Boost Your GRE Score: Analytical Essay Mastery | Ashley | Skillshare

Boost Your GRE Score: Analytical Essay Mastery

Ashley

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5 Lessons (20m)
    • 1. GRE Intro

      2:10
    • 2. Using The 5 20 5 Method

      3:17
    • 3. GRE Vocabulary

      9:19
    • 4. Argument Essay Template

      2:45
    • 5. GRE Final Thoughts and Tips

      2:45

About This Class

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This course is designed to help you boost your GRE Analytical Essay score by 1-2 points. As a teacher and writer I've helped hundreds of students improve their writing. I've compiled some of my best tips and tricks into this course to give you a quick and easy way to improve your score. This course covers:

  • Time Management
  • Analytical Vocabulary
  • Outlining
  • Building Analytical Templates
  • Includes Sample Prompts

I hope you enjoy this course! Comment below if you have any questions.

Transcripts

1. GRE Intro: Hi. My name's actually I'm an English teacher and a writer. I'm gonna be showing you how to improve your g r E score by 1 to 2 points. I've helped hundreds of students meet their writing goals, and I'm excited to help you do that as well. So one of the first things will do is take a look at the 5 25 method of time management. This is a really unique way to get your ideas on the page quickly and concisely while also making sure that you have Ah, a well written piece from there. We're gonna go on to boosting your vocabulary with analytical words. These are words that will enrich your piece and make sure that you're sounding very strong in your arguments After that will make easy, flexible and reliable templates that you can practice with over and over again. The more you practice with the use, the easier it'll be to draft. That s a on the day off. I've also include tips and tricks, healthy habits, day of prep and practice, writing examples inthe e um, supplementary readings below. There's gonna be tons of time to practice that you can have access to its all inthe e section below. So take a look at that. We'll also have examples of successful analytical essays and unsuccessful analytical essays . We're going to write some really great outlines and templates. So before we get all this, let's take a quick look at how you're feeling. Um, what do you goals for the G R E right, then below. And let's see if we can find some friends who are having the same experiences. Let's also take a quick look at your fears and obstacles. Where do you afraid of the day off? Is there anything that is holding you back from doing your very best right that out below? And we'll see if we can get some support from your fellow Jerry takers. Okay, so it's important to remember to remember that you're not alone. A lot of people struggle with writing on the spot, and they can feel nervous. So hang in there. Hopefully, these tips and tricks are going to help you feel more confident and get the results you're looking for. Thank you guys so much for to it again. And I hope you enjoy the course 2. Using The 5 20 5 Method : everyone. This course is gonna be walking you through the 5 25 method of time management. So we'll begin by looking at ways of unlocking better ideas during the outlining phase. Then we're going to practice hitting all the landmarks, making sure that you're getting all the substantiate ing fax on the page. The last thing you'll do is investigate for improvement, so making final edits before you rack up your piece. This is a really good method to use for both kinds of people. So we've got the first type of person who sits down in the testing room and their pulse is like a whip, and they're really nervous, and they just can't get anything on the page to begin with. And then there might be the other type of person where the ideas air flowing out of you faster than you can get them on the page. But they might like cohesion and clarity, which is also a problem. So the 5 25 method is a lot like a stoplight. The first section you're going to be brainstorming and outlining so letting ideas flow freely, it's go, go, go! Get everything on the page that you can. The second phase is like the yellow bites. You're gonna slow down and really make sure that you're finding your ideas. You're writing your collective piece. You're making it into a practical, informal essay and your last five minutes you're going to be editing for clarity. So it's your red light. You're stopping your re reading and you're cleaning the piece up. Okay, Now, I want to make sure that, um, it that you guys have, ah, some good clues for the five minutes on either side. So for the 1st 5 minutes, you don't want to judge yourself. You just want to let everything flow out of you. Don't get too hung up about, um, every single detail you just want to get the bullet points down. So don't write full sentences. Don't go wild with making it perfect. Uh, for the next section, yes, you're gonna be writing your full and detailed essay. If you get stuck, you go right back to the outline and also the the reading prompts. So you want to make sure that your re reading that if you get stuck to figure out how you can properly respond and the last thing is making sure that you are refining and focusing your response. Um, this isn't really the place to be going nuts with grammar and spelling. Those things are definitely important, and you should clean them up when possible. But it's more important that your substantiated your arguments and following the typical format and structure than having perfect grammar and spelling. Um, so just keep that in mind. That's a really, um, lesser known effective at the Jerry. Okay, so we're gonna have a quick assignment here. You can read the prompt below and then respond with utilizing this methods. You're gonna be doing an outline yourself using the 5 25 method. You'll do it, outline a written response and then the editing eso go ahead and put your final response in the comments below. And we could share that with the class. Ah, If you have any questions, let me know. I'm happy to help at any point, and I think you guys are gonna do a great job. Thank you so much for turning in. And I look forward to working with you again soon. 3. GRE Vocabulary: everyone. This is gonna be a video featuring some wonderful vocabulary to spice up your argumentative essay. A lot of this could be used for your issue based essay as well, but we're gonna be focusing primarily on argumentative vocabulary. Okay, One thing to remember before we do a deep dive. The