Blender 3D - The Cloth Simulation Guide | Stephen Pearson | Skillshare

Blender 3D - The Cloth Simulation Guide

Stephen Pearson

Blender 3D - The Cloth Simulation Guide

Stephen Pearson

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23 Lessons (1h 45m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:24
    • 2. Downloading Blender

      0:41
    • 3. Blender Basics Overview

      16:21
    • 4. Saving Your Blender File

      1:24
    • 5. What is the Cloth Simulation

      1:45
    • 6. Cloth Simulation Basics

      3:52
    • 7. 1 Cloth Simulation Properties

      4:46
    • 8. 2 Stiffness and Damping

      5:15
    • 9. 3 Baking Cache

      3:13
    • 10. 4 Cloth Shape

      10:21
    • 11. 5 Cloth Collision

      4:06
    • 12. 6 Property Weights

      3:00
    • 13. 7 Force Fields

      2:10
    • 14. Collision Objects

      4:44
    • 15. Interacting 2 Cloth Simulations

      2:56
    • 16. Blender 2.82 Springs & Pressure

      5:17
    • 17. Blanket Simulation P1 Simulating

      6:14
    • 18. Blanket Simulation P2 Materials

      3:23
    • 19. Blanket Simulation P3 Lights & Rendering

      3:53
    • 20. Blanket Simulation P4 Compositing & Importing

      3:46
    • 21. Balloon Exploding P1 Simulation

      8:09
    • 22. Balloon Exploding P2 Baking & Materials

      4:47
    • 23. Balloon Exploding P3 Animation & Sequencing

      3:47
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About This Class

Hello everyone and welcome to the Cloth Simulation Guide in Blender 2.8! In this course you will learn all about the cloth simulation and how it works in Blender.  Simulations are very confusing and sometimes hard to understand so I created this course so that you will know exactly how to use the cloth simulation and what the functions are.

In the first couple sections we will be going through how the simulation works and what the settings do.  After that I will be showing you how you can have multiple cloth objects interact with each other, how collision objects work and more. We will also jump into Blender version 2.82 and learning about a new feature called Internal Springs and Pressure.

Finally the last 2 sections will be complete tutorials. The first one being a blanket falling on a couch. In this section we will be importing a couch model that I am giving away in this course. From there we will simulate it, add textures and render it out!

The second tutorial will be a balloon exploding simulation. We will be using the new feature in Blender 2.82 called pressure and learning how to animate it.

If you want to learn about the cloth simulation or want to improve your Blender skills this course is for you! So hit that enroll button and lets get started!

The program that is used in this course is Blender 3D.

Blender 3D is a free open source program that allows you to create literally anything on the computer!

You can download by going to their website.

Song in the promo was from bensound

I can't wait to see the renders and animations you create!

Thanks

Stephen

Meet Your Teacher

Hello! My name is Stephen!  Thank you for stopping by and reviewing my Blender course.   My goal is to help you become the 3D artist you've always dreamed of becoming AND -  have a blast doing it.   Working with Blender and creating amazing 3D graphics is amazing and anyone can learn it.  

I really enjoy teaching others what I know.  I appreciate each and every one of my students.  Please let me know if I can help you perfect your Blender graphics!   

