Beginner Violin Class - VIOLIN MASTERY FROM THE BEGINNING - Beginner Violin Lessons | Lesson Pros | Skillshare

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Beginner Violin Class - VIOLIN MASTERY FROM THE BEGINNING - Beginner Violin Lessons

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

108 Lessons (12h 10m)
    • 1. Promo Video For Violin

      1:21
    • 2. Introduction Your Violin Instructor

      0:12
    • 3. Introduction to the Violin Bow

      4:49
    • 4. How to hold the Violin Bow

      6:46
    • 5. Holding the Violin Bow Exercise

      1:08
    • 6. Example of Violin Bow Hold vs Fiddle Bow Hold

      0:48
    • 7. Introducing Rosin and How To Use It

      6:00
    • 8. Holding the Violin

      5:06
    • 9. How to Hold the Violin Part 2

      3:39
    • 10. How to attach a Shoulder Rest

      5:13
    • 11. Violin Shoulder Rest Part 2

      3:30
    • 12. Working with the Violin Bow

      16:48
    • 13. Tuning the Violin 101

      10:24
    • 14. Tuning the E String, E Note on the Violin

      1:38
    • 15. Tuning the A String, A Note on the Violin

      1:15
    • 16. Tuning the D String, D Note on the Violin

      1:24
    • 17. Tuning the G String, G Note on the Violin

      1:20
    • 18. Tips On Tuning the Violin

      5:31
    • 19. Pre Scales Exercise 1 for your Violin

      7:51
    • 20. Notes for Pre Scale Ex 2 for Folks able to read notes

      0:13
    • 21. Pre Scale Exercise 2 for your Violin

      4:01
    • 22. Notes for Pre Scale Ex 3 for Folks able to read notes

      0:13
    • 23. Pre Scale Exercise 3 for your Violin

      3:46
    • 24. Notes for Pre Scale Ex 4 for Folks able to read notes

      0:13
    • 25. Pre Scale Exercise 4 for your Violin

      2:33
    • 26. Notes for Pre Scale Ex 5 for Folks able to read notes

      0:13
    • 27. Pre Scale Exercise 5 for your Violin

      5:05
    • 28. Notes for Pre Scale Ex 6 for Folks able to read notes

      0:13
    • 29. Pre Scale Exercise 6 for your Violin

      4:03
    • 30. Wrist Form with Partial Scale on the Violin

      4:42
    • 31. Full A Scale on the Violin with Exercise

      5:06
    • 32. Syncing up your Fingers and Violin Bow

      2:15
    • 33. D Scale on the Violin with Exercise

      5:02
    • 34. G Scale on the Violin with Exercise

      4:44
    • 35. Finger Terminology with High 2, Low 2 Exercises Violin

      2:30
    • 36. 2nd Octave G Scale with Exercise Violin

      7:36
    • 37. 1st and 2nd Octave G Scale together with Exercise Violin

      4:08
    • 38. Full Length Violin Bow Exercise Gaining Speed and Cleanliness

      6:59
    • 39. Violin Bow Control Exercise

      7:17
    • 40. Introducing Slurs on the Violin

      10:38
    • 41. Reading Music 101 Violin

      3:50
    • 42. Finding your Open Strings on the Violin

      8:14
    • 43. Reading Music with Finger Placement on the E String Violin

      10:49
    • 44. Reading Music With Finger Placement On The A String Violin 50

      8:03
    • 45. Reading Music with Finger Placement on the D String Violin

      8:09
    • 46. Reading Music with Finger Placement on the G String Violin

      10:26
    • 47. Music 102, Keys, Series of Sharps and Accidentals Violin

      8:07
    • 48. Reading and Understanding the A Major Scale Violin

      8:00
    • 49. Understanding the Violin Fingerboard with the Chromatic Scale

      24:00
    • 50. Note Lengths with Examples for Violin

      6:28
    • 51. Note Length Exercises for Violin

      5:52
    • 52. First Line Of Twinkle Twinkle On Violin Explained + Example + Exercise + Pdf 1

      10:38
    • 53. Second Line Twinkle Twinkle On Violin Explained + Example + And Exercise + Pdf 2

      5:42
    • 54. Putting It All Together All Of Twinkle Twinkle Example + Exercise + Pdf 3

      4:27
    • 55. Using Drum Tracks With Twinkle Twinkle Little Star Example + Exercise For Violin 4

      4:05
    • 56. Lightly Row Explained + Example + Exercise For Violin 5

      10:48
    • 57. Song Of The Wind Explained + Example + Exercise For Violin 6

      16:03
    • 58. May Song And Dotted Notes Explained + Example + Exercise Fixed Lecture 59 7

      15:21
    • 59. Intro To Vibrato On The Violin 65

      14:38
    • 60. 50 BPM (Beats Per Minute) Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick

      10:12
    • 61. 55 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick

      10:07
    • 62. 60 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick

      10:09
    • 63. 65 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick

      10:06
    • 64. 70 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick

      10:05
    • 65. 75 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick

      10:04
    • 66. 80 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick

      10:03
    • 67. 85 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick

      10:04
    • 68. 90 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick

      10:12
    • 69. 95 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick

      10:03
    • 70. 100 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick

      10:03
    • 71. 105 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick

      10:03
    • 72. 110 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick

      10:33
    • 73. 115 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick

      10:06
    • 74. 120 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick

      10:04
    • 75. 125 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick

      10:06
    • 76. 130 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick

      10:04
    • 77. 135 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick

      10:05
    • 78. 140 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick

      10:04
    • 79. 145 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick

      10:06
    • 80. 150 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick

      10:06
    • 81. 155 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick

      10:04
    • 82. 160 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick

      10:04
    • 83. 165 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick

      10:03
    • 84. 50 Bpm (Beats Per Minute) Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      6:47
    • 85. 55 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      6:09
    • 86. 60 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      5:38
    • 87. 65 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      5:12
    • 88. 70 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      4:50
    • 89. 75 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      6:12
    • 90. 80 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      6:38
    • 91. 85 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      6:16
    • 92. 90 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      5:55
    • 93. 95 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      6:16
    • 94. 100 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      5:58
    • 95. 105 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      5:40
    • 96. 110 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      6:00
    • 97. 115 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      5:46
    • 98. 120 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      5:31
    • 99. 125 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      5:48
    • 100. 130 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      5:36
    • 101. 135 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      5:23
    • 102. 140 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      5:11
    • 103. 145 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      5:12
    • 104. 150 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      5:43
    • 105. 155 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      5:32
    • 106. 160 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat

      5:21
    • 107. 165 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat 1

      5:11
    • 108. Thank you for taking this Violin Class

      0:11
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About This Class

Beginner Violin Class - Start Violin from Scratch - The most In depth beginner violin classes available online.

Why take a violin course from this guy?

My passion is inspiring others to feel more confident in themselves  and their playing. I feel like playing violin can do that. After years of  performing and teaching all over the US. at workshops, out of my home and through multiple schools, I was asked by many of my students to make videos of my violin course.  So here is the result.

I hope you will join me on the inside of this violin class where you will learn some awesome violin secrets

Building a strong foundation:

  • For the beginner players who would like to learn and/or improve their violin skills
  • Learn your basics - I will teach you a shortcut way to play violin to make it easier to learn violin faster. Every Detail will be broken down and explained in easy to understand parts to help you succeed.
  • You will learn everything to get you started on the violin from start to learning how to play on your own.
  • You will learn all the violin scales you need to know
  • You will get backing tracks to be able to play along with to help develop your violin skills

Who is the target audience for this violin class?

  • Anyone interested in learning the violin
  • Anyone who wants to play violin for enjoyment
  • Anyone who wants to be a performer or a musician
  • Great for all ages