Jerry is not about writing pretty. So don't worry about poetic language. Anything too fancy. We're just going to use very utilitarian words right now. So drop the poetry and pick up your tool belt. All right, The first section, we're going to get a little bit list e. So we're gonna be focusing on sequencing words. First sequencing words should be really familiar to you. They're one of the first things you learn when beginning to write essays in elementary school and so on. So examples would be 1st 2nd next, and so on. Sequencing words Just give your reader an idea of where they are in time and space. And they're also ways of substantiate ing the evidence in your article or I should say, essay. Let's take a look at some more detailed examples. We have to begin with 1st 2nd 3rd in the second place next. Then finally additionally, moreover, another And in conclusion, these. They're all wonderful sequencing words that can be peppered throughout your essay to give a context of where they are in time and space. Yeah, OK, But essays do need more than just a sense of order if the reader is going to trust you that you need to sound certain in your arguments, so ways that you could do that would be using using words to express certainty. So we're going to be using words to express certainty and show confidence. They're going to make your arguments appear more valid and conclusive. Let's take a look at vocabulary that expresses certainty. We have obviously certainly, of course, plainly undoubtably. There's so many others that could be added to this list. But basically it's anything that sounds super decisive, like you're very confident in your point of view, out of those things you would not use in a typical day to day speech. So keep that in mind. You're allowed to be a little more forceful here. You're even expected to be okay, so the next thing I want to warn you about real quickly is you cannot express certainty. If you're not going to substantiate your claims, right, you don't want to make big claims like, um, make things like obviously, obviously, this is the most important thing that you need to know or undoubtably. I'm the most important person without backing it up with fax or some kind of evidence based ah statement. So you could say, undoubtedly, I'm the coolest person in the world. I have four cats. Who knows? That's probably not the best argument. Okay, so now let's look at ways to support define and give consequence to our writing. We've made some pretty big claims using those words like obvious and undoubtably. So how can we substantiate our arguments were going to do that with the next set of vocabulary supported vocabulary is just like your BFF supported vocab offer specific examples of why you're in the right. Let's see what that looks like. We have, for example, such as to illustrate, for instance, namely and in particular, so these are just ways of really hampering home. Your your arguments and your evidence supported vocabulary helps your argument seem more valid. Here's an example. I could say puppies are the cutest, but that sounds a lot like an opinion, right? Whereas if I said puppies were known to be the cutest animal to illustrate, puppies have big, curious eyes, much like a human baby. That sounds a lot more evidence based, even if the facts aren't really accurate. Okay, so that's another interesting fact about the G r E, especially when it comes to the argument based essay. Is that fax air not necessarily required. They're great, but they're not necessarily required. What they're looking for is to see that you're capable of making a solid argument. So well structured, scientific based argument. So don't get too hung up on what you don't know about, um the crazy prompts that they've given you. All right, let's get back to work. Take a look at some new vocabulary. So now we're gonna be adding to your point of view. We're gonna look at examples, Okay? Addition, words. Reaffirm your argument. Think of it like adding money to the bank. The more you have, the more secure you are. So you don't need to go crazy wild, But it's good to have substantiate ing um, vocabulary. For every single piece of information you're introducing or as many as you can. There's some examples we have in addition to. Similarly, that one's always so hard for me to say, Ah, we have likewise as well as and furthermore, these are all great ways to continue to build your arguments. All right. Next we have contrasting vocabulary, so contrasting vocabulary is put simply showing the other side of things. Here's what some contrasting vocabulary might look like. We have, however, on the other hand, despite although on the contrary. And whereas all right, let's keep rolling along now we have conditional vocabulary. Conditional vocabulary is a lot like a mathematical equation. Conditional words basically say, if X is true than X must be false or I guess you could substitute in. Why? If X is true, then why must be false? So if we're to believe a premise that social media is bad for teens, then we must also believe that teens Aaron capable of deciphering what is trustworthy news and what has been sensationalized for likes in traffic. This is an example of what conditional vocabulary might look like. Okay, we have a few more examples here we have if, unless weather provided that four depending on, and so that these are all great ways to use conditional vocabulary. But there's also more. We have cause and effect vocabulary. It works in a similar way to conditional vocabulary. It says. If X happens, then why must be the result? Oh, or why, maybe the result? Here's an example due to the fact I eat a whole pizza, I feel like I might die. That's not a true story. Okay. Ah, here's some cause and effect Spoke a cause and effect vocabulary. We have since, as because off due to owing to the reason why leads to and cause of pretty straightforward stuff. All right, we have just a few more categories. Hang in there. Now we're gonna look at time based vocabulary. Okay? So time vocabulary is again very straight board we have before from since, As until meanwhile, at the moment when whenever. As soon as just as presently at the present. And currently okay, definition vocabulary. This is just basically what it sounds like. So it's things that are creating definitions. You're defining either a thesis or you're defining a few points or an argument, and these words could be is refers to that is consists of such as like, and I'm sure there's plenty of others out there in the university that you confined. All right, summary