Blues Guitar Lessons for Beginners 11: Jam Sessions - Rhythm and Lead | Brian Jackson | Skillshare

Blues Guitar Lessons for Beginners 11: Jam Sessions - Rhythm and Lead

Brian Jackson, Author/Publisher/Educator

Play Speed
  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x
3 Lessons (22m)
    • 1. Blues Guitar Lessons for Beginners 11

      2:27
    • 2. Guitar Jam I - Rhythm Guitar

      14:21
    • 3. Guitar Jam II - Lead Guitar

      5:12

About This Class

Blues Guitar Lessons for Beginners 11: Jam Sessions - Rhythm and Lead

This is the eleventh class in the series. In this class I provide blues guitar rhythms for you to strum along to or to play lead guitar over.

---Brian

Transcripts

1. Blues Guitar Lessons for Beginners 11: Have you ever wanted to take private lessons from the world's greatest professional guitarist? Yeah, me, too. How about settling for me instead? Consider this. I played guitar off and on now for the last several decades and still consider myself to be an advanced beginner. But that still makes me probably a better guitars than you. Another thing to consider. I seem to be a good teacher. I taught several friends how to play blues, rhythm and leave. Now I'm asking you to join the team, not because I'm a great guitarist. I'm far from it. Not because I've developed some revolutionary new teaching method, though I may have. You don't know not because I'm out to make a $1,000,000 though. Wouldn't that be cool? I'm asking you to join me because it will be fun for both of us. This'll course is unique and that I'm not a very good guitar player, So taking this course is more like sharing guitar tips with a buddy. It's less intimidating than spending lots of money and learning from a professional. So come on, let's play some blues guitar together. There are few things more rewarding on this planet than making music with. We'll begin with learning how to play open E and open a power courts. The core, the blues and rock and roll was in just one finger. Then we'll add that be accord using the second finger. And from there were off to the races. Power chords, open courts, bar courts, rock and roll rhythm and blues shuffle with it's all Here in guitar diagrams and talent. The course includes information on a how to play lead guitar and comes to a climax with the solo blues intro Shuffle, Turn Around and singing and lead Conclusion. By the end of this course, you'll know everything you need to play. Begin blues, rhythm and lead guitar or your money back. No, seriously, you Demi offers a 30 day, no questions asked. Money back guarantee on corgis is courses purchased, so there goes your risk. So if you ever wanted to learn how to play blues guitar way, not join me for a one buddy session while we learned together, I'll see you in the classroom. This has been Brian 2. Guitar Jam I - Rhythm Guitar: Hi. Everyone here in this lecture, we're gonna do things just a little bit differently. What I'm basically going to do is jam along playing what we've learned so far. And what I'd like you to do is I'm gonna remain in rhythm. So if you want to play lead, have you made it to that more advanced level? Then go ahead and play lead over my rhythm. Otherwise, there's gonna be a separate session, the second session in which we're going to get into playing lead and we're gonna exchange leads back and forth so you can either use this is a lead session to play over or you can play along, which is what I really recommend the first time through. So we're going to go through what we've learned. Hopefully I'll be able to control the keyboard and this guitar in my lap at the same time. So let's go ahead and pick up your guitar. We're going to jam together by playing what we've learned and what have we learned anyway? So the first thing we learned is thes e power cords. Can you believe how much power and what you can play with one or two fingers. You know, if you took the number of chords three of them and divided it by the number of fingers you're probably talking about, you know, no more than 1.5 fingers per record. So anyway, here's the 1st 1 We're gonna put our mighty one finger down there on that A and we're gonna sound these 1st 2 strings. Now you can see there. I'm kind of alternating, applying palm muting which we learned and taking it off to a little notes Ring a little so you can get kind of a wound and a Syncopation kind of thing going with or you could just power cord, Right? That sounds really good of your an electric. And you've got the volume cranked up. Now, next, What I wanted to is I want to talk about the next chord that wanna play is going to be the A and that toe play that you just move your fat first thing you're on down one set of strings and you play those two strings down. So, uh um right. And you commute it. Whatever you want to dio and then we're going to have Let's go for it. Let's do the hard cord. Here it is. It's that B chord which requires a bar shape. Right. So now we're doing now. That's not too bad. It gets really bad when we're talking about the alternating notes, which you know we're headed toward. But for now, let's jam a little with these three chords, right? The bard be here on the 2nd 2 strings. The accord, which is just one note down there on the D string at which is which is just one finger down there on the D string. And then one finger on the A string will get you that e which is where we're going to start . Let's jam back and forth on these power cords. Give me a break. I'm dominating things like that is easily is playing a single string with one finger. This is great. But what we really need to get up to is that top be shape And we're not going to get there until we probably play the blues. So let's start playing the blues Oh, yeah, Oh, yeah Oh, yeah Oh, yeah So and I say what we've been doing is pretty much this rock and roll rhythm, right, so one and two and three and four