Beginners at art - Information you should know before you start | Doris Charest | Skillshare

Beginners at art - Information you should know before you start

Doris Charest, Contemporary Fine Art Specialist and Instructor

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15 Lessons (36m)
    • 1. Introduction

      2:54
    • 2. The materials

      3:35
    • 3. Choosing paint for watercolour part 1

      1:50
    • 4. Watercolour The paint part 2

      1:19
    • 5. Watercolour The paper

      2:26
    • 6. Watercolour -Choosing Brushes

      1:40
    • 7. Washing brushes

      1:20
    • 8. Painting surfaces you can use for acrylic

      2:22
    • 9. Acrylic Paint

      1:50
    • 10. Acrylic Brushes

      1:41
    • 11. Negative shapes

      4:45
    • 12. Cropping

      2:25
    • 13. Focal point

      3:37
    • 14. Transfering a drawing

      3:30
    • 15. Basics conclusion

      0:48

About This Class

This course has all the basic information that you need to get started painting.  You will learn how to pick a canvas, acrylic paint and brushes. You will learn how to choose watercolour paper, brushes and paint. You will learn how to varnish your painting. You will learn many tips and tricks to painting that will help you become a better painter. 

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Transcripts

1. Introduction : welcome to my course on basic information for new to our beginnings. That's a lot of beginning, but this is basic information about how to choose the materials you need for the medium you want. For example, if you like water color, what brushes do you choose? What paper do you choose when you look at that big assortment of paper in the art supply store, you go, Oh my God, how do I pick? Well, after watching these videos, you'll know. Then how do you pick the paint again? You'll know once you've watched these videos, I do the same thing for acrylic and the same thing for drawing. It's how to choose your cereals. I left a year after the your blank here because I am filling in the blanks for you. If you have never done art and you decided you'd like to try something after you've watched these videos, you might have a better idea of what appeals to you. You might like acrylic or watercolor or maybe pencil here, for example. I show you pencils and different kinds of pencils. When I first started, nobody told me these things, and I had to learn by buying and trying. You waste a lot of money that way, and if you watch these videos, you have a head start. You know which pencils you need. Probably you'll need what paints you need, and then you can go from there. I include different things, like washing brushes. How do you wash your brush if the paint's stayed in your brush and got stuck there? Are you out $25 that you spent on that brush? No, it's really easy to fix those freshens, and I include other things, like mixing color. So what happens if you mix yellow and blue, for example, and you get green Now? Most artists know this from practice, but if you've never, ever played with paint, this is a good head start. And that's what this course is all about. Nobody told me these things in the beginning. I include other information like how to arrange shapes together so that they're more pleasing to the eye so you can just practice these things in these videos, and then once you actually get started on your art, you're ahead of the game. You have a good idea of what your materials are, what you need for the project that you're going to do at the same time pod. Arrange whatever is on the canvas. So these air great videos for you, the watch and practice before you get going. So have fun and we'll see you in the next video. 2. The materials : Now we're going to talk about materials. What you will need the absolute basics that you will need will be a painting surface or two or more, depending on how prolific you are. Acrylic paint and brushes. Now, a lot of people when they go into the art store, they have a lot of trouble knowing what to pick. So what I'm going to do is go over each of the materials slowly. First, there are pencils. Your average everyday pencil is HB, and it makes ah, Mark. Um, that is easy to read. Um, doesn't smudge too much. Then you have H, which is the harder pencil if you want a very sharp, straight line. Um, that doesn't smudge. This is the pencil to use to be. That is what most artists use. They tend to like this pencil because it does blend a little easier. Four b blends more, and it's a little darker. Six B is the darkest and the softest, so ill bland very easily, but at the same time, it'll smudge a lot if you use this pencil on your canvas. Quite often, it smudges when you try to paint over, so be careful on choosing your pencils. There are all kinds of brushes out here. There are angled brushes that are good for straight areas. You can use the point for small areas. That's what they're good for. There are round brushes with that. Just have, ah, small oval top. There are flat or square brushes. That's for making very sharp, straight lines. There are round brushes. That's my favorite. I love the round brushes because you can do just about anything with, um, and the very tip is good for small areas. There is the fan brush that every beginner loves, but we rarely use it after a while. And then the rigger brush, which is a small skinny brush that is used for tiny areas and signing your name at the end . These air my brushes. After a while, you develop a liking for ah, certain types of brushes, and these were the ones I like. Ah, you can see the ones that are well used are probably the ones they're used all the time. So, um, after a while, years Oh, look like this, too. Now, for this course, what I'd like you to get is a four inch brush, a two inch brush. Ah, one inch brush and 1/2 inch brush, all flat. I want you together or size eight round and the size to round, then a rigger. Now, if you can't afford to get all these brushes get ah, one inch brush that is flat. Um, a size eight round And the rigour Those old serve you, uh, for this course. 