Blender 3D Masterclass - From Zero To Hero | Ivan Yosifov | Skillshare

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Blender 3D Masterclass - From Zero To Hero

teacher avatar Ivan Yosifov, 3D Game Artist & Animator

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

34 Lessons (3h 31m)
    • 1. 1.1. Introduction

      2:12
    • 2. 1.2. Download and Install Blender

      6:14
    • 3. 2.1. Blender Interface Part 1

      11:10
    • 4. 2.2. Blender Interface Part 2

      10:08
    • 5. 2.3. Blender Interface Part 3 Properties

      12:18
    • 6. 2.4. Viewport Movement

      9:14
    • 7. 2.5. Transformations Part 1

      8:42
    • 8. 2.6. Transformations Part 2

      4:11
    • 9. 2.7. How to add objects to the scene

      6:14
    • 10. 2.8. 3D Cursor

      9:21
    • 11. 2.9. How to Duplicate and Select Objects

      6:48
    • 12. 2.10. Focusing on an Object

      2:39
    • 13. 2.11. Different Views in the Viewport

      3:47
    • 14. 2.12. What are Prespective and Orthographic views

      9:28
    • 15. 2.13. Viewport Shading Types

      8:51
    • 16. 2.14. Shade Flat and Shade Smooth

      3:16
    • 17. 2.15. Origin Point

      3:29
    • 18. 2.16. How to Control The Camera

      7:20
    • 19. 2.17. What are Collections

      4:20
    • 20. 2.18. Blender Preferences

      6:01
    • 21. 3.1 The Basics of 3D Geometry

      6:53
    • 22. 3.2 Edit Mode

      5:01
    • 23. 3.3 Normal Vectors Definition

      10:45
    • 24. 3.4 Normal Vectors in Blender

      6:57
    • 25. 3.5 3D and Obj File concepts

      5:16
    • 26. 3.6. Loop Cut Tool

      5:46
    • 27. 3.7. Subdivide a Mesh

      3:11
    • 28. 3.8 Proportional Editing aka Soft Selection

      7:07
    • 29. 3.9 Snap Tool

      3:11
    • 30. 3.10 Merge Overlapping Vertices

      3:41
    • 31. 3.11 Mesh Orientations

      3:24
    • 32. 3.12 Extrude Function

      4:45
    • 33. 3.13 Customize Viewport Shading

      4:49
    • 34. 3.14 Creating Faces

      4:39
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About This Class

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This course is continually updated in response to student suggestions and very fast evolving Blender Software.

Blender is a fantastic platform that enables you to make AAA-quality models which can be exported to any game engine, 3D printer, video ad, film production or other software. No previous knowledge of 3D or any other software is required. Here are some of the reasons why you want to learn Blender with this online tutorial...

  • Create assets for video games or films.

  • Make unique 3D printed gifts.

  • Design your dream house, car or anything else!

  • Create amazing 3D artwork.

  • Kick start your career like 3D artist.

  • Want to learn 3D just for hobby.

Learn how to create 3D Models and Assets for games using Blender, the free-to-use 3D production suite. We start super simple so you'll be ok with little or no experience.

By the end of the course, you'll be very confident. You will be able to create complete 3D scene from scratch.

Dive in now, you won't be disappointed!


Check out the Official Blender Snowcase Reel!

