Body Language: Appear Confident and Poised When You Speak | TJ Walker | Skillshare

Body Language: Appear Confident and Poised When You Speak

TJ Walker, Public Speaking and Media Training Expert

Play Speed
  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x
23 Lessons (34m)
    • 1. Body Language for Speakers Promo

      0:32
    • 2. Body Language for Speakers Intro

      9:24
    • 3. How to Smile 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      0:48
    • 4. What to do with my face 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      0:47
    • 5. What do I do with my hands 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      1:07
    • 6. What should I do with my eyes 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      1:04
    • 7. How to use your voice 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      0:52
    • 8. How to use a lectern or podium 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      1:26
    • 9. How to Sit 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      1:02
    • 10. How to Move Your Head 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      0:50
    • 11. What to do with your feet 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      1:01
    • 12. How to Move Hands 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      0:54
    • 13. How to Use Your Eyes When Seated 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      0:51
    • 14. How to Change Body Language for a seated Presentation Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      0:58
    • 15. How to sit for TV interviews 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      1:05
    • 16. How to Smile for TV 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      1:31
    • 17. What to do with your hands on TV 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      1:19
    • 18. How to Move Your Body for TV interviews 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      1:06
    • 19. How to Move Your face 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      1:01
    • 20. Where to look for TV Interviews 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      1:22
    • 21. What do I do with my body 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      1:06
    • 22. How to Speak with Energy on TV 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers

      1:15
    • 23. Body Language for Speakers Conclusion

      2:45

About This Class

Body Language for Speakers: Learn how to look comfortable, confident and relaxed in any presentation opportunity.

Body Language is always on. Imagine that every time you stand or sit to speak, you appear supremely confident, relaxed and authoritative. Every movement your body makes conveys the message you want it to. Imagine never having to wonder what to do with your hands or how to stand or move when you are giving a presentation.

You can be a master of your own Body Language. Today.

In this Body Language course you will learn what to do with your hands, body and face so that you will look confident and relaxed in front of your speaking audience. You won't have to wonder if you look nervous, scared or unprofessional any longer. Even if you are scared, you will learn how to look completely relaxed in front of any speaking audience.

Why go through one more meeting or presentation worried that you don't look or sound your best? Sign up for this Body Language course today.

What will students achieve or be able to do after taking this Body Language course?

*Looking comfortable when speaking

*Not feeling anxious while speaking

*Knowing how to move your hands, feet and body in a presentation

What do Udemy students say about this Body Language course?

"5 Stars! This guy really knows his stuff, and goes straight to the major key points, without spending time on unnecessary fluff that numbs your mind. I'd highly recommend this to anyone dealing with any form of professional speaking. All in all, an awesome buy - very practical, easy to apply in real life, and definitely well worth the negligible investment of 10 bucks. Keep up the good work, TJ! :)" Tom M Williams

"Excellent course; I highly recommend it. Down to the point, excellent quality, no babbling -- just straight to the point and informative, and expertly delivered. If you're going to be on camera, or just want to improve your body language when doing a speech, this is the course for you."

"5 Stars! One of the very best trainings I've ever attended! TJ values people's time. Each and every minute of this excellent training contains useful, valuable and necessary information everybody should know, not only those who intend to speak in the public or some kind of interviews. The teachings could also be used in everyday life conversations. Student support is also excellent! Thank you TJ." Gita Davoodi-Greiner

"5 Stars! Practical and engaging." Anthony Oguejiofor

"5 stars! Very useful course even for those who do not work on television . I really learnt a lot in this course." Bruno Brain Baruchi

 "5 Stars! The instructor does a great job of getting the information across in an easy to understand manner. The information is both useful and actionable. Definitely worth checking out." Salma Shamy

"5 Stars! A great course that is surely worth completing! It will surely help you in public events that you need to participate!" Christos Papazacharias

