Blues Guitar Lessons for Beginners 4: Bar Chords (The Missing B Chord) | Brian Jackson | Skillshare

Blues Guitar Lessons for Beginners 4: Bar Chords (The Missing B Chord)

Brian Jackson, Author/Publisher/Educator

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2 Lessons (17m)
    • 1. Blues Guitar Lessons for Beginners 4

      2:27
    • 2. Bar Chords (The Missing B Chord)

      14:37

About This Class

Blues Guitar Lessons for Beginners 4: Bar Chords (The Missing B Chord)

This is the fourth class in the series. In this class we learn how to play bar chords allowing us to play any chord in any key and also allowing us to complete the 12 bar blues chord structure by adding the missing B chord.

---Brian

Transcripts

1. Blues Guitar Lessons for Beginners 4: Have you ever wanted to take private lessons from the world's greatest professional guitarist? Yeah, me, too. How about settling for me instead? Consider this. I played guitar off and on now for the last several decades and still consider myself to be an advanced beginner. But that still makes me probably a better guitars than you. Another thing to consider. I seem to be a good teacher. I taught several friends how to play blues, rhythm and leave. Now I'm asking you to join the team, not because I'm a great guitarist. I'm far from it. Not because I've developed some revolutionary new teaching method, though I may have. You don't know not because I'm out to make a $1,000,000 though. Wouldn't that be cool? I'm asking you to join me because it will be fun for both of us. This'll course is unique and that I'm not a very good guitar player, So taking this course is more like sharing guitar tips with a buddy. It's less intimidating than spending lots of money and learning from a professional. So come on, let's play some blues guitar together. There are few things more rewarding on this planet than making music with. We'll begin with learning how to play open E and open a power courts. The core, the blues and rock and roll was in just one finger. Then we'll add that be accord using the second finger. And from there were off to the races. Power chords, open courts, bar courts, rock and roll rhythm and blues shuffle with it's all Here in guitar diagrams and talent. The course includes information on a how to play lead guitar and comes to a climax with the solo blues intro Shuffle, Turn Around and singing and lead Conclusion. By the end of this course, you'll know everything you need to play. Begin blues, rhythm and lead guitar or your money back. No, seriously, you Demi offers a 30 day, no questions asked. Money back guarantee on corgis is courses purchased, so there goes your risk. So if you ever wanted to learn how to play blues guitar way, not join me for a one buddy session while we learned together, I'll see you in the classroom. This has been Brian 2. Bar Chords (The Missing B Chord): Hello and welcome to the next lecture. This is gonna be a fun one. We're going to do bar chords here. Or basically, what we're gonna learn is how to play any chord that you want in any key, even though you don't know what a key is. So let's get started by picking up the last lecture where we left off. Remember that missing chord that we had in our song? Now, the problem with that missing court is that it's relatively hard to play. But mastering it lies at the heart of your ability to play guitar. So we're just gonna have to muscle through in this lecture and learn how to do it. So remember back here we are. Years are fretboard, by the way, I put the little circles on the fretboard because now we're moving up the fretboard so you can get therefore figuring out how relatively how far up the fretboard you are. So you're gonna see those little circles there now And here's our first e power chord shapes strum right. So we're going back and forth between these two fingers done at a and then our next chord up is just moved down a string right? Dada Dada Dada Dada. Now here's the third chord. The missing cord. All we've got to do is shift up. Two frets. Well, shifting up two frets is pretty easy. You're probably saying to yourself, But here's the problem. It lies in that open a string. Just above the problem is that we're playing a B chord here and there's no A in a B chord, so that open, ringing string isn't gonna work. The way that this would work is if we could move the nut, that white bar down there at the end of the guitar of we could move that up. That would make things perfect. But the nut isn't movable. It's stuck there. So what do we do instead? That's right. We use a finger instead and honest are tided, added Aditya. Fingers changed to from one and 3 to 2 and four, now 1 to 2. Just to get that is a bit of a stretch and then you have to start using your pinky to do the data editor. So this is hard. And what's also heart is making that bar across all the strings, or at least five of the strings to form this bar chord. That's the bar in the bar record. By the way, is that one finger barring everything? What you do is you put it down and get all your fleshy parts you make. It is straight and you press it down as hard as you do as you can and make sure that none of the strings buzz and that they all sound They don't go bunk, OK, and there you'll be playing this bar chord. So now let's look at these three together. Okay? What we're gonna dio is going to start the dud. It added a data, Dad, It added out of data. Dad? Dad. Uh huh Died. It added out of that I did. I did. I did. I did. I did. And you go up and down this way, right? We just go up to the next string and then we throw in the bar so that we can get that tough cord going. The be chord. Now, some modifications that we can make this make it a little easier since we're just playing two strings. You really don't have to bar that whole all five of those strings down there. You just need to bar the a string. So put your one finger on the A, making it a B and put your second finger down there and toggle back and forth. Your second, your fourth. Another way to make this easier is forget about toddling. If that's really hard for you, try playing this in its place. So you go died. It added. I doubt it. An Internet died it out of that right? You don't toggle it all on that missing cord. So given this new information, let's take a look at that song that we played. I've got the blues so bad it makes me blue. And if you remember, the 1st 4 measures are just playing the data data data on the E. Next on measures five and six we bring in. The aide added. I did, I did, I did, I did, I did, I did. And then we go back down to the e died. It added. I did. I did, I did. And then there was the missing court. Now we know what it is. The B Dad. I did. I did. I did. I did. I did edit edit, Heard it heard it, heard it, heard it, heard it. A. And if you play it all together, it sounds something like this. - I even had a problem. They're hitting that that toggle appear. So you've got to really stretch to hit it. And remember, you could just do this instead and never mind the alternating back and forth. And that's the entire song. Now that we have the B. Now I know what you're thinking. What about