Meet Your Teacher

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Ivan Yosifov

3D Game Artist & Animator

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Transcripts

1. 1.1. Introduction: Hello and welcome to this blender masterclass from 0 to hero. Are you ready to learn 3D? And right now it's absolutely free. You're not going to pay for very complicated 3D software like Maya max. We're going to use Blender, which is absolutely free for everybody. You can just download it, install it, and run it from scratch. What we're going to be covering in this course is we're going to start by learning all the interfaces in Blender, different interfaces, different tools, and everything about the blender interface and menus. Today we're going to deep dive and continue on by learning or the process of modeling, all the tools of modeling. And we're going to continue on with some texturing stuff with UV mapping, animation, rendering, etc. So by the end of this course, you're going to be able to create fully alone. Since like this, you're going to have the complete skill to work and create scenes for videos, for movies, for games. Through the whole process of learning. In this course, you're going to have to exercise a lot after each lecture. You're going to need to practice the things that I taught you. And this is the only way to master blender. So if you stay with me until the end of this course, I can guarantee you on 100% that you will be comfortable with Blender. You can unleash your imagination and create a lot of cool and interesting 3D art. I'm going to update this course weekly because blender and industry are changing a lot month by month. And I'm going to be staying up to the trends of different tools, different techniques, et cetera. So keep in mind that this course will be updated a lot and check it often if you already watched all the lectures. Thank you guys for watching my introduction and let's get started and turn you into a treaty professional. 2. 1.2. Download and Install Blender: Hello and welcome to this part. In this part we're going to download Blender. So open Google type blender. And it will be the first link blender.org. So it will redirect you to the blender website. From here you can see which is the last version day they released officially. It's blender to 0.9. And from this blue button download blender, you can just click on it and read directs you to the download page. Let me show you a little bit down here you can see the blender news, the developer blog, and a little description about everything in Blender, the cycle rendering, the modeling, sculpting the UVs, visual effects, animation, and reading, the creation of a 2D drawing in the 3D space. Color corrections and stuff like that. Keep in mind that blender is completely free, the whole program is completely free. So if you want to donate some money to the developers, you can do it by clicking on this button. If you don't, let's go ahead and download blender. Just click on it and it will redirect me to the download page. In this page, when I click the blue button, I'm going to download Blender, converting 61 mega megabytes and downloading the version for Windows. If you're working on Mac, you just need to choose the mac operations system. So let's click on this button. And a pop-up will appear. Just save the file and wait to be downloaded it. Let me show you a few other useful sections in this blender website. Go to the support. And here you can have access to the documentation, tutorials, community, frequently asked questions, report a bug, or some contact professional support from Blender. Let me show you in the download section few things to the downloads and demo files. You can download. Some creative sees in blender, which you can just open in Blender and analyze that how they are created, check out the quality of details and just learn from them. You can download only sees for free. The next tab is the requirements. This is very important to have a good computer for it. It doesn't need too much, but it's decent one, if you are in the recommended settings, you're going to need at least 16 gigabytes of RAM and four gigabytes of video RAM. So keep in mind that the recommended settings are good enough for working blender. But if you are working on very high sophisticated models, a CEIS, you're going to need to upgrade your system and use the optimal settings. Here you can read about the support of the graphics cards. And let me show you one last thing. Click on the walk term support. What this tab means is if you noticed, we are downloading Blender 2.92.9. Is this orange over here. So LTS means lifetime support. And what this means that the version 2.83, we have a support for two years. So right now we're downloading the version 2.9, which is a new one. And it will need to be batched to 2.93 LTS. And from that standpoint, it will be supported for too long years. So keep this in mind that if you download a version like this, you're going to need to patch it three times before it gets into LTS version. This is important for for a big project and future project to keep in mind how long your Blender version will be supported. So that's it. And I've already downloaded the blender. Just click on the File. Click Okay. And let's just click Next. Accept the Terms of Service. If you want, you can read them. Click Next. Choose a location on your computer where to be installed by default is on C Program Files Blender. And just click next flicking style, the installation process where you start. So blender is very small program, but it has superpower for features. And it will install pretty fast just like that. All right, the next step is to click on your Windows button. Type blender. And we're going to open Blender. This is the blender window. It has a lot of stuff that we're gonna be covering everything, so don't worry about it. The first thing you're going to need to do is choose your language. I prefer English. The second thing you can choose, blender, hot shortcuts, or you can choose industry compatible, which are if you're coming from 3D Studio Max or Maya, you can choose this and it will convert your shortcuts from Maya to Blender. The next thing is how you want to select objects with left or right mouse button. And what the spacebar to do, you can choose between different teams. As you can see, a pretty much like the black one. But if you want, you can just experiment and just choose whatever you like. So that's it. How to close this window, just click outside of the window and it will close itself just like that. So in the next tutorial, we're going to start learning Blender. Thank you for your time. 3. 2.1. Blender Interface Part 1: Hello and welcome to this video. We're going to learn about Blender interface and we're going to talk about just the PAN-OS. And we're going to ignore the viewport. Or the viewport is, this is this big window where you see a cube. Here is where the magic happens. In the view port, we are going to spend 95 percent of our time. Most of your work will be in the viewport. And the viewport contains all 3D work, including meshes, lightning, camera, et cetera. But let's first start and show you how to resize different panels. What piano is. At the bottom of the screen, you can see this banner with some numbers. It is called a timeline. So if you want to resize your timeline at the top, you have a little sick align. And if you hover on it with your mouse, you can see the cursor image change and you can drop the drag upwards and downwards. So going up and going down is resizing this panel. And as you can see, this panel ends up with another panel. Those are two separate panels. The first one is called outliner and the second one is a property panel. So if you want to resize them, you just need to select, again this line. Just have the cursor changed and just drag left and right. The bottom thing here is that when you are sizing the outliner in the property panel, they resize at the same time because they're connected, they're in one big panel sheet. But if you want the outline of Twilio to have a little bit more space downwards. We can just select this middle line and just drag downwards and upwards. So this is the basic of how to resize your, your windows. So let's get a little bit more detail about each of those panels. The outliner I'm just going to brief everything. We're going to have a separate lessons on each panel where we're going to talk about in depth about them. So this Outliner basically holds everything that you're seeing has. So as you can see in my view board, I have a cube. Here it is. And in my outliner, I have, in my hierarchy, I have the cube. You can have the camera, you have the lightning, and you have a collection. So what collection is collection is like a parent and the Camera Cube enlightening is like a child. So this is like a big box containing everything. And as you can see, I can just collapse it and hide everything, show everything. So Camera Cube and lights or child of the collection. Imagine it like a group. Like everything in the correction is a group of that collection. We're going to talk about the technical details and how to use collections and get more in depth about them in separate lesson. But basically collections hold some items of different types. What this AI on the right side means is you can hide and unhide your items. So as you can see, this is my light over here. If I click on the icon, it disappears. If I click back again, if the peers and the end. Another thing about collections, you can hide and unhide all the objects inside the collection would just single click. So if I click this, I, everything in the collection is hidden. If I click it back, you can have everything back is set. So the next thing is the property panel. What the property panel holds. It has the different settings for different stuff. For example, this cube. If it has a height of one. And in the properties panel, we can go and change the height. You can change it, change the position. You can change different parameters, parameters of it. You can also change the light intensity, light angle, et cetera, et cetera. So basically the properties. Now, these are the parameters for each of of Blender components. So it doesn't matter if it's a Camera Cube light, et cetera. Also, it holds a lot of different menus and options. We're going to cover them in a separate lesson. But here in the properties panel, mainly you have all the important stuff that are represented for the objects. The next thing is the timeline. The timeline is basically used for animation. So you said different keyframes here. And the timeline. Is working with frames. So as you can see, right now, we have 250 frames, will have a separate lesson about the timeline. I'm just going to point out what it is, so don't worry about about it. So basically, this is the timeline there. And if you click play is going to start and play the animation. But right now we don't have any animation. You can setup for the start position by just dragging here on just typing. I want to start from frame number five, and I want to end up with frame number a 100120. So the timeline just holds keyframes when you start to animate. All right, so let's continue with some of those here. The first thing, when you click on the file, from here, you can create a new scene, a general acute 2D animation, a C for sculpting, a scene for visual effects of video editing. From the second one, open. You can open a previous scene that you've already created. Open Recent will show you a list of recent projects that you work on. You can have also our recovery from an autosave or recovered the last session. You can save, save as, as a copy. Next thing is a wink and append. Those two are very bold. We're going to use them a lot, but I'm going to talk about them in a different video. So the next thing is import from this tab. You can import different file formats in Blender. Next thing is export. Again, you can export different file formats from Blender and you can clean up your scene. You can reset everything to factory settings or you can quit blender. The next thing is added in edit, you can undo, redo. You can hear a list of everything done like a history. You can repeat the last action, just clicking the G key. You can repeat the history. You can adjust some last operations, or you can search for menus. Here. You can remain renamed the active island, you can batch rename. This is renaming a lot of objects with a batching process. We're going to talk about this later in the final thing, the preferences, this is very important tab, we're going to talk about, about it in a different lesson. But keep in mind that in the Preferences we're going to have, we're going to spend time here adding some scripts and adjusting the blender and customizing it to our own needs. The next thing is the Render tab. From here, we're going to render still images or animations. And in the Window tab, you can create a new window, and you blend the window. You can create a new main window, et cetera. But we're not going to be using this too much. And the last thing that we still talk about is the layout, modeling, sculpting, UV, et cetera. But we're going to cover those menus in different lessons because there they need more attention and they need to be very in depth because this is the, those are different modes where we can work on and they do different stuff. Like, for example, in the modeling key model, the 3D model, in the scoping, in the sculpting, you can scope the model, the UV, anything. We'll create, our two-dimensional map in order to start the texture paint. And finally, we can start creating some shading materials like metal, rust, wood, et cetera. Create your animation, render. It creates a compositing on the rendering. And for advanced programmers, you can script some, some things. Or even for some new programmers you can scripts and things. So let's summarize this lesson. I showed you how to move and how to scale your panels. I told you about the outliner, about the collections, that it contains. Different elements, are told you about the property settings that you can hear, tweak the settings of each object. The next thing, that timeline, where we're going to animate and just play that animation and adjusted. The next thing, the File menu. Or you can save, open, create new files, some, some different formats. The Edit menu where you can undo actions, where you can click on the preference and start customizing your blender. The rendering tab to render still images, animations, the window tab to Togo and create new blender windows. And finally, from the help menu you can click and go to the official blender website and have some tutorial support writing the forums, et cetera. So thank you guys for watching this introduction part 1 and Whiting in the next one. 4. 