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Transcripts

1. Promo Video For Violin : My name is Chuck Millar and welcome to beginner violin lessons. This course offers a deep dive into fundamentals. The basics, and breaks down everything into nuances and small digestible parts for you, the student to be able to understand clearly and concisely what you need to be able to do to succeed as a violinist. This course offers everything you need to know from the very beginning to the very end. Reading music, playing music and time, playing with vibrato and feeling and in timing. In this course, you'll learn everything that I learned as a teacher for the last 20 years. Everything that I have offered to you in this course, what you've just found is the most comprehensive course found on the internet today on how to play the violin. So if you're ready and willing, let's go learn how to play the violin. 2. Introduction Your Violin Instructor: I'm so glad you decided to sign up for this course. My name's Chuck and I'll be your instructor. If you have any questions at all, just shoot me a message and I'll be glad to help. Thanks again and enjoy the course. 3. Introduction to the Violin Bow: The first thing we're going to learn about is our bow. So I have mine bow here and the different parts of the bow or the frog. The screw. Stick, the tip. Of course, the horse hair. And the part that we're going to look at first is the screw. And we're going to figure out how to operate it. Now, a screw is literally a screw. And what else is in charge of is making this fraud. This would piece here, get tighter or more loose. When I tighten this up or loosen it up and we'll make the horse hair get looser and more tight. You can see it in a quick fast motion. Loops here are more tight. Alright? So when I tighten this up all the way to see this horse hair slowly getting tighter. This is just pretty much how it works. And on the inside of your frog, you can see, once I get this out, the nut, this little guy right there. And just like there's a bolt and a nut. And the threads on the inside simply work like that on the inside. Now, depending on your age and your ability to manipulate these little things, you may not want to take this frog quite yet, but I'm just kind of showing you how it works. Before we get started and trying to hold the bow, we want to figure out how much tension we want to have on our bow or horse hair. When it's resting or I'm not playing the bow, I want to make sure that my horse hair is loosen it comes down and touches this fulcrum point of the stick. And that gets to loose. You can start to see the hair hanging down or draping over the stick. We're trying to do is we're trying to get the hair not to be up high are taught so that there's space in between here. But just low enough. Or it's touching the wood or in my case, carbon fiber. And when it's at that point, we know that we're ready to put aware bow or not played anymore. And the reason why we loosen up that horsehair is because your bot will have a tendency to warp one way or the other. If it's over time taught like that or has tension on the horse here. Okay. Now, how do I know how much tension that I want to have on my bow? Part of its feel. Because every bot is weighted a little bit differently and each row is a little bit different with the person who's repaired or put coarse hair on their bone. Now my pinky, the width of my pinky is about the width of space you want to have in between where the wood is and where the course here hands. Now, you can see that I'm putting my finger on the backside of the horse here, which is okay. But what you never wanna do is put your fingers on the part where you put the Rozin. We haven't discussed Rozin but the front-facing part of our horse here. So we have oil on our fingers and we just don't want to get it mixed up with that. The Rozin, which we'll learn about later. Ok, so let's get our bow tied enough so that we can put our pinky in-between the stick and the horse here. And then we're ready to hold the bowl. 4. How to hold the Violin Bow: Now that we've figured out some basic things about our bow, we want to do is we're going to figure out how to hold the thing. And this comes before we do the Rozin stuff. So and I'll show you that in a little bit. But what we're looking at is our frog. This would piece here. And you can see the little florida Lou on and you can see there that way, right? And the screw of course, which we're just going to be in play here. And we also see where the stick is. Right here. It's going to butt up against where this frog kinda comes out. So I'll put it up against my face. You can see it better. So see how it curls like this. So part of that frog where it meets and touches the stick of the bow is also where we're going to look at. So that's what we're gonna do first. We're gonna take our thumb and this is on our right hand. Hopefully you're right-handed player. And if you're left-handed, plane won't work very well for orchestras. But if you're a fiddle player are just wanting to learn on your own, definitely, you can get a left-handed violin. But for us right now, and we're going to take our right hand. And the only thing that we're gonna use, his thumb and where we're going to touch it is right here where the frog, just like we did before, the frog. The frog means the wood. So thumb touches right there. And notice I have my thumb. If it's faced towards use of Cs, you see yourself in the mirror. I'm going ahead of the bone. Some my thumb is more forward then where the Boas, some going in front of the strings. And then take my thumb and putting it where the frog meets the stick of the bone. So from this side it looks like this. From the side it looks like this. So from your perspective, that will look like this. Okay, so now that we have our thumb place, we're going to make sure that we're holding the bow. And in the middle part of the bell and doesn't have to be super in the middle of that can be a kind of anywhere in here. And we're going to hold the bow with our left hand. We're going to be careful that we don't touch the horse here. So we're just holding the stick of the bow. Then the thumb goes right there where the frog would part meets the stick. Okay. And then the rest of it. I'm going to explain this way. I teach an ergonomic style. There's a French style, there's a German style, and all sorts of different ways to hold your fingers. There's books on this. But what I like to do is I like to do what's comfortable for you. And if you're doing what's comfortable for you, generally, you're gonna do it right for you. So I'm gonna do, is we're going to have our fingers kinda reach over. And we're at the point where this knuckle as, so we have this knuckle that bends there and this knuckle that bends there. So we're looking at this knuckle right here, and on the opposite side of it. We're at. The knuckle. On the opposite side is I wanted to touch on the wood. Okay. So we're going to be careful that it doesn't ride on this knuckle, which is pretty common for beginners when they do this. But instead, we're going to try to touch it right on that knuckle on. So thumb is in place. The finger comes down and touches right underneath that knuckle on the wood. So that's their first step. Now, the next part that we're gonna do is we're going to have these other fingers kinda rest down here. And when we have a relaxed hand. So if you make a fist, it's all clenched up and you can see that there's no space in between my knuckles. But if I relax I hand you can see the space that exists between the fingers. And that's kinda what we're going for. And if I tensing up the other way, I can have two two-tenths of a hands and I'll have lots of space in between those fingers. And we're looking for is just relaxed, whatever that is for you. So it might be a little bit like this, might be a little bit like that depending on the shape of your hand, but make sure that you're my wrist is literally hanging, making my my risks is making my hand hang down from this point. And then the fingers are just being kind of deadweight. So the thumb fingers or deadweight, making sure that the knuckle underneath this knuckle touches the wood. Okay. And then after I do that and I still have this nice curl in my arrest because it's just hang in there. I'm gonna get my pinky to come up and touch some where where it's comfortable for you here. Sorry, you're not squeezing in and then you're not reaching rail far. But just where your pinky decides where it wants to go. Then you're gonna make sure that the knuckle is bent. So bent is opposite of stretching out the finger and pressing down hard. We wanna curl that knuckle and then just have the edge of the finger point downward straight on the violin bow. So again, step one. Thumb. Or the woodwinds, the frog. The frog is the wood part. The fingers curl around, touches underneath this knuckle. And then my pinky comes up and touches the wood part on the very top. And a curls around. 5. Holding the Violin Bow Exercise: After we're able to do this. And you can kinda see it back a little bit further. I can still have this curled risks. Well, we're gonna try to do is to make sure that we had right. And you may want to, depending on how comfortable you feel holding the bow at the very first couple of times. You may want to have a little help with your left hand. So what we're gonna do is we're gonna take this pinky and do push ups with it. Kinda when you're doing push ups like you're doing on the floor. Except it's going to be pushups with your pinky on the bow. So it looks like this. Pinky comes down straight, like we weren't supposed to do. And then it comes up and becomes curled and then straight and then curled and then straight and then curled. And it gets you used to have an curled Pinky. And it also helps you get used to the balance of your bone. So this is how we're going to hold our bow and just practice that. Get comfortable with it before we move on. 6. Example of Violin Bow Hold vs Fiddle Bow Hold: You'll notice in this video, after I've taught you how to hold the bow correctly, as far as classical is concerned, you might see me right up on my bow. In some demonstration purposes. This is a typical fiddle hold for a very heavy bow. And that is not a classical style. So if you see me writing up on the bow, you'll know why. So for right now, if you learn in classical music, you're back here where we have originally learned. If you're in playing fiddle music, kinda then it's going to be the gamut of where you can put your your hand, whatever feels comfortable for you. 7. Introducing Rosin and How To Use It: Let's discuss rosin, the kind of rise and that I use lead been seller. It's a German type of Rozin and this is what it looks like. Now, when you get here, Rozin, chances are stores aren't going to carry Levene's Zelda rosin, but you don't have to get Levene's other odds and you can get just about any kinda rosin. And you can kind of see that this has kind of a darker Amber. And the darker that your rosin is typically means that the more stickier it is, and the lighter the rise and the less to eat evidence. And what that means for you as a violin player is how gritty of a sound, how loud and gritty isn't going to be versus soft and fluffy sounds are soft and here he sounds. So darker, grittier and louder, which require someone to have a firmer grip and the faster boat or get a clean sound. And for those of us who are, might be beginners or having a little trouble with a speed on our bow. I might wanna go with a lighter color Rozin, which will really help with that. So when we use rosin on our bow, especially if you have a brand new bow, like a brand new one, you buy it online, you buy in a store and won't come with rosin on it. So if you try to draw it across your bow and won't make any sound and makes this weird whistling sound. So what we gotta do is we have to put rosin on her bow. Now, your bowl, if you take a look at it under a microscope, has these little teeth on it. And these little teeth will get the rosin hooked in them. So if you have a brand new Rozin block or a Rozin cake, chances are, it'll be very shiny at the top and you can see mine is broken in, coupled chips out of it, but it's not shiny eval, you can see parts of it are shine, but most of it is really subdued. That means you can sell it. I've broken it in. Well, when they're brand new, they're really shining. And sometimes if you get really inexpensive rosin or Rozin from China, It's hard to break the rise in because as it comes in on a boat from China or across the seas, typically the humidity will create a gloss over the top of the Rozin block and it makes it hard for you to break it in. So what we do with those types of Rozin blocks to break them in or the start to break in. We take like a coin and would just scuff up the top and then it makes it a lot easier to get into the rosin. So what we wanna do when we're starting our rosin block, I'm pretending that this is a brand new rosin block. Just to break it in, you simply start at the frog and go about four inches and go back and forth and put a fair amount of pressure on. You'll hear that mine has rosin on him because you hear if it didn't have brows and on it, it would make a kind of a, a wistfully sound, that moral. And once you started to get rosin on, eventually you would hear that. Now. You can see the difference in my bow. And I'm using this black bow for demonstration purposes. And because I like the sound of this black bow for the kind of music that I'd play. But you can definitely see where the rise and is on the bow and where it's not on the bow. So mine Bo has a fair amount of Rozin as it is. But when you breaking in a bow for the first time, pretending it's knew you'd go and little patches. And then for little patches. And then up the bot for little patches and up them buffalo patches. If you already have a ball that has rosin on it, you'll simply go from the frog without going in little patches all the way to the tip of the bow. And you can kind of hear that sound all the way through my bone. So you can already tell it and it has aroused. And so it really, at this point I'm putting way too much Rotterdam, Ivo. But that's okay. I'll just shake it off when it's done. Right? So the reason for this is we want to have even application of Roz and honorable. And you'll be able to hear when there's not enough are awesome because you're going to hear those wistfully spots or not the heart. Does it make sense? Ok, so and as you can kind of see on my bone now, it went from that black to this nice kind of wider your whiter part. Now, you can tell that's way too much Roz and right. So all I have to do is you can't see it on the video, but all I'm doing is whacking the bone on my on my leg was whacking the bow on my leg to get rid of the excess rosin. And then we get a good tone. Other instrument. 8. Holding the Violin: Alright, now we know how to hold the bow, we know the parts of the ball, we know how to rise and rubella. Now we have to figure out how to hold the violin. Now, on this part of our hand, on our left hand, where we hold up the violin. We're going to focus on is this part of our hand. And the part that we're looking at is the backside of this knuckle. So you can kinda see this crease that we have. And what we're going to focus on is this part of our hand right there. And where it's going to touch on our neck of our instrument. We're going to hold it kind of like a guitar at this point. So what's going to happen is you're going to hold your hand out on if you're right-handed, it'll feel opposite. Like you're left-handed person. You're left-handed person, you're trying to shake somebody's hand, right? So on the bottom part of your violin neck is wanting to meet up with this crazy part of your hand. So you're holding your handouts lightly sideways, like you're gonna shake somebody's hand. And simply, you're going to set your neck of your violin. And that little creeks. So that's the one. Okay. So the next step I have this shoulder rest is a wolf shoulder rest. But that doesn't make a whole lot of difference. Make it a lot of different shoulder rests. Kuhn is a great one. My recommendation is you don't get just Kuhn copies because they're not well built and you'll probably have to buy five or six of them before you realize that you have done should by a real Kuhn instead of a replacement because they'll break. So that's just my tip to you. I also like this wolf, which is a great product, but they also make lots of other ones that are also great. So it's not, not my recommendation to only buy this type of a shoulder rest, but it's gonna help you hold your inviolable. And we're going to discuss how to put one of those on in a little bit. But first steps first, holding the handout slightly tilted so that the thumb is pointed away from you, so not into your body, but a way, right? And then the net goes on the hand, so in the crease. And what we're gonna try to do is hold the violin right here on the opposite side of where the chin rest is, this black part. So we're going to have a good hold on it so it, so it doesn't fall down. Ok. Now the violin is gonna go in that crease. And then we're simply going to put it on our left shoulder and just set it up there. And now what happens with our other part of our hand? We're going to try to get it so that the palm is now face turn towards you. So you're going to try to see that if you were looking at it with your eyeballs, if there was text on your hand, you could read it. So it'd be faced kind of like a book towards you. So it goes down like a guitar is kind of easy to hold. And then it comes up on your left shoulder. And what's you're trying to have happen is you are trying to have it kind of beheld right there. Notice that my hand is at a little bit of an angle is not straight up and down, but as I add a little bit of an angle, and that angle helps the violin just kinda sit there without sliding down into the crevice of your thumb and your index finger. From the guitar position where the thumb is away from me, not in words, but away from you. And your wrist is nice and straight. What I mean by a straight wrist is if I were draw draw a line down here, it would be straight. So it wouldn't be a curved line, right? And from here, if I turn my head the other way, it should be a straight line, so it's not a curved line one way or the other. So straight arrest. So again, the violin is in that crease. I'm holding it kind of like a guitar and I'm calling it up to the camera for your reference. When it's back here, you're probably going to hold it in your lap, or a little bit farther down. Then the second step is the violin gets put. Because we're holding the violin with the opposite side of this black chin rest and it just simply goes up on her shoulder and we're trying not to let it fall down to that crevice. So give that a shot and see if you can try it a couple times. And your main goal is to hold it there without it falling. 9. How to Hold the Violin Part 2: Okay, this is part two of holding your violin. So we've discussed aware to kind of hold it on her hand, how to get it up to our shoulder and her left shoulder. There's a couple more really important points here to make this all happen and work correctly for you. And we're going to look at, on our violin, is that little black dot there. And really it's an end pin. And you can kinda see where it is on your violin. And sometimes they're black and sometimes they're brown or other colors, right? But it's that little guy right there and a sudden guide. We can use it as a guide to figure out where it is. And what we're going to try to do is we're going to line it up with her chin. Guy, your Adam's apple or the very middle part of your neck. So if it's pointed towards the middle part of your neck, you're in good shape where we fall apart or we have Trumbull is if it gets away from the middle part of our neck or to foreigners and is pointed away from RNA to, again, go too far. But now it's pointing towards the middle of our economics are pretty good. Now, the next thing that we wanna do is we want to have the angle of the violin. We had a 45-degree angle away from our bodies. So towards our left side, out and left. So if our violin is Restaurant in front of you, and then it's at a 90 degree angle, cut that in half. And it had a 45-degree angle. Halfway between straightforward and off to the side is 45 degrees. And that's kind of the angle that we want our violin to be at. Okay, so when we bring that violin up F, we have it in the crevice. We wanna make sure that that little button is pointed directly in the middle of our throat. And then our chin sits on this chin rest. Mean m different sizes of generous and shapes such as wherever it is, just in the debit part of our chin rest where chin goes. Now. Granted, I have one of these and I'll show you how to put that on later. But it helps me hold up this file and without it falling. Just kinda, kinda fun, right? So, so the next part is, this part here, helps me hold up the violin. But also when that, when you have that shoulder rest, it also helps you not have to feel like you're lifting up the bot so it doesn't fall when you go and you take down your hand. So again, having this button, we'll call it a button at the beginning, but it's really a nd pin holding it up. And then making sure your chin, It's about the same height as your scroll. So we're making sure that it's there all the time, so it's not too high. So you can kinda see that my scroll is about the same height as my eyes. And it's not June down too far, too low or it's down here are aware my neck is it's really kind of Chin, shin, and scroll at the same level for the height, making sure that my arrest and straight. I'm holding them that crevice. And our body isn't slumped over or just sitting up nice and straight shoulders back. And then we're good from there. 10. How to attach a Shoulder Rest: Okay, and we're going to learn how to put on a shoulder rest. Now, I can only describe it the way I have it with my shoulder rest, which is a wolf. And I'm going to show you what that signal that looks like and it's a little blurry on this side was a little Wolfe as WLS, ALL 40 Primo patented. This is for a four for size violin or full size because I'm an adult, I'm play a full size violin. And you can see that they have these little rubber feet. And these little rubber feet help protect the wood of your violin. Doesn't scratch it, which is great. And you can also see this isn't too blurry. There's a threaded kinda of a bolt action and not feature. So you can make your violin go higher on one side or lower on one side. So it kind of rests more aptly to your body because some folks have shoulders that slope more. Some folks have chests that kind of stick out so that the, the, it'll affect the angle of their violin. So what this does is it, it is able by adjusting that, by changing the angle so that it fits more comfortably to you on your shoulder. Okay, so let me put this back down. And so your violin looks like this where the chin rest is. Well, if you turn it over backwards, that chin rest is now on the bottom. So where it was on the top before? It's now on the bottom on the backside. So imagine that looks like this on your lap. So I'm sitting down on my lap. But for you on holding it up here, just so as you're looking down at your violin will look like this. With the chin rest on this side. When we're hooking in our shoulder rest, we're going to start on the chin rest side. So as it goes opposite or on the bottom part where the chin rest side goes. We're going to hook this site in first. And you can see that your violin has his little ridge, or most violins do. Well. You can kind of see that these feet are meant to go inside that ridge. So and this little part here is just kind of so that I can play electric violence. So don't worry about that for now. So it just simply gets set right on that ridge. So kinda looks like this from this edge. Now, where you want to have it put is for most folks, you're going to put this foot pretty close to the edge of this point. So it will go to the edge of the point. And on the other side. This shoulder rest is pretty flexible. But what we're gonna do instead of pulling it to get that flex, we're gonna start down. So like a clock, a clock army going to pull it down while holding your index finger and your middle finger on the other side where you've placed it on the violin. So it stays there, right? And now like a, like a clock arm, you're gonna pull it down so it's no longer on the violin. And then you're going to set it more that little ridges. And you're simply going to slide it around the violin. So the way that you look at it on your lap is you're going to hook the chin rest side. You're going to swing it down so that the feet are no longer touching the violin. And you're going to swing it up till it touches. And then slide it on your violin so that you're about halfway between this point and this point. So again, at a 45 degree angle, this is not always perfect for most folks. So sometimes depending on your your shoulder rests, size, or shape, it'll look more like this or more like this depending on what's comfortable to you. But this is a good place to start where the bottom part, where the shoulder rest is is close to this point. And the top part is at a 45 between this angle and this angle. At a 45. And there we have it. 11. Violin Shoulder Rest Part 2: Okay, this is the shoulder rest part two. It's going to be really important that you have a shoulder rest. There's lots of folks who don't play with shoulder rests. And, but I find for most beginners or people starting out for the first time, that a shoulder rest is one of your best friends? Because if I don't have my shoulder rest and I try to have my violin up and I tried to play it, and I hope I hold it were the button or that the mpeg is in here and my middle of my neck. And I'm holding it by that little part of the crease in my knuckle. I'm bringing it up. And I take my hand away. The violin kind of drops. And so what happens is I feel like most people feel like they have to hold the violin with their hand for to stop it from dropping. And that kinda gets in the way of you playing your instrument. Where if you had your shoulder s, Let me put it behind your shoulder as done and you're ready to play. And for some reason you needed this, flipped the page or do something with your hands. It's simply would just sit there and suspended in air because you have your shoulder rests on. So it's gonna be super important to get one if you don't have to have one, get one. Really, I'm a big fan of working with what works for you. So going into a shop, getting fitted for a shoulder arrest and the one that feels the best to you isn't a coun or a wolf. Shoulder rest. And that's the one you should get because it makes you feel the best. Once we have this up here, we're gonna get our crease and touch it to the bottom of the violin. And where we're going to touch it to on our neck of our violin is, do you see this little raised piece? Not so raise piece, the wooden Call and We're gonna go about one inch in. So about one inch in. And that's where our knuckle is going to be. So we're not going to make sure that it's not all the lip here, but not only that he wrote about a one inch thin. And once we have the 45-degree angle this way, so not forward, not a 90 degree angle this way, but halfway in between. And we had a heavy hand position. We should be holding our violin correctly. Now, if I back up, you can see that my, my elbow is dropped like a pendulum. So what I mean by appended onto the ever see a pendulum swing as total resting point is just straight down. And that's the same way that we want our L1 Ruby. So I wanna make sure that their elbow isn't curled in a snapshot out like a chicken leg, but it was just simply hanging down straight. Making sure that rest is nice and straight As that curl one way or the other. That's also not going one way or the other. Nice district this way. And now we're holding her violin correctly. 