Beginners Guide To Stock Market Chart Patterns and Technical Analysis | Steve Burnside, MBA | Skillshare

Playback Speed


  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x

Beginners Guide To Stock Market Chart Patterns and Technical Analysis

teacher avatar Steve Burnside, MBA

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

17 Lessons (32m)
    • 1. Introduction

      0:27
    • 2. What are the Lines Saying?

      3:11
    • 3. Basic Trends | Up and Down

      1:33
    • 4. Uptrend Example

      3:57
    • 5. Downtrend Example

      1:23
    • 6. Reversal Patterns | Head and Shoulders

      4:11
    • 7. Head and Shoulders Example

      2:25
    • 8. Reverse Head and Shoulders Example

      1:44
    • 9. Continuation Patterns | Bull Flags

      1:57
    • 10. Bull Flag Example

      1:47
    • 11. Continuation Patterns | Bear Flags

      0:33
    • 12. Bear Flag Example

      1:51
    • 13. ABCD

      1:44
    • 14. ABCD Example

      1:11
    • 15. ABCD Example 2

      2:02
    • 16. Final Thoughts

      1:15
    • 17. Final Thoughts

      1:15
  • --
  • Beginner level
  • Intermediate level
  • Advanced level
  • All levels
  • Beg/Int level
  • Int/Adv level

Community Generated

The level is determined by a majority opinion of students who have reviewed this class. The teacher's recommendation is shown until at least 5 student responses are collected.

165

Students

--

Projects

About This Class

"The best part about this course is you will have a real working knowledge that you can put into action today!"

Do you want a great system that tells you when to buy or sell stock...

Well, that is exactly what stock patters (or technical Analysis if you want to use the fancy name

Meet Your Teacher

Class Ratings

Expectations Met?
  • Exceeded!
    0%
  • Yes
    0%
  • Somewhat
    0%
  • Not really
    0%
Reviews Archive

In October 2018, we updated our review system to improve the way we collect feedback. Below are the reviews written before that update.

Why Join Skillshare?

Take award-winning Skillshare Original Classes

Each class has short lessons, hands-on projects

Your membership supports Skillshare teachers

Learn From Anywhere

Take classes on the go with the Skillshare app. Stream or download to watch on the plane, the subway, or wherever you learn best.