2.2. Blender Interface Part 2: Hello everyone and welcome to this lecture. In this lecture we are going to be talking about Blender modularity. As you can see right now we have four windows. This is my viewport, where you see your 3D models, lightning cameras, et cetera. Up here in the top right, we have our outliner. Below it. We have our properties channel. And in the bottom we can see our timeline over here. All right, so what is the same thing about all those windows? They all have the same button or here, but a different icon. As you can see, we have agreed with a bow. We have our list. We have like two switches, we have a clock. And those icons defined which editorial type is over here. So you can basically customize each of these panel to be different panel. Let me show you how. So if we click on this icon, right now we're in 3D viewport. We can click on image editor. And right now our viewport become an image editor. Here you can edit images. Click on the UV editor. It, it looks the same, but it's different. In the UV editor, you're going to be laying out a two-dimensional map of your 3D and create the textures over here. So let's continue on with the compositor. Just again, click here, click on composite. And here, this window will help US composite our image once we render it. Let me continue on the texture node editor. From here, you can edit your textures. The next thing is the shader editor. Here you can set up a pretty complex material. For example, if you want to create a matter or if you want to create a glass, if you want to create wounds, et cetera. So from here, you can create your materials for your objects. Let's move on. This is the video sequencer. It works just like Adobe Premiere or final good. You can edit videos here, cut them, arranged them, et cetera. The next thing is the movie clip editor. In this movie clip editor, you can put, for example, a video that you shoot with your camera or your phone. It doesn't matter. And you can track the movement of the 2D images and place a treaty insight or create visual effects. Maybe four short videos or four films. So here you can track to the images and integrate 3D images and add. So this is about our general tabs that you can change. Let's move on with animations. From here. If you click, you're going to be warmed up the dope sheet. Here you can have different keys when you animate and move them around. So the next thing after the dope sheet is our timeline. We already have one down there. Here you are placing your keyframes when you're animating. We're gonna be covering this other bit later. Let's Move on the graph editor. When you place different keys, those keys curves. And those curves can be manipulated in order to create different motion. You can create ease in and ease out animations. So pretty much in the graph editor, we're going to be doing that. So let's move on to the driver window. If you click, it looks pretty much the same, but it's different. Here you're going to be creating a pretty complex animations. All right? The last one is the non-linear animation. It looks just like our timeline, but it's pretty much the same, but it has few additional options that we're gonna be covering later on. So this is covering our animation. And let's move on to the scripting. Here is our text editor. When you can create and write code. Here is your Python console. You can type different Python scripts over here, all right, for the programmers. And the next link is the F0. So here you have different information about how to access different stuff. So this is very useful if you're going to code. Moving on, we go to the outliner. Here you have your scene lightening, your tweet diminishes your cameras, your collections, everything. We're going to be covering everything later on. Next thing is the properties. We already have a property panel over here, but you can duplicate it. The file browser, you can browse the files over here from your PC. Or the preference, you can set up different interfaces and select the preference. You also can access the preference from Edit. Click the preference, and it will be in a floating window. So let me go back to my 3D view port and let me close my preference. So this is how you can create modularity in your blender. So why this is important? Just check out here guys. You have a layout, you have modeling, sculpting, UV Editing, texture painting, shading, animation, rendering, compositing and scripting. All the things are different layouts for the work that you are going to do. So if you are going tomorrow, you click here. And as you can see, my layout changes. My layout changes because right now we're in the modeling process. And it changes because it is more useful to have it like that. If you go into the sculpting, you can access your sculpting tools from here. And as you can see, my layout focus on the properties of the brushes that, that we are going to use over here. And keeping my outliner over here. If we go to the UV Editing, we have the UVA through here. So we can see our two-dimensional transition of the treaty over here and just lay out the UVs and cover them with the textures. Also, it keeps one panel to the edit mode and keeps the properties and the outliner. And if we're moving through all those panels quickly, you see the texture unpaid have different layout. So the shading view is a little bit more complex and has many windows. Here you can see your 3D model. Here you can access your shader and tweak it up. And what you're tweaking your shader, your model will update in real time. So this is pretty handy. Here you have the image editor where you can see how the images held the textures are. When you play it. From here, you can access your files on the computer. For example, if you have already created a complex shader, you can drag and drop it. You have your Outliner and your properties, and this o applies for every window here. In this module, warranty is created with the mindset of how you can best utilize the different actions that you're doing. For example, here in the scripting tab, you have the code over here, you have the console over here, and 3D view so you can preview what you're doing. So for example, if I click on New and start creating my variables, test one, et cetera. And I can run this piece of code and just see the result in the console. And the whole modularity here is created with the use case of the scripting. What you ask, how I have so many windows compared to the first layout when we have only four windows. Alright, so this is again, pretty handy trick that I'm going to show you how to create more windows out of the box. So you need to go to the edge of each window over here. And as you can see, my mouse will turn into a cross here. And you're just left click and drag to the left. And I'm just creating another window. All right, So we have now two viewports. And if I want this viewport, see from the tap my model. So for example, we find modelling over here something and I want to see it, how it talks from the top. You can pretty easily create that. But what if we want to see it from the side? Again? Left-click here, drug to Dell. And for example, let's click on X. And right now I'm seeing it from the side. And I'm just going to arrange this a little bit like that. And now if I'm modeling here in the perspective view, I can see how my model is looking from the top and from the side. So this is pretty handy and pretty useful to create such modularity and just to create your best layout. So guys, if you want to close this windows, it's pretty easy. Go to the left corner and your mouse cursor will turn into a cross-hair again, just left-click and drag on top of the window above it. And as you can see, there will be an arrow. From this arrow, you can just click and release. The same goes for this window. Just drag from the top-left corner to the left window. And this window, and just release and you just close this window. So this is pretty much a blot blender modularity. It's pretty cool that they've integrated all this flexibility into the interface. And as you can see, you can create every imaginable scenario case that you want in Blender for your purposes. Thank you guys for watching this lecture. And I'm saying you end next one. 5. 2.3. Blender Interface Part 3 Properties: Hello everyone and welcome to this lecture. In this lecture we are going to be covering all the tools and the properties over here. So let's get started. The first one is our active two. From this two, you can change how you can select in your scene. So right now it's the default. We are not going to be using these to. The default settings are working just great. But if you want to change your selection mode, you can access from here. The next thing that is super important is the rendering properties. So when you click here, you can review all the rendering properties. From the first thing is you can see, you can choose your render engine. Right now we have three types of render engines. The first one is the IV, The second one is the workbench, and the third one is the cycles. Most of the time our use IV or cycles, the workbench, I don't use it. The next step that you can set up in the rendering properties are the sampling. The sampling is per pixel. So you can set up the rendering sampling right now by default is 64. You can increase this to get a high fidelity rendering. And this is about the viewport. The viewport shall be lower because it can take a lot of time if you increase the sampling. The other options that you can access here are a lot of post-process effect, like ambient occlusion Bloom, You can create depth of field of the camera. The subsurface scattering is mostly important for skin. You can have screen space refractions, motion blur, volume metrics. You can set up here in the performance your normal to be a high-quality normals, you can access here, shadows, indirect lightning, and so on. So basically this is your stack with a post-process effects that you can use once you start to rendering your scene. So from here you select your rendering engine. And from down there, you select all the post-processing effects that you want. The next thing is the output properties. So the output properties is connected with the rendering properties. From here, you can set up the resolution of your image. So right now we're working in 1080 P, But you can increase this or decrease this depending on what resolution you want to get. The next stuff here in the dimensions is the frame start and end step. This is connected with our timeline. See how our timeline is changing if I drag this down. So we're just changing the frames where your animation start and where your animation ends. The next thing is you can set up a different frame rate. For example, if you are creating a movie, there is 24 frames per second. Or if you're working on a Games which needs to support 60 per second, you can change that. Or even if you're working on a game that needs a 120 FPS, you can just select Custom and boosted up, right? We have other things like the output format. You can output in RGBA, in RGB. And you can change the file formats from here to export your rendering in different kinds of formats. You can also export movies, et cetera. So moving on with the view layer properties. From view layer properties, you can select different render passes. You can select only the lightning from the diffuse channel or the car from the diffuse channel. This is a little bit complex and we're going to be covering this a little bit later. But in just few words, what rendering pests is, imagine a picture and this picture is constructed of different things. For example, first, you have just plain cower without lightning. Second, you have lightning. Third thing, you have different reflections on your surface. You have shadows. And how blender works is it renders each of this and a separate channel and you can export those separate channels. And for example, if you're making a movie, you can import each of the render passes in UK, which is a program for composing. And in this program you can change each of the past. For example, you can saturate the cowers. You can boost up a little bit the lightning, you can change the shadows. So from here, you can work with the rendering pests. Alright, moving on, we have the same properties over here. And from here, you can change everything about your scene. You can change the default camera, you can change the background, you can change the explore path, et cetera. Here you can find all the properties that you need for your scene. Keep in mind that you can have multiple scenes. And this is only working for the currency. So the next step is the world properties. So keep in mind that the properties are general. So again, the c's can be multiple, but the world is only one. So from here