in. But we haven't been doing the alternating fingers. So we have the one to the three finger on that. A string there, the second string down than the one to the three finger on the next string down. And then we shift that up with a bar chord. And this is where things get hard is alternating that two and four finger to get that shuffle going. So let's focus on this cord and let's begin with the shuffle in E or actually the rock and roll rhythm any okay, At this point, it's worth pointing out that if you can't get that rocking thing going, just stick with one in the three. This is really, seriously simple. We're playing rock and roll here. Let's play rock and roll together with two fingers R one and R three. Okay, we're going to begin here with e so rock and roll, This is cool. Now they can't handle the alternate. Just dio Ah, OK, that's cool. That's how easy this convey be. Used two fingers and play half of the songs right on the planet. Now what about the blues If you want to play the blues instead of rock and roll, let's say you're feeling blue instead of feeling in a rocking mood. Well, just do a shuffle pattern where you're doing this one and ah, one and a two in a and you're doing it on one and the, uh, instead of the ant. Okay, so it sounds a little delayed, and it gives it a shuffle pattern, like let me see. Let let's first go through the cords here, right? So we did the same for the rock and roll. So here's your A and then finally have this tough part. And if you can handle that, use the simple one and two together or the even with one and three on the A and D Strings. So let's go back to her beginning court again and let's shuffle in E. - So that's cool. So we're playing the blues together or you're playing lead over the top of my 12 bar blues . And by the way, let's go ahead beyond these patterns and admit that we've been playing the 12 bar blues, right, So the first or the E the root note, the route chord you play that for four measures, and then you play the fourth and then back to the first for two and then the 5th 4th 1st Okay, so it sounds very bluesy. You're gonna know the blues, and you're going to know how to play it. Okay. And let's see what we have next. Well, what do you know if it isn't the shuffle pattern or the rock and roll pattern? Whatever we want to do the strum in G. So let's go ahead and we're gonna play Let's play the, um, the shuffle pattern. So we're up here in G with the G bar accord and then we're going to go to the C bar chord by going down a string and then we're going to go up two frets to the D and down again. So let's start playing the GI Blues and remember, you have the option of playing the blues now in any key you just remembered. You just need to remember a few notes on the top two strength, once you have these notes figured out that if anybody calls out anything, you just you play in whatever they call out that they want a plan by moving up or down the fretboard now. Oh, here we go. Here's our blues introduction. So we're gonna do our blues introduction in Open E and then we're gonna go and we're gonna do our open E seventh chord and our open 1/7 chord And then we're gonna do our open B seventh cord. So remember the B seventh and I'll put it on here is that we can look at this while we play . Let's go ahead and play the introduction. And remember, when you're starting out practicing this, play it 1/4 at a time. All right? So play it real slow, get it smooth and then slop through it. Oh, that's right, we're playing. - So there you go. That's the introduction and playing the open e strum hopefully here, playing it better than I am. And what's next? Well, we have the same thing in G. Can we move it up? And here we have the introduction and then we play the bar chords instead of the open chords. So let's go ahead to the introduction and give this a shot. This is kind of tough. - Okay , so that was a latte. Rather sloppy rendition, but Andy and not our next lecture. We're going toe work on playing some lead in jam session number two. I'll see you there and let's play some more guitar. 3. Guitar Jam II - Lead Guitar: So I made an executive decision as I was in the middle of things there, and I decided that what I was going to do is just play guitar for the lead section. Never mind. I've got the lessons on playing lead, so you go right ahead and review them to play the pentatonic scale of you want to play some of my nasty leads of you want or just play along as we play rhythm. So when I'm gonna dio eyes, I'm just gonna play the blues on and it's your job to decide. Do so. Here's 15 minutes of the Blues e. So if you're wondering where to begin, that's right. Player E minor pentatonic scale down there. It's very useful. See if you can do it for play along my weight. Let's play loathe blues in a different key. Let's go for a G. This much is easier way. If you haven't played with these three chords, you'll notice that there's a lot of songs in them like right, and I hope that wasn't enough chords that I actually have to pay somebody for that. But play with these cords. There's a lot of chords in here right where there's all kinds of songs in those three chords. Let me play Let's let's move up to a Okay, so play a blues and eight of my shuffle, Right? So that's the best I can do to help you out now is that you've just gotta play over and over again. For instance, Thea, um, pentatonic scale in a played both directions plant while I'm playing the blues and G. Okay, okay. And that's a little bit of playing things together. Slipping have been between the lead, which was chest A, the scale and the rhythm. So I hope that helps you out and play in lead over this. Play this section over and over again and play lead in these various keys. Play along with me if that's how you want to do a strum for a while, but get your fingers on the strings and let's get strumming so I'll see you in the next lecture.