3. Choosing paint for watercolour part 1: and now we're going to talk about paint. You're going to need a krilic paint non oil paint, not water color paint. Acrylic paint. There are a lot of brands out there, and just by the best brand you can afford, the more expensive the brand, the higher the pigment level. That means the color intensity is that much brighter, and it will go a lot further, even though it costs more per tube. It goes a lot further. You only need a little bit to get a lot of bright color, whereas with cheap paint, what happens is sometimes you need 34 coats off that paint to get that same intensity. So here's what you need. Ah, Liz Aerin Crimson Caddy Um Rand Ultra marine blue fei lo blue, cadmium, yellow or rail and yellow, white and black. If you cannot afford all these paints, just get one of each. Ah, yellow, one of each. Read one of each blue, but you will need white and black. Also, you need acrylic gel. This is what we used to ah, glue as glue to glue the papers onto the canvas or the board that you're going to use. Remember, cleaning your brushes is important after using the paint, Um, and we'll talk more about this later 4. Watercolour The paint part 2: 5. Watercolour The paper: 6. Watercolour -Choosing Brushes: brushes, watercolor brushes. There are different kinds you can get. You can get square brushes. That's just the ones with the square end Filbert brushes, which is a rounded end round brushes, which is like a tube that's pointy and rigger. Brush is long, skinny ones for writing your name and doing really tiny work. Now we're going to see a video that explains a little more about brushes. Here you can see the different kinds of brushes you can use for water color. First a square brush, then the filbert, then the rigor. And now for the round one. What I suggest for you when you buy brush is you take the little plastic cover off, see how it's pointy and soft. All watercolor brushes, air really soft. Take that plastic thing and throw it away. When people try to put it back on, the usually wreck the brushes, so these air your four choices. The round of square, the filbert and the rigour. That's it. But for the most part, when you're a beginner, you need one brush, a round number eight or number 10. Look at the little tiny number on the handle and get one of those. That's all you need. Nothing else. See you in the next video 7. Washing brushes: washing brushes, warm water and liquid soap are best for washing brushes. Make sure that you get all the paint out of the brush or the paint will harden and ruin your brush. If by chance you leave some paint on your brush, and that can happen when you're in a hurry, you can use a product called Windex, a product for cleaning windows, and let the brush sit in their sit in the Windex, and what happens is it softens the acrylic. Then you need to pick it out of the bristles, so gently scrape the paint out. Now, if that doesn't work for you, you have to buy a special cleaning product at the art supply store, and it comes with instructions again. You let it sit in the product, and then you gently scrape out the acrylic. Acrylic is really like a plastic, and when it hardens, it turns to rock. So it's quite important for you to wash your brushes properly now that I've said all that will go on to starting the painting 8. Painting surfaces you can use for acrylic: And now for the painting surfaces, you can use watercolor paper, canvas illustration, board hardboard or other choices like Matt Board. But what we're going to do is tow. Watch a video about it. So I've created a video that shows you the exact surfaces and how to use them. So watch the video now. Here we go I and welcome to mixed media collage. Different surfaces. Right now, what we're going to cover is the surface that you can paint on. So there's quite a few. The first ISS watercolor watercolor paper, especially £140 watercolor, um, is very good for collage ing. There's two services. There's a rough side and then a smooth side, but it's very durable. The second is canvas, so you can use a regular canvas. I prefer the a thick edge. They called it a gallery edge, and it's stapled on the back, and it's got a wide surface excellent for collage. The next surface is illustration board, so it comes in different sizes. You can buy it the size you want. It's like heavy card with a type of paper on the surface, very good for collage, but only in small sizes. Then there's Matt Board. That's the cheap way to do it. Matt Board works really well if you keep it small so they come in different sizes and colors and you use the backside. You use the weight. There's also hardboard and hardboard is would with hardboard. You have to put Jessel on the top, and Jessel is like a primer for most surfaces. For painting. You see it on the canvas. That's why the canvas is white. You can work in different sizes with hardboard, so that's it for now. We'll see you soon. 9. Acrylic Paint: and now we're going to talk about paint. You're going to need a krilic paint non oil paint, not water color