Transcripts

1. Body Language for Speakers Promo: So you're giving a speech? What do you do with your hands? What do you grab onto? Should you hold a pen to get behind the lectern? Where do you look? All these questions and more in this course body language. Four speakers. You're gonna have the best speech in the world. Best written speech of the road. If your body language is out of sync, no one's gonna remember what you said. All they're going to remember is how they feel about you and the pit of their stomach. This course is going to show you everything you need to know in order to look comfortable, confident and relaxed. 2. Body Language for Speakers Intro: this course is going to cover every single thing you need to know about your body language for when you're giving a speech of presentation talking to people. But if you want to fast forward a little, let me give you one tip that will solve most of your problems. And here it is. I need you to reach into your pocket and pull out a cellphone. Simply record yourself speaking on video and watch it. Now I know you don't want to a teach in it like looking at myself. I don't like my voice. I don't like my hair. You got to get over it. The only way you can really find out what your body language is is by watching video of it . Too many people spend so much time writing and rewriting and rewriting a speech, and it's great and changing every little bullet point on the Power Point slides, and then they get up and it's brand or turning around and staring at bullet points. The body language is so awful it destroys the presentation. Now people always ask me because I train train this point 10,000 people from six continents over the last 30 years, and I've trained presidents of countries on their body language, prime ministers, Nobel peace price winners, Miss Universes, CEOs and everyone asked teaching what's more important style or the substance. And the answer is yes, Pope, you can't ever just have one or the other if you have a perfect body language, but you have no message. What good is that? Think of it this way. If I apply to work for your company, you're desperate for a new corporate vice president for accounting. You're just desperate for this new accounting, and I have the perfect resume. Absolutely perfect resume. But I send you a cover letter and I don't use any capital letters, periods or punctuation mark. What's gonna happen in my application? I think you're going to throw it away. On the other hand, what's gonna happen if I had the most beautifully Litton written cover letter ever? But when you look at my resume, it turns out I don't have any accounting experience. I've only worked in fast food and ever more than two weeks at a time. In that case, you're gonna throw away my resume as well, so it's a false choice to talk about style versus substance. You always have to have both written communication. You have to have both when it comes to spoken communication. But here's the problem. Most of us never get any formal feedback on ah, body language. We go to class for years and years and years. First grade, second grade, 12 very college graduate school sometimes, and we get very specific feedback on how we've written a document written a term paper, even a speech. And yet most of us get no feedback on how we present. But if you're an adult in the business world, the political world or even a student in school, it's how you present that often has the bigger impact. Certainly for adults in the business world. How well you speak can have the ultimate impact on your career. Whether you ever get appointed to that senior position or CEO are elected to that top office, it's how well you speak, not just what you're saying. So that's why really understanding the body language is so important when it comes to speak . Now I'll give you just a quick tip here. You'll learn this and further courses. The biggest problem most people have of their body language is they just freeze up because they're scared. They stopped moving. Everyone always says T. J. Shouldn't I just act natural between it and act natural? Here's the problem with that advice. It's natural to be scared when you give a speech so your body language can become stiff. People say to me, You're more comfortable holding a pen. Can I hold a pen home? You can hold a pan. It might make you look comfortable, but it looks stupid. It makes you look uncomfortable to the audience. I have a choice. If I had to choose between you being comfortable or your audience perceiving us comfortable , I'm gonna side with your audience. And you should, too. You think of some of the most memorable presentations in recent years, No matter how good the presentation waas. It's the body language that is more memorable. A few years back, Senator Marco Rubio of Florida was giving the Republicans reaction to the State of the Union address. The only thing anyone remembers Waas him reaching a long way away, extending his body, looking like a little kid, stealing a cookie and from the bottle, and then putting it all the way back to the same place. It is a image that's burned in people's mind. The body language was like a scared little kid stealing a cookie. That's what people remember more than anything, he