bar chords? Right? This is all about bar records, and you promised to be able to play any chord in any key. Well, okay, let's look at the chord shapes instead. Just playing two strings, right. We have this original E chord shape and open E well to play a bar according to move it up to an F. All we do is bar the first fret, which is the f up there on that top string Sogo's E F. And we must once again have to reposition our fingers because we're losing with one finger to play with the 34 and two Now, one of the things that I like to do is play kind of what I call a sloppy F chord or a sloppy bar chord and served during 342 I take my three finger and I laid across two strings and then I just play the two. And this is just easier than getting my pinky in there and trying to cram that together with the three finger. So this is an alternate way to play the sloppy F bar chord. Now what if I wanted to play a G? Well, a G is up, two frets. So all I do is I slide this up, two frets, and suddenly I'm playing a G chord. I use the same e shape, and I could move this right up the fretboard. Well, does this work with the A shape? You bet it does. Take a look at this. Here's a C chord in the a shape. All I do is I go up three frets from the open A and I play. This is a sloppy C chord because I'm playing just my three finger to hold down three strings here. So this is the way you would play the A. If you want to play it the official way, then you would have 23 and four they're instead of just the three finger on the A shape in those bar chords sound like this. So here's my open E, and if I want to up that to a G, I just bar it on and play. And if I could go G to a T 02 a. C all the way up, and though there I'm just playing the e shape and moving up, a few frets at a time. Then there's the A shape. Remember, you got the a chord here on, and then if I move it up way could just keep moving it up a friend at a time and maintaining that a shape and you're playing different chords. So it's very easy to play different chords or to play different different keys on the guitar, unlike the piano that has black and white keys. And when you change key record, suddenly the whole shape of your hand changes. That's not true of guitar. It's very simple. The change chords on guitar, especially using bar chords. Now, what about blues in G right? We've been playing it and e fairly successfully here now. What if we wanted to do it in G Okay, now, here's the deal. You thought this lecture was hard already? Well, this may be the hardest thing that I'm gonna ask you to dio, and that's to play a blues shuffle in the key of G. So we're gonna move everything up to G. You were leaving me behind, and this is what it would look like. I have to make that bar. And remember, we just use a partial bar here at the G. And I used the need to use my two and four fingers to toggle back and forth Dada, Dada, Dada. And then I go to the A shape That just means moving down a string. And now I can move the whole bar up. Two frets to get the d. So we go back and forth with this with dining out, and I did add a down and out in under. Dona done it at another Data doesn't edit edit data, data, data, data, data. And that's the way you do it, G. And this is a very hard stretch and your hands are going to hurt. But you can now play the blues in any key. Now what about bar chords? Right we keep coming back to bar records. Well, let's look at the bar chord shape here. Here. I've got my sloppy G bar chord in the e chord shape in these sloppy e chord shape. And then I changed to the A shape and play a c and then I just slipped that whole thing up . Two frets to play the d in the A shape, and then I go back down again and I go back down to the e n or the G. Uh huh. Ah, uh uh, right up and down. And that's the way that you play bar chords. You play the blues progression in, and if you do that, it's going to sound something like this. Now, in that case, I played bar chords. I did a, uh, interesting strum and I did some rocking back and forth and I I did a turnaround there at the end, which we're gonna learn later, that kind of jazz it up. But you can do the same thing with cords instead of playing the alternating ah blues shuffle, and you can shuffle right along in the blues that way. So what about other bar chord forms? I said you could play any chord. Well, okay, here is a G minor. All you do is play the G shape and get rid of that, um, the and get rid of the note on the G string. Just drop it down 1/2 step. So that's a minor chord. And that sounds a little more depressing. Minor is kind of a sad way to play chords. And if you play in a minor key, you're gonna want to play minor chords. Another one is 1/7 chord, and these are very popular in the blues. And in that case, what you do is you get rid of the middle string. You don't hold your finger to hold that down. So just minor variations to the shape of a need to play a minor and a g seventh. And then what about the A shape? Well, to play the minor chord, you drop that bottom part of the A down 1/2 step and played with the two finger and to play the C seventh version, you just get rid of that middle finger again and play the three in the four, uh, putting a gap over that string. So that's how to play seventh courts don't get all hung up on this. Now, we're gonna go through chords at the end of this course heavily. I just wanted to show you this so that I could say you can play any chord in a major minor or seventh shape, and here is something you might want to memorize. These are the notes of the strings as you move up. So we go up one fret from that e, we have an f. We go up, two frets. We have a G to Mawr's and A to Moore's of B, and then one friend is a C and notice that these No, it's once you get up higher. Repeat, down below. Remember when we were tuning the guitar, we were able to get two strings to be the same string and play them together. That's because they the pattern repeats. So here the sea begins and the be on the a string. So I can either play a C up high on the A string or it could play it down lower on the A. So with that, we're done. What did we learn? You learned how to play a B bar chord, and we finally completed that song. You learned how to play alternating notes in the B chord shape, and finally we got to play the full. I got the blues so bad it makes me blue. Then we learned how to play Blue's and G. We moved the whole thing up to a different key. We were originally playing in the key of E, and we shifted the whole thing up. Three frets to play it in the key of G with bar chords. Then you learned how to play an open e shaped bar chord and an open a shaped bar accord. And finally, how to play minor and seventh bar chords. You now know how to play almost any mark or gathers ninth chords, and there's diminished chords. They're augmented chords, suspended courts, all kinds of different chords that we didn't cover. But you got the bulk of it now, and in the next lecture we're going to actually start a new section on 12 bar blues, and we're gonna learn how to play the various blue rhythms in preparation for playing blues leads over the top of them. So see you there