12. Working with the Violin Bow: Now that we know how to hold our bow and we know how to hold her violin. We need to know how to operate or about how to use the thing. How to, how to make our bow work so that our violin sounds good when we play it. So when we have our violent ready and we have our bow ready, we have to keep in mind where to place the bow on the violin and where we're gonna place it is somewhere in between where the bridge is. So these are some common components that we need to figure out. This is what we call the fingerboard here. And this is the bridge. Well, the fingerboard eventually runs out and it's just kind of hangs there where you see this part in the middle. And then here's the bridge of your violin. So we're going to be somewhere in between the point where the fingerboard ends and where the bridge is. So when you're using your bow across here, it kinda looks like this. Right? So we're not going to make sure that we're going to make sure that our bot isn't on top of the fingerboard. And it doesn't not gonna come up and touch this bridge. And I'm gonna show you a couple of examples of that. So when we're talking about when not to get too close to the bridge or not to get too close to the fingerboard. There's some reasons behind it and some pitfalls that we can fall into. And by just showing you what those are and can hopefully help you realize if you hear something that's going wrong, recognize what's happening, and then make a correction. So all I'm gonna do is play that a string or the second string. So these strings is the eastern, the little bitty string or can be called the first string and that's OK right now. And then the second string is the second biggest string or a string. The D-string is the third string and the port Stern is the big fat string. So I'm gonna play the second strand or the angstrom and just hear how it sounds. And you get a good solid sound out of that. If I get too close to the bridge, with my MOOC, move the bow wave evens out. And I'm going to get close to the bridge. And you get that Whistling sound again. So if you ever hear that Wesley sound or starts that doesn't quite sound, right? Chances are your bow is getting too close to the bridge. Same thing can happen if you move down lower past where the fingerboard is. When we start to change strings and we're not there yet changing strings, we're just playing one string. It can be really easy to hit other strings. Also, there is a difference in the tonality of the violin. So I'll give you an example of playing with your bot somewhere in the middle here. And I'll play what, the bow a little bit further down. Right? So when we have our ball in the proper position, it sounds better. We're gonna make sure that our bow is halfway in between the bridge and the fingerboard. And there's some different tone things that we can do as advanced player by getting a little closer to the bridge, in a little farther away, closer to the fingerboard. But for right now as a beginner player, we're gonna make sure that our Boas kinda halfway in-between. The next thing that we need to talk about is when we finally get our bow up to our strings, what part of the bow? And I'm going to try and use, it's really typical of a very beginner person to start out close to their frog. And this is typical because it feels like it feels as though we have more control over the bow at the very beginning. When your hand is closer to the strings versus being very far away from the strings. And it feels odd and you feel like you're out of control. But what we're gonna do instead is with our bone, we're going to make sure that we're in that middle part of our bone. So this is going to be the mid part of our bow right here. Once I find the midpoint of my bone right about there. And I take the tip of my bot, which is right there and I scoot my fingers and both of them at the same time. Once I have about six inches on either side, this is the going to be the beginning point of my bone and the endpoint of my bot. So when I'm using it on the strings, pretend my, my finger is where the string is. There's going to be from right about there, right about there. So we're really close to the tip. Right? So going back and forth between about six inches on the bow, and that's where we start. The reason why we use this part of the bone is because it's the easiest for a beginner to get a good sound right? Now. If we start with our bowl, add kinda where the frog is. It can Son really gritty if we don't move our bulk vast now. That's a horrible sound. Now, if we recognize we're getting some gritty sounds. And I'll show you an example. Besides this one. If I move my bow to slow at any point, even if I'm up here. It'll, it'll sound like this. That's not a good sound that we want to have. So how do I rectify this? And what I want to do to make a clean sound and not get that scratching sound is two things. Either I'm pressing too hard on the strings, which is a possibility, or moving the boat too slowly. Or it can be doing both of the things wrong. So I can have less pressure on the strings and I can move the boat faster. And now I don't hear that that grading the sound that we had anymore. We also talked about those whistles that we had only we're too close to the bridge. So here those things, we now we know how to correct them. So we're going to focus on about this point of the bulb. Set it on our strings somewhere halfway in-between the bridge and the fingerboard. And one of the drawbacks by being just simply a human being and trying to use your bone is you have this elbow thing and you have the shoulder thing. And when you work it from the elbow or the shoulder, it creates an arc. So from this point creates a an arc like motion from the point of my fingers to about down here where they meet again. And we want our boat to go straight. But how can we get it straight if we make this arc like emotion? When we use our boat for the first time, it's typical. That person holding the bot will want to use their shoulder like this. And notice how it's hard to see it in this video, but I'm keeping my elbow locked so it's not moving back and forth. So it's very typical. I would say it's good, 90% chance that the first time we try it, we're only going to move from the shoulder and that's not something we want to do. Instead, we want to move from our elbow, which we still have that arc motion. So I'm going to stop using my shoulder and now I'm going to use my elbow instead. I still have the arc motion, but I have less of an arc motion. See you in the big arc motion. And when I get into my elbow, I had less of an arc motion for my vote to be able to use. Right. So even if I had my bone, my hand, you can kind of see the arc motion that happens. So I am, looks like I'm, I'm swiping across the violin instead of burning it straight across. So we can do a lot of things to be able to resolve this one of this, one of the things that we can do is the use of our risk. And when we are at the very beginning of us playing, we're only using the small of a bot from this point to this point. So when you're ready, we're gonna do this together. And we're going to set the bow down right about there. It's going to be on the a string or the second strings have a little a string as the first string. The second string is the second string or a string. So we're going to set it down together. And I want you to specifically see my wrist and the angle of my wrist. So when it comes up, you can kind of see the rest bend upwards. So I have an angle here. This is the bend that we're looking at. And as I get the bow down, you can kinda see that my random forest is straightened out in this angle here. However, when you see it in real motion, you're not gonna see the hand move any different at an angle. It will follow the same angle as I go up and I go down. So it'll never wish wash back and forth that the hand is staying on the same plane. As I go up and down. And this helps correct the, the arc emotion that I hadn't before. Now, we're not using a big full bow like I'm showing, we're only using this little part of our bow yet. So we're going to try to, try to get that bone. And this is going to be a perfect exercise for you to do in front of mirror. So you're seeing just like I'm seeing myself in front of this monitor that I had. Actually this might my monitor and I can see myself and you're going to be in front of a mirror just like, just like I'm seeing myself. You want to be able to see yourself too, so that you can make sure that your bot is going in some crazy way. But instead it's going straight across the strings. Alright, so let's do this together and we're going to be on the, a string of the second string. And I'm going to start right there in my bow. And I'm gonna count to three to one. And we're going to play a violin for the first time. So it's three to one little bone. And that's it. And when he did that, now, it's OK at this point to have a slight delay. And what I mean by having a slight delay is o, check my teacher, I just saw him do it and then I'm going to rack, so check us. And then you go. That's a slight delay. So you're not doing it exactly at the same time as me. And that's totally okay. Now, we're going to have that o, we call it a down bow. And so if our bot is going towards the ground, we call it a down bow. And if my bot is going up towards the ceiling, it's called an up bow. Now I wanted to do a couple of downs again and we're going to reset the bones of down. And then I'm going to pick up the bone and reset it and do another down. And pick up the bone to reset it. I'm gonna do another down. Right? Now we're getting used to down bows. We're gonna do the same thing but for oppose. So I'm going to have my bow touched that a string or the second string. And now I'm going to go up towards the ceiling. Little bones. I pan up and I reset. And I'm one to play on. A string gets a three to one. And now we're playing a bows at the very beginning when we were doing this just as an exercise to just use our bow for the first time. Every time after this. For a while. We're going to try to never pick up our bow. And that's why we kinda do it at the beginning is to show you what it feels to pick up your bone. But after this, we're gonna do down bows followed by an up bow. But it's gonna be really important that the bone never gets lifted up off the strings. And what I mean by that is, let's say I do it down. I want to make sure that the boat doesn't come about the strings. When I go to do an up bow. And the same thing, I don't want the boat to come up off the strings like I'm showing you. And instead, we're going to bring our bone to a complete stop. Sounds stops there, but it's still setting on strings. And then I'm gonna do an ammonia. Comes to a complete stop, and I'm going to do another download. Now, when we're doing just this practice thing, we're just kinda feeling out or violin for the first time with her Bo, what we're going to try to do is we're going to try to up or down bows and oppose on every string. So the first string, ie the a string, second string, the D string, or the third string. And the big fat g string. Now when we're doing these different strings, There's going to be really important. And it's going to be a little bit differently later when we hold our bot. A slightly different, but for right now, our elbow is the thing that dictates what string you're bowling on. And we're thinking about it as the tip of our elbow. The tip of our elbow. If I bring the tip of my elbow upwards, I'm now playing a lower strain. If I bring the tip of my elbow downwards, I'm playing a higher sounding string, or an E string or a string. So the way we have to think about it is so that when we're playing one, we're playing notes on our violin. Strings on a violin, we wanna make sure that the angle over Bo doesn't dip down like this does. I went to hit multiple strings. Now instead we wanna make sure that our elbow stays at the same angle all the time when, when we're using our bulb. And that, that helps us stay on the same string all at the same time. So I'm going to use my D string this time. That's the third string. And notice this time my elbow isn't coming down or coming up, it's just staying on the same spot. I'm going to do the same thing but on my fourth string, and you're encouraged to do this with me. So when I go over to my G string that I want you to go ahead and try to play on. And notice when I do that, my elbow comes up higher in the air. So I'm announcing my fourth string, the big fat g string. And I'm gonna play that a couple times. Switch all the way over to my E string or the little bitty string, the first string. And from the fourth string, Notice how high my elbow is up in the air. I'm going to go all the way to my E string and see how far it had to come down to hit the E string. Now, take some time to start playing around with gesture strings without putting any fingers on the strings. If you find yourself holding the violin and you, your fingers are touching the strings, they won't be able to wring out. So just get them out of the way. Now, when we when I say Get him out of the way, that means they are not touching the strings. And you can hold your fingers up in the air if you'd like. They don't have to. They can just be wrestling, but just make sure they're not touching the strings. And you'll be good to go over next lesson. And I'll see you there. 13. Tuning the Violin 101: Alright, now that we have a couple of the basic first steps out of the way, we want to be able to play together. But in order to do that, we need to tune our instrument. And when we tuned our instrument, there's a couple of ways to do that. Typically, we have some sort of electronic tuner. Some of us use an app on our phone. And there's so many different apps to be able to download for free. There are some paid ones, but the free ones are just fine. Generally have an advertisement along with them. Some use electronic tuners. And you have to be really aware of the different types of tuners that are out there. Some are called chromatic tuners. And really those are the ones that we're looking for when we're looking for a violin tutor. And instead of a guitar tuner, even though they have some of the same strings, some of the frequencies that they use are one octave above or below, where we were using our violin tones at. So they become not reliable. So definitely if you're going to use a mechanical tuner, we're going to want to use a chromatic tuner. Some brands that I like our core GPA, intel it touch. In IntelliJ tuners. There's lot of other great ones like Sabine and Peterson makes a wonderful, wonderful tuner, although they're much more expensive. So this is going to be more on the lines of what's the mechanics of my violin and how do I actually tune it? And I'm gonna give you some tips and tricks on how to get it in tune with either the app on your phone that you download or mechanical tuner. So these are our tuning pegs. And some inexpensive violence have unencumbered tuners. And what that means on this side. And they're not flared out. To keep it in a better snug fit where there's just bored out with the peg fitting in there with a friction fit. And some more expensive violence have camber tuners which are easier to tune with your tuning pegs. And then some of us have these fine tuners. And what you can see here as it is, a couple of parks that we have here is the end tag, which was mentioned before. It gets tied in by these little nylon pieces. Sometimes gut sense is nylon. And then it gets to a tail piece. And in my particular violin that I have, the fine tuners or are these little knob things are built right into the tail piece. Okay. And some of them are not on the tail piece, but they're just little extensions that go fit right on the tuner, on the strings themselves. And they're right about there. This little thing that you see here is called a mute. The best, not a tuner. So. Please don't think of this as a tuner because it kind of looks one way back here. But as these little knobby things that we're looking at. So the idea is that if I use these to tune the tuning pegs, if I turn them, they change the pitch quite a lot and they went to work. So it changes it off for varying degrees. And if I use it, I'm going to want to make sure that I use it correctly. Because these next on violins don't have steel trusses in them like guitars doom. And because it is a friction fit, we're going to require ourselves to hold the other side of the neck as we as we tune. So me facing you, what I would do is I would actually put my hand on the neck and then push in and turn to tighten it up. And if I'm loosening at it, I'm just going to relax my hand and not push in and then let it let it relax as a untuned. So when I say to tune up, are tuned down. This peg is going to go clockwise to tune it up. So clockwise made look differently on your screen, but trust me, it's clockwise. Right? And if I don't push on it hard enough, it will just fall back in a spot. So that is why I need to put pressure inwards, inwards in the, on the peg so that it stays. So now you can kind of hear the tone without it dropping. So when I do that again, I'm just going to put pressure on and input. If I push too hard and you're gonna have to learn a little bit how hard to push. Because if he pushed you hardly can actually split the peg box. But it's pretty unlikely to put that much pressure on it that you'd actually split the peg box. Okay? Now even though this is an opportune quite yet, we're not going to worry about it quite yet for this video, because we're just going to show you how these work. And typically these, like I said, these, these tuning pegs use a lot of distance between the low note and the, AND these guys down here, these fine tuners are aptly named because they tune them finally, so if I have this number, I can turn this a little bit. And it barely can barely hear at home, but you can hear it coming up and pitch a little bit. Is the non-linear turned us NAB fast. So I turned it quite a bit. And the intonation changed a small amount. But when I use the tuning pegs themselves, they changed the fit quite a lot. So the generally the key is you're gonna get the tone. Just under the pitch. So this is an E. I'll get it right underneath him. And you're going to use your tuner, whatever tuna that you have and you're going to get under the pitch. So if this is e, it'll actually say little e up there. E. Alright. And then that tuner that there's going to have as bar that we use. So this would be flat. And then it's gonna come up just a bit underneath the tone that you want. And then you'd, you'd fine tune it from there. Some common problems that we, that we use when we use our tuning pegs entered, enter fine tuners. Is that these a screws is really what they are. They have limits to them. So if, if I tune this all the way, I kinda run out to limit now I can't what you're going to have a hard time seeing this where it is. But hopefully you can see that it's in all the way. So I can't turn it anymore. If I did, I don't want to force it because I can strip that screw just like any other screw, screw the kinds of distributed these stripped. So what I wanna do in that case, if I can't get it all the way up to e and I just have a little bit left to go. I want to back it off all the way. So turn it clockwise. Clockwise is to tighten it counterclockwise is to looseness and turning it counterclockwise till it goes all the way. And now you can see how much higher that screw is than the rest. Because I've, I've loosened it all the way. Now I'm ready to use my tuning peg to tune it up closer to where I wanted to be. And then I can find out the rest of the way now and now that I have a little extra room to go, Now I'm a little bit higher than what I need to be, but that's okay for right now. So however you choose to, to tune your instrument. If you don't have a smart phone to be able to download an app. Or if you don't have enough money to buy a mechanical tuner, you can use a pitch pipe, you can use a keyboard, some sort of a tone generator. Some people have other instruments that they can play these notes on. And the notes that we're using on the violin. Or as the littlest string is E, the second string, or is an a. The third string is a D, And the fourth string is a G. So we have E, a, D, and G, or I can use numbers and that's fine to 1234. In the next video, I'll be giving you an audio representation of your E, a, D, and G string for a really long time so that you can get your violin and pitch. And just in case you don't know how to use a mechanical tuner app on your phone. And I'll be giving you some tips and tricks on how to get it closer to the tone that I'm, I'm generating for you. So, see you in the next lesson. 14. Tuning the E String, E Note on the Violin: Hey, there, as promised, I'm going to play my violin with our big long note for each different note. In this video is going to be the E string. And the consequent videos are going to be E, then a, then D, then G. Even though in an orchestra setting we practice tuning to open a or a 440 is just going to make it easier transition to just go from the top to the bottom or to the bottom to the top. So we're going to start with this first string, any string. Here's your tuning note, ie, the first string. 15. Tuning the A String, A Note on the Violin: And here's your tuning note, the second string. In our next video, we're going to be tuning. 16. Tuning the D String, D Note on the Violin: Here's your tuning. In. Our next video will be tuning. In. Our next video will be tuning. 17. Tuning the G String, G Note on the Violin: Use your fourth string for tuning. Okay. 18. Tips On Tuning the Violin: Hey there again. I'm gonna give you some tips on how to tune your instrument. And the tuning device that I'm using is just despair phone that I have. And I am using app called G strings is a free app for Samsung devices, Android devices. So with that being said, I'm just going to be looking down at this device so you won't see me looking into the camera. But what I want to show you for this trick is a lot of people find it uncomfortable to tune at the beginning and they find themselves trying to hold instrument and tune it while they pluck a note. When we tune, we're really going to want to try to use our bow when we tend to have a good sustained, long note. When we pluck, when we tune, We have a couple of different tones that go on on and pluck. And I'm giving you an example. You can see that flash, it only read registers for a short period of time. And if for some devices that you're trying to use, it won't be long enough signal or a long enough tone for it to get an accurate reading. So we're gonna wanna user bow. And when we use our bow, what's going to happen as you want to be able to access these fine tuners. So at this point, we're assuming that you have it close to being in tune by using your tuning pegs. And now we're at that final spot where we want to use these fine tuners. So when I'm playing with my bot, I'm going to reach underneath so you can see that my arm is underneath this bot, right? So I'm gonna turn my palm of my hand face towards my face. So if it were a mere, I'd be looking at it and see myself and a reflection. And then I'm going to reach up and be able to turn these fine tuners. As my bot is going on underneath my, my hand is underneath my bow. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to get all of these out of tune just a little bit. And I'm going to tune them up for you while looking down and using my tuner. So there's a couple of things that you saw there. One is that when I was tuning, if I saw that I was really far away from a tone that I wanted to get to. I use these tuners and I move them really fast because they're fine tuners. They only tunes so much. And if that's the case, I can tune them quite a bit and get the job of tuning done faster rather than just turning it just a little bit at a time. And then when I finally get close to the note, the nice slow down and I finally, I use that fine tune as it's aptly named finally, so I get it just, just in tune. The other thing that you saw me do is after I went through and tuned all of the notes, I went back and tune them again. And the reason for that is these strings have tension on this neck that you see here. And in a lot of guitars or other instruments, there's this metal truss rod that's in there. And in violin specifically or fiddles. They don't have that trust routes. You're just relying on the strength of this wooden neck and the power or the joist here of your heel. And it's likely that what you have done a great job on tune in one of your strings on, will pull the other one or multiple strings out of tune at the same time. So to counteract that effect, I go through the strings and I tune them one by one. And then I go back and I tune them again. And if it's still pretty far off, I'll go into them again or even a fourth time there. So there's some tricks, Fourier, some tips and tricks, and hope you get your violin and tune. If you have any other questions about getting your violin and tune, there's multiple ways of doing it. But this is going to be the most effective and reach the largest audience for their delineation of how most people will tune their instruments. And we'll see you in the next lesson. 19. Pre Scales Exercise 1 for your Violin: Now that we have our instrument to and ready to go, we're going to take some small steps and do some small exercises to be able to get us ready to play our first Gail. So here's what we're gonna do. We're going to name our fingers first. And when I name my fingers, the thumb doesn't have a number. So I start as if I'm doing kid math and I go 1234. And after I count to four, I realize that those are the numbers of my fingers. So this is my first finger, second finger, third finger and the thumb. Thumb does not have a finger. The thumb does not have a number. Now, now that I know my fingers and I know my members of my strings, my littlest string is the littlest number 1234. Then we're kind of ready to go. So we're going to just do this exercise together. It's a pretty simple exercise. What we're gonna do is we're going to get our hands ready. And when we get our handwriting is going to look like this. Our fingers are going to be open. So as you're having your palm out when your fingers out. And what we're trying to get in touch with this part of our hand is read about here. And after we touched that part, we're going to do it again. And notice that I'm about 1.5 inch away from my NAT. Nat Does that shiny little raised piece of wood or there about a half an inch away from that nut. And after I touched that, so it's going to go away and then you touch it. And that's just that simple. So in other words, all we're gonna do is do it again and we're gonna do it together. I'm gonna say take your hand away as in one. And when I say two, it's going to come together and touch. So one is a way to touch, one as a way to as touch. So 1212121212121, 212. And then we have that exercises, a really great one to practice. And the reason why it's great to practice this exercise is for the first bit, as we began to play a violin or fiddle music or whatever it might be, we wanna make sure that that part of your hand touches your violin. Now that I have this part of my hand touching, and I've done my exercise a fair amount of times, I'm ready to move on to the next step. And that next step looks like this. Then I have my hand touching. I'm gonna curl my finger around. And after I curl my finger around, you're going to see that the finger is on setting on the tip. So this is my index and here's the first finger. That's the only one we're gonna do in this exercise. But it looks like this. And when I have my index finger and it's going to touch now, the difference here, the difference here is that when I curl my finger around, there's going to be a happy medium of where the finger touches. So I just take a look at my finger by itself. I have the tip. And then you can kinda see everybody's fingers looks different, but you can see mine. How it kind of has this tip and then it curls real fast into like a little slope. While the slope be part right there is the pad of your finger, it's soft and pliable. Now, where I want to get my finger to touch is on the tip of it, but slightly on the pad. So what I mean by that is if you have your finger curl around, you're going to not have your finger 100% up like this, so that your fingers pointed directly down. If you can see that. Because that would be too much of an angle downwards. It's also hard on your wrist and you're not going to have your finger the other way. Or if I push down on this null, this null go right here. So this one, but that one right there. If I press down on that knuckle and it'll look like this. And now I'm collapsing the arc that I have in my finger. Or a sub collapsed bridges how I describe it to some students. So instead of this collapse bridge, we don't want to have it curl around. And then our finger, most of the part of the finger that is touching is that tip of our fingers versus now, some other things to be aware of is your fingernail length. You wanna make sure that your fingernails aren't too long. And here's a good test. If you take the tips of your fingers and tablet on your tabletop or on your violin by itself. It'll sound, I have calyces so you hear little tick. But if I did it with this hand, it won't be quite as audible on the video. But now, what those sound like his fingernails with those sound like is the pads of your fingers. And you're going to want to make sure that when you're doing this, you're not hearing the ticky tick of your fingernails touching the wood. And as long as you don't have your fingernails touching the wood when you do that little exercise. And you're good to go if you happen to have been your nouns that are touching the wood, they'll need to clip your fingernails and get them down to a manageable level. Because if you don't, what'll end up happening is the fingernail will get in the way of you being able to curl your finger around. Because the fingernail will touch the violin and you won't be able to play the violin as well as you want to. So now that I have this in mind and I have my hand touching and I did that exercise and I'm ready for exercise number two, looks like this. Going to get my fingers are curled around. I'm going to have that nice arc decided my finger is touching. And if it's not, if it's somehow gone away, then I'm going to touch it back again just as a quick check. And now all I do is I'm going to, instead of using my bow, I'm just going to put it away. I don't need it. I'm gonna think of one thing at a time. Now. Now that I'm just simply holding my instrument with my index finger down, I'm simply going to lift it up and then set it down and lift it up and down. Once I get used to lifting it up and sending it down, I'm going to work on lifting it up, just up over the strings and then sending it back down, just up over the strings, and then back down. So we have up, down, up and down. And so the idea here is that we're not lifting their finger up really hot, but it's just a smidgen. Just a little bit. Okay, we're done with exercise number one. And we'll see you back here for exercise number two. 20. Notes for Pre Scale Ex 2 for Folks able to read notes: Notes for Freescale exercise number two. 21. Pre Scale Exercise 2 for your Violin: After we have our first exercise out of the way, I want to make sure my index finger where it hits or my first finger is about one inch away from this note here, this raised piece of wood. And I'm just going to play this note. And it's going to be on the a string or the second strings, the first string or the second string, E, then a second stream that you see. So that's the second littlest string. And companies my bow. And I'm gonna play it for a really long time. And keep in mind, our hand is touching, our fingers curl around. We're not directly up up on the tip of the pad and we're not collapsing our finger, but pretty close to being on the very tip of our fingers. Now, once I have that in place, I want to play this note for you and a big long bows. And what's going to happen is you're going to at home, you're going to follow along with me. And if you you're going to slide your finger around just a little bit about an inch area until it sounds exactly what I'm playing. So if it sounds too low, you'll slide it up. And if it's too high, you'll have to slide your finger down a little bit. Now, here's some tricks to be able to help you with this exercise. If you can hum or sing the note that your plane, so listen to it real well. And then you sing the note that I am playing. It'll be pretty evident if you're too low or too high instead of guessing. So let's say the picture was but legislator and the pitch that you are playing was sound pretty similar. But most people, when they hear the tone, they can audibly hear, that is a higher tone. But some people can't. And for those people, this exercise works a lot better because it helps get their ear calibrated to hearing different tones. So if you had to go and you had to actually sing a higher note, and my Nut was the higher note, then you know that you'd have to slide your finger forward. If you were to highlight. Tend to come down with your voice, then chances are you have to take your finger and slide it down to the right now. Okay, so we're going to try this exercise. And I want to play a B note. The email is on the a string, second string. That was my first finger. Good. And hopefully that was long enough for you to be able to find that first drink. But that first year note and the note, and it wasn't, just rewind the video and then try it again as many times as it takes for you to be able to give him a good sounding V Note and sounds exactly the same as my. Alright, I'll see you in the next exercise. 22. Notes for Pre Scale Ex 3 for Folks able to read notes: Notes for pre scale exercise number three. 23. Pre Scale Exercise 3 for your Violin: Now that we've had our first note that we played B, we're going to use an a note along with it, so that a node is just the open string, no fingers. So this is you're not your little string, but your second to string a. Sounds like. And then I'm going to touch that hand to the violin on a curl up and around and set it down on the second string. And once I have that, I'm going to have this be note again like we did in our exercise. Now, where you're going to place it on your bow is right about here. So not in the middle, not near the frog, but not at the tippy there, but somewhere near the tip and between the halfway point and the tip using this part of your bone. And the first thing that we're gonna play is an open a, so no fingers. And then once we get that done, we're gonna set our finger down and play the B node. So it looks like this and about this bead and I'm gonna play big long notes so that we have some time to be able to catch up to a I get ready. I'm going to set that finger down. And then I went to play the B note, that first finger, back to open a. And then I'm going to set the finger down again. I'm going to play B. Now let's do it together first and then just a couple more rules that we're going to put in there. Whenever I played the fopen a, I'm going to use my bow and make it go down towards the ground. And when I make it go down towards the ground, it's a down bow. When I make the bow go up in the air, it's an up bow. So open a's are on the down bone. And the B nodes or the first ten years are going to be on an up bow. Now, it's going to be really important for those of us who like to lift up our boat, never lift up our bow in this case. So the both sets down on the strings and never gets lifted backup. So when I have my bow set down and stays there, so I'm going to add open a notice I don't lift up the bow and it just stay sitting on the strings. And then my first finger goes on the bean on. And I'm gonna do it one more time. Pay. And then being and then being open. And then one open, and then 10. And then one open. And then one open. And then one. Here's some common areas that folks make with sometimes only play the violin for the very first time. Our elbow wipes the drooped downwards. And if it does start to drift downwards, that means we're going to be hitting other strings that we don't intend to. So try to keep your elbow up at the right level all the way through your bow stroke. Notice as I'm using my bot up and down, the angle of the elbow doesn't move downwards or upwards. It just kinda stays at the same level and he should be doing the same. So on to our next exercise, and I'll see you there. 24. Notes for Pre Scale Ex 4 for Folks able to read notes: Notes for preschool exercise number four. 25. Pre Scale Exercise 4 for your Violin: It's time for our next exercise. And we're going to continue on with what we've learned so far. And what we've learned so far is to go with an open followed by an index finger on the a string or the second string. And the next thing that we're going to do above and beyond that is to make some variations upon just what we just learned. And what we're gonna do is we're going to go down and then up on the open, a string. That's the second string. And after we did two times of that string, the second string, we're gonna put our first finger down and play two times again. So it's going to be 00 first finger on the a string. But keep in mind, we're still going to, before we do any one of these exercises, are still touching our hand kroner for neuron, homeowner Bahrain. And then starting. So let's do it together about this speed as an example, firstname clothing yet. So now we're going to start in 321, and here's the 1010. And the one here little bit with your inclination, that finger around us. And Tony amounts to open a long one. Right? There's a good exercise for you animals see you in the next lesson. 26. Notes for Pre Scale Ex 5 for Folks able to read notes: Notes for preschool exercise number five. 27. Pre Scale Exercise 5 for your Violin: Time for another exercise. What we're gonna do is we're going to introduce the second finger. Now, the second finger. And you can see that what we've learned so far is our not end. Our index finger is about one inch away from each other. Our second finger is going to be another about an inch away. And so it's about the same distance as we used before. Now, when we bring our violin up to play, it's going to be kind of important that your fingers and your knuckles are doing the right thing. And what I mean by that is the stretching of your fingers to be able to reach for that second finger. Cuz you can stretch to different ways. Here's how to stretch for on. And a very common way to incorrectly stretch. So what I mean by that is if I had my fingers straight and I tried to stretch my fingers, all of the fingers would look like they have these big, huge spaces in them. And that is the hardest way to try to stretch your fingers. Instead, if we have our fingers at the right angle and we still touch the wood to that spot. Right. And then we put our fingers down. We were going to want to try to keep our knuckles together. And what I mean by our knuckles together is notice how there isn't a space in-between the knuckles. So you see this knuckle here and then how it's close to this finger and then there's no space in between there. That's how we want it to look. And if I take my fingers away, really I'm structuring like this. And no separation in the fingers. Something to keep on the top of your brain when you're trying to do this exercise. Ok, so now what we're gonna do is we're in a plant opening and we're going to put the first finger down and I'll give you the note. Here's her too. And once I get that, I'm going to be done. So it looks like this. So it's a down bow on open. I don't want to call up bow up, but what's gonna be on my first finger? The next note has been the b of two inch away from your first finger. And so, so far we did them down down bone again, but now on the to seek sharp. Okay, so this exercise goes like this. Bom, bom, bom, dumbed down. I'm going to stop recently Bowman and do it again. So this is how the exercise goes on to show you $0.01 and we'll do it together. 32, ready? Go. Bone. Bone. If at anytime your second finger isn't sounding quite like mine does if it's too sharp or it's too low, we're going to make sure that our finger slides around a little bit until it matches direct page. So let's try that exercise one more time. Recently bone. Reset the button. We set the bone. One month's time. Jump and we'll see in the next lesson. 28. Notes for Pre Scale Ex 6 for Folks able to read notes: Notes for pretty scale exercise number six. 29. Pre Scale Exercise 6 for your Violin: Upwards and onwards. So far we've done open 12 and then we did a reset. Now, we're going to introduce the third finger. On the third finger, slightly different than what we've done before. Our nut. And our first printer was about enjoying and R1 and our second finger was about an inch. And that was really similar to each other. Third finger is going to be different. Or third finger is going to be right next to our second finger. And I'm going to bring this a little closer to the camera. So you can see just how close that second finger and the third finger are. Now when you're an adult playing. And you can see my fingers are pretty average size, but some adults have much thicker fingers than I do. And for those people, in order to get this in tune, you'll want to ride your third finger right on top of your second finger and then slide it off the second finger and then it'll be in tune. Or else there'll be too big of a gap there. But folks for medium-size fingers, children or gals that have slender fingers, you'll definitely see a gap where you won't see a gap in my fingers because I have pretty average medium-sized fingers for a male. So for slender fingers you might see something more close to that. But you'll see me kind of button my two fingers together or they're actually touching and being squeezed together. Okay. Now we're just going to get our third finger and tune for this exercise. But how we're going to do that is we're going to get our first finger in tune, then our second finger and tune. And then I'm going to play the third finger for an extended period time so that you can get used to that tone. And then just played a bunch of times. And when you are playing it a bunch of times, make sure you take your third finger off. And then put it back on and play it, take it off, put it back on a planet. When we're doing this exercise, we're gonna make sure that our first fingers down, our second fingers down all the time. And when I'm playing the third finger and lifting it up and not playing and then lifting it back down and then playing, lifting it up and not playing with my bow and then setting it back down. I want to make sure that these two fingers, the first finger and the second finger down as well, and they're in their proper places. So this is why we're going to play the first finger, first, second finger, and third finger fallen down by me point a log-log plot 1, third finger down on the a string. It's a D note by the way. And so we're just going to have a string and 2M sum sums like this, the pilot's name. And then the one. Now PD-L1 bow all you set the second finger down. And now the third finger is going to explain plenty to play this D for awhile until you get into. And in the next lesson will be used in our third finger a lot. So we'll see you in the next lesson. 30. Wrist Form with Partial Scale on the Violin: Now that we have a good handle on the third finger, there's some other things that I want to talk about before we get started. What we're going to talk about is having our wrist straight and our elbow in the right way. So I wanted to show you remember the chin and the scroll, our boats, it's supposed to be about the same height. And I tend to hold my violin just lightly lower than that because it feels comfortable with me. Keep people to have different size, shoulders and stuff. And for me it's just a good, good ergonomic feel right about here. Now. If you just watched my wrist and you can see that my rest isn't bent to one or one way or the other. So it's not bending this way. So imagine a straight line up and down between your hand and your forearm. If it were to be bent one way or the other, it wouldn't be a straight line anymore. So your outcome tried to have that straight line. The other thing is you're supposed to have a straight line here. So if I was to draw a straight line and I curled my hand one way or the other. Now I want to have a straight line again, right? So just think about that straight line being something that you think about all the time. And being in front of a mirror really helps with that as well. I'm going to bring up my violin a little bit higher so that you can see my wrist. And my wrist. My palm of my hand actually is in a position that if it was a mirror, I would see myself. So you shouldn't be looking at the palm of your hand when you had your hand open like this. I'm looking and imagining that flat surface or looking directly at the palm of your hand without it being at an angle or too much about angle words now based that way. Okay, so now we're ready for our next exercise. And we're going to use that open 1-2-3 down on, opening, up on one or two, which is a C sharp down. That three is real close to the two finger. Now, this is going to be a little bit different because we're gonna go down the scale. So all we've done so far is really go up the scale. Wherever you go down the scale now. So it's going to look like this. We have an opening and the one and the two and the three by threes and in the fingers that we're using. Then at this point, I'm not going to play this three again, but I'm going to go directly down a two, I can lift it up. Here's an exercise. One works hand, open E, one and my two. Then three. That's too soon. Too. One. Ready? One last time. Chunk. We'll see in the next lesson. 31. Full A Scale on the Violin with Exercise: Now for our full-scale and is going to be an, a Major scale. And we're starting on it, which is our second string. First string, second string, a string, a string, D string, g string. So we're starting on this a string. And the note that we're ending on as a. So these are the actual analytes replaying a opening. Then when I put my first finger down as a, B, C sharp, D, E, F sharp. She sharp. And all those nodes together, when I play them all in a row. Make my scale a major scale. Now, we're gonna do one more step than just putting a skill or a point up and down, up and down. So we're going to start on a string, open. The first few years of being. Second letter, C sharp, D, E, F-sharp, G-sharp. And notice there what happened before? I was only playing notes that were on my a string. And this exercise feature two strings. So I started out on the, a string player might open. And then the first fingers on the a string, second fingers on the a string, the third fingers on the a string. And then I switch over and I start to play on the E string. But there's a similarity of what I just accomplished. Whatever I have just done, including the distance between all my fingers that I've played on the a string or the second string. First, I'm going to play the exact same thing, but only on my eastern, my littlest string, my first string instead, he first finger goes in the same spot. Second finger goes in the same spot, and third finger goes in the same spot. So altogether it looks like this open 123 switchover to the E string, open 123. So we're going to do this that just all the way up without going down yet. For the first exercise 70, this will be now 12. Ready? Go one more time. Now we're ready to go up and down the scale. So it looks like this. Or I get up to this. Aim was third finger on the E string. I'm not going to play it again. Broccoli back down to my two. So example again, a little slower. Second, second finger. First under open three on the, a string to, on the issue. All over. 32. Ready go. We fritter a scale entrepreneur. Next lesson. 32. Syncing up your Fingers and Violin Bow: In this lesson, we're gonna be working on timing. And what I mean timing, I'm talking about when our bow and our fingers move exactly at the same time. We're going to try to think of it as like a gear. When the two meet. And one of the, the pistons turns, everything moves in congruence with each other. One doesn't move without the other one. We're playing our violin. We're going to think of our bow and our finger doing the exact same thing at the same time. Unit when it comes to moving their different strings with different fingers at the exact same time. So think of open, nothing happens of course, but what about this first finger? I'm going to set it down and my Bozeman and move at the same time. And when I pick it up, it happens at the same time. So when you're practicing, tried to practice that. When you're practicing you're a scale. Shall we know how to do so far? Practice trying to get them down exactly at the same time. And what will happen because in reality, your finger moves just a smidgen before yeah, your, your bot does. But your brain will automatically make those adjustments. As you start to get better at your time. You know how to plan a scale. And Let's take some time away from this video and come back to it in a little bit after you've taken some time to practice will be exactly at the same time to you're a scale. And I'll see you in the next lesson. 