oven. The third one is that the dough wasn't baked enough. Now, sometimes when we underbake the bread, what happens is that the center remains really doy and it doesn't get baked. Make sure that the bread is nicely baked. When you take it out, you can actually check if you can put a skewer inside or you can actually tap into bottom. It should sound really hollow. Make sure that the bread is nicely baked. The second question I get a lot is that the bread becomes really saggy from the bottom. Now, this usually happens if you don't cool down the bread on a wire rack. What happens is that the steam basically hits the bottom of the bread and it gets really saggy. Make sure if you're making the bread in a bread tin, take it out and cool it down in the wire rack, so all the heat can escape from the bottom and all the moisture air escape as well. The third question I get is that the dough itself is really bad and the bread when you bake it, it just spreads completely and doesn't hold itself. Now, this problem will usually happen when you're making really high hydration doughs like sourdough, and in our lesson, a ciabatta. This could happen because of two reasons. The first one is that the flour you're using doesn't have enough gluten to date that much amount of water. The second one is at the dough wasn't developed enough. Now, usually we think that if you put more hydration, the dough will tend to rise more and will have more open holes, but that's not actually true. It completely depends on the flour you're using. Some flours cannot take that much water. If you put too much water in the dough, what happens is that the flour cannot absorb so much water and it completely deflates. It cannot hold the gluten structure. Make sure to use the appropriate amount of hydration based on your flour. Also, when you developing the dough, make sure to give it a nice amount of stretching folds so that the gluten develops and it actually stays really nice, it doesn't completely collapse when you're proofing it and when you're baking it. The next one is that the dough is proofing really slowly or it's not proofing at all. Now, this happens because the yeast you're using is not fresh or it's probably expired and it doesn't work anymore. Do check if the yeast is good. You can just put it in a little warm water, with little bit of sugar. If the yeast is working, the water will start to develop this faultiness on top. You can check your yeast based on that. When you're storing yeast, I like to put it in the freezer, and I always use instant yeast. I get these 500-gram bags, which can be used in professional kitchens, and they usually last about a year. Try to get those if you can. The next question I get, especially when you make enrich doughs in case of brioche, is that the butter actually split from the dough and it didn't combine well. Now, this can happen because the dough wasn't developed enough when you added the fat in it. Make sure you develop it really well. The last one I'm going to cover is that the dough becomes dry when you're proofing it. Make sure to cover the dough nicely with a plastic wrap or a wet towel because you don't want it to get dry on the top because then it won't expand really well. Make sure to cover the dough at all times. I hope this Q&A helps you answer your questions. But if you have anymore questions, feel free to message me and I will get back to you on those. 25. Thank you: We've finally reached the end of this class. Thank you so much for attending this class. Please feel free to share pictures of your work as well, so I can just comment and help you out. If you have any questions, feel free to message me anytime and I will definitely get back to you. Also, follow my YouTube page and my Instagram page as well. Thank you so much and I hope to see you soon in one of my other classes as well.