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello, everyone, and welcome to the Claw Stimulation guide in Blender 2.8. In this course, you will learn all about the claw simulation and how it works in blender. Simulations are very confusing and sometimes hard to understand. So that is why I created this course. You will know exactly how this simulation works and what the functions are. In the first couple sections will be diving deep into the simulation settings and values and learning about what each slider does. After that, we will be going mawr into depth on the cloth stimulation and how to interact to simulations together how collision objects work. And we will also be going into blender 2.82 and learning about pressure and springs. Finally, the last two sections will be completing full tutorials. The 1st 1 is a blanket falling on a couch. In this section will be importing a couch model that I'm giving away in this course. From there, we will stimulate the cloth at a texture and render it out. The second tutorial will be a balloon exploding animation. We'll be using the new feature in Blender 2.82 called Pressure and Learning how to animate it, and we will also be rendering this out using the new render engine E V. If you want to learn about the closet volition or if you just want to improve your blender skills, this course is for you. So hit that and robot and let's get started. 2. Downloading Blender: in this video, I'll be showing you how to download Blender 2.8. Now what you need to do is go over to blender dot org's and you should see a big down the button right in the middle of your page. Go ahead and click on that button, and it will take you to a download page. You can come over here and change which version that you need. If you need a Lennix Mac windows, all the different versions go ahead and do that. You can also link your steam account if you want it to go to your steam. Once you figure that out, go ahead and click. Download a blender 2.8 and then we'll take you to this page and there should be a download that happens right here, and we can see it download. Once that is done, just go ahead and install it and you'll be ready to go 3. Blender Basics Overview: Hello everyone. In this video we are going to go over the basics of Blender. And so if you are completely new, this is the video for you. I'll be going through step-by-step on the different render engines, the shortcuts that we're going to be using, all of that in this video, right? When you open up Blender, this is the default scene. You have a camera, you have a cube in the middle, and then you have a lamp on the right side. If you ever get stuck on what button I press throughout this course, just look on the bottom right corner and you will see what I press. For example, if I left-click, you can see here it says left mouse and it will also highlight the mouse button on this sign right here. Same for the right-click, same for the middle mouse button. All of that will be displayed at this point. So if you ever get stuck, just look down on the bottom right. Let's first talk about the render engines that Blender has to offer. Over on the right side, there is a lot of different panels. And if we select this one right here, this is called the scene panel. We'll see that our render engine is currently on EV. There are three different render engines that we can pick in Blender, EV, workbench, and cycles. Ev is a real time render engine, and this allows you to actually view a scene in real time. It will calculate the lighting, almost instantly. Display it for you in your rendered view. Workbench, on the other hand, is basically just for modelling and sculpting your object. You don't really use this render engine for rendering because it doesn't really display materials that well. And the last one is Cycles. Cycles is blenders, a physically-based rendering engine. And this will provide very realistic results. It will calculate the lighting all that pretty accurately. Before we get into anything else in Blender, Let's go up to our user preferences and change a couple of settings there. To do this, we can go over to the Edit menu. Down at the bottom, we can go into our preferences. Underneath the key map tab right here. Here is a couple of things that we're going to want to check. First off, we have the selective mouse button right here. You can either select with your left-click or your right-click. In Blender version 2.79 and below, the default was set to right-click. Now with 2.8 and above it is set to left-click as the default. I recommend staying with left-click because that will help you with a lot of other applications outside of Blender. The Spacebar button down here allows you to pick what the spacebar will do. Currently it is on play and that is what I'm going to leave it on. So what happens is if I hit the space bar over here, it's going to play the timeline down at the bottom. Underneath that we have a couple of view options which I'm just going to leave at the defaults. The other thing that we're going to want to change is extra shading pine many items, make sure that is enabled. This will allow you to actually see the different views. So if I exit out of this window and press Z, we can see here we have a couple of different views. Material view is one of the ones that's added when you select the extra shading pie menu items. This will allow you to see what the material looks like without having to render it. We'll go over that in just a little bit. Next up on our list is selecting objects. To select an object that you can left-click on the object that you want to select. In this case, I selected the camera and you can see it's highlighted in that yellow outline. If I select the cube, It's the same thing. And then the lamp up top, it also highlights it. You can select multiple objects by holding the Shift key on your keyboard and selecting it. You'll notice that once we do this, the other selections have an orange outline and not a yellow one. This means that it's not the active object. The active object will be highlighted in the yellow outline, as you can see here with the camera. And if you want to deselect everything, you can hold Alt and then press a to deselect everything. You can also select everything back by hitting a and double tapping a will do the exact same thing. So a to select Alt, a to deselect, or you can press a and then double-tap a2, de-select. Now let's learn about moving around the 3D view. If I hit the middle mouse button on my mouse, I can move around and rotate the view around the object that I have selected. As you can see here, our view is orientated around this cube. Let's say for example, I wanted to orientate my view to the camera. I can select it and hit the period key on my numpad, not the period key on the keyboard, the period key on the numpad. And it will zoom in on the object that we have selected. And now we are rotating our view around the camera instead of the cube. If we select the cube, hit the period key on my number pan, I can zoom in on the cube, and now our view is back to the original. You can also zoom in by using the scroll wheel. Zoom in and zoom out with the scroll wheel. You can also do like a pan or zoom. So if you hold Control middle mouse button to pen backwards, as you can see here, holding the Shift key and middle mouse button will pan the view to the side. If you don't have a middle mouse button, what you can do is go over to the preferences and emulate it by going over to the preferences. Underneath the input tab, you can turn on emulate three button mouse. What this will allow you to do is hold the Alt key and then left-click to Panda view. You can see here it's displaying I'm using my middle mouse, but I'm not. I'm using the Alt key and the left mouse button to actually rotate the view around. So just in case you don't have a middle mouse button, you can turn that on. Since I do have one though, I'm going to leave that off because I find it's much easier with the middle mouse button. Now let's learn about scaling, rotating and moving objects around. To scale an object up, you can press the Esc key on your keyboard to scale it up. As you can see here, it's scaling up my cube. And if you want to see how much you've scaled it up, look on the top left over here on the top-left corner, you can see I've scaled it up five times. You can also set a manual number n. So let's say I wanted to scale the cube up three times. I can hit three on my keyboard, and that will scale it up by three times. And now I can't scale it up anymore even though I'm moving my mouse because we set in a manual number, it's locked to that scale. I can hit the Backspace twice and that will get rid of that selection. And now I can scale it up or down, as you can see here, to rotate an object, you can hit the R key on your keyboard and that will rotate it around as you can see here. And it's going to rotate it depending on the view that you are looking at it. So let's say I move my view over to this angle and I hit R to rotate. You can see it's rotating at that angle. If we go into the front view by pressing one on my number pad, it will put us into this view. And now if we rotate, It's going to be rotating it along this view. So if we rotate it like this, I can go look at the side. You can see it's perfectly rotated along the y-axis. I'm going to press Control Z to undo that. And now let's learn about moving an object. If I press it G, you can move your object around and you can place it anywhere that you want. You can also lock the movement to a certain axis. So let's say I hit G and then y. And you can see here it's locked to the y-axis and I can't move it outside of that if I wanted to move it up and down along the x, which is the red line. I can't do that because it's a locked to the y-axis. I can also backspace that and then hit the X key and you can see it's going to move it along the x now instead of the y. Just like that. And I can also right-click to cancel the movement. What I just did there is I cancel the movement. So if I press R to rotate, I can right-click to cancel that action and it will snap back to its original position. This works with everything. So if I press S to scale, I can right-click and it will snap it back to that original position. This is very useful in case you want to look at a certain part of your scene. I can just move my object out of the way, view what I want to see, and then right-click and it will snap it back to its original position. Now let's learn about the different views we already discussed front view by pressing one on the number pad, it will bring us into the front view. And if we wanted to view the R object on the right side, which is this side over here, I can press a three on my number pad in. It will move me into the side view. Now we're looking at our cube from the side. Let's say I wanted to look at the top view. I can press seven on my number pad and it will view from the top. And we can see our camera is right there. And now we're looking at our object from the top of it. Control 1 on the number pad will bring us to the back view. Now we're looking at the back. Control three will look on the left side. So you can see here, this is the right side. Now this is the left side and we were looking at it from this angle. If you don't have a number pad, what you can do is also emulated by going over to your user preferences. Underneath the input tab, you can enable emulate a numpad. And this will allow you to use the top row of numbers on your keyboard. So let's say I press 1 on the top of my keyboard. I'm now looking in the front view. Same thing for the side view, the top view and all of that. Since I have a number pad though, I'm going to disable this just like that and then exit out to save it. Now let's talk about edit mode. Edit mode is the mode that you're going to be using to model anything in blunder. To access edit mode. You can press Tab on your keyboard, or you can come up to this menu and select Edit Mode. Once we do this, you can see our object has turned into a orange color, and now we can select the different points on our cube. This point that I have selected right here is called a vertex. Every single mesh is consisted of many vertices. As you can see here, with our cube, we have eight different points, four on top and four on the bottom. You can select multiple vertices by holding the Shift key and then selecting them as you can see here. Once I've selected four of them, you can see the inside of that has turned into an orange color. And this means we have a face, select it. Let's talk about the different selection types. Over in the top left corner you can see we are on vertex select mode, which means that I can select the different points. If I switch it over to the edge select mode, I can select the edges instead of the vertices. And then finally, the face select mode will allow you to select an entire phase, as you can see here. You can also extrude faces outward. If I select this top face and press E to extrude, I can extrude it upwards. Now we have basically two cubes on top of each other. Down on the bottom, you will see all of your scene details. And if you don't see this, you can right-click and then enable the scene statistics right there. We can see here we have four vertices out of 12 selected. And then if I press a to select everything, we can see here we had 12 out of 12 selected. You can also see the edges, the faces, and the objects in your scene. This is a pretty useful setting in case you want to check how many objects that you have in your seat. There are many different ways to add objects or delete objects in Blender. To add an object, you can press the shortcut Shift and a, and you can add an a mesh and you can see all of the default meshes right here. Or you can come over to the Edit menu, then click on Mesh, and then add in and mesh over here. So let's say I press Shift a and I add in an icon sphere. From here I can move it over to the left side by pressing G and X and dragging it over. If I want to delete this object, I can press the X key and select Delete. Or you can hit the Delete key on your keyboard or go up to object and then down to delete right here. If I want to undo that and bring that object back, I can press Control Z to bring it back. And this will undo the last action. If I want to redo the action, I can press Control Shift and z and that will redo the action. You can also do this by coming over to the Edit menu and selecting undo or redo right here. So once again it to add an object, you can press Shift a and to delete an object, make sure you have it selected the X key or the delete key or any of the other ways to delete objects. And then you can select it and there it's gone. Now let's talk about the different views. If we come up to the top right, you will see there is four different views, solid view, and that's the one that we have selected wireframe. And this will allow you to see inside of your mesh, as you can see here, it's a now a wireframe. Next to that we have in the material view. So let's say we've added in a new material, it will display exactly what it looks like. And then we also have a rendered view. This will be what it looks like in the final render. When we render out an animation or an image, it calculates the lighting and does everything else. As you can see. You can also press the Z key on your keyboard