vocab. This is so important you need to summarise and restate your feces. Summary vocab is used to wrap up your arguments. It's very often seen in the PC statement. It's also seen, at the very end, the conclusion of your entire essay. Ah, here's an example to summarize. Social media cannot be bad for teens because and I'll let you fill in the blanks. Okay, summary vocab here we have in conclusion to summarize, lastly finally to sum up, to conclude, to capitulate. And in short, in short, is one that you can usually pepper in throughout the essay. It doesn't necessarily have to be at the very end. All right, so I know that a lot of these words are probably familiar to you, but we're going to practice using them in a very decisive way to show that you could make an argumentative essay. So use some of the vocabulary from class today to represent each category we covered. So you're going to write a sentence using one word from each category and you could put that in the comments section below. Okay. And feel free to get creative. Sometimes it's good to try out new and crazy sentences, so you can remember those words even more easily. All right. Thank you guys So much. Great work today. And I look forward to seeing you again in the next lesson. Beiber one. 4. Argument Essay Template: Welcome back. Today we're going to be exploring some argumentative Jerry s A templates. Some of these components could be used for the issue section as well, but we're gonna be focusing primarily on the argumentative essay today. All right, The first thing you want to do is begin with a sample outline. This outline can be applied to pretty much any type of essay that you're writing for school or for testing purposes. So you're going to begin with your introduction. Your body, which is broken down into the first main idea Second main idea, third main idea, and then finally your conclusion. I've included a link to this below, so you can explore it in further detail. But I encourage you with each prompt to try to create a sample outline. You don't have to go too crazy with it, but just have an idea of how you would like to develop your essay and how your thesis is gonna be supported with each additional argument. Okay, the next thing you'll do is create a Philip all template. Ah, this is something you can do with pen and paper. You could do it in a Google doc on word however you like. I've included a sample here below, so essentially what you're doing is creating a generic essay that you're going to plug the details into. It's kind of like a math equation, so you have your opening line, which says, the author argues, concludes, or whatever other word you might like to use. The author concludes that, and then you're going to restate the general idea of Thebes prompt. And then you're going to go through and break down, um, each different section here so you can plug in the details from your specific prompt into the template. Templates are super helpful because they build out this, um, way of responding to prompts. That's very methodical. So you're supporting every single argument you have, and you're following a structure which is expected for the proctor in for the computer. That's gonna be great in your test. Uh, like I said in a previous video, these essays did not need to be beautiful. They just need to convey that you understand how to support your arguments and how to present analytical and argumentative topics and viewpoints. Okay, so I've included some links below to some sample writing prompts I would encourage you to go ahead and try out some of the writing prompts using this method. Take the sample outline and take the sample template and give it a try. See if it helps you to create a faster completed piece and posted below. Let's see what you guys have compared to your classmates. I hope this was helpful. And I look forward to seeing you guys in the next video. Thanks, guys. Bye bye. 5. GRE Final Thoughts and Tips: Welcome back. Today we're going to be exploring some argumentative Jerry s A templates. Some of these components could be used for the issue section as well, but we're gonna be focusing primarily on the argumentative essay today. All right, The first thing you want to do is begin with a sample outline. This outline can be applied to pretty much any type of essay that you're writing for school or for testing purposes. So you're going to begin with your introduction. Your body, which is broken down into the first main idea Second main idea, third main idea, and then finally your conclusion. I've included a link to this below, so you can explore it in further detail. But I encourage you with each prompt to try to create a sample outline. You don't have to go too crazy with it, but just have an idea of how you would like to develop your essay and how your thesis is gonna be supported with each additional argument. Okay, the next thing you'll do is create a Philip all template. Ah, this is something you can do with pen and paper. You could do it in a Google doc on word however you like. I've included a sample here below, so essentially what you're doing is creating a generic essay that you're going to plug the details into. It's kind of like a math equation, so you have your opening line, which says, the author argues, concludes, or whatever other word you might like to use. The author concludes that, and then you're going to restate the general idea of Thebes prompt. And then you're going to go through and break down, um, each different section here so you can plug in the details from your specific prompt into the template. Templates are super helpful because they build out this, um, way of responding to prompts. That's very methodical. So you're supporting every single argument you have, and you're following a structure which is expected for the proctor in for the computer. That's gonna be great in your test. Uh, like I said in a previous video, these essays did not need to be beautiful. They just need to convey that you understand how to support your arguments and how to present analytical and argumentative topics and viewpoints. Okay, so I've included some links below to some sample writing prompts I would encourage you to go ahead and try out some of the writing prompts using this method. Take the sample outline and take the sample template and give it a try. See if it helps you to create a faster completed piece and posted below. Let's see what you guys have compared to your classmates. I hope this was helpful. And I look forward to seeing you guys in the next video. Thanks, guys. Bye bye.