said. It's the body language. Sometimes that stays much longer than anything else Now. A recent incident in the news I don't mean to make light of someone's medical problems, but the president of Colombia wet himself while giving a speech, and he had light pants on. So it was incredibly dominant. The image everyone saw. It was all over the Internet. People were commenting on it, and I certainly suspect, 10 years from now, 20 years from now if you mentioned the most people around the world, the president of Colombia and public speaking, they're gonna remember this image of someone wetting himself during a speech and continuing to speak. And the other thing was, if you watch the speech, if you listen to the speech, he sounded great. He did so many things well, but only takes one thing off with your image and how you're communicating with your body to destroy your message. Similarly, Michael Bay, the extraordinarily famous successful Hollywood director was at in Las Vegas not that long ago. Asked to give a presentation in front of Oh, a huge crowd, many tens of thousands of people in attendance, he went out. I was trying to read a teleprompter, which for a very brief Q and A session is a horrible thing to Dio. He couldn't see it. He panicked. He basically froze. I can't do and walked off stage. That image of the dejected, failed scared nervous person walking off stage is sort of potty language that people do not forget for days, weeks, years, decades. People are going to remember that, so I don't want put extra pressure on you. But if you're concerned about your body language, good reason. Because if your body language is really awful, people will remember it for a long, long time. Now I believe what you want primarily is for people to focus on your message and what you're saying. What your body language does is accentuate your message. It enhances it. It doesn't get in the way of your message, and that way everything is in sync. Ultimately, if you're speaking, presumably you want people to take away a good message you have. It's not just that you want people to say Wow, Look at Congressman Smithers. He sure has good body language. I mean, that's never really the goal. You want people to feel good about you to feel comfortable about you, toe like your message to focus on your message, to understand your message, and only after the fact come away with the conclusion in their gut that you were a compelling, confident, authoritative speaker in your own style. I'm not gonna tell you gotta wear a tie. You got to pick your own style. But make sure everything you do with your body anything. People can see anything people can hear that it is sending the message you want. That's the essence of what you're going to learn. In this course. I've sang better things, so you can really pinpoint exactly what you need to know and how to work on those elements . But the bottom line is practice on video until you can look at yourself and say, Well, I like the way that person is looking and moving. Watch yourself without the audio until you get to the point where you like what you see and you're convinced that you can't do it any better. You do that your body language will be in great shape. 3. How to Smile 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: So you're about to give a speech or a presentation? Should you smile. How do you smile When you're speaking, you need to look relaxed and comfortable. That means you need to have a smile on your face when you're standing up when you're introduced. When you're sitting down and when you're listening to, people ask you questions. Great speakers smile because they look like they're having fun. And they are having fun. If you have kind of a blank look on your face or this sort of empty glaze like you're thinking about what you're going to say five seconds from now, you won't look comfortable and you won't make your audience feel comfortable. So even if it doesn't come natural, you need to put a little bit of a smile on your face. Not kind of a frozen half smile. Not the TV of Angeles smile, but just a little bit of a smile to look relaxed 4. What to do with my face 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: So what do you do with your face when you're giving a speech or a presentation? There's this mistaken idea out there that in order to be professional, you need to be sort of calm and frozen and stiff. No, that's not what you want to dio. Your face shouldn't be frozen. You shouldn't have a blank look on your face. Your face needs to be as expressive as when you're talking to your two best friends. Now maybe the message is different, but that means your eyebrows need to move. Your face needs to be. Your cheek needs to move. That needs to be. Smiles frowns. Occasionally you need movement with your face. The blank so called professional look is not professional. It'll it just makes you look nervous and uncomfortable. 