33. D Scale on the Violin with Exercise: Welcome back. We're going to do now is we're going to take the things that we've learned and apply them to different stuff. So we can learn new stuff by understanding the stuff we know already. Now we've played this a scale. What started on the a string? One through r, 123 fingers. And then we went over to the East, did the exact same thing. And that was great. We learned our first scale and we're doing a great job. We can do the same thing if we start on a different string, let's say instead of using the second string and the first train, we're going to do the same fingers and the same spacing like we did before, but we're going to start on the D string. So the D-string as our third string, 123. And if I played my open, and then I played my one, two goes in the same spot, three goes in the same spot. Now I move over to the a string, which is the second string. Then the first finger. And the two, kind of a three, and then go backwards. One, Open Street to see how it's really similar to the ace, a skeleton. Same fingers and everything except I'm starting on a different string, ending on a different structure. Now, since I've started on a D-string when it's a D note, and I go from D, then F sharp, G, a, B, C sharp, then d. Once I get through those nouns, like successfully played a D major scale differently into a scale and played the whore a scale. Now the D scale starting on a D-string instead. And theirs or D scale. Okay, so practice your D scale along with me and we'll do next and slows and get a feel for it. And then we'll use this as a, as a lesson enter exercise. So it always goes three-to-one, ready? Go. And then after go, there's a pause. And then I lift my ball and I a violin up. As soon as it comes down we start to play. So 321, go back down to, to open and we're gonna go again. Back down to two. 34. G Scale on the Violin with Exercise: Okay, we're back and we've just learned how to play two different scales, the scale and the D scale, with the same fingers and the same space and with our printers. Well, guess what? I get to do it one more time. We've learned that a scalar started on the a string, or the second string, one to the d big scale, which starts on the D-string or in a third string, 123. Now we have one more and it's just got started on this G string, E, a, D, G. So if we start on this G string, play the same fingers, same spacing, and everything will be playing a G scale. So these are the notes that we played. G, a, B, C. Same fingers, same spacing and everything, right? So the space between one and open, the space between 2132 are real close together. So again, it's machine B. C, Next known as opening. First finger on the note. F sharp is that second finger at high two. And then three plus the second figure. Here it is again, switched over the D string backwards to one open. All right, let's do it together, but it's going to be counted 321 go then Paul, by a slight pause. And as soon as the instrument comes down with start together. 321, go backwards to one. Open. Still a few times. And backwards a couple more times. One last time. Backwards. And play a Warnock G skill. And we'll see you in the next lesson. 35. Finger Terminology with High 2, Low 2 Exercises Violin: Hey, there, let's talk about some terminology. Now that we're familiar with where our first finger went, in, their second finger went, enter, third finger went for are a scale and r, d scale. And our g scale. We're going to talk about what it means to put our fingers where and what we call them. Now, typically, we can put our fingers just about anywhere on our fingerboard. And that'll means different things to us. But what we need to know for right now in this beginner series of lessons here is when I put my first finger on about an inch away from the nut there, it's going to be a regular one. Now I have a two. But as more applicant to be called a high too. And the differences between a high and a low too, is that my second finger, if it's a low, Y2, is really close to my first finger. And where we got used to playing it with our scales was called a high too. So we're just going to notate right now that one is close to our first finger. That's a low too. And when we have it away from our index finger, it's going to be a high two. Okay? Now we have a three and we also have a high three. But for right now we're just really focused on this three, this high to the low too. And the regular one. There's also a low one. But for right now again has 123. And this is the exercise that I want you to do. I want you to have your fingers and position in one high too, in regular Three fashion. And then you're gonna take your middle finger, which is your second finger. And you're going to go back and forth between the low to high and a low to a high two. Without moving your fingers low to high and high to your index finger and third fingers, the ones that won't move. But the second figure does low to high to low, high to low, too high, too low to high to. Now. Just take some time with that and practice it for a while. Come back to you next lesson where we're going to use a low too. 36. 2nd Octave G Scale with Exercise Violin: Alright, now we're on to the second octave of RG scale. So far we've done AS Gao De scale and a G scale. The last scale that we did, this g scale as the first octave, double Ramy fossil, Aki don't, well there's more to it. Do RE, MI FA SO Lockheed doting. Sorry for the bad sitting, but you get the idea. We're going to start with a third finger, where the last note that we left off on that finger is a third finger on the third string, 12 third string, the D string, third finger. And were at play that note 1's followed by open a, that's the second string, 12 strings. And now we're gonna make our way up to the first irregular one. And now here's that low two. And we're going to want to have our fingers real close together. Again, if you have really slender fingers, I have like medium-sized fingers for a male, real slender fingers, you're still going to see a slight distance between those two fingers. But for me, you're gonna see them close together. For larger folks who have big, big thick fingers, they're going to have to get the middle finger right on top of the index finger and slide it off to get it in tune. So here we go. We have that three that we started on, on the third string. Okay? And then we have open a, and then the index finger goes down on a regular one. Now we have that low to real close together to our first finger. And now the three is, feels like a reach now where it didn't before when we had our second finger in a high two position. So now, since we have this low to the tendency when we're first starting out is to not reach quite so high as we need to. Sono probably feel like you need to reach a little further than you think you do to get it in tune. Now don't take that to mean that you need to reach really far and it's just a smidgen and just a small amount extra. Okay, so let's get through these notes against we have g, that's the third finger on the third string. Open a, the second string, first finger on the a string or the second string. Now you have that low to really close to your first finger. And that's at Siena. And then a D note which is your third finger that reach. And we were just talking about fallen by an E string open our first string open for staying on the E string. And the first string, one which is F sharp. And then you finally end up with G. So G, a, B, C, D, E, F sharp injury. Now some things to look out for a little bit is because we're starting to get used to this high too. And we'll play it a lot. Is when we go through this position. Typically a student will do this and put their finger in that high to position and then retracted into the low two position. Because this is comfortable and then the move, let's try to avoid that step and put it directly into the loan to position when we played the GSK. Okay, now I have my bone. We're going to play this, this g scale, second part of the g scalar. Remember the first part was open. Now this is the second part, second octave. So we're using this third finger on the D string, or the third string, followed by an open, a first finger on the a string. Second finger on the a string. Third finger on the a string. Now remember the second finger was low, so it's right close to the first finger, followed by the three. A regular one on the E, and then low too. And now it's finished. We're going to go backwards. Albany. There's the three. And what do we get back to the three? This is the expectation. And instead of playing only the three, we're gonna get all our fingers down in their respective positions with the three below two and the warm. So it looked like this. All three fingers go down. Open. The last, so over to the third string, three. So let's play this as exercise. And we're going to start together in 321. Go. Opening. One, followed up with another load to that Bruce said all the fingers down. So c You can see my fingers are starting to gain shoot Before I move a suit a few times. Which of course, fingers get shaped. Two more times. Load to last one. Any of your second octave of your GI SCO, you're doing great and we'll see you in the next lesson. 37. 1st and 2nd Octave G Scale together with Exercise Violin: Now that we know how to play it, our first octave of g And the second output of G with that low two, we're going to put them together. So let's start together. Real. 38. Full Length Violin Bow Exercise Gaining Speed and Cleanliness: We're starting to get some scales underneath their belt. We're getting through some things with scales. And by now, we're starting to feel like we're playing our violin, like a violin. Here's some things that we can do with their bow to give us a more robust, clean sound. For now, what we've been doing is we've been using this small part of our bow. So not at the prod tip, not in the middle, but somewhere in between here and here. And on these videos, you've seen me use more of my bot than those little parts. Having longer Bo's a little bit. It's gonna be a challenge at first because we're not actually going to play this way when it comes to playing our violin for real, we're just using this as an exercise to give us more control over our bone. And when we finally Backoff and he's just a little less bow than the entirety of the bow, which we're going to use the entirety of the boat. We'll find that we're playing the bow with more speed instead of small little strokes, or have lots more movement with her arm back and forth. And I'll give you a little example of what the difference in the tonality of your violin sounds like with small o versus a large bone. And we do small bows at the beginning because it's nice and easy. So we'll start at those small bows. And I'm just going to make my bows bigger and longer and to be able to play it the same steed, I have to move my arm much faster. So one thing you hear right away, the difference is it's louder and doesn't always have to be louder. As long as I play with less pressure on my bow, I can use a nice long bow feature. And it wasn't quite as loud as it was the last time because of that pressure feature. So what we're gonna do is we're going to play our two octave G scale that we've just learned. But we're going to play it with the full length of a bulb. Some common mistakes that happen when we use the full length of our bowl is making our bow do a kind of a wiper. Action, means the bot isn't going straight across the strings. So when we do this at the very beginning, we want to do it really slow. And look at ourselves in a mirror and make sure that our bow is nice and straight all the way across every single time. And if it is doing a little bit of wobbly, wobbly, don't worry about it too much. Just try to reign it in by doing it slower. Even in this video that we're doing is going to be at a certain speed. If it's too fast to get your bone ice and straight, then practice it's slower by yourself without this video and then come back to the video. Here we go. We're gonna play are two octave G scale. Started with a down bow, but from the frog all the way to the tip, from the tip all the way on the problem session, we go 321. Go one more time. Alright? Now we can practice that at home for except a lot. And we'll see you in the next lesson. 39. Violin Bow Control Exercise: Alright, now that we can do big, long and clean strokes with their bone, we're going to do short choppy ones. And there's a lot of different terminology like staccato and stuff like that, but we're not going to worry about that. We're just going to worry about the actual movement of our bone. And the reason why we're doing it is so that we can get better control of our bow and our reaction time with her bone. And our overall comfortability and getting to know our bot gets better by using her bone a lot of different ways. So this exercise, we're going to use our bone in some short movements. So we're going to start with a download. And it's going to be small movements with a complete steps. It has a definite start and a definite stop. And we're gonna go 1234. So almost using all of our boat is like we did last time, but they're in separate sections. So short, short, short, short. And it has a start and a stop, stop, stop, stop. Now after we do that, the down, we go up again. So up, up, up, down, down, down, down, up, up, up. Ok. Or we could do this was burning easer to active GI scale. But every note that we play is going to have that down, down, down, down, knowing whether the next note going up, up, up, up and so on and so far. So I'm going to give you some faster examples. And then when we do it together is going to be more slower. Alright? So the way we're gonna do a little bit slower about the speed. Okay? So three, One, go. One last time. Okay. That was a great exercise. And can't wait to see you in the next lesson. 40. Introducing Slurs on the Violin: Well, that last lesson was fun, and now we're on to something called slurs. Slurs happened when you use two notes on one bot. So the one bot that I'm talking about is a down bow Bob. Now, I'm going to connect to nodes again. And two notes again. A slew slur doesn't always have to mean two nodes. That can be lots of them, da-da, da-da, da-da-da. So how we're going to do this for our exercise is we're going to play R D scale. And we played the D scale a couple of videos ago. So it wants to just refresh our memory. So it's going to be this open D string or the open third string, 1-2-3, followed by our index finger playing out regular one. And then our second finger playing high to. And then a three being really close to the to open a, then a regular one. And then I hide to last. So it's going to be a three really close to the two. Now to slur, we're going to do two notes at once. Hormones thinking I know, but you get the point right. So we're gonna do together. So it's gonna look like this, just first-order to break it apart and that we're all a little tiny little parts. And then we're gonna put all together. So it looks like this open D followed by one, all in a down bow. All right, let's do it again. One more time. Alright. Okay, so now we've done a bunch of material. Let's do the next part, doesn't ups. We just did open. The next part of the scale is 2-3, and those are going to be upwards on our bow. 2-3 stood again couple more times. One more time. One last time. Alright. So if we put those two together, we are going down, down then up, up, as we move up the scale of D. So we're going to place this really slow. Go ahead and play it with me. 321. Go one more time. Let's do one more time for good measure. Alright, so now we're going to just repeat the process except we're going to go all the way up to scale to the other d. Alright? So we're gonna do super slow so that you can see my boat change. So I'll also say down, down, up, up, and I won't be calling out the notes, except I will be calling the direction of the Bo. Alright? So we're gonna do this quite a few times. And if you have a hard time catching on, just rewind the tape back into the starting point, and then we can start again to have good solid starting point. Alright, here we go, but really slow. Down. Down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down. As last note, down. All right, so now that's what a slur is. So doing multiple nodes at once, we're happy to do it two times for the same bot. So we're going to continue to design. We're going to be the same scale and everything except I'm not going to call out the down downs and an up bucks. So again, if you get lost, you feel like you need to start over. Just rewind the tape, bring it back to the beginning of the this next part, and then start again. He'd get lost again, real wind it back to the beginning part again. Then you'll have a good starting point to get caught off. So 321 go. Yeah. Okay. Now we're gonna do one last time. We're going to slightly increase our speed about the speed. And if you're not ready for it yet, don't worry. Some, take some time practicing the first spin. And when you're ready, go back to this video and you'll be ready for the second part. Three to go. Alright, great work and I'll see you in the next lesson. 41. Reading Music 101 Violin: In this section, we're going to be learning how to read music on the violin. And to start, these five lines represents something called a staff. Alright? So we have five lines and it equals a staff. Now, what are the first things that we are going to see when it comes to the staff is called a treble clef. It's also called a G clef. And we're gonna kind of skip some of the underlying meanings of what that means. And head right into what these lines and spaces mean. So your staff is made up of lines. And then the spaces in between the lines and the lines and spaces and lines and spaces in lines and spaces in lines and so on. Right? Now. They're going to be really important for us to be able to learn some acronyms. And we're going to start with the lines. So we have, we have every good boy does fine is kind of how I learned it when I was a kid. I think today, most school districts have changed it to be every good Boy Deserves Fudge. For now, what we're gonna do is we're just going to write these out. So we have some words. Every good boy does. And what we're looking at as the beginning letter of every one of these to help us remember the names of these lines. So we have E, G, B, D, F. And keep in mind that when we're doing this, we're going from the bottom of the staff to the top. Every good boy does fine. Okay. Now that we have the lines kind of taken care of and you're going to want to take some time to see if he can try to memorize the E, G, B, D, F notes. Or also going to learn the spaces. So these spaces that we have or the spaces in between the lines are also going to use the same uniform method of remembering by going from the bottom to the top. So we have F a, C, E, and F-A-C-E. spells from the bottom to the top face. Now, you have every good boy does fine for the new lines and we have F-A-C-E. and take some time to try to memorize them. If you can actually write out your staff that five lines, don't worry about drawing the treble clef quite see yet, quite yet. And draw your lines in there and then put some circles in there and then fill in the circles. And if you need to write out all the words, those are gonna be some great tools for you to start to memorize the names of your lines and the name of your spaces for your staff. 42. Finding your Open Strings on the Violin: Now we know what the staff looks like, what this treble clef looks like. We know that the staff has five lines, and we know that these lines have some names to them. Every good boy does fine, every good Boy Deserves Fudge. And the spaces in between the lines being F-A-C-E. spelling face. Now that we know that, we're going to take a simpler approach on how to read music on her violin. Now, what I mean by that is music when it was written in manuscript form is what you're seeing was meant specifically to be written form violin, which makes it extremely easy, and this is how it works mathematically. The first thing that we're gonna do is we're going to find our first open string. And what I mean by that is on your violin, you have your first string, your E string, or the little bitty string. And where is that on our staff? Well, what we're gonna do is we're going to find our spaces and we're going to find the top space. And when I mean by the top space is the space that's closest to the ceiling. So the very top space that you see that's surrounded by two lines. Now, for your reference, there still spaces and lines that go above what you see, and spaces and lines that go below it, you see what we're specifically working on the space. And I am going to draw a circle to represent where that space is. Now that space is E or E string. A little bit string. And remember when we learned our spaces, it was F, a, C, E. So that's where that exists or how we get there. How, how do we find that m? Now once I have my first open string, we'll call it open string. So we can kind of see visually as we go along. And this is, we'll call it one or the first string open. Now that I have my first string open and I find out where it is on my top space. I'm going to go to the very next space below. And I'm going to draw a little curve, blind it into notate that I'm going there and then I'm skipping it. So I'm going to the very next one. So I started at the top space. I went down one space, I skipped it. And now I'm going down one more space. And I found my second open string. So the difference that we found is this is our first string, ie, the little bitty string. And I went from my top space and I went one space down, down to the next space down. And now I found my second open string, wishes the second string. So first string, second string, which is a string and I, my first term is the E-string. Okay, so we're following so far. And if this is moving too fast for you, simply rewind. Go back a little bit further in this lesson. Review the steps to find the first string and then do it a couple times so you get it. And then we're gonna move on to the second string. Now, what I want you to see as we move along here is the same. Mathematical principles happen every time we try to find an open string. So if what I did is I went to the top, opens up top space, and I skip the space. I went down. And I one downside, if I counted it, if I countered itself as an open eye and go 123, and if you decided not to count itself, you'd go 12. However, which way you decide to do it? You're going to do it the exact same way to find your next open string. So I go from my second string, open, which is on a space. And I go down one space, and I skip it. And now I go down one space again. And I've found my third string open. So my third string open is 123, the third largest string, and call that D my D string. D open string. Ok? So as you can see, the distance between my first string, E open, skip. Find, is the same as how I found my third open string. I started at my second open string. I skip an open. I go down one more bikes as skip a space. Sorry. I skip a space. And I go down one more. And I've found my next open string. So if I decide to count the space as one, I go 123, and then I do it again, 123. And if I decide to count, I don't decide to count itself as my spine starting space, I go One, 212. And the same principle applies. Okay? So what we can't see here is that there are lines and spaces above, and there's lines and the spaces below, and they go down to infinity and up to infinity. So if I was going to try to find my fourth string, try to think about how we would find it. Now let's go through it. So we started on our third string and we do the exact same thing. One more time. We go down, we start out the space that are a third string starts on, and we go down one space, skip it just like we did before. And we go down one more space again. And now I'm going to have my fourth string, or G. The Big Fat string is by fourth string. Might open string. Alright, so let's do this one last time. I'm going to find my very top space. And that's going to be my first open string. Happens to be e. To find my next open string on my violin, I'm going to use a start at that opens the open string that I found and I go 12 down and I find my next open string. The same principle applies when i go down again. So I start on the open string two, I go 12. And now I'm on my third try. I found it as on a space. And I do it again, 12 and I found my other open string. Some things to think about as you're starting to gain some, some knowledge about your open strings. Open strings on your treble clef, on your staff are only on spaces. They're never online's. So just keep that in mind as we move forward to make it a little bit more clear. As we move along into putting our first fingers, 30 seconds fingers and third fingers down and finding where to put them. And we'll see you in the next lesson. 