and switch to the different views. Most of the time, this is how I use it because it's very fast. I can just press Z, go into wire-frame, z go into rendered view, and then material view like that. There's also toggle overlays and toggle x-ray toggle overlays two, we'll get rid of the grid and the outline around the object. So if I select Toggle overlays, it will just display what the model looks like without any of the extra details. If we go back into solid view, we can press Z and then toggle x-ray. And this will allow us to see inside of our mesh. You can see by looking at this view, we can see the ear right there. And then on the other side we can see the eyes. And you can also select the vertices on the opposite side. If, if toggle or relays is turned off, we can't do that. We can only select the faces that are visible. Finally, let's press the Enter key on our keyboard and look at the properties. Here we can see a couple other details, the location of our object. And you can also change this and you will move the object as you can see, the rotation value, the scale value, and the dimensions. The dimensions currently say two by two by two. And we can change it depending on what we type here. We can make a completely flat, stretch it out a little bit, and you can do all of that. Finally, the last thing that we will talk about in this video is the timeline. Down here we have a timeline and this is the amount of frames in our animation. Currently we have 250 frames. Now the default frame rate in Blender is 24. So that means if we play your animation, it's going to travel 24 frames every single seconds. On the bottom right here we have a skip, a forward, and a play option. If we click this button to play it, you can see our timeline is now moving. So if we had any animation data, it would play once we play the timeline. You can also press the spacebar to play it automatically as you can see there. And that is very useful. You can also press Shift and then left arrow or right arrow to skip to the end or the beginning of the timeline, as you can see on the bottom. And then the spacebar to play it once again. You can also add an keyframes. So let's say I added in a keyframe by hitting the I key on my keyboard. And we can add in a keyframe to any of these different properties. Let's say I added it to the location value. What we can do then is drag this upwards and then skip to a different part of the animation and move the queue. If I skip to frame 80, and then I can press G and then x2 move it along. I can move it to this location. Then I can hit the I key one more time and add an another location keyframe. So over 80 frames, it's going to travel from this position to this position that we just added. So what we have to do now is hold Shift Left Arrow to skip to the beginning. Or you can click the backspace button. And then we can hit the space bar to play. And you can see it moves over to that location over 80 frames. So that is basically how animation works. You can also add keyframes, do almost anything in Blender. If you hover over a certain value and had the icky, it will add in a keyframe to that value. So there you go. That is a full basic overview of Blender. I hope this is useful if you're completely new and now that you have a basic understanding of how blender works, let's jump straight into the course. 4. Saving Your Blender File: to save your blender file, you can go up to file and click on Save As or save. If you've already saved your blender file, you can go ahead and click save. But if you are saving a new blender file, go save and it's If you do this, you can save it to wherever you like. You can click on this option here and name your blender file, so I'm just gonna call it saving. And then I can go over here and click on Save as Blender File. Let's say, for example, you want multiple blender files saved to show the progression of your scene. You can do that by hitting control shift s and then hitting the plus sign, and that will add a one next to saving. So if I do that, it'll saving new blender file. If I do it again, I can hit the blessed sign again and we can see it's now at saving to dot blend. So now let's say you did a couple things. You deleted that cube you press shipped, AU added in a sphere, and now you just want to save that blender file all you have to do is hit control s or command s and you can see down here it's saved That blender file lender will also warn you about closing the program if you've done some changes without saving. So let's say at it in a new object and I hit the exit button, we can see that blender says save or discard changes or cancel. If I had saved, it'll save our project, then we can go ahead and close the program. 5. What is the Cloth Simulation: the claws. Demolition is one of the hardest things to create anti gee because it is a very simple riel world item. Yet it has a very complex environmental in directions with different objects. The blender team has been working really hard for many years to create a very accurate class simulation. The cloth is affected by many different types of forces, such as wind or moving objects. Collision objects, just to name a few cloth can be an open or closed meshed in blender. Commonly, you'll find the cloth object as a plane or a cube, but you can also find it as more complex meshes like a stuffed animal. But I think the soft body physics simulation will be better from the more complex meshes. Once the meshes enabled as a cloth, the cloth modifier will be added to the objects modifier stack. As a modifier, it will also interact with different modifiers, such as like an armature or the smooth modifier. It is important that you know the order of the modifier stat, because this can affect the outcome of the cloth simulation. We will talk more about this in later videos. You can also apply the cloth modifier to freeze the mesh in place. In this case, this simulation is saving you a lot of time Modeling the cloth. The shape of the cloth at every frame is automatically calculated in the background so you can continue working on whatever scene you have. Be careful, though, because this simulation, just like all the other simulations in Blunder it is very CPU intensive. Depending on how fast your computer is my lag or even crash, we'll be talking more about the class demolition and how it works in later videos. Thanks for watching. 6. Cloth Simulation Basics: how the closet Galician works is you need to start out with a mesh. This could be any mess. You can use a regular cube, a plane, a monkey head, whatever you want. From there you go over to the physics tab, which is this little button on the side and then you quick on cloth. Now the object that you have selected is now a cloth simulation. If we play this, you'll notice that it falls straight down just like that, and it acts like it would in real life. Richest falls straight down. Now what you can do is add more geometry at in collision objects and whatnot. To add a collision, object to your clause in relation. You need to first enable a cloth. Then you need to go over to the object that you want to have a collision with and then go collision in the physics panel right here. Once you do that, we can play our animation. And here is what it looks like now. Currently, the cause stimulation only has four verte sees toe work with. If I go into edit mode on this Q, we can see exactly how it works so we have. Vergis is on the corners right here, and that is all the geometry on this plane. So it's not gonna work that well. What we need to do is go into edit mode, press a once or twice to select everything right, click and go subdivide. We do this a couple times, and now we have more geometry, and the costs in relation will look a lot better. If I go out of edit mode and I play this now, we can see it looks a lot more like cloth. Would one thing that you want to avoid is rectangle faces. If I go into edit mode and I right click and go subdivide, you'll notice that the faces are now rectangle rather than square. This won't work very well for the class demolition and works a lot better if the faces are square. So to fix this, we can control Z that to undo hit control are to add in one Luke cut in the middle. Now, if we press a once or twice to select everything, then we can right click and go subdivide and do this a couple times, and now we have square faces and this simulation will look a lot better. So now if I restart the animation and play it here, we can see it looks really good. Let's say that you've like how this cost in relation works and you want it to stay in that exact position. To do that, you can go over to the modifier tab right here and apply the clause simulation modifier. Now, if we go into edit mode, we can see that these vortices are now stuck in place. If we restart the timeline, you can see there in the exact seems a lot. And if I play it, nothing happens. That is because we applied the cost in relation modifier. And now that's no longer thing in the physics panel. This can be useful if you have other objects in your scene that you want to be moving around or animating and you want your class simulation, do stay in its place. Over in the physics panel of the Claw settings, there's an option to bacon our simulation. What this will do is it will save in that cash, so when you close the program and open it, back up your cost in relation will still be there and you'll be able to go through and see how it looks currently, since I don't have this baked in, you'll notice it looks a little bit weird, and that's because we have evicted in. So what we need to do is restart the animation set a end frame of where you want your simulation to end. I'm just gonna type in 100 then I'm going to click Bake now. I can go through this and jump to any position in the timeline, and it will show me that exact frame of the cloth simulation. This is also useful if you want to distribute your blender file or send this to a render farm with the bacon cash enabled, it'll work correctly. The claws simulation saves a lot of time from modeling. Those little creases in blankets are trying to model a blinking that has fallen on top of a couch or anything like that. This will save you a lot of time, and it will look a lot better than trying to do it by hand. So there you go. That is the basics of the clause stimulation, and now in the next section we will jump into the settings and learn exactly what all of these settings and values do. 7. 1 Cloth Simulation Properties: hell over one and welcome to a new section in this section. We're going to be jumping into the claw simulation settings and learn exactly what those settings and values do to get started. We need to first ad in a cloth simulation. So what I'll do is I'll press shift A and added a plate. This is gonna be our demonstration planes. I'm going to press s to scale. Then I'll price G NZ two dragon upwards now Currently, if we were to add in a clause in relation to this plane, it only has four verte sees, so that would not work very well. So what we need to do is go into edit mode, right? Click and go subdivide. This will add in some more geometry and we need to do this a couple times. All right, click, subdivide, or you can come over here in Turn up the number of cuts. I'm going to go with a value of tents. We have a lot of geometry to work with. From there, I'm going to go over to the visit, stabs to go out of edit mode and enable a claw simulation and now to actually see this in action. We need to select the Cube and adding a collision modifier to it. So now our plane will actually interact with this cube. Don't worry about these settings over in. The collision will go through those in a later video. For now, we're just going to be focusing on the cloth settings right here. So with airplane selected, let's go through these. The first thing that we have here is a preset, so you can select different presets of what you want. So, for example, cotton is just the basic one right here. If I go over to a leather, which is a lot, which is a lot more dense and stiff material and if I play this, you will see that it looks like leather just like that. And that looks pretty interesting. Let's go back over to cotton and you can also see the other presets here. The quality of steps will talk about that in just a second. The next thing I want to talk about is the speed multiplier. So with a speed of one, this is how it looks like. You can see it runs pretty smoothly now if we turn up the speed. Let's go with a value of three. This will look a lot faster, and, as you can see there, it just went right through the Q because it was moving too fast underneath that we have the physical properties. Here is where we can set the mass of the plane, Weaken said. The air viscosity. The mass right here determines the weight of the plane. Let's go ahead and set the speed multiplier back down to one, and then we'll set the mass all the way up to one kilogram right here. So now if we play this, it's going to look in lot heavier and you can see it's almost going through the Q because it weighs so much if I bring this all the way up to a value of 10 this away 10 times the amount that it's already weighing and it should go right through the cube, as you can see there because it weighs way too much underneath at the air viscosity. This is basically how dense the air is around the plane. So if I play this, you can see it looks like that if I turn up the density of the air. It will slow down to the plane, as you can see here, so it's moving through the air, but it's moving all its lower because the air is a lot more dense. Then, underneath that we have the bendy model. There are two different options here you have angular and linear. Angular is a little bit more smooth with its bending. There's not that many sharp edges, and you can see how that looks here. Then if I restart the animation and said it over to linear, they're going to be a little bit sharper, and I think it looks a little bit more interesting. As you can see, There you can see the edges are a little bit sharper and not as stiff around the bending. The last thing that we will talk about in this video is the quality steps. This determines the quality of your simulation. The lower you go, there will be more glitches, Maura, things that passed through each other, and the higher you go, the better it will look. But the longer it will take to bake and render. So to demonstrate this with this you be sphere. I'm just going to do a little bit of animating, So I'm gonna hit I to add in a location key frame. Then I'm gonna jump to frame 20. I'm going to drag upwards, hit I location rotation. Then I'm going to go to frame 40 right here, move it over to the right and then hit I location rotation. And now we'll add in another key frame. Source. Simulation is going to look like this. If we restart the animation now and play it, we can see that it looks pretty good. It moves the cloth just like that. But now if we go back, if we select our plane and set the quality of the steps down to a value of one, so it's very low. We played this again, and it just passes right through it because the quality is so low. So if you have any issues with objects passing through your claws simulation, try turning up the steps right here, and hopefully that will fix your issue. In the next video, we will take a look at the stiffness and the dampening 8. 