5. What do I do with my hands 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: It's the most common body language question I get. What do I do with my hands when you're speaking, what you want to do with your hands is what you do all day long. When you speak, that is, you move your hands, you gesture. One of the surest signs of somebody who's nervous, uncomfortable, not really confident in their speaking is they put their hands together. They freeze their hands that grab elector, and they put their hands in their pocket. They hold a pen, anything other than doing what they do all day long. When they speak and that is, they move their hands. It's a huge myth out there that somehow you're not supposed to move your hands when you speak. In theory, you could be moving your hands so much over your face. It's wildly distracting. But I could tell you I've worked with more than 10,000 people over the last 30 years. I have never yet had a client waving their hands over their face in a distracting way. If you want to look comfortable, if you want to look confident, you have to move your hands when you speak 6. What should I do with my eyes 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: What do you do with your eyes when you're giving a speech or presentation? Okay, your eyes are a very powerful tool. They can either work for you or against you. When you're speaking, you need to be looking at your audience specifically, individuals in your audience. The worst speakers were staring at their notes or the power point slide, and a lot of speakers look at their audience. But it's kind of a windshield wiper thing back and forth. You don't want to be like either those you want to look right at someone. Hold that thought for a full thought. A couple sentences, then go to another person in the audience. Look at them, not a stare down competition. But just look at them for a couple sentences, one thought. Then go to another person. Be careful to include the whole room, not just the people right in front. Not just the friendly faces, but is many people is possible in all quadrants of the room. Do that, and your eye contact will really help you 7. How to use your voice 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: So how do you use your voice effectively when speaking to an audience? Here's the key to using your voice. You need variety. You don't need to waste time about sounding duper or more resident or like some network anchor. Instead, you just need variety. Good speakers use their voices kind like a roller coaster. Sometimes there's something fast, sometimes slow, sometimes around corners. Think of it when you're having a conversation with one of your best friends about sporting event or a hobby, something frivolous. There's more animation in your voice. Sometimes it gets a little higher, sometimes lower, sometimes softer and sometimes ladder. It's not any one thing. It's the constant variety in your voice. That way you don't put your audience to sleep. 8. How to use a lectern or podium 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: So how do you use effective body language when you're speaking from behind a lectern or what some people call a podium? My advice. Just don't do it. Don't get behind the lectern because the lectern destroys your ability to communicate effectively with your body. For most people, they get behind electorate. They grab it, they lean on it. Now their body is frozen from here down. They look scared. It's is if they're hiding from their audience. The audience can't see you. You become immobilized now. There may be a time when you have to, because the microphone is attached. You don't have your own microphone, okay, But there are plenty of times when everyone else gets up, speaks behind the lectern, and you do it just because everyone else did it. That's a horrible reason. If you're speaking to a room with 20 people or so you don't need that microphone. Typically, you don't need to stand behind the Lector. Therefore, just walk around, go up to people gesture, talk to them, make it more conversational, get closer to them, do that and your body language will seem so much more effective, confident and comfortable on all the other speakers who stand behind a lectern. The electron is the training wheels for speakers 9. How to Sit 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: So how should you sit when you're giving a presentation and you're sitting down in a boardroom or a panel discussion? Just because you're seated doesn't mean you need to sort of sit back, relaxed, hands up, feed on the table, and what you shouldn't do is kind of lean on the table. Schlumpf, overlooking all the rules around my jacket and the people on the sides can't really see me easily. What I would recommend is hold yourself up high, lean forward towards people towards the table, and don't touch the table. When you're speaking enough, you're listening to others find relax on the table. But when you put your hands down, you get all slumped over. Move your hands and gesture. Make sure people can see you occasionally. Look around the table, get eye contact. Do that, and whether you're standing or sitting, it won't matter. You will be at your most effective 10. How to Move Your Head 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: So what do you do with your head when giving a presentation? Not at first blush. This sounds like a silly question. What do you do with your head when you're giving a presentation? But nervous speakers tend to freeze their heads. They have sort of