paint. Acrylic paint. There are a lot of brands out there, and just by the best brand you can afford, the more expensive the brand, the higher the pigment level. That means the color intensity is that much brighter, and it will go a lot further, even though it costs more per tube. It goes a lot further. You only need a little bit to get a lot of bright color, whereas with cheap paint, what happens is sometimes you need 34 coats off that paint to get that same intensity. So here's what you need. Ah, Liz Aerin Crimson Caddy Um Rand Ultra marine blue fei lo blue, cadmium, yellow or rail and yellow, white and black. If you cannot afford all these paints, just get one of each. Ah, yellow, one of each. Read one of each blue, but you will need white and black. Also, you need acrylic gel. This is what we used to ah, glue as glue to glue the papers onto the canvas or the board that you're going to use. Remember, cleaning your brushes is important after using the paint, Um, and we'll talk more about this later 10. Acrylic Brushes: brushes. There are all kinds of brushes you can use. Score brushes, filbert brushes, flak brushes, round brushes and, the very last, a very small rigger brush. Now watch the video learn more about brushes. So here are my brushes. A very large square, one that I used for covering large campuses in a smaller one, also a filbert brush with a rounded tip. Those I like a lock to. And then that's like a another square bus, a round brush often used in watercolor. But for acrylics, you use it for smaller areas and a rigger brush for very fine detail. It's hard to choose, but what you really need is just two brushes. Member that coarse hair brushes leave texture so that one would leave a texture on your canvas. So if you like a texture in your paint, that's the one you use of all these pressures. You don't need them all. You need just a couple. So this is what I suggest. A square brush and a rigger brush so the square to spread the paint and the rigour for small detail. So check the store's out, see what you need. At most, you can add a round brush, so see you in the next section. For more information, 11. Negative shapes: negative painting by Doris Shutting You were going to talk about what negative painting youth, and it's really just the way you paint around the shape. So here I have some trees and I'm going to give you visual about what negative painting is . So I'm adding some trees here, and what we're going to do is negative paint around it, and I'll show you the difference between negative painting and positive painting. When you're doing this, just practice first and just put in some basic shapes just like that. So now negative painting is just taking some paint and painting around the shape, and then you just feel in the areas around the shape, and that's all there is to it. Negative painting is not painting the shape but painting around the shape and making that single shape stand out so you can do negative painting and still have color within latte tree if you want it. But then the painting around it easy either lighter or darker, something that makes the subject stand out. So in this case, we're making it darker just so you can see the example. So you're painting around the shape. Take your time and just feel in the species in the beginning. It's hard to see because finding that shape that negative shape because we're so used to painting the positive shape, it's actually a challenge, and some people have a hard time in the beginning. It's hard to see the shape unless you're really thinking about it. So just paint the shape like that and fill it in, and we're almost there. We're going to fill in some of the other shapes, and then you'll have a really good example of what negative painting is now. I want it really dark because I wanted to show I want the shape to show and I'm using on Lee a white shape for the tree, so that is easily seen by you so that you can really picture what negative painting ISS. So just take paint and paint around the shape. It's not any more complicated than that, but it feels complicated sometimes when you're actually doing it. And here we're almost done, and you can see those tree shapes see the blue shapes, so that's the sky behind it. The sky is the negative shape, and the positive shape is the trees and I really like to darken it so you can see you don't have to have a flat color inside those shapes. It could be a graduated color. It could be multiple colors. It doesn't have to be all the same. It's just so that you can tell that the shapes are negative shapes the ones that your painting now we're going to try positive shapes just so you can see the difference. So we're going to paint a tree with the brush and see how now you're painting the positive shape your painting the opposite of what you did before and you're painting the shape itself, and that's called the positive shape. It's not a complicated process, but sometimes it does require a little bit of thinking. So on the left we have negative shapes on the right. Here will have a positive shape just so you can see the difference. The shapes can be multicolored, but it's just to give you the right idea and the concept So left side, negative shape, right, signed, positive shape. Now it's your turn. I want you to practice this and see what you can do. Have fun. This is really kind of a tricky process sometimes. So it's worth the practice. See, do this now and we'll see you in the next Theo. 12. Cropping: 13. Focal point: Welcome back focal points, quick tips on two different ways to create a focal