2 Stiffness and Damping: Hello, everyone. And welcome to another video. In this video, we're gonna take a look at the physical properties, the stiffness and the dampening and all of the values. Inside those two options. I've created three different collections. And if I press one, we conceive, This is our first collection to this is our second collection. And three, this is our third and these all show different values in the stiffness and the dampening. Let's go ahead and go over to the first collection. And in this one we're going to demonstrate the stiffness. The stiffness is basically the amount of stiffness that will resist stretching in the clause in relation. So currently it's at a value of 15. And if we play our simulation, we can see exactly how this looks pretty basic. Nothing really to special. If we restart the animation, set the attention all the way down to a value of zero and play this one more time, you can see that the clause stimulation doesn't have too much of an effect. The reason for this is because the mass is set to a very low number. If we bring up the mass to a value of three, it's gonna weigh a lot more, and if we play this, you will see that the cloth is now stretching a lot more. Let's bring the tension back up to a value of 15 with this new wait, Let's restart played this one more time and you can see it doesn't stretch as much. So that is basically what the tension does. It resists stretching in the costume, elation moving on from there. Let's go take a look at the compression, and this is the amount of force that it will resist from compressing in on itself with its at 2 15 Let's go ahead and player simulation, and we can see it collapses just like that. But it moves pretty slowly. If we drive this all the way up to a value of 150 you can see it is a lot stronger and it's not collapsing. Let's go ahead and restart and set the compression all the way down to a value of zero, and we play this again and you can see it collapsed in on itself instantly because there's no structure for this simulation and moving on from there. Let's take a look at the sharing and right here I've set up a quick animation where this cube comes up and hits this object right here. This value right here controls the amount of de formacion in your mesh one. Another object collides with it. So when this cube hits this object, it should deformity quite a bit because this year amount is set to zero and let's go ahead and take a look at it. We can see here that this object is totally deformed now, and it doesn't look as good. And it's just kind of hanging out there, and it looks really weird. If we restart the animation and turn this year up to a value of 25 let's actually go all the way up to 100. We restart and played this again. You'll notice it's not as deformed as it once was. It actually has a little bit of structure to it, so that is what this year does. It takes into account deformations and tries to share that from happening with the value set to a high number. And finally, let's go back to the first collection and let's take a look at the bending this is pretty easy to understand. Basically, this is the amount of bending that will happen in your class simulation. So with it set to a value of 0.5, this should bend quiet. Good, and there won't be any tension. But now, if we restart and set the bending really high like a value of 56 we play this and you can see it is a lot more stiff in the wrinkles. You can even go higher, like all the way up to, ah, 150. And then if we restart and play this again, you can see this is what it looks like over in the clause in relation settings. If we change this over to leather, you'll notice that the bending is set to 150. If we restart this and play it, you'll notice this is what it looks like because leather is very stiff. There's there's going to be a very little amount of bending, and that is the reason why it is so high. Jumping back over to collection three. Let's go ahead and take a look at the Dampen e. How this works is it will take into account the dampening effect right here and try to minimize it. So with this set to zero, we can play it and you can see there's a lot of deformations happening in our close simulation. But if we were to turn up the dampening all the way up to 50 we play this again. You can see it's trying to minimize that effect. So basically how this works is these values affect the amount of stiffness, compression, shear and bending the high. You turn this up to the less of an effect it will have if we drop over to collection to we can take a look at this. Let's restart the animation, select it and bring up the compression very, very high. The compression here is set to 50 but the impression in the stiffness is set to zero. If we play this, you can see it collapsed pretty slowly. And if I drive this although down to zero for restart played this again, you can see it collapsed instantly, so the dampening tries to slow it down, jumping over back to collection one. If we turn up the dampening for the bending, it will give us some strange results as you can see here. It basically tries to slow down the bending, but it creates some weird vibrations in the cloth simulation, so I would be careful when messing around with the damping in the bending. 9. 3 Baking Cache: Now let's talk about the cash settings. Here is where you can bake in your simulation so you can jump to any frame on your timeline to view exactly what that frame looks like. You can also save your bacon in, so once you close the program and open it back up, it will save in that bacon cast. You can instantly go to whatever frame that you have selected. See, as you can see right here, I can't really jump to any frames, and that's because we haven't baked in our simulation over on the simulation start you convey. Determine where you want to start the animation and then where you want to end it. If your timeline is only 100 and 50 frames long, you don't need that extra 100 frames. You can go ahead and set this to 150. Underneath that, we have an option to bake, and this will just bake. In this simulation, we have calculate to frame. So if I'm on frame 80 I can click calculate to frame, and it will calculate all those bakes all the way up to frame 80 and then Aiken jump to whatever frame that I want. Keep in mind if you do any settings, like if you change the quality steps up to a value of six, you can see that the cash is now gone and you're going to have to re bake it in. You can also play your simulation, and you can see it's breaking in that pre cash. And this blue line is a temporary bake, so if I do any settings, it will disappear. If I want to save this instead of re baking it, I can click on current cash to bake, and then it will save this in. And then I can go through here and select which frame that I want. If you don't like how your simulation looks, you can go ahead and delete that bake and then change your settings and then re bake. If, for example, you have multiple bakes like a particle system, a fire simulation or anything like that, you can click on bake all dynamics in that old bacon every single simulation in your scene . If you don't like any of your simulations, you can click on delete all bakes, and that would get rid of everything, and you'll have to re bake every simulation that you have in your blender file update all to frame. Let's say, for example, I like how frame 100 looks and I want to just bake in that I can click, update all to frame and that will bacon that current frame, as we can see right here. You can also rename your bacon cashes just by double clicking on this and I can call this one cotton. Then, if I wanted to add in multiple bakes, I can click on that plus sign. I can change this over to leather. Then I can change that preset to leather and then I can bake this in. And as we could see there is starting to bake. Keep in mind the end frame will go back up to 250. So if you have a 150 frame animation, you'll have to put that in right there. Then I can go through here and decide. This looks pretty good, but I also want to take a look at the cotton, so I just need to switch over there. Then I can switch over to the cotton and see how this looks. This will keep those settings, though from the leathers of what I'll have to do is just click on the presets, change it back over to cotton, restart the animation and play it again. And then we can see this happen. We can bake this in and you can see it's certain to bake. Then I can preview this one. This looks pretty good. Then I can select the leather one restart, Play this and we can see this is what it looks like, so you can have multiple bakes and you can switch between those two until you find something that you like. 10. 4 Cloth Shape: in this video, we'll take a look at the shape handle. The shape panel allows you to create a sewing groups or PIN Group's PIN group's allows you to select certain verses and have them stay in place while the other parts of the mesh move around and the PIN group deals with the Vertex groups and we'll talk about those in just a second. But basically what we need to do is a sign a vertex group to the parts of the mess that we want to stay to add in a new Vertex group to an object. What you need to do is go over to the Vertex panel and then give it a plus sign right there . This creates a new group. From there, you can go over to the object mode button and click on weight paint, and then you can start painting in what you want if you press and you can bring up the tool panel, and here is where you can change the amount of way that you're dealing with one means fully read at 100% weight. It's gonna be this dark red, and then it will go over to the green, which is about 50%. And then where the blue is, that means there is no wait, so no values will be implemented with the way paint, you can do a lot of cool things. If you look over on your toolbar, you can select a Grady int, and so you can have a Grady int of 1 to 0, and it will look something like this. You can also select the sample. Wait. So if you want a certain color, you can just click on that and you can see on the toolbar it will display that exact weight . If you're great is too sharp, you can select the blur tool and start blurring out the Grady int. So it smooths out those edges to change your brush size. You Kenbrell up the rays just like this, and you can also mess with the strength. You can see that if the strength is lower, it doesn't do a full radiant so these to correlate with each other if you turn the weight all the way up. But the strength is that zero. It's not going to do much, but if the weight is up a little bit, it will start to paint. And the more I click on one spot, the more red it will become for demonstrating this pin option. We're gonna go over to the Vertex panel and give it a new Vertex group. You can also name this if you want to, so I'm just gonna call it pins. Then I'm gonna go into edit mode and assigned where I want. So if I hold Ault and then left, click on one of those edges, Aiken, select it holding shift. And also I will select this loop cut right there. And then I will click a sign with a weight of one. You can also play around with this slider. If you want less weight. I'm just gonna leave it at one for now. Now, if we go out of an emote, come up to object, moan and select weight pain. We will see that we've added in the stripes along the edges of our plane. So on the edges, that is gonna be 100% weight. And in the middle, there is gonna be no wait jumping back over to the physics panel. Weaken, Select That pin grew by just clicking on this and selecting pins. Now, if we play our simulation, you will notice that the edges are stuck in place while the middle is moving around. This could be very useful. If you want to create a flag of some kind or a clothes pin where some clothes are hanging on a line, you can do some really interesting stuff. With this, you can do some pretty interesting stuff with this pinning option. For example, if you select one side of that pin and leave the other side unchecked, we can play our simulation and this is what it looks like pretty cool. And the sickness underneath the pen just controls the stiffness of the pen verte sees. As you can see there. Now let's take a look at the sewing. The sewing is basically sowing in real life. You take an edge or a string, you put it through one face into another face into another face, and then you pull it tight. That is basically how the sewing works. So to demonstrate this, let's go ahead and model a quick shirt and then wrap this around to do that will use this plane down here, so I'm going to select it, hit our than X and 90 and then enter. Then we'll drag forward a little bit and then drag it upwards. Now, you can follow along in this video if you want to. This model is in the resource is if you want to go download that now to get started, we just need to scale this down a little bit and then place it how we want. So somewhere around here will probably be good, something like that. And then we need to start modeling where the arms would be, where the hips are on the shoulders and whatnot. So let's go ahead and scale this down just a little bit and then dragged down Go into edit mode and I'm gonna hit control are and Adama Luke cut right in middle. Then I'll delete half of it. So I'm gonna box selected by pressing B than X. Then Vergis is now. If we go over to the modifier tab, we can enable a mere modifier, and this will save us a lot of time. Make sure clipping is turned on. Then we could go into edit mode one more time, and then now we can add in a lot more Luke cuts. So the clause immolation will actually look good. So I'm gonna hit control are and drag this up a little bit, using the scroll wheel to around that many cuts. Something like that. About 12. You can see it in the bottom. Left, left, click. And then right click. We also need to add in a couple Luke cuts going vertically. Soul at it for Luke. Cuts left, click and then right click from here. We can select this for, to see and then just start modeling it. So I'm gonna press oh to turn on proportional editing, Then, G. And I'm gonna move this in just a little bit. Something like that. We also need a strap for the shoulder. So I'm going to select to Vergis is just like this, Actually. Let's go with three Regis's. Then I'm gonna hit you to extrude drag it up along the sea access, then left click now to duplicate that process, we can hit shift are twice to added another. Things like that will do that three times. So there you go. We have a basic shirt. I do want to smooth out this area so I'm gonna go into edit mode. So, like that courtesy press X and delete it, then press oh, to go out of proportional editing and then I'll just move this end to smooth it out. Something like that will look just a little bit better. There we go. Now, what we need to do is duplicate this entire thing and move it to do the back of this model . So I'm gonna press a to select everything, shifty why, and drag it across. I also want to make sure this is closer. So all press B for Bak select and draw a box around the entire thing, then g y and bring it closer to the model. Something like that. Then from here, what we need to do is connect these two. So to do that, you could go into edit mode once again, then select where you want to connect. So I'm going to select these top Burgess sees these ones back here as