you can change different aspects of your world. Alright? So here are your world properties and here are your seam properties, which seem properties are working only for this currency. The next super important thing is the object properties. From here, you can access all the properties for this. Right now, our objects, for example, we located on X, Y, and Z on 0 meters. If I start to change it, I'm starts moving my object. But first you need to select your object. Obviously, I select this object and I have different information for the lightning. So from here you can access different properties of your object. You can select the transform, you can change the relations you can add to a new collection, create instancing. We're gonna be covering each of these properties in our lecture. So don't worry about it. Just keep in mind that from the object properties, you can change the properties for the current object that you selected. Alright, let me get everything back to normal. And the next super important thing that we're going to use is the modifier properties. So the modifier properties is one of the most important thing in Blender and we're going to work here a lot of the time. So what it does, if you click over here at the dropdown, you're going to have a huge list of different properties of different modifiers that we can apply to our object. So I'm not going to be covering in this lecture what each of these does, but we're going to be covering them in our course. But keep in mind that from here you can add different properties onto your mesh. So for example, I can add a screw property and I can change the different properties about screws. I can have different models. For example, I can add mesh, the former. I can add UV, rapper, I can add weight normals, and all of the properties are stacking and you can change them and shape your geometry by using all those modifiers. So from here, you add your modifiers. We are going to be taking a lot of time working here. So keep in mind that this is one of the most important properties. So keep in mind that this modifier property appear only on geometry. If I select my lightning, it disappears because I cannot apply a modifier to a Lightning. So let's move on to the next thing, which is the particle properties. From here. From the particle properties, we can create different effects like grain, like for, right, like here, you can create even dust, et cetera. And from this panel we're going to be creating different effects for our scene. The next cool property is the physical properties. And here you can create very cool physical dynamics. For example, we're gonna use this panel to create CVD simulation. We're going to be using this panel to create fluids, rigid bodies. So salt bodies, you can create different force fields or you can just dynamically paid. So from here you can access your physics proper and simulate different behaviors. So moving on further with our constraint properties. From the constraint properties, you can create different constraints which are connected with some out some different objects. For example, you can copy a location over different object. You can copy the rotation, you can copy the scale. You can also limit distance, which will restrict the movement towards certain distance. So keep in mind that when we work with constraints, we're going to be accessing it from here, and we're going to create relationships between objects using constraint. So the next important thing is the object data properties. You can access it from here. And the thing that we're going to use a lot is the vertex groups. What you can do here is you can select different vertices of your 3D mesh created as a group and start modeling with, for example, with animations, those vertices or with some forces. You can also do this to the shape geese. The shape keys are used to transform one object to another, which is in other 3D software's called blend shapes, but here is shaped keys. So from here you can access this and we have a lot of different properties that we're going to be covering more in details in our further lectures. The next important thing is our material properties. You can access it from here. And as you can see over here, we have different properties of the material of our 3D object. So for example, you can change your shader from here. You can change your base color. Let me show you. I can change it to blue. You can change a lot of things about your material. But this is very familiar to one of the things that I've showed you in our previous lectures. So let me show you what it is. I'm going to change my timeline and I'm going to change it to shader editor. And keep Look here. If I start changing the roughness over here, it starts, starts to change in our shader editor. So basically, this material properties are our shader properties. And I often don't access the material properties of the object from here, because as you can see, here is a little bit limited. Here we can create different connections to our shader and you can change all the properties over here. So how, how I work is I don't access my material properties from here. I access them if I really need a very quick change. But if I'm working on my material to create my final materials, and I need to create different shader networks and change a lot of the values. I often work in my shader editor, which you can access from here. So let me go back and turn this into my timeline, right? And the final thing that we are not going to be using an AU is texture properties. From here. This is a thought that was designed for older versions of blender and you can change different things about your textures. But we're not going to be using much in our lectures. So this is pretty much covering all the things that you want to know in the interface section. And I think we're pretty much done. We've explained everything about our interface, how you can change everything, you can access everything. We discussed, all the properties over here, just briefly, of course we're gonna be covering them in details very much in our next lectures. And I think we're ready to start with our viewport in our next lectures. Thank you guys for tuning in. I'm pointing you in my next one. 6. 2.4. Viewport Movement: Hello and welcome back with my next lecture. In this lecture, we're gonna talk about the viewport, that big thing in the middle of Blender, where we're gonna spend 90% of the time. So let's get started. As you can see right now, we have the cube, we have a camera and a right, simple as that tree objects. The first thing that I want to show you is how to select an object. To select an object, just simply left-click on it. Just like that. And you can see that there is an orange outline around the object. So this orange outline indicates which objects are selected in our view port in blender. Right now I just selected my cube. But if I want to select all my objects, I can left-click and drag, just like in Windows and release. And I've selected all my object. As you can see, all the objects are turned into an orange cower. Just our 3D has this orange outline because it's a 3D mesh the others. So the next thing is how to select object one by one. Let me show you. I'm just clicking outside of the objects so I can deselect them. And if I want to select juice my cube and my camera, I first click on my cube, then hold shift on my keyboard and click on the camera. And right now, as you can see in my outliner, in that blue rectangles, we have the camera in the cube selected and the light is not selected. If I want to select my light, just hold Shift, Click on the light. And as you can see, the indication in my outliner shows that all the three objects are selected. And this more white bluish color shows which object is select or asked. So if I want to deselect my light right now from the group, I just hold the Shift key again and it will work in reverse. The last time I hold my shift key and click on My light, I select it. And now if I do the same, I'm going to deselect it. I'm just going to click on my light just like that. And as you can see in my outliner, it's deselected. So right now, there is no vast selected object. So if I want to deselect my cube, I first need to hold shift and click on my cube. And it will last select my cube, as you can see here in the outliner, it's still not de-selected my tube to deselect it, I need to hold, shift again and click again on the cube. So right now we've clicked two times with the shift. So the first time was to select it as a vast selected object, and the second time was to deselect it. Alright? So this is pretty much how you can select objects in your viewport. Of course, you can select them from the outliner, just clicking right here. So discovers the selection process in our outline there. Right now, my blender is selected. To use the blender hotkeys in the viewport. So first we're going to talk about how to navigate in blender with Blender case. So it's pretty simple. The first thing you need to do is if you click on your middle mouse button by debt and start moving your mouse left or right, you're going to start rotating around the objects in the viewport as you can see. So if I want to zoom out, just rotate my mouse wheel forward and I'm zooming and I'm start rotating me back and I'm zooming out. So using my mouse wheel, my middle mouse button, forward and back, I'm just zooming in, zooming out. If I press the middle mouse button, I'm rotating. And the last thing that you need to know is held to pan How to move away from that cube. So how to do this? Hold shift on your keyboard. And again, with the middle mouse button pressed, starts to move away from the cube. Just press it and drag your mouse away from the cube. So as you can see, you can pan wether it. And if you start combining all the keys that I've told you about, let's say I just rotate, I penalty or bit, I assume band I rotate. So those are the blender hotkeys. So pressing the middle mouse button will rotate around the object. Moving the mouse wheel forward and backward will zoom and holding Shift and pressing the middle mouse button. We'll just move the camera. You get a band around the objects. But I actually don't use the blender hotkeys. And why I'm doing this is because I work in the game development industry where we need to use more packages and not just blender. So for example, if I am going to animate, animate in Maya, if I'm going to texture, I'm gonna texture a substance painter. If I'm using. Game engines, are used on real or unity. So all those packages derive mentioned are using different hotkeys than blender. So for example, if your work even in animation industry or different industry that needs and require more packages, not just blender, you're going to need to set up your interface to work with the industry standard hotkeys. So how to do that? Go to edit, click on preference gold. So go to key map from here. And from this dropdown menu, right now, we are using the blender hotkeys and what I'm using S3 compatible because as I told you, I'm using Maya substance Bader unity and real and more programs that are working with industry compatible hotkeys. And this is essential thing for my work, for all the view ports to work with the same hotkeys. Because for example, if I'm animating admire and I want to, you know, fix some 3D modeling in Blender. If Maya is different than the blender, the hotkeys, I'm gonna get confused. And I want my blender keys to be exactly like my myokines and my Unity or Unreal Engine hotkeys. So I'm just gonna choose the industry compatible keys. All right? And the next thing that I set up is I'm gonna go to navigation and I'm going to click on invert zoom direction, and I'm gonna choose the mouse. So right now we're working with industry compatible hotkeys. And I'm going to show you the new hotkeys on how to zoom, pan and navigate in the viewport. The first thing is how to rotate around the cube. With the industry compatible hotkeys, you're going to need to hold the out key on your keyboard. And by clicking my left mouse button, I'm going to start and rotate around my cube. As you can see, I'm just rotating around my cube, holding out key and clicking the left mouse button. The next thing is coding my out key and holding my right mouse button. I'm going to zoom in and I'm going to zoom out. Alright? Using again, holding the ALT key and the right mouse button, zoom in, zoom out. Right now with just holding my out key and just clicking my left and my right mouse button, I can simply rotate and zoom, rotate and zoom. And how to bend pretty easily. Still hold the Alt key and click your middle mouse button. And in this way, I'm just holding my out key on my keyboard and I'm just shift. Shift changing from my left mouse Berlin to my right mouse button to, to my middle mouse button. And as you can see, it's pretty easy, pretty intuitive to work like that. Holding out key and using the tree mouse balance. So again, to summarize, holding out key, right mouse button to zoom, left mouse button to rotate, and the middle mouse button to pen. It's pretty easy. All the engines, and as I told you, Maya and substance Bader are using those hotkeys. So I pretty much recommend for you to use those hot keys if you want to work in the industry and not get confused from jumping from one software to another software. If you are comfortable with only the blender hotkeys, your feel free to use them. I've already showed you. Thank you guys for watching this part of the tutorial series. And I'm waiting you in my next one. 7. 