Transcripts

1. Introduction: If you're ready to start building an understanding of how to read chart patterns, then this course is for you. During this course I'm going to give you seven essential chart patterns. So you can read stock charts. Now a great time to buy, a great time to sell and start having more confidence in your stock trading. My name's Steve. I'm going to be your instructor for this course. I'm going to try to get all of that to you in less than 30 minutes so we don't have any time to waste. Let's get started. 2. What are the Lines Saying?: So the first thing we have to talk about is what are the lines saying? You see this little chart I have in the bottom right-hand corner. It looks like there's a lot going on there, but there's really just two forces acting in. Each, are opposing each other. It's called supply and demand. So regardless of what market you're in, you might be at the grocery store, you might be at the toy store, you might be at the stock market. Supply and demand are the two things that impact price. Now supply and demand can change because a news story breaks or a CEO leaves, or some other factor happens. But what actually happens is supply and demand change. So what these lines are saying, all of these lines, all they're saying is, is there more supply or is there more demand? And as a price of a stock goes up, there's more demand. And as the price goes down, there's more supply. Now think about that. Think about Valentine's Day, February 14th, if you sell roses, What Is there a ton of on February 14th? That's right. Demand. There's a ton of demand for roses. Roses self for more expensive on that day of the year than any other day of the year. And the reason for that is because the demand is high. Now what happens to the price of roses on February 15th? They go down. Why is that? That's because demand has come down and there's more supply in the market. There's more supply than demand, so the price comes down. Well, the same thing applies to the stock market as we see here, right here at the bottom. There's gonna be more supply in it, bringing the price down. But then it hits a point where supply and demand kind of counterbalance each other. And then demand for that increases so the price goes up. That is all that the stock charts are telling you and the patterns that I'm going to show you today, the seven essential patterns are really ways for us to understand supply and demand in the market. So we can have an educated guess as to whether or not we think the price is gonna go up or down because there's going to be more supply or more demand on that specific stock. Now something else I want to just mention here, since we're here, as you can see, when a stock comes down, it hits a point where it goes back up. That point is called support. There's a point of support as a stock goes down. And that point of support is where demand and supply and demand kinda, once again counterbalance and then the price starts going back up. And then at the top side of it, it's resistance. So as the price goes up, there's a price where it gets too high and then resistance comes in. People start selling, so more supply comes into the market and then the price then goes down. So supply-demand, support and resistance, okay, that's what the lines are saying. Then we're gonna get right into the seven essential patterns. 3. Basic Trends | Up and Down: Alright, first let's talk about the two most common trends, the two basic trends and probably the two most profitable trend you'll ever heard about. You'll learn probably overtime or my opinion is that the more complicated we make the stock market, the less money we make in the simpler you make it, the easier it is to make money. But that's just my own personal opinion. But let's talk about the two basic trends, which are just up trends and down trends. Now these up trends and down trends are pretty obvious, but I want to talk about a couple elements of them. So in an up trend, it would look like this. And an up trend we're going to define as a series of higher lows. Okay? So that means this low right here, this low right here, see how all of these are higher. The definition of a downtrend then is the exact opposite, right? It's going to be a series of lower highs. So we're going to have that. Okay? And then we're going to have this series of lower highs, okay? And once again, we're not paying attention and we were paying attention to the price action. But if these lows aren't exactly lining up, that's okay as long as the high continuing to be lower than we're going to call that a downtrend. Okay, let's take a couple really looks at some real life examples. 4. Uptrend Example: So let's go ahead and take a look at a stock chart of Tesla. And at this point before we get started in really analyzing this chart, I just wanna say reading stock charts and understanding trends and understanding stock patterns. It's an art and a science. If all of them were always as clean as the AP trends and downturn that I drew for you on the slide before, then everybody would make a million dollars at this, but it's not that that definitive. And so there's a little wiggle room often that you have to give yourself. That's where really you're understanding your risk profile and risk tolerance and being able to set what are called stop limits or stop orders on your trades is gonna be really important. And I'm going to show you what I mean by that here in a second. So as I look at this sock and Tesla, or this chart of Tesla, here's what I see as the upturned. I see a low right here. I see a higher low, high, low, high, low, high or low. And we have a higher low here. And then you see we end up with a lower low right here. So that is where this point right here is where the pattern gets broken. Okay? It's obviously a lower low. It's it's pretty aggressive. The high doesn't get back up. There's another load that comes down. Now you might be saying to me, Steve, I kinda see something right here and right here, that could be the same thing in that's true. And that's where the art and the science comes in, and that's where your risk