43. Reading Music with Finger Placement on the E String Violin: Hi again. Now that we know where our strings are, our first string open, our second string open, our third string open, and our fourth string open. And I remember we used the simple approach of finding the top space and we go, if we count itself would go 123. And the same principle applies. All of these notes are the exact same distance apart with just one space in the middle. Keep in mind that open strings never found online. So if you find something on a line, a note online, it's never going to be open. So with that in line, we're going to start learning some notes on our E-string. Sometimes when you see a note, you're going to see circles generally. So sometimes you see them as a filled-in circle. Sometimes there are unfilled in circles. Sometimes they have on unfilled in circle with a stem. Sometimes they have a filled in circle with a stem and a flag. And they look a little bit different. But what we're looking for it just at this point is that when we see a circle, where are we going to play it on our violin? So we don't necessarily care about the note value or the length of the note yet. We just are thinking about where do I find it on my violin. And in this case, if I see any one of these nodes or circles, I'm going to have my E string, my little bitty string. And I'm going to play on note, either down or up. And it's not going to matter at this point, right? What works out? Great, and for these notes that are on the E string, knows who that are on the a string and those that are on the D string and the G string. Is that the all workout mathematically the same. And I'm going to show you how this works. So our E string is right here, our first string we found in the top space of our staff. If I know that this is open in what I sent, gonna say open, I'm going to include a number up here and try not to confuse this circle with this looking circle. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to fill this in SI unit. You know that it's a note. And I'm going to leave this blank so you then know that this is a 0 and I'll, I'll do. So now, you can see the word very small. If you can see it, the words 0, okay? If I go and use this open, so this is another 0 up here. And I go one space or a line above the note that I'm starting it. So let's take a look at this. I'm starting here on my top space. Might open. Note, if I go one line or space above where my starting node is at. So I'm starting on the space and were just going up one line or space to this line. Right? What I'm gonna do is I'm going to add one to it because I went one tying up. I'm going to add one to the value of it. So this was 00 also means open, no fingers. Now the amount of fingers that I'm going to put on this one because I went one space up is going to be one. And that would be my first finger, my index finger. So on our hand or thumb doesn't have a value. But my index finger does. This is 1234. So it's just like kid counting 1234. So when I think of playing these two notes together, I want you to play first OneNote. And that's the first string open. And you can go ahead and do it now with me. So 321. And now we've just played this open. Now we're going to look at this note. And I remember when our index finger and goes about one inch away from this nut, it's going to go right about there. But the string that it's going to go on is our first string. And that'll become clear a little bit later. So I'm just going to plot this. You can use it, you can plug it to or you can play it with your bot. So 321, go. Now we've successfully played this note. So the letters that go with this r, e. So we're looking here at this node, and then we also have F. It's actually an F sharp, but we're not going to worry about it right now. Because I don't have anything in a key signature quite yet. And we don't know what that means quite yet, and that's okay. But we're just thinking of this pretty simplistically at this point. And we're just going to call it an F because it lens on the F known. So how did I arrive to, to say that that's an F note Island? Every good boy does. All right. So now I have, I understand the distance between my open on my very first space and my one that's online line that's above my space. Because I went one step upwards. I added one to 0 to get to one. And when I go to 0, that means 0 fingers and the one means one fingers. Okay, now that the process continues, when I get to my second finger, this here is a note. Now. We're going to discuss why that's a genome in a future lesson. But what I want you to get out of this is that I started at my open string. I went one above my open string. So I added one to it. And I got 10 plus one equals 1s. And I put my first finger here on the F. And if I go up one more, I'm going to add one to my one. So one plus one equals two. So now I'm going to put my second finger when I see this note. So simply, if I go from space to line to space, consequentially, I'm gonna go open 121. I'm thinking about this at the very beginning. I'm not really specifically thinking about this is an E, This is an F, This is a G. I'm breaking it down into finger basis to make it easier to look, look at what I'm seeing and say is that I open a one or a two. Now, the same thing happens here. I'm going to go one more up. So there's these lines that we don't get to see that better above it. And I'm going to draw a note there as a circle. And I started at an open on my first space that I went one above it, I added one to it, so I was able to get to my first finger. Then I added one to it to get to jean note or the second finger. What do you suppose if we go up one more to the next line? So I went from this space to this line and I'm going up at one time. So I add one to it. And here I'm going to play a three. So just as a little reminder of the last lesson that we've go, a couple last lessons that we've done. We've done open, no fingers. And that's an indication of this note open. Then our index finger goes about one inch above where this this nut is. And then if I'm going to play it to that, to typically when we first learn violin, is going to be about an inch away from where index finger is or one. So whenever I see a note here, a genome, we're going to have once a G-sharp, but we're going to call it g for now. So we have that too. And then when I see a three, which is an, a note, that a is going to be played with my third finger, three. So I'll have my index finger about it in a way. My second finger about an inch away from I1, and my third finger is really close to that second finger and that's gonna be my note or my third finger. Okay, so who's gonna play these in concession without any specific length? I want to play opened 123. So we're gonna play together. I'm going to give you the example first, so let's listen to it. And then on the second time around, I want to say 123, go and then we'll play it. So here's your example. 12. Ready, go. Here's the two. Alright? And here's a great example of how we get to, to find some notes that are under E-string. Now, we know how to play some notes on the eastern, and I'll see you in the next lesson. 44. Reading Music With Finger Placement On The A String Violin 50: Just as review, we now we know where the E string is. Our first finger, our second finger, and our third finger open 123. Now that we know where the E string is and the notes that you can play on the Eastern. We're gonna think of this as being the lowest note we impossibly play on an E string. And what I mean by that is if you think of pitch and this, I can play notes that are higher on it. They keep on going up in pitch. And as I go up in pitch, I see notes that are higher up on my staff, right? The lower the notes that I see on my staff at a lower notes, they are the lower the pitch, the lower i find it on my staff. So if I know that the lowest note that I can possibly play is this E note. And I can't play a single note that's lower than it. Every note lower than this note has to be on a different string. Then E. From E upwards, I can play notes on the E string, E, F, G, a, or open 123. But anything that falls below this means I have to play it on a different string. That gets us to notes on the, a string. Or a string is found here. Couple ways that we did that is we found our first string, one, which is an E string, E. And I went down and I skipped a space and I, one dense went to the very next space and I found my second string a. The same rules apply as what I was able to do with the E string. So if this is an open 0 fingers, fingers, and I go up one line or space. What finger do you suppose we put on it? Because we went up one, I add one to the value of 0, and I get my first finger. One. If I play a, that's an open, open, no fingers. That's the second string 12, the second string a. I'm going to go up one line or space. Because I went up one, I'm going to play my index finger or my first finger. And that's gonna go one inch above where this nut is. Right about there. It's gonna sound like this. So I'm going to play these two nodes, a and then one. Okay? Now remember the same rules apply. If I go up one line or space from this line. To this note, I add one to the value of one, so one plus one equals two. So this would be a two. That means I play the second finger. Open. No fingers. One, I play my first finger to I apply my second finger. Now the same rule applies again. If I go from my second finger and I go up one line or space from, from my second finger, I add one to the value. And of course, again, I get a three. That means if I see a note here open 1-2-3, I'm going to use my third finger on my a string or my second string. So again, I have my first finger about an inch away from the nut. By second finger is about an inch away from my second my first finger. And my third finger is real close to that second to that third finger. And we're going to play these together. I'm going to give you an example first, so I'm going to play through it and then I'm going to give you 12, ready? Go and play. So here we go. I'm going to play this open, followed by this one, followed by this two, and then the three. So let's do it together. 12, ready, go down and bow down though. Then above. One more time together. A 12. And then the three. Ok. Now if we exceed the nodes that we've played so far, we can see a pattern. We went open 123. If I follow this up to our eastern which we already known, we also have open 123. So if I have an open 123 and I am just going up one line or space at a time, one line or space reminder space at a time that I'm that I'm going to open 123, open 1-2-3. If this exists down here on the D string, the same way, I would go open 123123123. The same thing. Let exist down here. If I was on my fourth string, I'll go open line 123. Open 1-2-3, open 1-2-3, open 123. So you see there's this pattern that exists. I play open or one open and 1, first finger to the second finger. Three, the third finger than open, D, open, then one, then two, then three, and then a process continues again. Open. 123123, said works out mathematically well for our fingers. So when our brain is thinking about these notes were not, at least at this point in the beginning of us playing. We're not thinking about as I'm playing a song, this is an a note and that's an F sharp, and this is a C, And that's an a, and this is an a and that's a D note. I'm simply thinking mathematically because it's easier to come up with this in our brain. If this is, first of all, where's my open strings? Where do I find them? And I think of them in these little spots in these open areas. And then from there I go. Okay. If I have this note, how do I play it? I'm going to first start with open, then weirs the one and here's the two by c, this note, I'm simply going to put my second finger on the first string. And we're going to continue with this process with the D string and the G string in the upcoming videos, and we'll see you in the next lesson. 45. Reading Music with Finger Placement on the D String Violin: Alright, let's get to our D-string or third string, D. We've learned some things to be able to let us know what some of these lines and spaces mean. So my lines again, we're, every good boy does fine. My spaces where F, a, C, E spells face upside down. Well, what happens when I get lower? Then my lowest line that I memorize something on, and that was my next one up was f of F-A-C-E. but we have to think about here when it comes to these strings, is that just as in the previous lesson, we didn't open 123123123. Might Alphabet works the exact same way. And let's make this example to work out with in my, in my musical alphabet, a, B, C, D, E, F, and G. Now it doesn't go any higher than g. So if, if I went higher than my g allowed, I was simply start again. An a, a B C D E F G, a B C, D E F G. Well, if I want lower than it, I can simply go all what comes lower than a. I can look here and I go one step backwards. This is a g, then f, and so on backwards. Now, if this is E, right here, my last note that I've memorized, every good boy does fine and I go one down to are my open note is I would go backwards simply and realize that this is a deep because I went back one in the alphabet. Now, again, as I went up with open 123123123, my alphabet does the same thing. And I'm going to clear off some of these circles and see a little more clearly. The next step. If this is d, I'm going to write an d. And each one of these, I want to write a little button, the number. If this is d. The next note above D, Because I'm going up in the scale, I'm going up on the page. This is going to be E, then f, then g, then a, b, c, d, e, f. G. And this goes on forever. I went up one line or space at a time, and I go D E F G a B, C, D E F G, a, B, C, Great. And I go down, G F E D C B a, G, F E, D, C, B, a. And that goes down forever as well. So when we're thinking about notes that are on the D string, now that we know and can figure out some of the notes that are above or below or in the staff is, or my Cray memorized notes. We're going to find our first string, E, r, second string a, or a third string d. So d is that space under the first line. And I go up one liner space. And if this is open, then what do you think goes here in this space are in this line, I should say. So this is a space and this is a line because it's on the line. I go up one line or space, so I add one to it. So this becomes my first finger. If I go up one line or space again, I'm going to add one to it, so I'll go open. Open. 121 more is three. So now I know where my notes are on my D string. So from d or the third string, we're going to find it 123, the third string in. It's going to be opening, followed by my first finger. About an inch away from that, not my second finger is going to be about an inch away from where the first finger is. And now we're finally gonna play this third finger of the D string. Now that we're starting to understand that there's a simple mathematical formula for understanding where notes are on a violin. Open, 1-2-3, open 123, open one to three. Is that opens can only be on spaces and we've learned that before. But what about other notes? Let's take a look at this. Because some other truths exist and can be shortcuts for us to be able to try to figure out where notes are on the staff. So again, my staff has five lines, 12345, and I have my treble clef. So I can kind of figure out where some notes are. Ones. And notes I've always drawn as before, as, as an, as a dad or a circle. But instead of the circle, I'm going to just say what the fingers are instead, lands one, 23123123. So now there's represent the fingers where they are on the staff. Notice that my ones are always online and my 3's are always online. So 1s and 3s are always online's. My two is always on a space. My open is always on a space. My two is always honest space. I opened as honest space. My 2's out of space. So 2s opens or opened in twos are always on spaces. So if you have a little bit of trouble being discerning where to put your finger. Think about, is it on a line or is it honest space? And that can help give you a little bit of clarity about what finger to use. And you can always go back to your open strings and simply count up open 12 or three. Alright? We're going to discuss the G string and where to find notes on the G string. And our next lesson. 46. Reading Music with Finger Placement on the G String Violin: We're starting to understand where the E string is. From the E string up. We're starting to understand whether a string is a string up to the E string. Notes that I can play on my D string are from D up to my a string. And I have these notes down here where my g string or my fourth string is going to be. And in order to get a good handle on using these lines that fall below our staff is we're going to need to know a couple of ways to count backwards. And the easiest way to count backwards is using r 12 threes. The opposite way. So here's my staff. I have five lines. And if this is my third finger from the count back to from three, then my second finger to my first finger, 10. There's a step in here that's a little bit counter-intuitive. If I go up and I count up, I go 0123123 and so on. And that seems pretty simple to do. But if I go backwards, I go 321 open. Now my next one. So I have to go, if i go lower than that, I have to go from 0 to three. So this pattern backwards is three to one, open, three to one open three. So what comes after 0 or 0 fingers and open is a three of them counting backwards, three-to-one open, three-to-one, open, three-to-one open and so forth. Now, the other way to count backwards, if we're thinking about notes specifically, is a little harder. Now, our musical alphabet again is a, B, C, D, E, F, G. And it repeats itself over and over again. And the same way happens if I go backwards. And why we're looking at this is because I have to get down to these lower notes. And so far I know that this is E. Every good boy does fine. And I want to try to figure out what notes these are lower than my 0s. So the easiest way to do that is by using your alphabet backwards. And here's a good trick to be able to help us. Figure out how to say GFP to CVA in a smooth way that makes it easy for our brain to remember. So I have G, F, E, D. And then I'm going to break it up. So I'm going to just have G, F, E, D, and then C, B, a. And now if I just say, gee FED, I mean, I'm pretty quickly, it sounds a little bit like the word graffiti. So graffiti. Then I have to memorize the last little bit. Cba, which is a little easier to do. So the thing that sounds like graffiti, CBA turned into GFP CBA. So as I'm going up MySQL go a, B, C, D, E, F, G, which all of us know our alphabet on the way backwards as G, F, E, D, and CBA. Cba. And once you get good at it enough, you don't have to put that pause and there you go. And GBD, CBA, right? So I'm trying to learn these notes that are on my g string. Here's my staff. I have five lines, 12345. Here's my treble clef. And I know that this is an E note. If I go down one, G, F, E, D, C, B, a. And if I go and up one Morris and G, F, E, D, C, B, a, D. So I'm doing this backwards, but it kind of makes it a little bit easier to think of what these next steps are because I'm always remembering what at least this note was E, for remembering my lines and spaces, every good boy does fine. If I can think about this and then subtract and my alphabet, I can, I know what these other notes are. So E, D, C, B, a, G. What I'm thinking about these notes, as far as a finger perspective goes. I'm thinking about these in relationship to my open strings. So my open string, again, my first open string might Eastern was the very top space. Then I went down to, and I found my a string or my second string. And I did the same thing with D. My third string open. Now if this is a d, I do the exact same thing. I go down one space, skip it. I find G. Ok. Now that I have g, I know that's open, so no fingers. So I'm going to start here fresh from here on out. I'm going to have two lines underneath my lowest line for my staff. And then I'm going to draw a note, G, or open fourth string, so forth, string or G. Once I have that, I know it's open. So on my violin, it's simply the fourth largest, biggest string. So 1234, the big string. And when I see this note, that's all I do is I played open no fingers. If I go up one line or space. This is open. Just so you can draw your eye to. And this is the openness is the open networking right here. If I go up one line or space, I have to add one to it just like we did before. And now I'm going to play my index finger or my first finger here. So this is one I placed my first finger on this note, which is an amen. Ok, so now I'm gonna do it one more time. But now I'm going to move up to this notes on go from here is one line or space above. Or I just was, so I have to add one to it, one to the value. So now this becomes open 12. So this becomes my second finger, right? So this is open, open gene. Then my first finger is about an inch away from the nut. And that's this a note right here. And now my b note is that second finger, it's about an inch away from my index finger, and that becomes this two. So as I play, it's right. Now the very next note after that, I went from open my first finger, my second finger. And if I go up one line or space above, or I was, I'm going to add one to the value, so I get three. So now I'm going to use my third finger for this note happens to be a C note. But if I, if I think about open 123, I'm going to use my third finger, so my index finger, or a my two for this beat note. And when it comes to this third finger, is the three is right next to the two. So 0123. So I'm gonna play this for you. Open G, a, this is a B note, and then C. And then after that I'm going to count 12. Ready? Go, pause, and then we're going to play it together. So here we go. Example first, gee, here's the a or the one. Here's the B or the two on the fourth string, g. Now the three is a, C, three. So now we're gonna do it together. 12, ready? Go. Opengl. Here's the node to be jazz, and we'll see you next lesson. 47. Music 102, Keys, Series of Sharps and Accidentals Violin: Okay, right now, we can figure out how to play some of the notes when reading music. Figuring out where to put our fingers, at least in the remedial sense right now. And now we're going to start to figure out some other things that are important about our staff. And remember our staff has five lines. And then we have this treble clef. And let's think about the treble clef right now. Right now, the treble clef is the thing that happens first that you see. So a straight line is drawn. Then you'd have this point that intersects here at the very top. So you're on the very top line. And I'm just going to draw it a little bit bigger so that you can see it on the camera. I'm drawing a dot there. I have a dot here on. If I call this the first line, second line, third line, third line, and a line. And I'm going to draw a thin curve. On the bottom line, there's another dot and I'm going to draw a big curve. And the curls around, curls around the 123 fourth line. Or if you're counting up from the bottom one to use that line, which is a genome. Every good boy does fine. So your treble clef is also known as the G-Clef. So when it curls around the g, that's the reason why they call it a G. So let's try this one more time. I'm going to draw it a little faster, a little bit more clean. And you can practice drawing utero class too. So I have the thin curl, a large curl into curls around, a straight line curl and it curls around. We're gonna practice it a couple more times. If you have a piece of paper at home, you can follow along. But our staff has five lines. We're going to make this straight line. The dot, the dot on the middle line and the top line. A little bitty curl, a bigger hero between the third line and the bottom. Then a curls around the genome. So one more time real quick. And here's our treble clef. Now typically you have as little lying curling down one way or the other, but it's really not important. In their room medial sense of you creating a treble clef. The next thing that we're going to learn is called a key signature. And key is spelled just like a key that you unlock something like. But what it does for us is it tells us what notes to play. And if we have a high to low or low to high or low on or a high three. And it helps us be able to figure out. Where to put our fingers a little bit more specifically than previously before, where it was always a regular e1, e2, and e3, and it might change now based on my key signature. Now here's some things to think about. Generally, you have sharp, which looks like a number sign or a tic-tac-toe sign. Or there's nothing there where you have this flat or a series of flat. So it looks like funny looking B. Now, we don't need to necessarily know what all those mean, except you'll see a bunch of them in Rome. Now. This is the next thing that you see right beside the treble clef. This gives us some information that we need to know, even though we don't, we're not diving really deep into what it means. But I wanna give you a little bit of a background of the series of at least sharps. Because when we're armed with a little bit of knowledge that can make other stuff make more sense. If this is confusing in any way, like you're getting too much information right away. It's okay to skip this part of this lesson. But as you get more confident in your music reading, will go back to this and it'll make sense later. Because it is kind of a intergral key part to learning music overall and understanding music theory, at least the remedial music Gary. So I have this staff and I have these sharp things that are somewhere. But where do they go? What do they mean? Your series of sharps follows some easy methods of learning like we've done already about every good boy does fine the face. Upside down. We go, fat. Cats go down alleys eating bugs. And these are our series of sharps or that number sign Little looking thing. So that is kind of funny to think about fat cat scat and getting go down alleys, eating bugs. But it's makes it super easy to learn. So fat cats go down, ALI, eating bugs. So what we're trying to get out of this is the first letter on all of these words, F, C, G, D, a, E, B. So say that a couple times fat cats go down alleys eating bugs, fat cats go down alleys eating bugs. One last time, fat cats go down alleys eating bugs. Now, if we understand our series of sharps, here's our treble clef on our staff. And fat cats go down alleys eating bugs. That's if I decided to put all of the sharps in there. And they go specifically in this order on the, on the correct F like this f that we're using here goes on the top line. Every good boy does fine. It wouldn't go down here on this F. So later that becomes memorized and we don't have to know that right now. But it helps us understand how to play some of the things on the violin and how we're going to use the sharps to our advantage and start understanding them slightly, is when we play an a scale. And we've already played in a scale, but we're going to play it in a way that helps us understand where it is on the violin, where it is on your staff. And we'll, we'll figure that out in the next lesson. 