perfect posture. Their head just doesn't move much. When your head is frozen and stiff, you'll come across is nervous, uncomfortable. You'll make your audience feel uncomfortable, so you really have to have a normal head movement. Most people, when they talk their head, moves to the left or the right. Up, down. There's a full range of head movement. Don't worry about looking like a bobblehead. You're not going to look like a bobblehead. The far bigger problem is not moving your head enough. Not too much head movement 11. What to do with your feet 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: What do you do with your feet when you're standing and giving a speech or a presentation? The best thing to do with your feet is to move them. Actually, walk around now. This may seem hard, but guess what? Every five year old can walk and talk at the same time. It's not that difficult. You may have heard a speaker is supposed to stand with feet firmly planted. That's very amateurs, just not the end of the world if you do that. But most nervous speakers stay in one spot right next to that Lecter. If you can walk around, move a little. Your audience will perceive you as more confident, more comfortable, more relaxed. As long as you are walking back and forth in a pacing rhythmic manner, you'll be OK. Feel free to stop. Sometimes walk to the left side of their walk to the right side of the room. Crete variety. That's the beauty of walking is it just makes it more interesting for your audience 12. How to Move Hands 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: So what do you do with your hands when you are seated, you're sitting down on your panel and you're not standing and walking around. The best thing to do with your hands when you're seated in giving a presentation is to move them, do what you normally do when you're comfortable and relaxed. The problem many people have is they hunker down. They put their hands on top of the table or there to relax, and their hands were back here under behind their hit. That's not what you want to do, and you don't want to be holding pencils. You don't have to write anything down when you're talking. The best thing to do. Keep your hands free and moved. Um, and a confident manner. Don't rest your hands on the table when you're speaking, have your hands moving and you look more comfortable, confident, relaxed and authoritative. 13. How to Use Your Eyes When Seated 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: So how do you use your eyes? Where do you look when you're giving a presentation and you're seated at a table or in a panel discussion? Your eye contact should be the same as when you're standing giving a presentation. That means you should be looking at people. Just because you're seated down doesn't give you the license. Start reading stuff and dropping things around and losing eye contact. It doesn't give you a chance to look at your computer screen to look at your power point. You should be looking at people in the audience. Look at somewhat. Hold eye contact for a couple of sentences for a few seconds, then go to the next person. Don't use this opportunity to bury yourself in your notes. 14. How to Change Body Language for a seated Presentation Body Language Series for Public Speakers: So how should your body language change from standing and giving a speech versus sitting down on a table or a panel discussion? Here's the answer. Your body language shouldn't change with one exception from the waist down. You don't want to move if you're seated. Whether you're on a panel discussion on director's chairs in front of people or sitting at a table talking to a board of directors, you don't move from the waist down you don't want be moving around your chair and seeming distracting. But you do want to move from the waist up so everything else is similar. Your body should move. Your hand should move. Your facial of your eyebrows should move. You should be giving good eye contact. Everything you do that works effectively when you're standing and giving a speech. You should do exactly the same thing when you're seated. In speaking, just don't move from the waist down 15. How to sit for TV interviews 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: So how do you sit if you're doing a television interview? Television is simply different from in person communication, speeches and presentations. If you're on TV and you're sitting, you really need to pay attention to a couple of details. For starters, you'll never want to sit back relaxed and comfortable. Now you see three chins. Everyone looks fatter. Dumpy er, If the camera were further back, it would look like I have a big belly. You will look your least attractive and your heaviest if you sit back relaxed on camera. The next thing you know what I do is set up perfectly straight like this. You will look scared and stiff and nervous. The best way to sit for a TV interview, hold yourself up high and lean forward about 15 degrees into the camera. Now the double chin disappears. The camera can latch on to your face. The camera latches onto whatever it's closer to. That's why you want to hold yourself up. I and lean forward about 15 degrees 16. How to Smile for TV 