tolerance comes in. So I want to just say real quick that something like if we look at this little dip right here, often if I've bought Tesla right here and it's going up, I might have a stop order that is right about at the line right below where I bought it. So if I have that stopped ordering because that's where my risk tolerance is. This little dip right here is actually not going to trigger an order for me to sell. So I can actually keep writing that out. Now, as the stock price goes up, I want to move where I would sell the stock cuz I don't want to give back my gains, right? I don't want to give back the money I've already made. So at this point, at this high, I'm probably have the limit halfway through this up. So like right about here is where I'm going to have a stop order in to sell if it comes back down to that price, which is y over here, my price gets triggered. The trend ends no longer in an up trend. So that up trend, what I wanted to show you here, and I don't wanna get too, I don't wanna get too complicated here. I just want you to understand it's not always as clean as there is always an up, then down, then up then a down. It really is about you making sure you know where you would sell if the, if the if the stock went the other direction, right. So if we bought it right here, and then it went down and said here, then we would sell it right here. And we already know that price ahead of time. We know that price before we put in order in. But what happened is because there were little bumps, you're going to see those little bumps and then we're going to still have a series of higher highs confirming the AP trend. So you do have to assess your risk tolerance when you're doing this. There are definitely some cleaner charts out there for AP trends. And I hope that you put some of those in the project section of this course. But I wanted to show you this one because I wanted to show you that it was, it's not always as definitive. There can be some little blips and blips there and that you have to be able to set and assess how low you're willing for the price to go before you sell on a stop order. In something like this, as the price goes up, you're going to want to adjust that stop order along with it. Okay. That's your basic up trend was an extra bonus information there. Let's go ahead and look at a downtrend. 5. Downtrend Example: Alright, so let's do a downtrend with the same stock with Tesla. And so we have a high right here. We have a high right here, we have a high right here. And you can see that's a series of lower highs. Then we have some consolidation. This is kinda interesting. You get some consolidation there and then you have another lower high right there. And then right here where you have a high that's higher than a high that's high or that's where that trend gets defeated if you will. And so once again, the reason I wanted to show you this stock is that it's not always, when you look at a downtrend, it doesn't always just look like this. If you look at the stock chart of Tesla, you can see there's a down and an over and kind of a down. So, but there's never a point where the trend gets defeated until we're over here on the right side, right? As long as we're over here on the left side, all of this over here, we'll call it all of that over there is confirming the downtrend, right? There's nothing that's show is showing us a higher high. It might almost get to the last high, but as long as it doesn't defeat it, then you're okay and it's gonna key and then it keeps going down. So with that, that is a chart of a basic downtrend. Once again, I'm excited to see what charts you put in the project section so we can have conversations around them. And with that, let's get in to our next patterns. 6. Reversal Patterns | Head and Shoulders: So the next two patterns we're going to look at are called reversal pattern. So these patterns give us an indication that a current trend might be defeated and it might start going the other direction. So the first one we're going to look at is a Head and Shoulders pattern. And the second one we're going to look at is a reverse Head and Shoulders trying to keep it easy for you here. We don't need a whole bunch of different names. And a Head and Shoulders pattern is a pattern that's indicating an up trend is going to turn into a downtrend. So what that looks like is you're going to have something come up, down. Okay? And so essentially what you have here, you see you have a head right here and then two shoulders. And we'll actually let's do the shoulders like this. So we can just mark them a little bit different for you. Right here and right here. Okay? And so what this is essentially saying, what you're seeing here is you're seeing an up trend. It gets to a point where there's the supply right, outweighs the demand. So it comes back down. It tries to make a push up against. So we're still looking like we're in an up trend, right? So we're lower, ha, high or low, right here, coming back up, then it comes back down. And then this low is going to be right about at the level of the previous low. It's gonna go up again. This high right here is going to be lower than the head high, right, the right shoulder lower than the head. And then it's going to start going down. Now, this pattern is confirmed when it, when it breaks through the price of that dip right there, right? So once it breaks through that, we know we're now having lower lows, right? So if this ended up going down, that's a, let's draw this out a little bit further down here so you can kind of see exactly what I'm talking about. So you have down, it tries to get back up, comes down. And so now what you see here is now you're having a series of lower lows starting with that kinda right shoulder dip right there. So the reason why the Head and Shoulders is so so prevalent and it works so well, is because it's, it's a signal, it's all of this. The whole thing is a pattern of a battle of supply and demand back and forth. That demand is, is trying to overtake supply, but it can't win, and eventually supply wins out and the price starts going back down. Now, the