48. Reading and Understanding the A Major Scale Violin: Although we already know, are a major scale, because we've practiced it already. This is the first time we are going to be able to see it in a way that's written out for us when we're reading music and manuscript. Here's some things that we need to know. First of all, we have our staff, which is the five lines. We have our treble clef. Now we have this new key signature. This key signature tells us a couple of things. First of all, it tells us we're in the key of a and we don't have to know right away that it tells us that, that is actually in the key of a. Other than my scale. Starts on an a, F, a C, and ends on a, a, b, c, d, e, f, g. Now, it also tells us that we have to place our fingers in a certain way. Now, this tells us that our F, every good boy does fine. This F note is sharp. So it also tells us that every single f, So in the case of, let's say this was a song, this F down here, F-A-C-E. would also be sharp. So in this case, this f, The only one that we have in our scale is sharp. And on our violin, F sharp is our E string. But Irregular One, One and Julie from the nut, like normal. But that is an F sharp. Now we know what that kind of looks like and sounds like F-sharp. Now that we have this f sharp, we also have C-sharp. And if I follow my C-Sharp over FAC, C-sharp, FAC. C is also sharp. Where is C-sharp as far as it relates to the scale? It's on our a string with our high too. So I have an inch between the nut and the one, and about an inch between my first finger and my second finger. And so I have a high two is what we call that. And that is going to be my C-sharp that I played. I also have this G-sharp here, so I have every good boy does fine. What comes after? F in the alphabet? Abcdefg. So this note, this sharp that's up there is G as G sharp. And that affects this note here, this G, This G that we see. So even though that we're familiar with the a scale, whereas G-sharp on her violin is on the E string. And it's going to be this high too on the E string. So I have an inch between my. My knot in my one and now an inch between my one and my two. And that is your G-Sharp. Now this kind of makes sense for us. I play my regular one open. There's no sharp here, so I just played a regular one. Open, then one, regular one. And I have a high too, which is that C-sharp that we have here. And there's the d, So a, b, c, d, That's the three. So let me mark these fingers down for a, you have open 12. Three, open 123. And we're also going to march down some other things for you. I'm going to tell you that their high 2s or regular ones or regular 3s. This is open, which of course is just no fingers. I have regular one or just as always, we've always put our finger there as a regular one. Your C-sharp is high to one inch away from our index finger. If it was a low too, it would be really close to our first figure, but it's a high two or normal. Our three is regular because there's no sharp there. We have a regular open, they just means no fingers or regular won. A high too. On the E string we have a high two inch away from our index finger and then irregular three. Okay. So I want to play this as an exercise for you first. And I'm gonna point with my bow to what note that I'm playing. So I'm gonna play just to open a and open a is our second string. So first string, second string. So I'm just gonna play this open a, followed by my first finger at irregular one. But my second thing here, because it's sharp as a high two, C-sharp. My very next note is a three, but as a regular three, So it's really close to my two, followed by my open E and I'm on my first string E. No fingers. Now I'm going to put a regular one or just a standard one on my first, my first string, which is an F sharp. Every good boy does fine. F sharp. After that comes a two. And this is a high too, because it's a G sharp. Every good boy does fine. The very next note above F is a g high two inch away from my index finger. And then three is a regular screen, writes really close to my second finger. So let's play this together. I'm gonna play DO, RE, MI, FA, SO LA, TI door will open one high 2-3, open one high 23. And I want to count it out as 12. Ready? Pause, go in or we go, we're gonna play the same time. So here we go. 12, ready? Go. Sort strings. One more time, back to open a go printing. Now we know how to play the scale as far as it relates to reading music. Good job. And we'll see in the next lesson. 49. Understanding the Violin Fingerboard with the Chromatic Scale: To better understand how sharps and flats effect where we put our fingers. We have to know that there's something called positions. And in this course we're only going to ever worry about the first position. There's first position, second position, third position, and so on. But it really means my fingers are staying right about here and not moving up the neck in any way. Now, your fingers are going to cover a certain amount of area on the violin fretboard. And we've talked about this little nut thing a bunch of times. And this box represents your nut and new team nut. Now, these lines that are coming down represent your strings. So this is the E string or the first string. Here's a string or the second string. Here's the D string, or the third string and the string or the fourth string. Now your index finger or you're pointing finger, is going to be in charge of these first two steps. And what that means for us on our violin is everything that we've played for our index finger or one has been about an inch away. And we also have the opportunity to play a low one. And a low one is halfway the distance in between the nut and where irregular one would go. So it goes right about there, halfway in-between the distance. So I'm going to call this a low one. Now, this is reg GW, one, regular one. And that's giving us some understanding, at least of a terminology to use to if I'm using a low one or a one, if this is an irregular f node or F sharp or whatever it might be. So that it gives us somewhere to be able to get to when we're reading music. Now. This covers the ones. The ones. Now I have. I'm going to use lines here for my low two and my high. Now, the difference between my low too and my high two is if I had a regular one, my low two would be really close to my one and my high to be about an inch away. So low to high to a low to a high to low, and a high too. So that's the difference between my low and my high to you. And you can see that there's four different versions of what we've plays upon low on regular one, low to you at a high too, and they're all what we call half steps away. So if you took a keyboard and you went from white key to white key, if there wasn't a black he and middle may only be a half step away. And all of these notes that I have written on the bottom are a half step away, two, and we're going to touch on this in just a little bit. The next thing that I'm going to have is what I call a regular three and I'm going to dot that. So it's a regular three. And then I'm going to have another dot, which is going to be my High three. So the difference between what we've done so far is we've always play with irregular three. So I have my regular one which is about an inch away from are not my high too, which is about an inch away from my index finger. And my three was always rho close to learn my high to wood beam. High three simply means, consider being a half step away from where my two are real close. It's going to be about that in a way just like the rest of my fingers. So now I'm going to have a high three. And this is where this little dotted line is indicated. And that's all we're going to cover. We're not going to cover fourth fingers in this particular course. But what I want to get across is using your chromatic scale, understanding the names of your strings. And if we have a good understanding of what a chromatic scale it is, we can figure out where these notes are on our fingerboard. And when we're reading music, if for, come across something that we're not really sure where it is, we can always use our chromatic scale to fall back on to figure out where that node is supposed to be. Now, our chromatic scale, it falls into half-steps, so they're all real close to each other. And so instead of Doe, mean as Dory, right? So you have these little half-steps and whole-steps. So it's broken up into parts. Now. And I'll say that there's going to be three rules to help memorize your chromatic scale. And the chromatic scale is something that is, looks kind of garbled because we had a lot, a B-flat being C, C sharp, D, E flat, E, F, F sharp, and G. And it looks overwhelming to the beginner who sees this for the first time. But we're going to break it up into parts that help, that makes sense to us, especially if you take it into these rules. So the first rule is, I'm going to underline rule one. If Rule one existed and there was only one rule, it would read this. Eva, a, B flat, B flat, C, D flat, D flat, E flat, F, G flat G, But it doesn't. So the rule looks like this. Rule one is. Flat, followed by a regular note or it's natural. This funny looking square with two sides on it is unnatural. And to even understand it a little bit more, every single note, whether it's a or b or c or d, has its own Sharp, has its own natural and has his own flat. So even though I'm calling these notes a flat, a, and then B flat, I could just as easily call this a flat a, a sharp. But this is kind of a common way to be able to say these, these notes so that you can memorize them in easy way. Now, as long as you know your chromatic scale at the end. And you're used to saying E-flat instead of d sharp. You'll be able to say, okay, well, d was first that I was E-flat and I could say is D-sharp. But in any case, that's for another lesson at another time. Just realized that the notes in rule one, rho one is a flat followed by a natural and unnatural. Notice that I'm not writing a natural or the weird looking box thing. When a letter or a note is by itself and doesn't have a sharp mirrored. It is considered to be natural. So it doesn't have to have the market indicates that it is natural. Okay. So with that in mind, flat, natural flat, natural, flat, natural. And that is rule one, flat followed by as natural. So again, If that was the rule, it would be a flat, a, B flat, and B flat, C, D flat, D, and so on, all the way through the scale. But the rule number two, number two is that there are exceptions to rule number one. And I'm going to circle these exceptions so that you can see them clearly. So the exceptions to the rule one is C sharp, CNC sharp, F and F sharp, so it's C and C Sharp and F and F sharp RMI exceptions. Okay, so now that I have exceptions, I have a, let a be thought being that I have my exceptions, C and C Sharp and F and F sharp. So once we take in our brain and realize that I have rule one, which has a pattern, and then I have a new pattern for the exceptions, I have to memorize these c and c sharp, F and F sharp. And as long as I memorized them, as soon as I get to C, I can remember that there's an exception, so now becomes a flat, a flat rule one exception, C in c-sharp. Rule three. States that after every exception is a note that stands by itself, and I'm going to just draw a box around D and G. So after every circled bit is the box, after every exception is a note that stands by itself. So it doesn't have its own flat or sharp is just NADH from by itself. Again, remember that if I went 1.5 step to the right, I could just as easily call it E flat, D sharp. And I could just as easily if I go backwards one, I could just as easily called C-Sharp, D flat. But because we're using these, these terminologies are the simplistic way to learn chromatic scale, reusing the specific notes because they follow these rules. 123, you're, you're flat to a natural your exceptions and then the note that stands alone after the exception. So when we go to try to memorize our chromatic scale, we're going to say a flat, a, B flat B are exceptions, are C and C sharp, F and F sharp. After every exception, the circled parts is the note that stands alone. So when we say that the next letter in the alphabet and simply d or simply g. So if I said the whole chromatic scale and in a row, and be a phi a, B flat, B, C, C sharp, D, E flat, E, F, F sharp, and G. So I broke it up into its parts again is rule one, a flat, a, B flat B. The circle part is the exception. So now NIH exception is C and C Sharp. After the exception is the note that sits by itself. So it's just d. Once I get done with my exception, I go back to rule one again. E flat, E flat, a, B, B, E, C. How they're the same rule a lot a and d phi E is the flat, followed by its natural. Once we're done with our rule one, we get back into the exception again. F and F sharp. After the exception is a note that sits by itself in S and G. And I know that's a lot to take in right now. So if, if you have that won't like my brain is going a little bit weird now because I'm not accepting all that data. Just stop. Rewind the tape. Listen to it a couple of more times. See if you can write out your chromatic scale. And writing an out maybe 20 times in a row goes a long ways to memorizing it. Okay? Now that we have a chromatic scale and understanding what it is, we have to be able to understand how using the chromatic scale can help us play or violin. So this is our G string. So, and this is our E string. So our first string, this is this line, E string, a string or second string, third string or fourth string. So it really looks like your violin. First string, second string, third string, and fourth string. Now with that being said, my low one, right here is my low oneness and a dot, and it's labeled low one. I have to find g and my chromatic scale. So I have found G, a, B, C sharp, D, E, F, F sharp, and G. What comes after G And my chromatic scale, it starts over again with a flat. So I can also just go right back to here again. So after G, which is G a here, the very next note, or my half, my, my low one. Now that I know what a low one is as now, a lat. Okay. Does that make sense? Now, now that I know that this is a flat, What is my next note in the scale of birds? I've done a flat. And now the next note, my scale is now a or a natural. So I'm just going to write an a in there. So I now I know what the low one and the regular one is on the G string. Now I move to my low two, I've just done a flat and a. So my low to as now B flat. And now what comes next after it? So I have v flat and then i have b. So it's really just the first rule of law, chromatic scale, a flat, a B 5B. After my first rule comes my first exception. I've gotten done playing my low and my high to now I'm on my regular three, so my third finger. And let's just go over this on the violin so we get the best idea. My low one is my regular one, but halfway in between the distance of my my nut and my index finger. So that is a flat. A flat. If I move my finger up to a regular one, I'm now playing a note. Now I have a low two, which means my first finger is close to my nice Second fingers close to my first finger. Now I have a B flat, B flattened. And then I move up 1.5 step to a high too. And I have a B note. So that's what we've covered so far. The next part that we're going to do is we're going to use our third finger. So typically what we learn as we have, we know where one is, our high two is three. This regular three or the three that I just mentioned is while we're gone form. And that's begins my first exception, C. And then C sharp or a high three exceptions. Three and high three. So if I had my regular one, my high too, and my three, the difference between a C note, C and a C sharp is simply the distance between my high 23 being a c, and then the high three being or reach to being about the same distance between my one MIT, MIT one of my three. So now this becomes a high three, C-Sharp. So now, if we're ever reading music, and we need to be able to know where a C sharp or a flat or a B flat. We now can say by using this chart or writing out your own chart. I can get there by being, but I can get to a B-flat by applying a load to or high three for a C-sharp. Let's continue this out. We have a D. Note. That is our third string, 1-2-3, third string D. So if D is the name of my open string, my chromatic scale says a low one is going to be the next note up and my chromatic scale. So that happens to be an E-Flat. So E flat is going to be my low one. After that I have e, i irregular one will be e myeloma because I just got done playing. E will be my first part of my exception. F. After F comes F sharp is my Hi to. So now what? I'm at my high too for the D string. And now my regular three has gone to be a G nota. After gene. I could call it a G-sharp, but in my chromatic scale that weren't learning is called an, a flat. A flat. So I hope this is starting to make sense. And if it's not making sense, that means you're moving through the course too quickly. Is backup. Listen to it again in a couple of times. You'll definitely catch on. But what I'm gonna do is I'm going to write out the rest of these chromatic notes. So we start with a, a. Where do I find a? A is actually my second note in my chromatic scale. A is my open second string. The second string. What comes after a and my chromatic scale on B flat. Then I have C. Excuse me, I have B and my next one. So I have I'll change that to be. So we have a, B flat, B, a, B flat, B. After B becomes our exception, C. After our exception as C-sharp. After our exception is a note that sits by itself, which is D or our regular three. And then we have E flat for high three, E flat. All right? Now we have E flat. The next note that, that we were going to work with is our open E string. So we're just going to find a0. And we found e. After e becomes our low one, which is the beginning of our exception. F. Our regular one, is after f. What comes next? F sharp. F sharp. After F sharp is what? G after, gee, I can continue on or just go back to the beginning again. And I have a flat, then a for my regular three. And then my high three is going to be B flat. Again at any time, I can choose to call the next note that comes higher as a sharp or a flat, one-step lower. But in this particular case, we're trying to memorize our chromatic scale and utilize it to help us find the notes on our violin when it comes to reading music. And, and take some time, really. And when you're going through your scale, it'll look like this. And we don't have to play any notes. But if you go with your open and maybe plug-in or some to give you a signification that we're starting with an open, open fourth string. I'm going to go like this. Put my first finger on a low one, a flat, tender regular one, a, B flat, B, C, C sharp. And all I did is I went from low one to regular one to low to high, high to regular three than the high three. And I'll just send them out loud. That's important to be able to Sam out loud so that you can start to memorize them and do the same thing with D here. So starting with a note, the third string, Fernando, E-flat, low one, regular one, low to high to F-sharp, regular 3G, high three, a flat or G-sharp. And see, see how that works. So you just go string by string. And then you'd say out loud the note as you played them to help you memorize them. That'll do it for this lesson and we'll see you in the next one. 50. Note Lengths with Examples for Violin: Let's take a moment to learn our note lengths. Sometimes we have really long notes and really short notes, some notes in between. And we need to be able to figure out what they look like and their definitions. So we can play them in the right order. Logn node, short notes and everything in between. So we have notes that look like this. And these notes are called whole notes. And pretend that it's a perfect circle by the way. So it's whole notes are worth for the. So when we're playing our instrument, if you're beat structure as 1234 and your bot length would be for all those four beats. So if he had just a single beat than if it was 123 fourths, but I'm going to drag my bow for the entire length of four. Every type of node that I present to you after this is going to be divided by two. So a set of four beats, it'll be too. So I half-note looks very similar to a whole note. And notice it's not filled, then there's just a circle with the space in the middle. Now the only difference here is that it's two beats. And the difference of how it looks is that you'd have this stem on it. So half note with a stem to beats, half note. So when I play my violin, if I beat structure as 1234, my bowl is going to be dragging across that violin for those whole two beats. So now for the next one is going to look really similar to a half note. So a circle with a stem. Except the difference is, instead of it being unfilled, it's going to be filled in. And remember that every set of different notes that we present is going to be divided by two. So if I divide four by two, I get two. And if I do that again, I split it in half essentially is what I'm doing. I'm going to have what's called a quarter note. And that equals one beat, one beat. And if we play our violin to it, and our meat structure is 12, I'm going to play several of these individual one quarter note. One beats 12341000, right? Now, if I divide that again, or I split it in half, if I get 1.5 of a beat. Now, it's going to look like this. It's really similar to what we've had so far. And everything is almost exactly like the whole note was almost like a half node except the data stem quarter note as almost like a half node except it's filled in. Now we have this eighth note. And it looks exactly like the quarter note, except it has a little flag on it. And what do we put two of them together? Side-by-side. They're going to have the flag that attaches both Stems together. Now, if this is 1.5 of a beat, 1.5 of a beat, what ends up happening is you have 1234, and so it breaks it up into semi beats or half days. So if my counting structure again was 1234, how fast these notes would be as 1234. And so you can hear me stop my foot. And that is the beat structure. And I'm gonna play several eighth notes in a row, 12. And now there's other notes with dotted notes and stuff like that, but we're only going to focus on these specific notes. So when we use an exercise to practice, we're going to use whole notes by themselves, half notes by themselves, quarter notes by themselves, eighth notes by themselves. And then eventually move into mixing up your beat structures. So in the next lesson will be due exercises. 51. Note Length Exercises for Violin: Okay, now we're ready to do some exercises to get used to playing these different types of notes and their lengths. So I'm going to give us a good solid beat. And it'll go like this. I'm going to give us 1234 then play one. Now, we're going to start with these whole notes. And whole notes again, our four beats. So our bot is going to go on for a whole four beats. And if you can't get your bow to go all four beats, it's okay to just switch Bose as long as you don't stop your bot. So it'll continue on. And let's say it goes 12. I run out of bow and I just move with the opposite way without making a stop, right? So we're gonna get this done and it's gonna go like this. I want to cut to four. And then when we come back to one is when your bot will start with now. So we're going to be playing on the D string for eight now. So the third string, 1-2-3. And we're going to start 1234 down bow for switch goes 1234 and down, 341234 and down 41234 and down. One. Great job. Now, we're going to do half notes. Half notes are two beats. So when account the same way I'm going to go 1234 and play, right? So we're going to do the same thing that's going to be on the D string. And we're going to start with a down bow on the D string, third strings. So 12341, 111111111. Right? Good job. Now, the next node that we're going to work out is quarter notes. So by B's structures, 1234, by bold change with every single number that I call out one. So again, we'll have a blank 1234 or you don't get anything. Corners, cut it out, and then we're a start on the beginning of no one can gather a realtime. While the district again, starting with a down bow, quarter notes. So 1234, down, down, down. Alright, great job. For the last one. We're going to do eighth notes. So remember that counting structure was beat structures 1234, we count in between those beads. So we go 1234. And right now we're going to count, we're going to make a bot that happens with every one and the next part of it, as in the end, we're going to do an up bow. So every down is number one or two or three or four. And the APOE will always be an so, down, up, down, up, down, up, down, up. Okay. So I'm going to count it out for us with 1234. And then you will come in at one and really dumb down, up, down, up for one. So look like this on the D string. 