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: So how do you smile for television interviews? If you're on TV and you don't smile little, you're going to look scared. Stiff tents. It's much worse on TV than if you're in a room standing and people can see you for a typical presentation. If you're on TV and you're being introduced, you're not speaking. But the camera could be on you. This is how I look at my face is just blank. Is that impressive? Now most people think I look bored, boring on interesting. It just looks horrible. So you need a little bit of a smile on your face here. I'm going to intentionally smile. Just a little. Doesn't look like a big smile. It's a subtle thing. You don't even have to show teeth. Think of it. War is your just your cheeks going up a little bit. It makes your face come alive. If you don't smile, you're gonna look scared, stiff, nervous and uncomfortable. Now here's the thing that's confusing to people. Even when you're talking about bad news. Serious matters. A little smile on your face when you're doing a TV interview won't look like a smile. You'll simply look more comfortable and relaxed again. It's not a gigantic, gigantic smile. It's just a little bit of a smile, a slight upturn, and it brings your face alive. 17. What to do with your hands on TV 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: So what do you do with your hands during a TV interview? If you wanna look comfortable, confident and relaxed during a TV interview, take these and move them now. Is it a possibility that you cover your face and look nervous and are distracting? It's possible, but I never see that happen. The far bigger danger is keeping your hands frozen stiff, folded, clasped together. This makes you look scared, stiff, nervous, and it tenses up your body. Now, in this shot that I'm on now, it's kind of a tight shot. So if I move my hands down below this area, you can't really see them. But by moving my hands, I'm moving my body, my shoulders. My vocal courts all get more movement. When you freeze your hands, you freeze your arms, freeze your shoulders, freeze your vocal cords and that's when you get kind of that can sound in your voice where everything is tense and held up. Don't do that. You want natural movement. Whether the camera captures it or not, it will not look unprofessional to move your hands. When you're speaking, you'll simply look more relaxed, more comfortable. Don't constrain your hands. Move them 18. How to Move Your Body for TV interviews 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: So what do you do with your body during a television interview? When you're being interviewed on TV, you want to move your whole body because of the only thing that's moving is your lips. You're going to look scared, stiff and nervous. Now that's a subtle thing. It's not jumping all over the place and doing the hokey pokey. But when you are comfortable and relaxed and you're just talking to people, if you lean forward, you lean back. You go to the side. Sometimes your shoulders move up. There's lots of movement with your body. If you doubt me, have someone record you when you're just talking for 10 minutes and then after you've forgotten your recorded. Look at that part and you'll see tremendous amount of body movement. So remember you don't want to freeze yourself if you have to consciously practice and think about it, That's OK, but you want your body moving any time you interviewed on TV. It's a sure sign of a scared amateur if all of a sudden nothing is moving, but lips 19. How to Move Your face 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: So what do you do with your face during a television interview? Of course, you have to smile little on TV in order to look comfortable, confident, relaxed. But you have to do more than that with your face. Some people can smile. Yes, I'd like to tell you my next message point, but everything else is out of sync. It's a frozen smile. What you need with your faces. Full movement. Your eyebrows have to move. When you're on TV, your face has to move. You've got it. Have lots of move. I don't mean I don't need anything distracting. That looks weird or unusual, but here's think your face moves when you speak. In real life, your face moves when you're talking to one colleague at work in the hallway are in person. So if all of a sudden you get on TV and your head is kept rigid and frozen, that's going to make you look stiff, nervous and uncomfortable. So you've got to keep moving your face 20. Where to look for TV Interviews 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: What do you do with your eyes when you're being interviewed on TV? Where do you look? The best place to look when you're being interviewed on TV is not at the camera necessarily . But at the reporter interviewing you, you cannot go wrong by simply looking at the human being. What you don't want to do is sort of play to the camera. Hi, Jim. I'm glad you asked me that question. You see how awkward that looks? How phony. How I literally become shifty eyed. So in general, you can't go wrong. Just look at the reporter now if there's no reporter around or you're doing a satellite TV interview that by all means look at the camera. But other than