well. Press control e and click on bridge edge loops and you can see that bridges them together. Now we need to connect the ones underneath the arms. So I'm gonna go into front view Z and go into wire frame, then see for Circle Select and then I'll select all of these ones down here. Then, of course, you can press controlled E and click on bridge edge loops. All right, there we go. We've connected the Vergis ease, but we're not done yet. We also need to delete these faces. To do that, you can press a three to go into face select mode or click on this button up top holding shift. I'm going to select this face and then this face press X and go on Lee faces. What this will do is it will leave the edges intact, but delete the faces, as you can see here. All right, we're done with the modeling. Let's go ahead and go back over to the physics panel and turn on sewing. Let's go ahead and player simulation to see how this looks. So I hit the space bar. We can see that it just crashes into it, so there is a couple of problems going on. First off, we need to select our model and enable a collision so it actually collides with it. We also need to select a shirt go over to the modifier tab and make sure the mere modifier is above the claw simulation so it actually takes it into account. Going back over to the physics tab. We can take a look at these settings. This Max force right here controls the max amount of force that the strings will pull towards each other with its at 20 That means it's very, very strong. It's at the max number. We need to set this to a manual number. Let's go with a number of five to see how that looks. If we restart the animation, play it once again, you can see it's working a lot better. There is still a couple problems, though. First off, the quality is not that good. It's clipping through, and it doesn't look very realistic. So let's go ahead and turn the quality steps up to a value of 15. This will help with the simulation. If we now player simulation, you can see it's working really good. It is connected up there. It's connected down here, and it looks really nice. If you want a stronger pole, you can turn up the Max Force. Let's try a value of 10 will restart the animation, play it one more time and you can see that looks pretty good. If for some reason you don't have enough room right here, all you would have to do is just scale these along the X axes just a little bit. So they now connect properly along that edge. We also have a shrinking factor, and what this will do is it will actually shrink the mesh in and playing around with the setting. It seems to always break this simulation, so if I bring it up a little bit and play it, you can see it's shrunk the clock down a little bit. So there's not a lot of room along this edge right here. If I go even further, it will even break it even more as you can see like that. So normally I would always leave this at zero. But if you need to shrink in the mess, you have that option. We also have dynamic met. This will enable you to use any deformations that you have, such as displacement, armatures, a lattice, anything like that. If you have those, make sure this is turned on. You can also open up the collisions and turn on self collision if you're meshes actually colliding with itself. In this case, I don't really need this option. But if you have a clot that is colliding with itself, you should turn it on in a later video. We will go through the setting, so don't worry about them right now. So after playing around with the model a little bit and making the shirt just a little bit better, we can play our simulation and see how this looks. What I did here is, I added in a subdivision service modifier and tweak the shirt just a little bit. And as you can see, this looks really nice. So this is a very fast and easy way to add in clothing to your characters. 11. 5 Cloth Collision: in this video, we're gonna look at the collisions in the cloth simulation. The first value that we have here is the quality. And this is the exact same thing as the quality up here. It just helps improve the collision. So it's a little bit more accurate. Keep in mind if you go higher with this number, it will take a lot longer to bake. A quality of two works for most simulations under the there, we have a check box for object collisions. If I turn this off and we player simulation, you will notice it passes right through this object right here, which has a collision modifier. So if you don't want your object to collide with anything, you could go ahead and turn that off. I'm gonna leave it on for now. And then here we have the distance. This is the distance of when it will collide with it. So currently it set to 0.15 And if I play it, this is what it looks like. If I drive the distance all the way up to a value of one meter, you'll notice it stops right up there. So that is the distance of when it will collide with the object. The impulse clamping right here prevents explosions in tight collisions In some situations , if you're claws, simulation is flying out. Are getting are moving around after a collision has happened. Try turning this clamping value up to prevent that. The collision collections down here give you an option to have different collisions in different collections, for example, if this object is in collection, too. So if I pressed the MP, I could move it to collection, too. Then if I select the collection in here, if I go collection one, it's not going to take into account this plane because it's not in that collection. Now, if I play this, you'll notice it passes right through it. Now, if we were to select collection, too, and then we press the play button, you will notice it does take into account because we selected it right there. This is very useful if you have multiple collections with different claw stimulations and you don't want them interacting with each other self collision. If I turn this on, you will notice that the cloth actually collides with itself. Now as before, if I uncheck this and play this again, you will notice it goes right through each other. As you can see there, with this value turned on, it will actually collide with itself. The friction option here determines the amount of friction on the cloth itself. So if we turn this up very, very high to a value of 80 and we play this, it's not going to slide around. As you can see, it almost gets stuck right there. But as before, if this is set to a value of one, it's going to slide around and there's not gonna be any friction. The distance right here determines the amount of distance that it will collide with itself , just like before. If we were to turn this up to a value of 0.1 meters, that's the highest you can go. And if we play this, it will look a little bit weird. You can see it's not collided with itself down here. It's leaving a small gap, and it's almost breaking the simulation, so you should probably leave this at a lower number Now. If we play this, you can see it is acting normally. The impulse clumping is the exact, same as the impulse clumping up here. If your object is moving around our two exploding or doing anything crazy, try turning up this value to clamp down on that movement. And finally, we have the Vertex group. Here we can determine where we want the self collision to happen. So, for example, we could go into edit mode and select half of this and apply for Text Group. To do this, we can go over to the object data Penhall and give it a new Vertex group by hitting that plus sign. Now, if I presby for box, select and draw a box around half of the plane, I'll just hold see, and I'll select it manually just like this. Then I can click a sign on that Vertex group to actually see if this is working correctly. We can go over to the weight paint mode up top and weaken. See, half of it is now read. That means it's going to collide with itself. Now we can select that Vertex group in the collision panel, so over here we can select a Vertex group and selected. Now, if we play this, you will notice that this part is actually colliding with itself and in the corners. But over here, it's going through itself in this part is not so. There you go. That is the collision panel in the cloth simulation. 12. 6 Property Weights: the property waits allow you to select different parts of your cloth to have different values, and we can determine those values with a Vertex group. Over here we construct a Vertex group of which we create. So let's go ahead and do that over in the object data panel we can add in a new Vertex group. Then, if we go into top view, we can select 1/2 of it to be to have that group. If I go into edit mode and I press a the diesel it B for bak select, I can draw a box around half of the mesh. Then I can click a sign with a weight of one. Now, if we go back over to the clause in relation settings, we can select that vortex group in any of these drop down menus. We have the structure. We have the sheer, the bending and the shrinking. And we talked about all these values in a previous video, and you can go check that out if you forgot about them. So basically, how this works is with a value of one. It's going to display the max amount of tension that we select here. This graph determines the amount of weight at Blue. It's going to display 0% and then at Red is going to display 100%. So if we have a structure, tension of a max of 2020 is going to be the where the red is. And if the way Grady in is green, it's going to be about 10. And then at zero, it's going to be zero attention. To really demonstrate this, let's go with the bending group. So I'm going to use to like that group and then for the Mac spending where Red is, that's going to be the Max. I'm going to set this to a value of five. So now if we play our simulation, we can see that over here it's really, really wrinkly. And then over here we have a lot bigger wrinkles to demonstrate this even better. Let's go with a value of 10 now. If we play this, you will notice over here really big wrinkles, and then over here it's just moving around. This also works for every single option that we have here. We have the shrinking, so if I want to select that group will de select the bending so we don't need that anymore . Then I can set the max shrinking up to a value appoint 11 will completely break this simulation. So I'm going to just go with a value of one, and now we can see that half of it is now shrinking, and then the other half is as it once waas. If you want to add a Grady int effect to your cloth, you can go into top. You go over to wait paint mode before we add the Grady int in. We need to actually reset this. So I'm going to select the brush tool and set the weight up here to a value of zero and then I'll just paint in the rest. Now, this is gonna take a long time with this brush size so I can press the f key to drag up my brush. Then I can paint the entire thing now that it's completely at zero weight weaken still, like the Grady int set the weight all the way back up to one and then give it a Grady, in effect, just by drawing, There we go. And now we can use that Grady inch for any of these values over on the right side. So there you go. That is the property weights. And in the next video, we will take a look at the field weights. 13. 7 Force Fields: over in the field weights. We can determine the amount of force that a force field will have, and you can see a lot of different options here. If I press shift a and go over to force field it down at the bottom, we can see all these different force fields right here we have forced, which just has a force going in all directions. And then we have wind. Let's go with wind and then I'm going to front view and then rotate this so it's facing the cloth and place it over here. Over in the side panel. We have a strength amount, and if I turn this up, it'll move the cloth, as you can see here. Then, if I drive the strength all the way up to a value of about 100 we player simulation, you'll notice that it's pushing the cloth in that direction, going back over to the visits panel. We can select that amount of force for the wind, so currently it's that 1% so that means it's going to display 100% of that strength. If I drive this all the way down to zero, it's not gonna have any effect on the simulation because we said that 20 right here. If you have multiple force fields, you can play around with those values as well. So if I want this to only have half of the strength, I can set it to half, then play this and it will only display about 50 strength in the force field. We also have a gravity. So if I want to turn gravity all the way off and we player stimulation, you'll notice it's just staying exactly where it is. And then the force field takes it, so it's looking like it's floating in space. We also have a value for also all of these force fields we can control with one slider. If I turn this all the way down, this wind force field will have no effect, and you can see it's sustained exactly where it is, so that's pretty easy to understand. And we can also select a defector collection. So, for example, if this force field is in collection to and we select that collection down here, it will have an effect, and you can see it's pushing that cloth that direction. But if I select the first collection which has no force fields in it. We player simulation and it has no effect. In a later video, we will be creating a full on tutorial using force fields. So go ahead and check that out. If you want to learn more about these. 