2.5. Transformations Part 1: Hello and welcome back to the next lecture. In this lecture we're gonna talk about the transformations or how to move, rotate, and scale your object. So let's get started. The first thing that I need is I need to be in the select mode. Here, the select box. I'm going to select this cube. Just left click on it. And how to move, rotate and scale it by clicking for on your keyboard, you're gonna go to the object mode. Remember that I am using the industry comparable keys from here came up in the strict compatible. As you can see, if I switched the blender, there is, the hotkeys are different. It's not for on your keyboard. So the hotkeys are a little bit different in the inner city compatible, but this will work, for example, like in my Ymax, et cetera. So I prefer using this as I'm working in the industry. So the last thing is here. From here, if you click on those four arrows while you select your objects. So first go selected, then click on the four arrows and as you can see, a gizmo appear. So what it does, the red is x, green is y, and the blue is. It's a bit different in the other 3D packages like Maya and the y-axis is up. But here the z-axis is the difference between blender and the other packages. So right now the arrows of the gizmo are pointing to the positive values. For example, if I start, if I click on this handle, just left-click on it and start to drug. I'm moving my cube in the positive x. And as you can see here in the transformation under the object property that you can see that we've moved our object four meters, 0.45. Alright? So right now I'm in the positive. I left-click and drag my object. I'm going into the negative. And as you can see, my X right now is minus eight. You can also put a number here. For example, if I want to move it two meters in the positive axis, just two, or just put four, or just put 0 to center it. Next thing, if I drag the green one and moving positive y, negative y. If I move the blue one and going into the z positive, z negative. Pretty straightforward. If I select the middle white circle, I can move my cube freely in all the three axis. As you can see in my transform, I move it my cube on all the axis. So if you select this, you are going to move it on all the axis. So if I click on the blue little square over here, I will move my cube on two axis. As you can see, I'm just moving it on X and Y. And I'm not pushing it upwards. So it's not going up right now. However, if I select the green, I can push it on X and Z, but I cannot slide it to y. So if I select This one, I'm not moving to y, so I'm not going left or right if, if this is my right and my left, alright? So by selecting those cubes, you can move it freely onto axis. The next thing that it's showing you where the negative and the positive is up here, this gizmo. So as you can see, where you have a line, it's showing that the positive value is over here. And when you have only a dot, it's showing that this is the negative value. So while you're rotating, you can always take a look here and just see where is the positive and the negative. Let's move forward with the rotation. So if I click on the second one, this is the rotate, our gizmo change and as you can see, are full circle like a axis. So if I start dragging on this axis, I'm starts rotating my tube on X. If I start on dragging on this axis, I'm rotating my coupon z. And of course on the green axis, you can rotate it on the y. Alright? Pretty simple. It's just the same. And if you select the White Swan, you can rotate on our axis. Again, checked my transformation on the right, how I'm rotating on all of the axis. Just like that. Just like that. And as you can see, we have pretty messed up q. So I'm gonna 0 it again from here. You can just drag and increase the rotation, or you can just put a number of, uh, for the degrees. Alright, pretty simple. Let's Move On. The third thing is the scale. So from here, I can scale on this axis, scale on this one. I can shrink it in the matter of hate. Or I can just select the white circle and start scaling on all the three axis uniformly. Just like that. Alright, pretty cool. So if I wanna create a shape, may be something like this rectangle. Pretty easy, pretty simple. If I want to create a height out of it. Again, pretty easy and simple. Again, those two, we'll work on two axis, the little boxes that I told you here, if I select this one, you can see that we are scaling on two axis on the x and y. So pretty simple guys. Pretty simple, pretty straightforward. And the fourth one, this is a gizmo with all the transformation. So in this one you have the move, you have the scale, we have the rotate. So with this one, you can pretty much do order operations, but with one gizmo, I truly never use this. I only use those. So it's pretty simple. It's pretty straightforward for me. And we just bring back everything is pretty straightforward for me. Just switch. So for example, if we want to move, I'm just gonna start moving any file one and rotate them going towards 841 scale. I'm just gonna start scaling just like that. Just like that. So let me show you the hotkeys guys. So the first, the move, Let me just hover it. So the move, the short key is W. For the rotate, the Schottky is e on your keyboard and for the scale is r. So if I, if I click W0, my keyboard, right now I'm gonna move. If I click on my keyboard and we want to rotate, and if I click are, I'm going to scale. So I highly encourage you guys to take your time, practice the hotkeys practiced the scale, the move, and rotate, so you can master it. Let me show you a little introduction or on how comfortable you need to be in blender in order to work freely. So for example, if I want to move this cube, I'm going to move it, make it here. I'm going to shrink it down and will not rotate like that. I'm gonna duplicate it and I'm going to rotate like that. I'm gonna move it like that. We're going to shift select. Maybe I'm gonna scale them and we're going to move them just like that. So pretty easy. I've made something like a letter roof for a house. And maybe one more duplicate located here. I'm gonna set the rotation through 0. I'm gonna make it like that. I'm going to move it. We're going to scale it, so I'm going to shrink it down. As you can see, I've created prefers the shape. And this is because I'm pretty comfortable with my hotkeys. So I highly encourage you guys to time and learn those three actions. As those three actions will be like 90% of the time used and you need to be very comfortable in 3D. All right guys, thanks for tuning in. I'm Whiting you in the next lecture. 8. 2.6. Transformations Part 2: Hello and welcome back to next lecture. In this lecture I'm going to show you a few tricks on how to move, rotate, and scale your object in a different way. So let's get started. I'm gonna choose my move, so I'm going to press W on my keyboard. So watch now closely. If I start to move on my x axis, C here at the bottom, you have x, y, and z axis. And if I press Y on my keyboard and just press Y, I automatically snap my 3D objects to only move on the y axis. As you can see, there is one more pretty cool thing. If I click on my keyboard five, it will move my three objects five meter from the center. So as you can see, the center is where the green and the red line are crossing. And I just moved my cube five meters in positive direction. So I just move my cube in five meters in the positive direction. So if I click backspace and click minus five, I'm moving my cube minus five, as you can see here, is a formula. And if I delete, I've started the leading, the numbers. If I put, for example, 12, as you can see in my formula, I added 12. So let's delete this one. It is right now in the center. So it's right now I'm going to release, and I'm going to click again and press on my keyboard. And as you can see, I'm just moving on the z-axis. If I press x, I'm going to move on the x axis. If I press y, I'm going to move on the y axis. So this is pretty handy way to move your cube only in this direction if you want to. So for example, if I move it over here, I want to start moving it, but I press y, I'm going to move the cube only. And this y-direction on the place that the cube was. So let me show you another example. If I move it over here and start to move it and oppress X. And moving on X, if I press Z, I'm moving a little bit on z here, on x here, and z here on y. As you can see, pretty handy. And this works for everything. If I want to rotate on x, as you can see, I press on x. I can press Z, I can rotate on Z. I could press Y, I can rotate on y. Again, jumping from mode to mode. This is pretty handy. And let me show you the scale against our scaling. Press z, x plus y, and your scaling on this direction. Pretty cool. And if I type for and just put 4x 2y here, if I deleted, press Enter, I'm going to finish it. So pretty handy guys. Let me just put everything to 0. And let's summarize pretty quickly. So this is important. I often use this hotkeys. So again, just starts to create your movement and then click x, z, y. That's pretty much it. And you can move on those axis from the position of your cube. For example, my cube is here, starts to move Prezi, and moving from this point, all right, not from the center, but from this point. And if I put like five meters, it will move my cube five meters from the location that I started to move my cube. Alright, so this is pretty much for this mode tip. Thank you guys for tuning in and I'm waiting you in the next lecture. Bye. 9. 2.7. How to add objects to the scene: Hello and welcome back with the next chapter of our blender masterclass. In this lecture, I'm going to be covering how to add objects in blender. So let's get started. There are two ways of adding objects. The first one is you can go here at the Add Object, click on it, and you can find a lot of menus over here. So if you go to the mesh and we click on UV sphere, you can see that we've added a sphere in our outliner. Here, there is a sphere and you can see an orange outline inside our box. What this tells us is that inside of this box that we've created, if I click on my cube, the sphere is not visible. But when I select my sphere again, I can see that the sphere is inside my cube. So I'm gonna move it aside. And as you can see, we've added a sphere. Let's go again here. Let's add another cube. Alright, let's go again here. You can add a cone. So from this menu, you can have different objects. We can even add the monkey, which is iconic model for the blender. So going here, mesh, let's try the torus. As you can see, we've added a lot of different objects over here from this menu. So the second methods, how to add objects to you're seeing it's a little bit more complicated because I'm using the industry comparable keys, but I'm going to show you how to bind it. So if I go to Edit preference and if I select blender hotkeys. So I'm right now switching the hotkeys. And if I click shift and a on my keyboard, this menu, this one will pop out everywhere inside my scene. My cursor is. So for example, if I modelling and I need a quick objects to be added to my seem, I simply click shift a go to Mesh, invited the plane. All right, shift a go-to mesh. I've a cylinder, etcetera. So this is how you can quickly add objects, not going here from this menu, but everywhere in your viewport. But this key is not binded into industry compatible keys. So what you need to do is we're going to copy the key and we're going to insert it into our industry comparable keys. So how to do that? Go to the key bindings and type shift a. So here I'm searching this shift and a hotkey what is binded to. So let me search a little bit. So here this is the object mode ad and this descript, This one is calling this menu. So I'm just going to select this text, click control-C on my keyboard, Go to the industry comparable keys. And now I'm going to open the 3D view object mode, object mode, Global. I'm going to go all the way down. So from here, if I click add new, is going to add a new key byte. So what I need to do is I need to paste the function that I've copied. I need to click on shift, so it's activated which shift? An a. And here you see the hotkey is shift an a. But one more thing that is missed is the naming. I'm gonna go back to my blender Keys type shift a, and I'm going to search for a function object mode, open this ad and you can see the name review Treaty on the square empty at going to, again Control C. Go to my industry comparable keys. In the naming for my co menu. I'm gonna base this. I'm going to hit Enter and I'm going to close. And right now I'm working with my industry comparable hotkeys and effective shift a, I get this menu. So you can do pretty much every other menus inside the blender hotkeys and bind them to your industry comparable keys, it's not a problem. This is the method how you can add them. So right now I have this shift and a and I can freely at objects over here, no problem. Just like that. Again, shift a, Maybe I can add a torus. I can move it, I can scale it. Alright, we have that. The next thing that I want to show you is how you can delete the objects from the scene. It's pretty easy. You just select the object, hit delete key on your keyboard, or select the other object, a click backspace on your keyboard and you just delete it. And if you, and if you made a mistake, you can always press Control Z to go back and fix this mistake that you've made. If you delete something by accident or something like that, you can always go back and take control Z. So this is pretty much for this lecture, super easy to add objects. I show you how to bind the keys. You can bind everything from the blender hotkeys, just go to edit to preference. For example, if, if I want to search, what is link_to, for example, X four shift, shift an x. You can find all the keys that are binded to shift and x. And if you want to copy something, you just copied this information, add it into the industry compatible graph, whereas the clip graph editor in the same place and just bind it with the same hotkey and it will work just like a char. So this is pretty much for this lecture guys. I hope you enjoy it. I hope you'll learn something. And we're going to move on with the next one. Thank you for tuning it by. 10. 