reverse Head and Shoulders is the exact opposite. It's a reversal patterns in a downtrend is about to turn into an up trend. And so let's take a look at what that would look like. So now we have the two shoulders here. You see that? You see the head right here. And this would be once again in a downtrend, right? It would be coming down here and then it would hit support. That would be the left shoulder. Go backup, break through that support down to a lower low. So it still looks like we're in that downtrend. Come back up, be right about the same price. Now in these Head and Shoulders, you'll see these prices in real life. It could easily look something like this. Like we're, this price is, is a little bit higher. But once again, what we're doing is we're trying to confirm the AP trend or the downtrend. So that goes up, comes back down. The next price on that, on that right shoulder is now higher then the previous low, right? Confirming or not. Kinda saying, hey, it looks like this applied demand could be shifting here. And then it's going to start going back up. And then once again, once that price gets past that shoulder, then you're going to have a confirmed pattern and most likely a reversal. So that is the head and shoulders and the reverse Head and Shoulders. Let's go ahead and take a look at some real life examples here. 7. Head and Shoulders Example: Well, here is a chart of Starbucks. And remember when I told you this Head and Shoulders patterns don't often look super, super clean. Well, this one I chose specifically because it's not very clean. And I had just went, but I just want to show you how the supply-demand element is working here. So in this one we have kind of an interesting Head and Shoulders. So we have a kind of a shoulder over here, a head right here, and a shoulder right here. Once again, it's a little lopsided. The right shoulders definitely higher up than the left shoulder. But the same theories and philosophies are applying here, which is why I want you to see this when you're on the lookout for it. So we have the shoulder, we haven't a definitive up trend here. That comes down forms a support, comes up to the head, comes down, hits support, goes up, comes down, breaks through support. And then kinda has a little here and then it's just, just down, down like crazy, right? And so that's why this works. Now, if you bought the stock or viewer waning to sell the stock or concerned about, you know, you bought it back here and it's going up, going up at this point right here is where you would sell because this is the confirmed downtrend right there. And so at that point, the reason why this happens, right, is a bunch of supply comes in because people over here, all these people bought, right? All of the prices over here, people bought the stock. So it's going up, going up, going up. People are happy as it comes down, as it continues to go down, more and more people are logging into their accounts or, you know, starting to put more supply into the market because now they're almost at a losing proposition, right? If they bought it back here, if it gets back to the regular price over here, they would have given away all of the gains that they could have had. And so more supply comes into the market, which is what turns it into a downtrend. Once again, these patterns are all about recognizing when that supply demand shift is about to happen. And that's why the Head and Shoulders works like that, is because the supply, the demand and the supply are changing at the head and shoulders part. And then you can see where supply just takes over and it's down, down, down, down. Alright, now let's go ahead and take a look at a reverse Head and Shoulders, which is taking a downtrend and turning it into an up trend. 8. Reverse Head and Shoulders Example: All right, so let's look at a reverse Head and Shoulders on a chart of Starbucks. So on the left-hand side you can see an obvious downtrend happening right here. Down, down, down, down. Comes up, comes down, makes another lower, low, comes up, makes a higher low right here. So what we have here is we have the head and then we have the shoulder and the shoulder. Let me clean this up a little bit so you can see this a little bit better. So you have the head right here, shoulder one shoulder to now once again, this is confirmed when it breaks past this point. So we have shoulder too. It's going up going up. Now it hits a piece of consolidation here. And then just is off to the races. This consolidation we could actually call a bowl flag, which we're going to learn here about momentarily. And so when you see that, you'll see that there's a flag handle right there, some consolidation and then it's off to the races. So this could be a reverse Head and Shoulders into a bowl flag. And then you're just making a bunch of money. So there you go. I do want to point out, you know, you have this one kinda candlestick that got kinda crazy right there. That's why this is an art, not a science. You're gonna have stuff like that all the time. You have to have enough conviction that you are in a certain type of pattern. Now you wouldn't buy over here based on the fact that this is a reverse head and shoulders, you would wait til right here. Most likely Azure by point, right once it confirms that it's a reverse Head and Shoulders. But I just did want to point that out because you're going to have that that's part of trading and you're going to have to be able to overcome that. And I'm sure you can. With that, let's take a look at our trend continuation patterns, which are bear and bull flags. 