14. Collision Objects: Hello, everyone. And welcome to a new section in this section. We're going to take a look at collisions and a couple other unique things that are with the cloth simulation to enable a collision. You probably already know how to do this. You need to have an object selected and then go over to the physics panel, which is this button right here. And click on collisions. This will open up a new panel with a lot of different settings. And we have two main settings right here. Ones for the particles and ones for the soft body and cloth, the particle ones we don't need to worry about. Since we're not dealing with particles, we can go ahead and collapse that menu. And then here are the ones for the cloth. Let's go ahead and take a look at the first setting, which is the dampening. Now I think this value on Lee works with soft body simulations and not the cloth. But basically what it does is it will dampen the bounciness. If we zoom in here and set it to zero, you can see what it looks like now if we restart and set this all the way to a value of one . It'll look of the exact same. And that's because this only works with the soft body simulation, so you can just leave this at the default values. The value that will work for the CLA simulation is the outer thickness. We have an outer thickness, any inner thickness right here. We'll talk about this one first. This is for the out of thickness of the year mesh. So with its set to a value of one, we restart the animation and play it. You'll notice that the cube stops way above the plank, so this is a value of one blender unit, and you can't go any higher than one. See if I try to put into right here, it's not gonna work. So this is the maximum distance that you can have with a default value. A 0.2 I think that works very well for most scenes. Let's press the space bar and see what our simulation looks like. You might notice that it passes right through the object. The reason for this is because single cited is turned on. This basically means that the only sign of the object that will have a collisions is in the normal direction. To view the normals, you could go into edit mode, open up this panel right here in turn on normals for the faces I'll bring up the size. You can see this. The normals are going in all of the directions, and this is pretty normal for the Cube. About the problem with this is if our cost simulation is inside a Q, it's not going to take into account those edges because the normals were not pointed in that direction. To fix that, we can uncheck, single cited, and this will take every single face into account. Now, if we restart the animation and play this again, you'll notice that it actually collides with it. Now. This inner thickness value does not have an effect on the cloth simulation, as you can see there on Lee use for soft bodies. So the only three options that you really need to worry about with the clause in relation collisions is the outer thickness, and this will also work for the inside as well. So if you see I turn this up, it collides with it inside. Just like that, then the friction right here. And then the single cited Let's talk about the friction. The friction value right here controls the amount of friction and object will have when the claws simulation collides with it. This is what it looks like with a value of five. You can see they're just floating out down just like that. If I restart the animation and we bring this up to a value of 80 that's the highest you can go. We played this again. You'll notice that the clause simulation just stays right there as because this object now has a friction of 80 and it's acting very, very sticky with a friction of zero. It will act like ice, and there will be no friction at all. The last option that we have to look at in at the collision modifier is the field absorption. This allows you to control the amount of force fields that will go through the object. Right now it is set to zero. This scene that we have here is a collusion object. We have a wind force field with a strength of about 600 then we have a clause simulation with a pinning on this left side, so it's looking like a flag. If I press the space bar, we can see exactly what this looks like. And the wind is working just fine and going through this collision object. If I drag in the field absorption all the way up to one, it still won't work correctly. The reason for this is because we need to select the force field itself Intern on absorption in the property panel. Now you will notice that has no effect on the simulation. If this is turned off, then it will have an effect and it will move the cloth. But if it's turned on, it will have an effect and it won't be able to go through the collision. You can control the amount of force field that will go through this by turning this slider up here. So if I set this to around 50% only half of the strength of the force field will be able to get through. So there you go. Those are collisions in blender 15. Interacting 2 Cloth Simulations: Hello, everyone. And in this video I'll be showing you how you can interact to different cloth simulations together to get started. Let's go ahead and drive this cube up, and then we'll go into edit mode and right click and subdivide this a couple times. I'll do that one or two more times. I think that's probably good right there. Then I'll press shift a an ad in a plane. This plane is going to be the plane that catches this object saw, scale it up a little bit more and drag it along the X. The next thing that will do is we'll select the plane, go over to the object Dana panel and give it a new Vertex group. We're going to pin the edges of this plane, so go into edit mode, and we also need to subdivide this a couple times, so I'm gonna hit control, are and in to Luke Cuts. Then control are at in one, Luke cut, so we get square faces. Then I'll press a once or twice right click and subdivide. I'll do this a couple more times till I get the desired effect. I think that's pretty good from there I can hold Ault and then left click, and that will select that entire loop holding shift and all. I will select this loop and then click a sign. Now let's go ahead and apply the cloth and collision modifiers. So going over to the close simulation settings, all glow cloth, and then I'll go collision underneath the cloth shaped. Let's go ahead and select that pin group, and we'll leave it just at the default settings. Next. If we go over to the model bar tab, we can see that there's a clause simulation and then there's a collision. Make sure the collision is underneath the cloth simulation or it's not gonna work properly from there. Let's do the same thing with the cubes all select it. Go over to the physics tab and then click on cloth and then click on collision for the cloth preset. I'm just going to go with leather, and now let's player simulation to see what this looks like. If I play it, you will notice that the cloth is interacting with the cloth underneath. Let's make this a little bit more interesting by rotating the cube around. Then we'll play this and we can see it starts bouncing just like that. Pretty cool. Now the reason why the cloth simulation is above the collision is this. If I select my plane and have the collision above it, it's not going to take into account of the cloth simulation. So now if we play this, you'll notice that the Cube is hanging out where the plane was originally. So it's really important that if you have any modifiers that deform the plane, that the collision is below that, so it actually takes it into account. Now, if we restart and play this, you'll notice it's bouncing around just like that. Now, if you wanted this to act a little bit more naturally, like making some Indians and actually moving the cloth around, you would have to use the soft body. Physics that is the one limitation of the close simulation is it's difficult to interact with other objects doing this method. It will interact, but it's not gonna look very natural. 16. Blender 2.82 Springs & Pressure: Hello, everyone. And in this video, we're going to be using Blender version 2.82 beta. This version of blender is still being worked on. If you're watching this video and this version is already officially out, that is perfectly fine. There are two different cloth simulation settings that are in this new version of Blender and will be going through them if you want to follow along and go ahead and go to blender dot or go and download the latest version of blender by clicking on this button here in scrolling Down to go experimental. If you click on this button here, it will take you to a experimental page where you'll be able to download 2.82 jumping back over to Blender. We can go ahead and get started on this video. First thing that will do is add in a plane so we can actually see our Claussen volition hit the ground and then I'll select our cube and drag it upwards for this. I'm going to go into edit mode, right click and subdivide this cube a couple times next, also like the plane and give it a collision modifier so the cloth will actually interact with it. And then for the Cube, I will go cloth. If we scroll down here, you will see two different panels, internal springs and pressure. Internal Springs allows you to have springs inside your mesh. Let's go ahead and take a look at this. If I turn this on and we player simulation, this is what it looks like. And as you can see, it's not collapsing in on itself like it would. If I turn this off and restart and play, you will see that it just stays right there. But if I turn this on, it will be a lot more stiff over in the settings. We can determine the length of the springs right here. Now. Currently, this cube does not weigh that much, so let's go ahead and bring this up to a value of two. Now, if we restart and play this again, you can see it weighs a lot more. Over in the max. It's spring creation length weaken Set this up to a value of one. Now this deals with blender units, so it's only gonna be about here in the spring length. If I play this now you will see it collapses in on itself. If I bring this spring length higher, it'll be a lot more stable. As you can see there, let's try a value of two. You start and play, and you can see it looks like that check surface Normal's This check box will look at the normals on your mesh and determine where the springs will be. For example, if this top face has a normal pointing downwards, it's not gonna work. This option checks to see if normals are pointing in opposite directions. Currently, our normals are pointing up, and then this side is pointing down, so it's going in opposite directions so it will work. But if we were to flip this, let's go ahead and do that. I'm gonna go into edit mode, press three to go in to face select mode. Then I'll press aide de Select and see for Circle Select, and then we'll start grabbing those faces up top. If I press F three and type in the word flip, we can flip those normals on top of the mesh. Now the normals are pointing in this direction going down, So if this is turned on this side will collapse in on itself. If I player simulation now you can see that's what it does. But if we were to uncheck this so it won't take the normals into account, this will work properly, as you can see there. Underneath that, we have the option for attention and compression. These values determine how strong the compression is. So if I set the compression known to one is going to collapse pretty fast on itself. As you can see there, If the tension is also set to one restart and play it, we can see that's what it looks like. But if these values air set to a higher number like 20 and we play assimilation, you can see it's a little bit stronger. We can also select a Vertex group, So if you have some parts of the mess that you want to have springs and some parts you don't want to, you can still like that right here underneath the internal springs. We have the option to enable pressure. What this will do is it will create a balloon effect on our mesh. Right now, we have the pressure at zero, and we can see what this looks like. You can see it's just a basic simulation. If we turn up the pressure to, let's say value of 15 and we play this, nothing's gonna really happen. The reason for this is because we need to turn up the factor amount. This is the actual air pressure. So if I set this up to a value of 150.3, we player assimilation and you will notice it now has a balloon effect. If I bring the factor up higher, it'll expand it even more. We can also set a custom volume right here, and this is the air pressure around the object and inside the object. If I go with a value of 15 you can see it looks like that, and the higher I go with this, value them or it'll expand outwards. And, of course, if I bring the pressure up here, it'll expand even more and you can see sometimes it just breaks the simulation, so you have to be careful with the target volume and the factor. The higher you set this to, the more it will expand, but at some point it will just explode. Let's bring the factor back down and then the target volume back down to 15. And there we can see what it looks like and you can see it's bouncing around on the plane just like that. You can great some really interesting stuff with this, and you can also select a Vertex group. If you want some of the mess to have the pressure in some parts, you don't want to have it. So there you go. Those are the new settings in Blender 2.8 to thank you for watching and I'll see you in the next section. 17. Blanket Simulation P1 Simulating: Hello, everyone, and welcome to a new section in this section we're going to be creating. The image that you see on screen right now will be importing in a couch model that I'm giving away in this course. And then we'll also be learning about creating a blanket with a texture to get started. We don't need the default cubes. We can go ahead and delete it and then go over to file and then appends. This allows us to import that model in navigates. Were you downloaded the couch model and it's in. The resource is you go grab that. Once you have found a, you can click on couch model dot blend and click Own collection, and then you will see the couch collection right there. Go ahead and select it and go upend, and there you can see it in our scene. Now to actually move it around, you need to select the empty that's at the bottom left, and if I press as you can see, it's scale in the entire thing, rotating it, moving it around. The reason why there is an empty right there is because there's a lot of different objects and it would be a pain to try to select a mall, So that's why you only need to select the Empty and then move this around next. Let's press shift a and add in a plane and this is going to be our ground. So scale it up pretty big and then we'll add in the blankets. I'm just gonna be using a plane in the price of G and Z two Dragon upwards going into top view. Let's go ahead and press s and X and skill it along the x two. It's more of a rectangle and maybe scale the entire thing down just a little bit. Now we'll go into edit mode and add in some loop cuts. So I'm gonna hit control are and adding to Luke. Cuts left, Click and then right click and then we'll add one. Going down the middle. Control are left, click and right click. Now that we're doing with square faces, we compress a once or twice, then right click and click on a subdivide will do this a couple times. Do we get the amount of geometry that we want? I think that's probably good right there. Next. Let's go ahead and add in a collision to all of these objects. So I'm going to select the couch model right here. Go over to the physics tab and click on collision. We'll do the same for the arm rest. Collision will do this one. You want to select every single object that your cloth might interact with, so this back rest, I'll add collision. Maybe this one, and then finally will select the ground right here. The plane and Addie collision modifier to it. Now that we've done that, we can now start simulating. So I'm going to select my plane, go into front view by pressing one on the number pad. And now let's rotate this so it crashes down. I'm gonna double tap are and we can rotate it something like this up a little bit. Double tap are again and scale it down. Maybe something around there. So it crashes down and then forms a pretty organic shape. Now it's at in the clause simulation. So click on cloth, and then, for the preset weaken, just select cotton, which is already the automatic default settings. The quality steps I'm going to turn up to a value of 10 so it looks just a little bit better. And then underneath the collisions, I'm gonna turn on self collision. So it actually collides with itself. Now that we've done that, we can go ahead and press the space bar and you will see that is starting to simulate. And then we can pause it right about there. And that looks pretty good. It landed in a pretty organic shape. And if you don't like how your claws simulation looks, you can just go ahead and restart. It may be rotated or something like this until you find the right angle, Play it again and then you might find something that you actually like. So what we're gonna do is paws are close simulation at a frame somewhere around there, I