2.8. 3D Cursor: All right, Welcome guys to the next lecture. In this lecture we're going to talk about the cursor. It is, it is a pretty handy tool that we're going to be using a lot. So let's get started. The first thing is right now I'm in a selection mode. All right? And as you can see here in the middle, this white circle with red dots in it. This is our cursor. And how can we move this cursor? And what this cursor does? I'm going to show you right now. So from here, you can select the cursor or press the shortcut. See, I just press C and watch. If I start to click anywhere in my 3D view, I'm just placing my cursor there. As you can see. I'm just changing the position of the cursor. And I can freely hold my mouse button and just move it in the 3D view. How this is different. For example, if I go into my selection mode to move an object, I need to go to the Move tool and move it. But the cursor is different. You just need to click on the cursor. Again, I'm using the C hotkey and I'm just moving it. The first thing that the cursor does, you spend your new objects at the cursor. So I'm using shift a to create new mesh. And let's create a UV Sphere. As you can see, the sphere spawns at the cursor position. If I move the cursor over there, and if I create a cylinder, I spend my cylinder over there. Let's bomb a little cone here. And as you can see, the cursor is pretty handy to spawn elements in my scene at the position where the cursor is. So this is the first thing that you can use the cursor for spouse items, but it expands away more beyond that. And I'm going to show you right now. So what do you need to do is you need to press Shift X and you get a half this menu. I'm going to go through all of them. The first thing is cursor to world origin. And you can press 1 on your keyboard from here. If I press one, I'm going to activate this cursor towards origin. So what this does is it creates different interactions with the cursor. So for example, if I want to move my cursor in the middle of my scene at the origin and press Shift X. I click on cursor towards origin. As you can see, my cursor goes there and right now I can spawn objects over here with shift and a. Alright, so the next thing is how can we move the cursor to our selected object? So first I'm going to select this object, and then I'm going to click Shift X. And I'm going to use the second cursor to select it. Right now my box is selected, and if I click, my cursor will move in the center of the box. So moving on with the next option is cursor to active. So what this means is active object is the last selected object. So if I select the sphere and I select the cylinder, select the cube. Right now, you can see that this is orange outline. This is orange outline in this a little lighter, orange, more like a yellowish. So what this does is this is my last selected object, so this is my active object. So if I select Reverse elect for example, select the cube I'm holding Shift to select the others shift, shift. Right now my sphere is the last selected. So if I press Shift X and click on cursor tractive, my cursor will go to the sphere. Remember that, that my cursor will go to the active object, which means the vast selected. And you can make the difference just by seeing the outline there. These are little yellowish. Alright, so let's move on with the next thing. The next thing is selection to grid. What this does is it's going to snap my 3D objects to the nearest point in the grip. For example, its scale this cube a little bit down, something like this. And watch now, my cube is inside this cubic grid. And if I press Shift X and click on selection to grid, it's going to snap to the nearest point of the grid. And now I'm moving at the actual snapping point of the grid. Let's try one more time. If I put it over here is going to snap in the upper left corner, I'm going to press Shift X selection to grid. It snaps my object to the grid. So this is what this does. Selection to grid. The next thing is selection to active. Remember guys, what active was? Let me show you again. I'm going to select this cube. I'm going to select the cylinder. I'm going to select the sphere. I'm going to press Shift X. And I'm going to click selection to active, and everything is gone to my last object to the active object. If I change this, my last active object is this cube Shift X selection tool. Active. Everything goes to that octave object. All right, Let's move on. The next thing is selection to cursor. This is pretty handy. I'm going to go into my cursor mode. I'm going to place my cursor over here. I'm gonna go to the selection mode, and let's select those are the geometry you can also hold here on the selection. And if I hold my left mouse button is going to pop out different selection modes. So if I click on selection box, I can select everything effectively. Constellation circle. I can select with my circle just holding my mouse. If I click here and click on selection was so it's going to create a lasso selections. This is Mao little toolbox that you can use. And you can switch between those modes if you click Q on your keyboard. So I'm clicking q and I'm changing my selection mode. All right, so right now I'm going to select this. And I'm going to click Shift X. And as I said, selection tool cursor number eight on your numpad or on your keyboard. If I click it, everything will go to my cursor position. So what it does is it says, place my selection to the center of this cursor. Again, selection cursor, going inside there. I'm going to select this selection, the cursor. All right, this is what this does. And moving to the final two is selection to cursor, but keep offset. Let me show you what this does. If I select everything and click on selection the cursor, see how everything bags and go into the center of this cursor. But if I choose selection to cursor, keep offset, see what happens. It creates an averaging of the position from the three objects and their center. And place the objects with a proximity to the center of the cursor and keeps the offset from all of the objects. All right, so selection cursor, move it in the center in if I choose selection cursor, but keep my offset, it's going to move my objects to the cursor center, but keeping the offset. So the final thing is the cursor to grid. Let me show you what this does. It's pretty much the same as selection to grid, but it does to the cursor. So I'm going to go into my top view and I'm going to place my cursor over here. And I'm going to go cursor to grid. As you can see, it snaps to the nearest point of the grid from here, cursor to grid, snaps gear. All right, so this is pretty much about the cursor. Let's move it to the origin point and how you can use it to manipulate the geometry, move it, and do very different things. And the final thing that I want to talk about is this orange dot in the middle. It is called the origin of the objects in Blender. But in the other 3D packages and game agents, it is called the pivot point. So I'm going to name it the pivot point. So this is the pivot point from where you just wrote object, you move your objects. We're going to talk about it later. We're going to have a separate lesson about it because it can be very handy in 3D. But this is pretty much about the cursor, the hotkey, see the Hartman, you shift X that you can use from here. And I've explained all of those menus. Keep in mind that you can use the numpad from one to nine. So make these actions, it's going to be pretty fast if you use it, it's near your mouth. So thank you guys for tuning in, and I hope I see you in my next lecture. Bye. 11. 2.9. How to Duplicate and Select Objects: All right guys, welcome back. With my next lecture. In this lecture we're going to talk about how to duplicate an object. And then I'm going to cover the topic of how to select an object, different methods of selecting an object. So let's deep dive in. So the first thing, how to duplicate an object. Keep in mind that we are still and the industry comparable hotkeys. So it's going to be different than the standard blender keys. So I'm going to select this cube and I'm going to click on my keyboard or Control D. And as you can see, I can freely move a copy of my object. Then I just place my left mouse button, just like that. And when I press it, I just release a duplicate objects of the first one. So I select this one Control D, and move it in the 3D space and place it over here. You can also select two objects. I'm going to select this one, I'm going to click Shift, select this one. And I'm going to click again Control G on my keyboard. And as you can see, I can duplicate two objects at the same time. What about, oh, five objects? All right, Let's select them all and created more of those objects. So this is pretty simple how to duplicate an object. Just use Control Z of this object and everything's going to work. Let me show a little trick. So the next thing that you can do is when I click Control D on my keyboard, I can freely move it without any restrictions on x, y, or z. But if I click on my keyboard, y is going to restrict my duplicating cube only on the y axis. Now, I'm going to click Z on my keyboard only on the z-axis. And I'm going to click my X on my keyboard only on the x axis. So this is pretty neat and a handy trick. While you duplicate, I'm going to select those two, metrology and Mackenzie. And as you can see, I'm just duplicating on my z-axis, the things that we've talked about in the previous lessons are working like a charm here. So this is pretty important to know the basic of Blender and use the basics with combination of the more advanced techniques later on. So that's why I'm going to teach you everything in Blender step-by-step. We're going to go slow because I want you all to understand the basics a bit. Let me show you another trick. So I'm just going to delete this one. Let's select this cube. Again. Click Control Z, and I'm going to duplicate on z. But if I click on my keyboard, I'm duplicating on four meters ahead of the center of the previous clip. Let's duplicate those. Control Z, Z on your keyboard. Let's press eight. And as you can see, we have very good alignment between those four. And they have separate space of four meters between them. And you can create a BLA, see the blog spine maybe, or something like this. This is pretty, pretty handy. All right, let's move on. So how to select objects with left-click, of course, is the first method. The next method, you can select them from the outliner over here, from the scene collection. As you can see when I click on them, I'm just selecting them. Let me show you few had the tricks. The next thing, which is pretty simple and obvious, is just if you drag on top of them, you're selecting the thing inside your drag area, just like that. But here's a cool menu over here, the Select menu. If I open it up, you can select all the objects. So if I press Control a on my keyboard, I'm going to select them all, everything in my outliner. So let's duplicate few cubes just like that. Let's move them a little bit like that. And as you can see, we have a lot of objects. We're going to press Control a. And I select everything in my outliner and how to deselect them all control shift and a will deselect them out. So from here, as you can see, control a selecting them all. Control Shift a is deselecting them. Oh, and there's a coup handy invert. So what it does is if I select this light and click Control I on my keyboard, only the light or only the selection will be reversed and will be deselected. So let me demonstrate. I select those three cubes, control ie, those three tubes are not selected. The other meshes and lights and camera is selected. So basically, this is how the world works. The next thing is the box select, which is this one, as I've already told you. But there is one more thing, the circle select. This is pretty cool and handy. So this my circle. And if I hold my left mouse button and start going through some object, as you can see, when it passed by the center of the object, the orange dot, it starts selecting them just like that. Hop, hop, hop, just selecting them. So this is pretty cool. If you want to turn off this method of selection click Escape on your keyboard. So this is another method, are not using it pretty much, but you can use it if you want. And there are some other hand, the selections that you can explore by yourself, but they are here. The first thing is select by type. So you can select by mesh, you can select by cameras, you can select by surface. Just a quick demonstration. Click on the camera, select all the cameras in my scene. Click on the mesh, select all my measures in the scene, et cetera. You can select the active camera, you can mirror, mirror selections. You can select a random object. As you can see, select random objects from your scene. And if you have another selections, select more or less, select group, select linked, and select better. So this is pretty much about selection and about duplicating things. I hope you enjoyed this lesson and we're going to move on with my next lecture. Thank you guys. Take care. Bye. 12. 