9. Continuation Patterns | Bull Flags: All right, so let's take a look at our bowl flags. And a bowl flag is essentially a pattern that's going to tell us that an up trend will continue. So we have an up trend and then we have this consolidation. This consolidation is what makes it a bowl flag because the consolidation, once again, supply and me and think about that consolidation as supply and demand, just wrestling back and forth with each other trying to figure out who's going to win. And then eventually the demand side wins out and it's going to break out to the upside because demand is winning. And so we have this up trend, consolidation and it continues to go up. And the reason they call this a flag is because you have an up, which is the flagpole, consolidation, which is the flag and then the breakout. So if we zoom in on that a little bit, if we have that consolidation and then the breakout, What I want to note a couple things so that consolidation, the trend is not confirmed until it breaks out of those lines, the, the support and resistance lines of that consolidation. The other nice thing is once it breaks out and say you buy it right here, well then you have an obvious place to put a stop order in if it goes down past that line again, right. So if you bought it, you say this line is indicated at $35. Say you bought it at $36 because you thought it was going to go up or you can put a stop limit order in for say, 3450, something like that, right at that line. Because if that line, if our trend goes up and then comes back down and breaks through our, our resistance line. And breaking through that resistance line is what created the bowl flag. Then we know that the pattern that we're looking at, the we're looking to trade is not confirmed. So that's a bowl flag. 10. Bull Flag Example: So we're gonna go back to our trusty friend, Starbucks here and look at a bowl flag here in this chart. And so what we have is a series of higher lows right here. So we have a definitely a confirmed little up trend right there. Super nice. Then what we have is an area of consolidation right here. And you can see it breaks out of that consolidation and continues to run higher my guesses with this gap and I haven't looked at the specific date, but you can see that there's definitely a little gap there. My guess is this is kind of a run up then Consolidated because of probably an earnings call, something like that. Earnings come out, we get a nice little pop and then it's off to the races after that. So from this point, once it pops up, you know your past that point of resistance and you're off to the races and now you can see up trend consolidation and there's our flag. Now, I will say the, the more, the more it looks like an arrow, the more the pennant looks like an arrow. It means that the price action in that stock is getting tighter and tighter every day, you will often have a more aggressive move. The more, more, the tighter the arrow is. In this, you can see the one that we just did for Starbucks here. There's not much of an arrow there. It's pretty, it's more rectangular than it is arrow. But you'll see the more arrow you get, the more move you're going to have one side or the other often. And so because there's pent up that the supply demand battle is getting so intense. You can just imagine there in the ring fighting it out. And finally somebody wins and off it goes. So there you go. There's bowl flags. Let's take a look at bare flags. 11. Continuation Patterns | Bear Flags: So a bare flag is going to tell us that the downtrend is going to continue. So once again, you have a downtrend and then you have some consolidation. And then it's going to come back down again. We have our lower lower than we have our area of consolidation. And then it breaks out to the downside. And you can see that flag right there. We don't have to get too deep into this because it's exactly the opposite of a bowl flag. And you can see that that flag, and then it jumps lower to the bottom. And with that, let's take a look at a real-life example of a bear flag. 12. Bear Flag Example: And I wanted to show you this chart at Disney because I wanna make a point on this one, which is, there's nothing that says how long a downtrend has to be or how long consolidation has to be until a move can take place. And so a lot of times people are looking for moves that are confirmed over very, very long period of time well, in the dynamic oddness of the current market and with computer trading and technology, a lot of these moves are happening a lot faster. So it's worth just looking at this chart. I don't know if this what I'm seeing here, I probably wouldn't trade off of it, but I wanted to at least show it to you just to show you that you can find these, these different patterns in very consolidated timeframes. So what we have here is Disney. And you can see here we have a little downtrend right here. And it consolidates over and then breaks down. And then you can see that that makes our flag right there. And then you would know that the flag is confirmed because it broke past that bottom support level. And then it's going to reverse here, down here at the bottom. But this bowl or, I'm sorry, this bear flag definitely took it for a ride for quite a few points there. So I'd love to see in the project section some more bare flags that you find on charts. Now bear flag is important because if you hold a stock, if you're holding a stock for the long term or swing trading stock, you might want to sell stock that you hold at that point and buy it back at a lower level. There's no reason why you can't take the profits you have in it and then get back into it when it's at a lower level. That's something that I use these bare flags for stocks that I own. So with that, let's go ahead and jump into the next lesson. 