think looks pretty good. And then we'll right click and go shades move. What we're going to do now is apply the clause simulation modifier. What this allows us to do is edit the vergis is in place or move it to different scenes. Now, before we apply the claw simulation, we need to you be unwrapped. This This will make it much easier when we're adding textures or materials to do that. Let's restart the animation and go into edit mode and then press you and click on Unwrap. You might notice at the bottom right here that it said Object is non uniform scale. The reason for that is because we need to hit control a and apply the scale. This will tell blender the dimensions and how everything works. Then we can go back into edit mode you and then unwrap. Now we can player simulation once again and find a frame that we like and then a pause right about there looks pretty good. Now before we apply the modifier, let's go ahead and press shift D just in case we want to go back to this simulation and then we'll press em and move it to a new collection collection, too. Then, to hide that collection, I could go one to hide it, and you can see it's hidden right there. Now we can select our blanket right here, go over to the modifier tab and apply it. Now, if we go into edit mode, you'll notice and now has vergis ease. That looks pretty good. Announce. Add in a subdivision surface modifier to smooth everything out. Let's go with a view of two, and there we go. Our blanket is starting to look really good. One thing that you might notice, though, is that it's completely thin. The reason for this is because we used a plane. So let's go ahead and add in a solidify modifier to give our blanket a little bit of thickness so quick on solidify right here and then for the thickness. We can just play around with this until we find something that we like. If you hold shift, you can go more precise. So I'm probably going to go around this value right here, 0.3 and we can also press G and Z and just drag it down just slightly because there is a little bit of ah, gap between where it hits, maybe a little bit more. And if you go further down, you might have to go into edit mode and select a couple of verses and dragged them up. So it's not clipping into the couch Now. If we go into front view with the plane selected, you'll notice that there is a small gap in between where the blanket is and where the plane is. The reason for that is because of the collision distance. To fix this, we can go ahead and select the blanket press S and Z to skillet up just slightly. And there we go. But you might notice there's a little bit of clipping and still have to drag it up a little bit. And then I think that looks pretty good right about there. So there you go. We have simulated of the blanket, and in the next video, we will create the material. 18. Blanket Simulation P2 Materials: for the material. Let's go ahead and select our blankets and go over to the material tab and give it a new material to actually edit the notes. We're gonna go ahead and split the view. And I did that by clicking in the top left and dragging across. We can change this over to the Shader editor and then we compress end to close off that panel. So we have a little bit more room. Here is our current material is just using the basic principle shader. And if I presidency and go into rendered view, we can see what this looks like now. I'm currently in cycles right now and if you want to use even you can. But I find that cycles looks a little bit better. So what we're gonna do is press shift a and add in a image texture. You can also find this texture in the article previous to this video or in the resource is , then we can take the color, plugged that into the base color and then click open navigates where your texture is, where you downloaded it, and this is the texture that will be using this blanket one right here and then click open image there. We can see it in our scene. That looks pretty good, but you might notice that it looks kind of plasticky and the dimensions of the UV map is not very good to fix this. We can go ahead and go over to the UV image editor and go into edit mode, press A to select everything, and here we can see our UV map. If I press a weakened, select the U map on this part and then press s to scale and you will notice it's scaling up that texture on our model over on the left, Scale it up to what you think will be the accurate size. Probably around there is pretty good. From there. We can go back over to the Shader editor and continue on with the material. The roughness value, usually blankets and cloth, does not have a lot of glossy nous. So we're gonna bring the roughness all the way up to a value of 0.9. The speculum app gives it a little bit of speculum around the edges. We're gonna bring this down to a value of point to and there you can see that our cloth is looking a little bit more rough. We also need to add in a little bit of displacement. To do this, we compress shift A and go over to vector and then bump place that right in the middle, then take the color output and plugged that into the heights than the normal into the normal of the principal Chatur. And there you can see that our texture is looking a lot better and there's some bump on the fabric. You can play around with the strength. I'm going to go with a value of about 0.4, so we just get a little bit of bump. One more thing that we do need to add is the sheen, and this helps for fabric material. Gives it a little bit of whiteness around the edges will drive this up just a little bit to about 8.7, and I think that will give it just a little bit better. Look, one more thing that will do with this material is turn up the sub surface scattering. What this will do is it will let light pass through our blanket now most fabrics and blankets and other sort of material like that light does shine through it. So let's go ahead and turn up the sub surface, scattering up to a value of 10.1, and it will slow down the render time and you can see the effect right there. That might be a little too much. So let's go with a value of 0.5 and now light will be able to pass through the blanket just slightly. So there we go. There is our basic blanket material, and in the next video we'll work on the lighting and camera settings. 19. Blanket Simulation P3 Lights & Rendering: Now let's go ahead and work on the lighting and camera position for the lighting. We're going to go over to the world settings and import a HDR. The HDR is also linked in the project policy, and you can go download at the one that will be using. Is this one right here called Reading Room Off of HDR Haven? You can download any of these sizes. The two K will work perfectly fine since you're not gonna even see the background. Once you have a downloaded go over to the world settings in blender and underneath color. We're gonna set this to environment, texture, environment. Texture allows you to import 3 60 degree images into blender. Click on open and navigates where that is. Once you have found it, go ahead and select it and go open image and here we can see it in or seen. Now, if I press Z and go into rendered view, you will see that that background is now in place and it's lighting are seen pretty good. We also need to select the lamp, the default lamp and go ahead and delete that since we're not going to need it to position the camera. I'm gonna go at around this angle and hit control Ault and zero on the number pad to snap the camera to view command option zero. If you're on a Mac, then you can select the camera by clicking on the outline. Press G Middle mouse button and drag it backwards so you can see the entire blanket. Something around here will look pretty good. Now Let's go ahead and add in some depth of field to really sell the scene. To do this, we need to place our cursor right on the blinking and add in an object you can hold shift and then right click to snap the cursor to that spot. Or you can select the cursor a tool on the left side, and just place it using left click. Once you have it in place, go ahead and press shift A and added an empty and then plane axes. Then you can select the camera icon and go over to the camera settings and enable depth of field for the focus object. So, like that empty that we just added by typing the word empty, and you should see two of these use empty 001 and that is the empty that we just added. And then for the F stop. This is the amount of blur that we can add. Let's go with a value of one f stop. If we praise E and go into rendered view, you'll notice there's quite a bit of you'll notice that there's quite a bit of depth of field and it looks really nice. Let's go over to the render settings and do a couple of things here. First off for the color management. Let's set the look to medium high contrast. Just add in a little bit more and then finally will add in a wood material for the ground. So go ahead and select the plane. Open up a new window and go over to the Shader editor. And then we can add in a wood texture. This is also off textures dot com Should go download that click new on this material. I'm gonna add in a image texture, suppress, shift a and go over to image texture. Place that in the middle of the nodes and take the color and plug it into the base color and then click open Once you have found the texture that you would like, go ahead and select it and go open image. And here we can see it in our scene now. Currently, it's too big for this plane. So let's go ahead and scale up the UV map. So I'm going to go over to the UV image editor by clicking up there, going into edit mode. I compress a and then scale the UV map up so the wood looks a little bit better. We'll scale it up to the amount that I want a little bit more, and then you can take a look at it this way. Yep, that looks pretty good to me. And then you could go back in the camera view, jumping back over to the Shader editor. Let's bring down the roughness of the material, so it has a little bit of a shine to it. That's a little bit too much, so we'll leave it at 0.2. Okay, now we're ready to render. Let's go ahead and press control s to save our project, then go up to render and click on render image, and then you can see it's starting to render up here. Now, since we are using the subsurface, scattering is going to take a little bit longer 20. Blanket Simulation P4 Compositing & Importing: all right. The render is done and there we can see it. It looks really nice, but there is a little bit of noise in are seen to fix this issue. Let's go ahead and add an A D noise note in the composite er To get to the composite er, you need to click on compositing and here you can see our notes set up. Go ahead and select the render layers and move it over to left to give us a little bit more space. I'm gonna press shift a and add in a filter and then d noise note right here and place that in between the image and the output to actually see what this is doing. We can hold control shift and left click on the D noise node and that will add in a viewer . And there we can see our noise is now gone. If your image zoomed in, you compress V to zoom out and Ulta be to zoom back in. Now this scene is not that complex, so we don't really need the normal or Albita nodes. But if you have a really complex scene and you wanted to use this it's very easy. What you have to do is go over to the layer panel right here and turn on D noisy data. What this will do is it will add in a bunch of sockets in the render layers. Then all you would have to do is take the dino is normal. Plug that into here. The albedo plugged that into the albedo as well. But since we did not do this before we rendered, we're going to have to re render to actually use these. I'm not going to do that, though, because it doesn't really need it now to actually save your image. You compress F 11 to bring up that render and then click on this button up here and we can click on viewer note and here is our final image. Then all you have to do is call gone image and save as all right. We have created the couch with the blankets on it, and it looks really nice. Now the question is, how do we import this into another scene? Let's say you're creating an architecture room or an interior or something like that, and you want to import this couch with the blanket. Well, that is very easy. Let's first go ahead and move all of these objects into one collection. Now we already have a collection called Couch right here. So let's go ahead and select a blanket and hit em and move that to collection and then collection catch. So now that we have everything in this collection, let's go ahead and drag it into its own collection by coming up here and dragging it right there. So now we have the couch collection we have collection one which has the camera empty and plain. Then we have collection three, which has the old Clause simulation right there. We only need to worry about this collection. Now that we've named it, we can go ahead and save our project. Now, let's go ahead and open up a new scene. To do that, you can go over to file and click on New and then general. Now let's go ahead and import that in. So I'm gonna delete the Cube, go up to file and upend, And now you want to navigate to where that blend file has been saved. Once you have found it, go ahead and click on it. Go over to collection, then you should see the collection called Couch. Select that and click a pen from library. And there we go. We can see it in our scene now. It already has the material. See if I go over to the material tap. It already has that cloth right there. And every single one of these has a modifier in all that. So it's already ready to go for you whenever you appended in. Now, keep in mind. If you were to send this bun file to a a friend or something like that, they would not have the texture. Now, if you want to pack everything into that blend of file, you need to go back over to that couch one right here, Couch tutorial one. I'm not going to save this file and we can go up to file down to external data than automatically packed into dot Blend. Now, this will pack that texture inside this file right here. So now we can send this to a friend or do whatever. And this blanket will still have that original texture. All right, there we go. That is the end of this section. Thank you for watching. If you created your own image, I would love to see it, so make sure you post it. 21. Balloon Exploding P1 Simulation: Hello, everyone, and welcome to a new section in this section or going to be creating a exploding balloon effect using blender 2.82 Now, if you don't have this version of blender, you can go to blender dot org's slash experimental, and you will be able to download the blender 2.82 beta. Now, if you're watching this video and this is already the official release, you don't have to worry about this Jumbe back over to Blender. Let's go ahead and start creating the scene. So the first thing that will add is a UV sphere. So all press shift day and go over to mesh and then you be sphere. We're gonna rotate this year 90 degrees. So if hit our than why and 90 and then enter. Now let's go ahead and do a little bit of modeling to make this look like a balloon. So go into edit mode and then all of select that single over to see right there and then press oh to go into proportional editing. So now if I move this, we can move the entire thing just