2.10. Focusing on an Object: All right, welcome back guys. With the next lecture. In this lecture we are going to be talking about how to focus on an object. It's very simple and short lesson. So first of all, if I go way beyond my object and for example, away over here. And if I want to focus on my object, I really should go drag, you know, move. And it's obtaining the hairs to go to that object specifically. So what you can do is you can go to your outliner over here. And for example, let's select the light and I'm going to press just simply F key on my keyboard. And I'm just focus on this. So imagine that the F key is like a focus. I'm going to select the cube from the outliner. I'm going to click F. All right, you can focus on it. For example, if I select my camera, I can again click F and it focused on it. And keep in mind that when you focus on an object, the rotation and the movement will be focused on that object. So for example, I focused on this. And as you can see, I'm rotating. It's rotating around this object. And if you want my camera to rotate primary on this object, I just press F on my keyboard. I start rotating. It's rotating around the center of the object that I focused in. So pretty simple, F key on your keyboard focus. And this is only in the industry compatible hotkeys and the other hotkeys, you need to press the dial button from the path. So if you are working on a laptop, working in industry comparable hotkeys is perfect, like I told you before, for me is a must and I strongly recommend for you guys if you want to work in the game development industry, if you want to work in visual effects industry like Houdini and Maya and animation in Pixar, you're going to be using a lot of other tools. So working with this, if the strict compatible hotkeys is a must, that's why I'm teaching you embed way. So thank you guys for tuning in. This is about focusing on an object. Select an object preserved key. You focus on it. And if you go way beyond in, if you don't see the object, just find it in the outliner you can cite here in the search. For example, keep Click on it, click if, and you go there. Thank you guys for tuning in and watching you in. My next one. 13. 2.11. Different Views in the Viewport: All right, Welcome again. With the next part. In this part we're going to talk about the different viewports in Blender. So let's get started. The first thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to get rid of that cube. And I'm going to create a monkey. All right? I'm going to scale it up a little bit. This is because I want to focus on the monkey from different angles. For example, if I want to see the monkey here only from this side, but I want to be perfectly aligned or this side or this side, there is a way to do that. So here in the upper right corner you can see a gizmo which, which says X, Y, and Z. Those are the, those are the positive sides and those are the negative sides. So for example, here is y plus y here is minus y. If I start moving this, you can see in the upper left that I'm moving in the plus section of the meters. And if I go here, I'm going into the negative spaces of the meters. So when you have this y with this line, this means plus and this is the minus. Alright? So how can I navigate with this? You just simply click on this dot, on the green dot and you have a perfect alignment on the y-axis. This is the front orthographic view. Over here you can see which view is this. If I click on the X, I'm going into the writer or to graphic. If I click on the Z, I'm going into the top or to graphic. And if I click the how green data without the connection, I'm going to go into the negative space. So I'm going to see it from the bottom. First, I see the front or two graphic. Then I click on the set negative and I see the bottom or to graphic. And the same from this. You can see the left. You can see the right, you can see the back. You can see the front. If I click on the Z, you can see the top. If I click again on the Z, you can see it about, alright, so from here, you can change from prospective mode to alter graphic. I'm going to talk about perspective and orthographic in the next lecture. So don't pay attention right now to it. So the next thing I want to show is that you have to click on those circles. So here, just to get to those orthographic views. All right, you can do this by using hotkeys. So if I click F1 on my keyboard, I'm going to go to the front or the graphic. If I click F2 on my keyboard, I'm going to go to the right toward orthographic. If I click F3, I'm going to go to the top. So the reverse of this is if I hold Control and click F3, I'm going to go to the bottom. So while you hold control and click F1, F2, and F3, you're selecting the negative space. Let's try Control F2, left taught graphic. I'm going to press F2. I'm going to go right orthographic. Again control F1 back, just F1 front. Alright guys, so this is about orthographic modes and how you can access them. So again, this is pretty handy. You modelling, you always, constantly need to see your mother from different angles and different perspectives. This is a feature that we're going to use a lot. So keep in mind and try to learn the hotkeys. Thank you guys for tuning in, and I'm waiting you in my next lecture. 28. 3.8 Proportional Editing aka Soft Selection: Hello guys and welcome to this next lecture. In this lecture we are going to be talking about proportional editing. It is also known as soft selection in other software like mine. So let's get started. First, I'm going to delete this cube and I'm going to create a plane. Then I'm going to go into my edit mode and I'm going to sub-divide maybe 40 times, something like this. And this necessary in order to show you how these work. So to access the proportional editing, you can do it from this menu, the circle. Right now, it's not active. And if you hover on it, you can see that the shortcut is P on your keyboard. So if I click B on my keyboard, now my proportional editing is active. Alright, so let's go and how it works. First I'm going to select this vertex, and I'm going to click again B on my keyboard to disable it. If I start moving my vertex, you can see that only this vertex is moved and the rest around it, it's not. But if you turn on proportional editing and if you start moving, you can see that the vertices around this one are interpolated and averaged and moving with it. If you want to create a little radius, you can use the mouse scroll wheel. And as you can see, I'm just increasing and decreasing the radius. And if you decrease the radius, you can see how you can create this type of shape like a mountain. And to keep in mind that the proportional editing is working on averaging the vertices along the way of the fallout zone of the zone of the circle. So as you can see, it's starting to averaging down everything and you can manipulate it. Let's say something like this. You can increase the size in this mode and let's play a little bit with it. You can create the valley to sleep debt. We're going to increase this. I'm just creating a riverbed. And maybe mountains. You can, of course select multiple vertices and the soft selection will work. Just like that. I'm going to change a little bit the radius. So I can create more of a spike in, out, in maybe something like this. Let's try to him, but something like this. Okay? So if I go into my object mode, you can see that we've created this valley and those melons. Now I'm just going to shade smooth. So we can see the final result. And as you can see in your window, everything is so smooth, so, so correct. If I tried to create this by hands, let me just delete one and create another plane. And let's go and subdivided again 40. So if I try to create this without the soft selection, I'm going to click B on my keyboard to disable Several it. Let's see how you can do it. You need to select this vertex in. It's like those two. Maybe averaged them down. You need to select those two. And you can see that this process is pain in the ass. And that's why we are using the soft select. There is more to it. So if I click on my soft select or proportional editing, and if you click here on the drop-down, you can see that we have different shapes and what they do. Let's start with the, with the second one with the sphere. You're going to start using the proportional editing and fall off will act like a sphere. As you already see it is. Alright, let's change it to route. You can see that it's creating some kind of a top edge. Maybe like a church roof, something like this. Let's try inverse square. This little bit more different on the edges. Let's try the sharp one. And doing what it says is creating a sharp, spiky look. You can't use the liner one. It will be straightforward angles, as you can see like this. And this. And constant will create just 90 degrees shape on the edges. Of course, you can multiple select vertices. And the last one is the random, which is pretty cool. It creates every time random shapes. If you're pulling in and out. And you can pretty easily create spiky mountains. Maybe something for a sci-fi book. Let me go here. And as you can see, it looks pretty, pretty amazing. All right, guys. So we're going to be using this too often. And let me demonstrate a little bit more on the monkey yet. So if this is our mantissa yet, and let's subdivided few times, just like that. And if I go into my vertex mode and select this and start to shape it, you can create different shapes by just using the proportional editing for, for example, right now, I'm trying to make my monkey look angry. And as you see, we can achieve this look pretty easily by just using this proportional. And let me just smooth. And wallah, we've created our monkey to be angry or you can, you know, change his mouth. Let me just make the fall off a little bit less. You can select here maybe. And just experiment where it goes. All right, we've created some angry monkey. So this is pretty important to, to, to use, keep it in mind and you can access it by clicking B on your keyboard. And also here you can access different properties for it. Thank you guys for tuning in into this lecture. And I can't wait to see you in my next one. Bye. 29. 3.9 Snap Tool: Hello and welcome to this lecture. In this lecture we are going to be talking about the snap tool. So let's get right into it. First, I'm going to delete this cube and I'm going to create a UV Sphere. All right, then I'm going to go into my edit mode and I'm going to choose my vertices. And hear from the magnet is our snap too. If I turn it on with X on my keyboard, the shortcut is X. Just click on it, select the vertex, start pulling it on our z-axis. And what you can see is that it snaps and move with increment values. Just like this, right? And this is because of the snap tool. So it starts snapping meter by meter up or down. It is pretty often use the snap tool to create even parts or sum of some kind of object. So from this drop-down menu, you can access the different snapping types. The first one is our increment. And for example, right now I'm just activating it. And if you move one up or one down, it moves with a big pace. But if you hold Shift on your keyboard, you can move with small basis. As you can observe here. If I let go my shift, I can move again and snap with bigger pace. All right? The second thing that I'm using are family is the vertex snap. So when you click different snaps, you can have different properties. Over here. You can experiment and try them out. I'm not going to cover those properties, but you can experiment with them. So the turmoil that I'm using is vertex and increment. And vertex is pretty important what it, what it does. Let me show you guys. I just select this vertex in. If I move it over here, it's going to snap to the, to the other one. Just like that. So here from six vertices, we have merged them and combine them at the same place. And they are just too. Let's try this out. This methods you are going to use a lot while we're starting our modeling process. So keep in mind that this is pretty important to the snap vertex, snap increment. And you can experiment with the settings. Just take your time and put some experimentation effort. Try to learn this too. But this is pretty straightforward. Snapping to vertex 2 increment, you can snap the edge, you can stop phase, you can stop the volume or edge centre. But the most important, our increments and vertex. So this is pretty much about this. So thank you guys for tuning in, and I'm gonna see you in my next one. 30. 3.10 Merge Overlapping Vertices : All right guys, Welcome back. With the next lecture. In this lecture we are going to be talking about different problems that can came up with the snap Vertex tool and how to solve it. So let's get started. So in my previous lecture, I told you about the snap tool. And what we're going to do is we're going to go into vertex mode. And I'm going to select this vertex, go to my snap to activate it with X on my keyboard or from the magnet. And I'm going to select vertices. All right? And now what I'm going to do is I'm going to snap this vertex to this one. And as you can see, now they appear as one. And you see them in the 3D space as it is only one vertex or here. But remember that with snapped the second vertex on the first one. So this is a problem. For example, if you're making a render, It's okay to have overlapped vertices one on top of another. But if you are creating this for games and for animations and stuff like that is going to cause some problems. So this vertex should be combined, or in other words, merged with the second one. So those two vertices should become one right now, as you can see, we have two. Snap them again and how to merge them or how to combine them. I'm going to select all my vertices. I'm going to go to the mesh over here, and I'm going to go to the clean up and all the way down to merge by distance. What is going to do is it's going to merge every vertex that we've selected. It's going to calculate the distance between the vertices. And if the distance is in the range of what we set up, it's going to merge the vertices. So I'm just going to click it. And right now on the whole cube, everything is merged by this distance. So from here, 0.0001 meters, everything, every vertex that has this kind of distance will be merged with his neighbor. So if I put it this distance all the way up, you can see that the vertices start to merge automatically because the distance is relevant to all the vertices and they all merge into one. Where if we turn it down, Let's get back to a region. And this will merge only the vertices that are overlapping through right now if I'm going here and just like the vertex, you can see that this is only one vertex. Let me just turn on snap. Again, just one selecting. And you can see that we have only one vertex. So this is pretty important when you are creating a complex model just to clean up your geometry. Again, I'm going to do a quick example if you want to merge this comma here to create this triangle, and then select all my vertices over here, mesh, cleanup, merge by distance. And this is fixed as you can see. So thank you guys for tuning in. And this short lesson, I'm going to wait, you end the next one. 31. 