13. ABCD: Alright, now we're going to look at the a, B, C, D pattern. This is an awesome pattern. And if you find it, it often is very, very reliable. And it looks like this. You have a spike comes down. And what we essentially have, and maybe I'll make this a little lower just because just to give you a little more impact there. So what we'll do here is we have a, right here, we have B, C, and D. And so what a is, a is the initial, the initial move up in the stock. It's gonna come down to B, which is gonna find support. It's gonna go up. Often, this move will not be as high as a and it'll be a little bit lower. Comes back down, hits support again, but support is a little bit higher, right? So we're making a higher, high and then it goes up from there. This is an ABC pattern when it breaks the price of that a spike. So say there's a spike is $50 once the stock price gets backup, and this line is 50. That's when this pattern has been confirmed. And then you can know, okay, great. And it looks like it's gonna go up. I'll buy it here. And then once it's going up, then you'll know that 50 is your stop. If it goes back down below 50, the pattern has been broken. So you can buy it here. 51, put a limit in for 4950 because you want to give it a little wiggle room. And then you're defining your risk as well as taking advantage of a pattern that ABCD pattern. Let's see this in real life. 14. ABCD Example: And here we are with Apple, one of my favorite stocks like so many other people. And let's take a look at the a, B, C, D pattern in this stock. Also a little bit of a bowl flag that will find here also. But as we're looking at it, kinda up trend here, we have the spike right here. It comes down to B, comes back down to C. And then we can see a is right about there. It's going to break up. Then we're going to have some consolidation right here. And it's going to come up right there. So d is kinda what's called this section D here. Although you could also look at this as a, B, C, bowl flag D if you wanted to, because you can see we have the, the pole of the flag there and then it breaks out. So almost two patterns right there that are confirming that Apple is going to go up in price, which is something that you love to see. You love to see when you can get multiple patterns confirming the same direction. So there you go. There's an ABCD. Once again, we'd love to see charts that you're finding of this in the project section. So we can all see more, have more examples and learn together. 15. ABCD Example 2: I also thought it would be worth showing you this chart. This chart is of Coca-Cola. This is a very, very recent chart. And for full disclosure, I have recently purchased Coca-Cola based on some of the price movement that I've seen. But I want to show you this once again, remember we talked about there doesn't have to be a timeframe to confirm these moves. And so I want to show you a really small ABCD pattern that I'm seeing in this, once in this chart that you're seeing right now, I don't have any more information than this. The next the next open stock Day will give us some more information. So I just wanted to show you what I'm seeing, how I'm trading this and what I'm hoping happens with Coca-Cola. Right here. We have this move higher, that's creating the a, it's coming down. We have the b right here, up, back down. See this is actually a higher, a higher low. And you can see it's going up and it's already broken through that a section. And so what I'm hoping happens here with this ABCD move is that coke sees again this high over here or close to it, that has like 60 bucks, $0.$60. And so even if it got up to 5856, I would be happy with that. But you can see that a, b, c, d move is right there. And hopefully we see coke go higher. And with that, I just wanted to show you really a really small pattern there. Now, I have really a great risk profile here because I know I can put a stop-loss order right at a which on this chart specifically is right around, let's call it 50 bucks. It's 510 for right now on this chart. So I could put a limit stop limit order in at $50. And if that order hits 50, then it would just sell. And so I can hold onto Coke for as long as it doesn't hit 50 and it hits 50, it would sell because I'm going to make an assumption that the trend has reversed and then I might be able to get it at less than $50. So there you go. There's another example of ABCD. 16. Final Thoughts: So there you go. There the seven essential chart patterns that you need to know for the stock market. And I wanted to give you just a couple of final thoughts. And my final thoughts really revolve around cooking. Here's a picture of my son cooking some mac and cheese. And just like cooking where the first time you cook a steak, it's not perfect. The first time you make a cake, it's not perfect. It doesn't look like it came from the baker. It takes time to understand exactly what temperature and how long and how much salt do I put in? It's very similar with the stock market. You need to give yourself time to understand all these patterns, see them over and over again. So don't get frustrated. If you a trade on and you lose a little bit of money, it's going to happen. Nobody wins a 100% of the time in this. So give yourself time, do some paper trading words, not your money. It's just fake money to make sure you're seeing the charts correctly. And I do want to emphasize as a introduction to chart patterns. I just want you to know what charts are out there and why they work. I hope you do some more research on this chart patterns. And I really do hope to see you in another course soon with that, thanks again for taking the course and we'll talk to you soon. 17. Final Thoughts: So there you go. There the seven essential chart patterns that you need to know for the stock market. And I wanted to give you just a couple of final thoughts. And my final thoughts really revolve around cooking. Here's a picture of my son cooking some mac and cheese. And just like cooking where the first time you cook a steak, it's not perfect. The first time you make a cake, it's not perfect. It doesn't look like it came from the baker. It takes time to understand exactly what temperature and how long and how much salt do I put in? It's very similar with the stock market. You need to give yourself time to understand all these patterns, see them over and over again. So don't get frustrated. If you a trade on and you lose a little bit of money, it's going to happen. Nobody wins a 100% of the time in this. So give yourself time, do some paper trading words, not your money. It's just fake money to make sure you're seeing the charts correctly. And I do want to emphasize as a introduction to chart patterns. I just want you to know what charts are out there and why they work. I hope you do some more research on this chart patterns. And I really do hope to see you in another course soon with that, thanks again for taking the course and we'll talk to you soon.