point. Now focal points are tricky, and we often have to really plan them. For example, here is this collage of different papers, and they all looks very regular and organize. And there's no real one place that something stands out for a focal point, and that makes it boring. So what you're going to do is create a focal point. You're going to need some light, beeper and some dark paper. I'm We're going to use those two elements to create a focal point. We'll get those now and then we'll keep going. So here again, we have the basic shapes, and we're going to take a piece of paper dark construction paper. This is just a plan. Keep in mind that this is not a real painting. Were just planning something for a future painting, so I put a big, dark shape, and now I'm going to add a small late shape. Now that's an instant focal point, a very big dark with a little tiny piece of light color on it. But to make it even more interesting, I'm going to add a bit of green, So now I have more unison between what's around the black. I have a little bit of yellow and little bit of green. That's one way to create a folk point. A second way is to take some smaller shapes, and in that light area, just drop it there, so that creates a focal point. But we might add a few more pieces all by itself. It looks a little bit lonely, so we're adding two more pieces right there, and that makes one long stripe and I don't really like that, So I will separate the pieces separated. It doesn't look great either. So too close together and one further way is the best. Here is another option. You can try different sizes, so a small piece looks lost, so you don't want that. A medium piece still looks lost, so you don't want that either. So the next trick is to add a bigger piece, and that works way better than just a little pieces by themselves and the bigger piece closer and almost touching or touching some of the background. Now, in this painting, you have light areas against dark areas and neutral areas so all around the flower of the colors are darker and more neutral. That makes the pure white and the hot pink stand out, and the rest is all neutralized, so you don't really have another focal point. The white is the biggest part in that whole painting, the biggest AB, so that's one of the tips and tricks to creating a focal point, and we'll see you in the next section. 14. Transfering a drawing : transferring a drawing by Doris Shelley. Here, we're going to just learn how to transfer a basic drawing. Sometimes you want a drawing that you want to repeat more than once and other times. You just want to do the drawing and then not mess up your paper or your canvas. If you do it on a scrap piece of paper and then transferred, it's easier now. This is very faded because I like to work with light pencil lines. So it's a nest. I'm going to draw a nest. Just use simple basic shapes and then show you how to transfer that. So that's an easy drawing. So the next step is for you to dark in the back of your drawing. Whatever you're drawing is it doesn't matter. You're just dark in the back like that. An HB or to be pencil is best. You want dark, soft lead, something that easily transferred. I tend to use a soft light to be pencils because I like a light line when I'm painting. I don't want this dark, heavy line there, so when we're transferring this, it's going to be liked. I warn you ahead of time. So then What you do is you retrace your shapes just like that, You can Scotch tape the drawing to the paper. If you're afraid it's gonna move. Kind of have a line on some rough degree there. So take it out and you just trace your lines. You condone arc in the back even more than I did. I tend to not darken enough sometimes, so if you want to darken it more, go ahead. It makes the lines easier to trace. If you have a lot of detail darkened a lot this time. This drawing is very simple simply because I want to show you how, as opposed to actually doing a drawing. And so I kept it simple, so I don't need to transfer a lot of information. If I'm trying to transfer a very detailed kind of drawing, then I would really dark in the back a lot and work at getting it so dark that when I transfer all that little detail, it's going to come out usually. And here I'm just about done and I can at one more and then we will see what it looks like . Be careful not to let your drawing so here. I have the basic shapes These turned out like because I've been darkened my background very much, but I can retrace them. I have those basic shapes there now, and I could just retrace them. But again, I don't like dark lines, so I'm not going to retrace them very, very dark. So that's it. So do a drawing dark in the back and then trace it. And you have a very easy way to transfer that drawing. I could transfer this drawing 10 times, and it would be the same every time if I wanted to repeat an element in the painting. So have fun trying this out, and we'll see you in the next video. 15. Basics conclusion: thank you for taking my class. I hope you're a little more knowledgeable than you were. And I hope that all your art making brings you lots of joy. It certainly has brought me a lot of joy. Here are a few examples of what I teach. I teach watercolor for beginners. I teach mixed media for beginners. So join me in my you Demi classes, All classes air for beginners who love art and who want to know more about art. And that's my basic premise. I love art, and I love teaching art. And I want to share my love of art with you. So join me in my classes and we'll see you in the next class.