like that. If I use the scroll wheel so I'm gonna press G and X and drag this a little bit this way to get sort of a balloon shaped something like that. Then, before we go out of edema, let's go ahead and hold all to and then select that ring right there and then I'll hold shift and then select that single virtue. See, we're going to pin These Vergis is in place so they won't move. To do this, go over to the Object data panel and give it a new Vertex group by hitting that plus sign and then click assigned with the weight of one. Now, when we add in the cloth simulation, we will be able to pin those overseas. Let's go ahead and do that. Jumping over to the physics tab will go cloth, and then for the preset, we'll select silk so there's going to be a silk preset and you can see the weight is very low. Then we'll scroll down to the pressure and will turn that on, and then we'll also go underneath collisions and turn on self collision. One more thing that we need to do is underneath the shape. We need to select that pin group that we just create it. So select the PIN group. So now if we play this, you can see the verdict. Seas are stuck in place. Now it's work on the pressure. So what we're gonna do is animate these values, so they expand and then at a certain point, they'll explode. So what we're going to do at frame 50 we're going to select down here at four AM 50. We're gonna set the pressure to a negative value of negative one and then hit I while hovering over this and that will add in a key frame. We're also going to do the same for the factor. So said the factor to one with majority is and then hit I while you're hovering over that next going over to frame 60 we're going to set the pressure up to a value of five and then hit I. So you concede now that the pressure is set to 5/10 frames, is going to go from 1 to 5 and you can see it's starting to expand, and then we're gonna turn up the factor as well. So we're going to jump all the way over to frame 140 set the factor amount to a value of 20 and then hit I one more time hovering over that. Let's go ahead and play this to see what it looks like so you can see it crunches down and it actually breaks the simulation. So we need to play around with these values. So first off, I'm going to go to frame 140 I'm going to set this to a lower number of 10 and hopefully that this will work. And then I'll hit I one more time. I'll restart and play this and we can see that it starts to expand. And there we go. And it doesn't break this simulation, so we're gonna go with a value of 10. I think that'll work just fine. And that's basically all we really need to do for this simulation. How this is gonna work is we're going to have to UV spheres. One UV sphere is going to be cut up and then we'll add one UV sphere is going to be cut up and then we'll create an explosion, and then this one will just disappear at frame 140. So what we're going to do is press shift d on this, you be spear and you can see it changed it a little bit. Don't worry about that. We're gonna hit em and move it to a new collection collection to and then hit. Okay, let's go ahead and go to that collection will restart the animation and play this. And once it reaches frame, 140 will apply the clause simulation so you can see it. It's now at 140. Let's go over to the modifier and apply the claw simulation. Now, before we add in the next class immolation, let's go ahead and delete these key frame since we're not going to need him. So I'm going to right click while hovering in the timeline and then go delete key frames and that will get rid of everything just like that. Now we're going to cut this up, so I'm going to go into front view by pressing one on the number pad and then go into edit mode by pressing tap. I'm gonna press a a couple times to de select everything, and then I'm going to hit Kate. This brings up the knife tool. What we can do now is start cutting up our object right here to get some pieces flying out in all directions. So all you have to do is left click and then draw across left click again and then enter. And before you de select this press V to cut in a scene just like that and you can see it's separated. Now we're gonna do this a bunch of times suppress 80 diesel. It's OK. Click drag across left click enter and then V I'll do that a couple more times so you can get it. So we're gonna press K left. Click drag it across left click again, enter and then press V to cut that in place, as you can see there. So one more time K left click drag across left click again enter and then V to cut it in place. And you can see this is only going halfway through. And that's what I want. If you wanted to go through the entire thing, you compress K and then left. Click and then you compress Z to go through the mesh. Well, cut it right about there enter and then V and you can see now that it cut the entire match all the way through. And I think I'll leave that for there. Now we need to do this a couple more times. Do we get a lot of different pieces? All right, Once you are happy with the amount of cuts that you have, we can go ahead and apply a clause in relation to see what this looks like. So we'll select the cloth simulation in the physics tab, will restart the animation and play this and we can't really see it too much. So let's go ahead and add in a plane. So I'm gonna press shift day and add in a plane, drag it underneath the cloth and skill it up and add a collision. Now, if we play our simulation, we can see this is what it looks like, and it's cut up into a lot of pieces, and that's not too bad. Now to get the explosion effect, we're going to animate the pressure value again. So we're gonna turn this on and then at frame 140 we're going to animate this, but currently we can't see our cloth. That is because it starts at frame one we wanted to start at from 140. So open up the cash settings and set the simulation start to 1 40 Now, if we restart here, you can see it's right there on frame 140. So at this frame we're going to set the pressure amount to a value of one, and then we're going to hit I and then I while hovering over the factor and of the pressure . Now, if we play this, you can see they explode out in all directions, but we don't want them to go that far out. We only want them to go out a little bit. So for five frames, this is going to animate. So we'll go to frame 45. Hit I once again. So it had another key frame. Then go to the next key frame. 146 set both of these values to zero. So zero on the pressure and then zero on the factor and then we'll hit. I I just like that. Let's go ahead and restart this to see what this looks like. And there we go, you can see it exploded in all directions. And that looks pretty cool. So we'll go back here, play it. Not too bad. Let's go ahead and scale up this plane so they don't fly under. Played again at from 140. There we go. So we have created an explosion. 22. Balloon Exploding P2 Baking & Materials: When animating in blender, it uses a curved to smooth out the animation. This is not very good for this tomorrow, because it makes it look just a little bit weird. To fix this, we need to open up the graph editor, so we're going to split the view by dragging out the left corner and switching over to the graph editor. Over in here, we can see exactly what our animation looks like. We're gonna press a once or twice to select everything and then hit t in Click on Linear. So now it's a linear transition, and it'll be a lot smoother. Now that we've done that, we can go ahead and bacon are seen, so going over to the clause settings will set the end frame to a value of 1 40 then enter, then click on bake and you can see it's starting to bacon down here. If we player simulation, we can see exactly what it looks like, and once it reaches 1 40 it stops. Let's do the same thing for the second sphere, so go to collection to buy heading to on the top of your keyboard. We'll select the UV sphere and then click on bake and you can see it's starting to bake down there and we'll go right here and play this one more time to see what it looks like. Now. This looks pretty good, but I would like to add a little bit more detail. So what we're going to do is go over to the modifier tab and add in a subdivision surface modifier. We'll set the view to a value of two, and then we'll right click and go shade smooth. We'll do the same thing for the first fear, so I'll go to collection one, select the UV sphere, add modifier subdivision surface and set both of these two to right click and go shade smooth. That looks pretty good. And now let's create the materials. The material for balloons is a pretty glossy material, so we'll give it a new material. We'll set the base color to a nice red color and then, for the roughness will set it all the way to zero for the clear coat. This will just give the whole thing a clear coat. We're going to go with a value of about 0.4, and that's basically all we really need to do. If we open up the preview, you can see this is what it looks like and that looks like a balloon. Go to collection to once again and select. The UV sphere will give it that same red material and then we'll select the ground. I'm going to go into edit mode with this plane and then also like the two back courtesies and give this a background. So I'm going to select those two back there holding shift, then press you to extrude Z and will drag it upwards to smooth out this plane. We're going to select both of those back vortices and hit, controlled be and then to ride this out and then we'll drive this up a little bit to give this more of a bevel. Look, something like that would look pretty good. And then we'll right click and go shade smooth, not too bad. And then finally, for this material will just give it a little bit of a blue color. Something like this. And then for the roughness of drag it down to a value of 0.1 are seen, is starting to come together. But there is a couple more things that we need to do. I'm gonna go to collection one and select the lamp right here and said the power of this to 2000 rather than 1000. And I'm gonna hold shift and bringing collection too, so we can see the entire scene and that'll president, and go into rendered view. The shadow is a little bit strong, so what we're going to do is bring up the radius amount. Let's go with a value of two, and you can see that the shadow is a lot more soft, and I think that looks pretty good. The world setting is also a little bit dark, so select the world's and was to bring the color up just a little bit to brighten up the whole scene. I'm going to position the camera in the front view, so hit one on the number pad and then I'll hit control halt and zero on the number pad to snap the camera to view. We can select it and then place it how we want. Let's go ahead and restart the animation and then crazy and goingto wire frame view, and we'll place our camera right about here. I think we'll look pretty good. And then we'll add in a cylinder to stick out of this balloon so it looks like there's a pipe that's blowing air into it. Sell press, shift a and go over to mesh. And then cylinder rotate the cylinder 90 degrees along the y. So hit. Why? So here are Then why in 90 and then enter press s to scale and then press s and X and skeletal on the X two. It's a little bit bigger and then we'll move it towards the end. Right about there. Let's also organize are seen just a little bit. So I'm going to select the cylinder holding shift also like the plane, and move these two collection one So press M and click on Collection one. And then we'll play this to see how it looks. And it is slowing down because there is a lot of Vergis is and simulations to work with, that you can see our firm. It is a little bit lower, and I think that looks pretty good 23. Balloon Exploding P3 Animation & Sequencing: if we were to render this right now, we would see the cylinder from collection to and this one in the same frame. This is not gonna work very well. So what we're going to do is animate when these show up in the rendered view. Let's go ahead and bring in collection to by holding shift and then clicking on to and we can see it brings it in at frame 39. We're going to animate this first sphere to disappear. To do this, we need to go over to this menu on the top, right? And dragon, the camera icon. And there we conceded in our scene. So at frame 139 we're going to hover over the camera icon and then hit I going to the next frame frame. 140 were going to uncheck this and then hit I so it disappears, will do the opposite for the second spirits, all select it and then hit I while hovering over it while it turned on Go to frame 139. Uncheck this so it's not visible and then hit I. So it's not visible here, and then it trans visible on from 140. So there we go. That is basically all we really need to do. Let's go ahead and going to render view one more time by pressing Z, and then we'll go a little bit and that looks pretty cool. So now let's go back over to the Render settings and E V will turn on screen space reflections. We get some nice reflections in the materials, and then underneath color management will set the look too high contrast, and this will give everything a little bit more saturation and a little bit more contrast. And there we go. We're now ready to render out are seen. So to render and TV we need to go ahead and go over to the output section and select a folder of where we want our output to go to. Whenever you render an animation, you should always render this in frames and then sequence it out later. So that's what we're going to do. Select a folder of where you want your render frames to go to. I'm going to select this one and go except, and that's basically all you need to do So now let's go ahead and save a project, and I should have done this way before now, because this version is a little bit unstable. I'm going to call it balloon tutorial and then save that blender file. Now, if we go up to render, we can click on render animation, and this should only take a couple of minutes because we're using TV and it will go really fast. And as you can see here, the second you Be Sphere is not visible. But once it reaches frame 140 it will be visible. The render is now done now to view the animation. We can go ahead and exit out of this window, go over to render and click on view animation. Once we do this, we can see an animation playing in real time, and that looks pretty cool. Now two sequences out into a movie file. What we need to do is go over to this plus sign at the top here, go down to video editing and then video editing. This will bring up a new window and make sure you're on frame one. When you do this, go over to add down to image sequence and then navigate Tore. Your images are mine, are right here. So I'm gonna press a to select everything and go add image strip from there. Just change it over to a movie file of your choice. I'm gonna go with MPEG and underneath the encoding, I'm going to set the container to MP for the output quality. I will go with lossless, then go up to render and render animation once again. And as you can see here, it's going a lot faster since it's already rendered. And it's describing those frames and putting them into a movie file. So there we go. That is how you create an exploding balloon animation using blender 2.82 If you created your own animation, I would love to see it, so make sure you post it