3.11 Mesh Orientations: Hello again guys. With the next lecture. In this lecture we are going to be talking about mesh orientation. So let's just get started. Alright? So right now I have my cube in the center. I'm going to select it, and I'm going to select my move tool. And as you can see, we have the orientation, that is my x and y axis are here. All right, everything looks good and the cube looks good. So if I start rotating on the y axis, just like that, and I turn my move tool, you can see that my orientation is still like that. It is not twisted. It is not pointing at the direction that the cube should be. And what this is called, this is called global or world orientation. So this is oriented by the grid and our axis is from the grid. So if you want to change the orientation to face the cube or rotation, we can go over here, at the global or over here orientation and just select Walker. And you can see instantly that our orientation aligns with our key. So if I start rotating like that, you can see that we have our z axis over here. If I rotate like that, you can observe that our z-axis is pointing at the direction of the cube. So this is pretty handy. This is something that you're going to use often to navigate in 3D and to place your object locally or globally. So from here you have access to more different orientation. You have normal Geebo view cursor. I'm just telling you guys that the most important to that you're going to be using all the way to this course and hopefully to your professional career is going to be global and Walker. Those two are the main orientations that you're going to be using. Alright? So let's create, let's create a sphere. Let's move it a little bit up. And right now, our sphere is also using vocal. And if I click on my cube, you can see the local orientation on for the cube, the axes are pointing as the orientation of the axis of the cube. If I click on my sphere, is going to be different. Let me just click over the cube and the sphere. And those are represented for local mesh. Alright? And if I go to the global and you can see that my global is aligned with my gripped. And my global on the cube is also aligned with my grid. So this is pretty much about the orientation of the 3D mesh. Keep this in mind, global and walker what they are. Practice a little bit. Take your time. So thank you guys for tuning in. I see you in my next lecture. 32. 3.12 Extrude Function: Hello, with this next lecture. In this lecture, I'm going to teach you how to extrude from faces some geometry. This is pretty cool. Lecture. Pay attention because this is one of the coolest two that I'm going to show. First I'm going to go into my edit mode and I'm going to select the faces are right. There are a few ways to extrude geometry. First I'm going to select this face. Right now. I'm going to right-click and I'm going to select extrude face just like that. And if I start to drag, you can see that we've created another cube. Right-click, extrude face one more. And let's try to manipulate it to create a weight or shape over here, all right? And as you can see, this is one of the most powerful tools and blender with which you can create different shapes. Select those to click Extrude. I'm going to extrude them. Click Extrude. Let's try to shape them. I'm using the scale so as you can see guys, pretty handy, Pretty cool. Let's try an extra dose phases. Let's try and just shrink them down just like that. And we've already try to create some shapes. So you can select those 20 right-click. And if you click E on your keyboard, you can extrude instantly. So this is my workflow. I'm just selecting the faces, right-click E. Extraordinary, select this face, rightfully E, extrude. And as you can see pretty fast, Let's create few ice here. Extrude a little bit down. Let's try to shrink it. Something like this. I don't know. This interesting shapes. And the other hotkey that you can use to extrude this over here, this is the extrude method. You can use Control E from your keyboard. So if I select this one, click Control E on my keyboard, you're going to have this yellow line with the circle with the plus, which means I'm going to add geometry over here, like this. And there is no need to click anything. If you are in this extrude mode, right now, I'm in the extrude mode and wherever I touch of pace, I can extrude it. All right, so well, I'm in this mode. I can extrude from everywhere. Let's try and create an interesting shape. I'm going to remove this. And let me show you my workflow, how I work. I'm going to go into my face mode. And let's extrude this. Extrude this one. Let's create something like that. All right. I'm going to create an interesting shape over here. I'm using Control key and I'm shaping it like that. Let's create size over here, control V. Let's create a base. Another controlling, a little bit up. Another one. Alright, let's shrink it up. And if you want to right-click extrude, right-click extrude. Let's try to shrink it down. Just like this. And as you can see, we've created some interesting shape. Let's move this over a bit up. It's like a garden or long-term or something like this. Let's put this over here. And we've already have a model. So this is pretty much about the extrude. Please take your time to explore the extrude tool and try to create different shapes with the extrude, just turn on your imagination and try to create something from it. It doesn't even matter if it's accurate to something in real life. Just try and Freestyle on the extra two. It does create something awesome. Thank you guys for tuning in. Check your homework and I'm waiting you in my next lecture. 33. 3.13 Customize Viewport Shading: All right, welcome to this next lecture. In this lecture, I'm going to be covering how to customize your viewport and how to set it up perfectly for muddling. Alright, so I've already added the monkey head into my scene. And if I press shifts it, as I've already teach you, you can go from different modes, rendering wireframe material or solid with the hotkey Shift Z. But there are more to this. As I've already told you from here, it is the same as this shading. You can switch them. But there is a drop-down menu. And if I open it, a whole new world opens with a lot of different options. So the first thing is to choose the solid mode. And four here, you can select different type of lightning. So here right now I'm just selecting a studio lighting. And if I click on the sphere, you can open different types of lightning and choose from each one. Let me just zoom in on my Mac here to show you how they change. Let me change to that coup lightning. Maybe like this or this. We can also select the math cap. What this does is this is going to change the material on our geometry only in the modelling preview window. It is not renderable. So this only for the premium. You can select different materials. You can select some wise. You can select some Chrome, as you can see, with a lot of shininess, vermis moot, my geometry. To see it a little bit more. You can select some other types like these gray or maybe you're a fan of this one. So here you can select different materials for your 3D model, but this works only in the viewport when you go to render your image or exported to another program or a game engine, this won't work, this just work in the view board for your eye. So let's say I'm going to choose this one. From here. You can use the flat shading and the flat shading is perfect when you want to check see what model that you are creating. Here is a little trick that I do. I go in the courts up and I select Single. And from here, you can change the color of the flood shade. I prefer black. So you can observe and see how this shading affects our model from different angles. All right, so there is flood shade, mid-cap and studio lighting. And let me go to the material to bring back that cover. The next thing that it is pretty important. We've already talked about back face culling. And here you can turn in on permanently. So I highly recommend this to be turned on. And the next cool thing is the cavity. This should be on. Always. Let me just turn it on. And now you can see how our edges or construct and you can see our geometry more like a treaty. Let me just turn it off again. Here. Not so good edge flow here, everything pops. You can see that everything pops out and it's more readable. And hear from the type, this is the screen type. I prefer to work in worlds like you just click on world type and you see that you have this nice cool shading while you're working on your model. And you can just share this MOOC. We have this coup and nice shading. Let me turn it off for comparison. On and off, on and off. That's pretty, pretty huge difference. And that will be helpful while we're modeling. So this is pretty much how you can customize your viewport shading. Let me just bring back everything for later comparison. You see here pretty flat shaded, not looking so good. And just with few tweaks, selecting the material back face culling cavity, everything looks way more better. All right, so thank you guys for tuning in in this lecture and I'm waking you in my next one. 34. 3.14 Creating Faces: Hello guys and welcome back to the next lecture. In this lecture, I'm going to show you how to create faces from vertices. Let's get started. I'm going to create a cube. And from our previous lecture, I've turned my cavity, my back face curling, and I select a mat, grab this one. A little bit shiny. Alright. So what we're gonna do right now is we're going to go into edit mode. And I'm going to select this phase, the top one. I'm going to click Delete on my keyboard. And here are different options of the deletion. What, what should I delete blender ask you, what should I delete? Should I delete the vertices? Should they delete the edges or the faces? Right now we're going to choose the face and I'm going to delete the top face. I'm going to select this one to click Delete on my keyboard and select the face. And as you can see, that we cannot observe the interfaces of our cube because they are blackface code. And from our lecture about the normal vector, we don't have a normal over here. So right now, just for this one, I'm going to turn off my back face culling so I can see the 3D geometry in all the directions. And here we have gaps. Over here we had a face and 0 there at the side. We also have a face. And right now I'm going to show you how to reconstruct this face. So the first thing that we need to do is we're going to need to create another hotkey for this one. So I'm gonna go to Edit and I'm going to open my preferences. And here in the 3D view, I'm going to open 3D view. I'm going to open mesh. And I'm going to open mesh global. I'm going to scroll all the way down and I'm going to add a new hotkey. All right, I'm going to open it and I'm going to name it mesh under square face, under square off. What this does is it going to add phase to the vertices. I've selected an x, I'm going to click on Shift. And here on the a, I'm going to click F. So my hotkey Shift F. Alright, we've set up the hotkey, and now let's get back to business. I'm going to select this vertex. I'm going to shift select this one, this one, and this one. Right now if I click Shift F and the hotkey that we've just created, it's going to fill up the face. So let's do it. Shift left. We've created a new face. If I select those four vertices on the side of the cube shifted, just fill this gap two, alright, and we have our cube back. Let me show you what you can do with three phases. Let's delete this one face. Let's delete again this one pace. I'm going to go into my vertices. And right now I'm going to select to those two vertices on this side and this one. And I'm going to click Shift F, and it will create a triangle. It, it creates geometry between three vertices are four vertices. Let's select this fall one, click, click Shift F, and we've created a face, all right? And if we select this vertex, this vertex and this vertex and click Shift F, We've created a triangle face over here. The same applies to the side. We've selected three faces, shift f with just created this triangle. Alright guys. So this is pretty much how you can fill up the gaps and create different phases between vertices. You can also select this edge and this edge and click Shift F, and it will create the same phase. You can use both the edges or the vertices. It's a premium. Those are two methods that I've showed you. If I select, let's try and select this one and this one, and click Shift F. It will create the triangle face. Alright? So those are two techniques by selecting vertices or by selecting edges. All right. This is pretty much about this lecture, how to recreate faces. We've created a hotkey for it. Just remember it shifted f. Alright, thank you guys for tuning in. I'm waiting you in my next one.