that, you don't know what cameras on. If you're in a TV studio, there's three cameras on, so someone's asking you a question. All of a sudden, you're ignoring that person, ignoring the camera and you're staring off into space over here that can look up. So in general, look at the person talking to you. If there is any director producer, camera person around giving you other instructions, certainly defer to them. Listen to them. If there's no one around then and only then look at the camera 21. What do I do with my body 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: What do you do with your height? Your full body When you're speaking standing up in front of people, The best thing to do with your body, your full height is create variety. Nervous speakers stand at one height the whole time may be perfectly erect straight, maybe hunched a little, but there's no variation. Really comfortable speakers sometimes leaned forward. Sometimes they stretch high. Sometimes they tighten up. There's tremendous variety. In their height. They leaned forward. Maybe they go back. Now. I'm not talking about entertainers or motivational speakers like Zig Ziglar, although he was great at getting down on bended knee and being dramatic. I'm talking about serious business speakers. Warren Buffett, Steve Jobs. They are constantly case of jobs were moving their body up, down, sometimes even sitting. Sometimes standing There is variety and what they do, they're not frozen and stiff. 22. How to Speak with Energy on TV 20 Part Body Language Series for Public Speakers: So what do you do with your voice when you're being interviewed on television? For starters, don't worry about sounding deeper, more authoritative. You don't want to mess with that. What you do one is more energy. So what happens to most people when they get on TV is they get a little nervous. They get scared. Our bodies air like turtles. We sort of tighten up. And what that does is it brings our energy level down. It makes us seem flat. Boren Monitor board. So in order to sound more natural or energetic, you need to boast it a little. I don't mean yelling and talking like this. I just mean more energy. Imagine you're at a restaurant or a bar with your favorite buddies, your friends. You're telling a story, and all of a sudden there's a loud party over in one corner. There's a birthday party, and the other people are laughing. There's a music on. You have to speak louder than normal, but you're also more energetic than normal. That's the best tone of voice to use when you're on TV. People say TV is a cool medium they think will get it. Be cool. It's cool because it cools you down. You need mawr energy to sound comfortable and confident 23. Body Language for Speakers Conclusion: So this concludes the body language course here. I do want to give you a couple of caveats. There's no one thing you could do with your body or not Do with your body that is gonna be universally loved. I'll have people write to me occasionally, TJ. I can't believe you move your hands. It's awful. It's distracting. You should keep your hands down to the side. I fundamentally disagree with that, and I tested audiences all over the world. Audiences uniformly respond much more favorably to speakers who move their hands. Yeah, you could move it too much, but that's not the problem most people have. Most people have the problem of just tensing their body and freezing it up. You've heard me say that, but I just have to stress there's nothing you can do that's gonna make everybody happy. But what you do want to do is make sure you've avoided the obvious things. They're going to make you look awful or come across is scared, nervous, unprofessional. The final thing I want you to really take away from this is just practice on video. If you're going out to the biggest party of the evening whether it's a black tie event or whatever in your social set is the biggest event of the year. I'm willing to bet that you look in a mirror before you leave the house because you want to see how to your clothes look, makeup, hair, whatever it is you do, toe look your best. You don't want to just hope that it comes across well, you want some independent proof? The independent proof is you looking into a mirror. Now the problem with body language for speakers is you can't really look into a mirror to get a sense of this, because if you're giving a speech and you're practicing in front of the mere, you're looking at yourself. Uh oh, am I getting a doubled Shan? It's more hair falling. It you're not in the moment. You need to simply give your presentation. Haven't recorded on video. Have a friend, family member colleague do it. If nothing else, set your phone on the side and recorded yourself. The video quality doesn't matter as long as you can see yourself and hear yourself. Keep practicing until you can look at that video and, like your body language and keep practicing and listen to it, sometimes without the audio. And simply look at how you're coming across. Once you're happy with how you're coming across, you will be supremely confident and your body language will be in sync with what you're about, what your messages and what you're trying to dio and you'll be in great shape. Good luck.