1234. Down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down, down. Alright, great work. And we'll see you in the next lesson. 52. First Line Of Twinkle Twinkle On Violin Explained + Example + Exercise + Pdf 1: It's time to learn our first son, twinkle, twinkle little star, on the violin. We have a various amount of nodes. And at this point we should start to get comfortable being able to find where these notes are. So we're gonna do a quick overview. And with the overview, I'm going to mark down some fingers for you to make it a little bit easier for you. Okay, so we're starting with these two notes and every single set of notes that we play are into. So look at OneNote, I play one bot, I look at the other note and I'd go the opposite way on my bone. So if I know where my open strings are, 0s or first string, sec, second string a. So I went from the E string and I skip the space, one more in the space down, and I find my second string. From my second string, AI go from there and I take it and I go skip a space, I go down. Now I know that these two nodes are my open D string. So I'm going to above it, right? 00, if I have those two zeros are going to play two opens in row 0 simply mean opens and what string? And I'm going to play him on. I'm going to play the third string open. So I'm going to write a little three. You can see that in there. Now. Now that I have two opens here, what's my next two notes? And these are these two notes right here. So if I have my open first string, I skip a space, my second open string, I can see that these two nodes, or on my second open string a. So I'm going to write 00 here. What I'm going to write a little, little bitty too, if you can see that in your viewing device. That's those both say 2s. So open, open, followed by open open. But they're two on two different strings, the third string and then the second string. So on my violin, my third string is 123, the third biggest string. And I simply play those two times. First time, second time. Now, when I play, again, I'm trying to only hit that third string when I played those first two notes. Up first note that I see in the second node that I see first, unless they see second Note that I see. Now, I'm gonna move my way up to the a string. So how I am able to play these as I move my elbow down slightly and then I find myself that because I moved it down, I'm not too far that I hit my E-string, but I'm now on my a string and I played down and up again. So if I plot these two notes together, I have open, open. Open, open, open B string, open a string, third string, second string. Okay? Now we're moving on that and they have these two notes open. What is here? These two notes, these pair of notes here. Now, when we're looking at these notes, were thinking about, I know where my open string is. So once I find my open string, I'm going to go up from it and say, hey, how many spaces or lines is it a wave from my open string? And since this is one line or space above where my open string ones, I'm gonna put my first finger on the second string a. Since this is higher than the a string these ones are, but they're not so high that it's above where my Easterners, I know that they're on my a string. So these two notes, I'm going to play with my first finger on the a string. Two of them in a row. Sub i play all of these three sets of notes together, or I count them 123456 notes. I'm going to play it open, open, open, open, open, open on the D string, open open on a string, 11 on the a string. So let's play them together three to one. Alright, moving on, we have some of the same notes that we've already played before. And if we kind of figure out where they are, we can look back and say, hey, if I already figured out some of these notes, yes, I did. I can find these notes by finding my open string with first open string, skip and go to my second open string. Or simply known that I've already done this work once by figuring out and saying, oh, this is an open string and it's my second string. Put little two in there to let you know that this, the second string open. Now, all of these notes from here on down will be on your third string d. If I find my D note, here it is again, there, the space below the bottom of space on my staff. And once I go from D, I go up one line or space. And these would be my first fingers. If these are my first fingers, I go up one line or space to these notes. And so now it's a two. From here I go up one line or space again, and that's going to be a three. So let me write these out from the bottom. Open string first, open, open. And I'm going to put a third little bitty three if you can see that. So just know that these are 3s. And because i went up one line or space from my opens, I add one to the value. And these guys are going to be one. If this is a one, and I go one line or space above that, I add one again to the value, and those are twos. Now, I go up one line or space from a two. So this is a two. I add one to the value, and that's going to be a three. So let's just play only this spot right here. And we're going to forget about these opens right here, but we're only going to play 332211, open, open, all on the third string, on the D string. So let's play these two notes first, looks like this. And then these two notes, these 2s and the 1s. And again, these are all on the D string. Last time. And we're going to play the opens, open D string. And now we're going to put them all together. So I'm simply going to play 332211, open, open. 321. Go. All right, so let's take a look at the whole front line again of crinkled twinkle little star. I'm going to play these two notes which are open. And you can kind of see the open circles above there. You have then my second string open here. These are ones. So I'm going to put the first finger on my eight string. Opens again because I've already figured out the a0 over here. I can use the same information again, and these are open on my second string. And then we just got done practicing this little part. 3-3, high to high team won one opened opens, so it's going to be 33. That's right here, then the height. Then a one, regular one ending with D Open. Alright, so we're gonna play this nice and slow, only the first line. And I'm going to play it first for you. So you can hear it all the way to on the second time, go ahead and play it with me. So try to come in right exactly as I, as I come in. So we have example first 32, ready? Go. Alright, good job. And the next lesson we're going to be tackling the bottom line. And we'll do together in the next lesson and I'll see you there. 53. Second Line Twinkle Twinkle On Violin Explained + Example + And Exercise + Pdf 2: Now we're ready for the second line of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star. And let's get on it. So we're going to break up these notes first, get a good understanding of what they are and how we play them. The first two notes of my second line. So this is my first line and this is my second line. The first two notes of my second line are to open a strings. So open, open. And these are a notes, a, a, or second string, the second string. From here on out, we have these sets of notes here, all on the D string. So I can find my lowest note, which is an open on my D string and account up 0123. So I use a third finger and our third finger on these two notes because they're the same. I used math upwards here, i 10123. This time we're going to use subtraction. So if these were two notes were 3s, and I marked him up here for us. If I go down one line or space, I subtract one. So these two notes that we see are twos. So subtract one from three, I get two. Now, these two notes are one space or line away from these two notes, which are twos. If I subtract one from them, so I subtract one to subtract one equals one. So these two notes are ones. Make sure that they're on the right spot. Okay. So so far I have opened opened 332211, and we're going to play those that were played as an example first. And then the second time, you'll join it after quick account. So here's the example. A little slower than that. So as I'm playing them on playing bom, bom, bom, bom, bom, bom. Serve for the bad thing, but you get the idea. So each one of these notes that I see I'm playing a bow for. So down bow, up, bow down, bow, and bow down, bow, bow down bow of bone. Also some folks tend to get confused when they see a 33 together. And some, it's easy to say, well that's 33. Tend to think. Instead, each individual note or number that you see is it's own number. So this is a three by itself and that's a three by itself. And these two together are not 32, it's a three by itself and then a two by itself. These notes that are over here on this side of the page repeat themselves over again. So I went open open 332211. And can you see the pattern open open 3.3.2 to one, open, open 332211. So it happens all over again. Open a, open, a third finger on the D string, third finger on the D string, or the third string, second finger. And then 11 is what we end up with. I'm gonna play this second line altogether as an example. And then I want you to go ahead and try to play along with me when I get all the way through. And then I'm going to I'm going to have a quick count. And then we come in together. We're going to play each one of these notes together. And as soon as we get down to this note, we immediately have to with our bow switch strings and go back to the a string. And then switched strings here again to go down to the D string or in a third string. Here's our example. Three. Alright, great job. In the next lesson, we'll be playing both of these notes together and learning equipped trip so that we can pay the whole song altogether from beginning to end. 54. Putting It All Together All Of Twinkle Twinkle Example + Exercise + Pdf 3: Now that we're getting more comfortable playing notes on our staff and relating to them to a song like Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star. We're going to play this first line. Dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot at the DOM. Then we're going to play the second line, right after the first line. That data dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot. As soon as we get done playing, the second line will go back up and play the first line. On this page. Generally you would see a third line, but it would simply look like the exact same as our first line again. So the whole song goes, twinkle, twinkle little star. How I wonder what you are up above the world so high, like a diamond in the sky. Twinkle, twinkle little star, how I wonder what you are. So instead of having this third line down here and reading it real small, so you won't be able to see it. Well, we're gonna do instead is we're gonna play the first-line, took over the little star Holland or whatever you are up above the world. So highlighted eminent and sky. Twinkle, twinkle little star. How I wonder which one? And I'm gonna play it all the way through first as an example. And then I'm going to count as in. And we're going to play that first line, followed by the second line, then the first-line again, and then we'll be done. So here we go. Here's the example. Starting with the first line. Second line, first-line. Well slower, 321, go. Second line. The first line. Alright, great job. Now we're going to play Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star again. But in the next lesson, we're going to use a drum track to help us keep on time. And I'll see you in the next lesson. 55. Using Drum Tracks With Twinkle Twinkle Little Star Example + Exercise For Violin 4: Alright, we're gonna use some drum tracks to help us play in time. We're going to use this song along with our drum tracks. When he hears drum tracks is more fun to play along with because it almost sounds like you're playing with the band. And number two, it helps us be on beat. Let me describe what we're going to here. We're going to have two long beat, so it has a tick, tick. The second set of beads are exactly how long and fast our bows gone to move. And they're a set of four faster ticks. So I'll sound something like tick, tick, tick, tick, tick, tick. Now those four last ticks would emulate your bot. So tik, tik. This is how fast I'm going to move my bow. So let's hear what that sounds like. Here's the long ones now the quick. What's going to happen is I'm going to play through the song all the way with the drum beat so that you can hear what's happening and can get the feel for it. Once it goes through again, I'm not going to slow down and count. You'll play when the second time goes through. And you'll start out with these first two D notes. So here we go. I'm gonna play first. Second law. Okay, ready? Second law. Okay, now we know how to play with a drum track. What I've done is included a bunch of drum tracks at various speeds. So if you feel like at anytime you're going too fast or too slow, you can simply click on a speed that's a little faster for a year or a little slower for you. So you can play at your own comfortability. Anytime you want to. When playing with a drum track, you're always getting better at playing in rhythm and playing in real time with something else. So there you go, and we'll see you in the next lesson. 56. Lightly Row Explained + Example + Exercise For Violin 5: This is a traditional folk song called Lightly Row. And all of the notes that we're going to be playing in the sun are either on the E string or the a string. There's no notes found on the D string or the G string. What I've done is I've put these numbers and hopefully you can see them. I'm going to call them out and we're going to talk through some of these notes. Not exactly quite as in-depth as we want before, because we're getting more familiar with what we're seeing, how to read her notes, how to find the notes on each string. Let's talk about the notes found on this first line. Now, the first note that we have is on open first string E. The second node that we have is on the a string second finger. And you can see this two hopefully. And this is a two also. Now, there's some differences between the values of the nodes. These are quarter nodes or one beat, the ones that are filled in. And this is a half note where it looks almost like a quarter note, but it's not shaded in. And the difference between these two nodes is that this equals one beat, that equals one beat, but the half-note equals two. So as I've laid open to two, that's really going to be short, short, long. Now on to the next measure and understanding what measures are really important. And this is the first time that we've got a chance to see measures written out. But the first thing that we see as our treble clef and our staff that has five lines. And you see these lines that exist that break up, that these notes, these notes get put into these categories so that I can count them better. I can keep track of counting. What you don't see here is a time signature or a key signature. Because being we really haven't addressed those things yet. So where we're going to put our fingers isn't our traditional knows that we've learned so far. Open, regular one, high 23 for all of our strings. So I've got done looking at our first measure, indicated by our treble clef and our first measure line. And then played open to two, with the length of our nodes being short, short, long. The next measure is three on the a string, followed by one on a string, and then another one on the a string. And just as I had this rhythm, short, short, long, I haven't again, short, short, long or one beat, one beat to beat again, and the fingers are 311. So I'm gonna play these notes for you. Open E string and a string to two short, short, long, followed by 3.1.1 on the a string. Now the next measure is open 123. All of these notes are found on the a string, but all of the notes are quarter notes. Each one gets one beat, short, short, short, short. So I want you to see is this pattern that exists in the sun. We have short notes and then a long note. These long notes being the half notes. If I was only able to say the length of the note with the first line, it would look like this. Short, short, long, short, short, long, short, short, short, short, short, short, long. Alright, that makes sense. And then Yuan with the rhythm of this short, short, short, short, short, short, long, short, short short, short short short, long, short, short short short short short, long, short short, short short short short long, short short short short short, short, short short short, short short short, short, short, long. So now that we have the idea of how long we're going to pay with their bows, either shorts or lungs. Let's continue along with the notes that were playing. So Albany, second finger on the a string, second finger on the a string. Third finger on the a string, first finger on the a string, and first finger on the a string. All of these notes in this measure are all on the a string, open 1-2-3, followed by open 0s, three of them in a row. Now we're onto the second line. I have open E, followed by all of these notes on the a string, 2.2.2, followed by notes only on the a string, 3.1.1. And my next measure, I have open two, open, open, starting on the a string open too, and I switch to my E string, open, open. My last measure, I have 2.2.2 all on the a string. Okay, let's move on to the third line of Lightly Row. Starting on my third line, first measure of my third line, I have 1111 all on my a string. My next measure, my second measure, and my third line. I have 123. All of these are found on my a string. On the third measure of my third line, I have to 2.2.2, and these are all found on my a string. Second String. The last measure and my third line as 23 open. The first two notes are on my a string. A last note is open E. Starting on my fourth line. I'm starting with an open E. Then going to notes all on my a string, 2.2.2. The next measure is 3111, and they're all found on my a string. The next measure I have is starting on my a string open to these notes are all on the a string, followed by notes that are on the E string, open, open, ie. Last notes that I have in the wholesome are 2.2.2. And these nodes are found on my a string. So I'm gonna play the tongue all the way through and then give you a count in after the count and go ahead and play with me in real time, and then we'll get all the way through the song. Now, I've, I've, I've taken the camera and polluted in closer to this. So hopefully you can see, if you have some trouble seeing these nouns. Just message me, let me know and we'll make sure that we get a PDF of this outflow. You, here's the example, starting the first now often two to first-line. Second measure. Measure, measure. Second line. Right here. The last line. 12. Ready to to shore to second line, 12121212. Alright, great job. After you feel comfortable at this song, after you practice with it for a little while, you're gonna want to try to practice with the drum tracks that we've provided. And again, it's going to be a long note, click, a long click, and then click, click, click, click, click, click, click, click, short, short, long, long. Now that you have the tools to play builds to play Lightly Row and along with a backing track. Go ahead and practice those and we'll see you in the next lesson. 57. Song Of The Wind Explained + Example + Exercise For Violin 6: Welcome back and we're going to be moving on to Song of the wind. There are some things that I want to talk about here before we get started. And the first thing that we're going to look at is this time signature. And it's the first time we've seen this time signature is generally written as a number on the top, followed by a line and a number on the bottom. And you can see here that I have a four over four. However, this key signatures as a two over for a time signature tells us a couple of things. And what it tells us is that on the bottom part of this four here, it tells us that a quarter note gets the beat. And what it means is if I take a whole note and divide it by four, I get one beat. Now, because the one or quarter note gets the beat. That means a quarter note is equal to one. Now, the top part here just says that there's four beats in a measure. And remember that these measures are outlined by measure lines. We know what measures are. In this particular case of this song. It's still a four on the bottom where a quarter note gets the beat. But on the topic tells us too. And what that tells us is there's only two beats per measure. There's some other things in the song that we want to be aware of. This is the first time that we've ever seen arrest. And I've drawn out what a restless light. And there's all sorts of different types of rests. There's whole rests, there's half rests, and There's eighth rests. This happens to be a quarter rest. A whole rest would get four beats. A half rest would get two beats, Just like a half note and I, and a whole note. A quarter rest would equal 21 beat or a quarter note. An eighth rest would equal one of these guys, these eighth notes, 1.5 of a beat. And we can see that our a couple rests in our song. And when we come upon arrested just means we simply don't play and that in that space that we see the rest happen. Now some other counting things that we're going to do. We're going to break it up into short notes and long notes to make it easier for us to count. But we're just gonna go over basic example of how this works. Since there's two beats in a measure, each one of these eighth notes counts as 1.5 of a beat. Since there 1.5 of a beat, I can count 12 and, or think of it the, mathematically like half and half equals one, half and half equals two, this equals my two beats and I'm looking for in the first measure. The same thing happens here in the second measure where I have. 2 eighth notes and 2 eighth notes. This equals one beat together. So a half and a half equals one and a half and half equals one. Therefore, I get my two beats by adding them together. Okay? What we're going to think of, however, when we look at these different notes, or does it break up the two different types of nodes in our mind? And we're going to think of the long notes that we see as quarter notes and the short notes that we see as eighth notes. And we're going to call the short notes short or eighth notes. So short, short, short, short, short, short, short, short, short short, short short long. And now this rest also gets a Long Count to short short, short, short long rest, short, short, short, short short short short short short short short short, short short long, short short short short short short short short short, short, short, short, long, rest. Now we have a basic idea of the rhythm of the Sun. There's going to be some more difficult parts of this song. In some small areas that we want to take a look at and practice more often so that we can take care of those spots and get better at them so we can play the song all the way through without having to stop and muscle our way through a certain part, the parts that are in the sum. So we have these parts of the song right here, 1331 open rest. And it happens again right here, 1331 open rest. And the reason why they're difficult is because we're switching strings right away. And we're changing our fingers as we're switching strings. So this is a new skill that we're kind of learning in overcoming. So I'm gonna play just these parts slow. And we're going to tackle these parts first before we start to learn the song together. So we're going to play one on the E string, followed by three on the a string. Sounds like this. After I played those 13 on the E string and a string, then these nubs follow the three and the one on the E string. Now together, they seem simplistic in nature. Why don't I put them together? I have to move my bow rather quickly deployed them in time. So you do for an exercise before you get too far into the Sun, is you'd simply play 13311331, but can never stop until you feel like you can do it pretty good. This is an example of how you practice this measure. And once you get comfortable with playing it at a certain speed and try to play it a little faster. Once we have that, we're going to incorporate this long note followed by a rest. So we have short, short, short, short, long note, rest. Nope. Looks like this and sounds like this. So I'm gonna play it a few times. And if you'd like, you can follow along to reading, go rest. Rest of resetting my boat. Rest. Rest. 1212. A right? I think we're ready to start the sun. I'm gonna make sure that I write some of these notes in for you as we're moving along. So we start on the a string, then we get up to this E string open. Now, notice that I'm only having one open or 1-0 for you here, because the consequent notes after that R 0. So since you see the first 0, we don't have to continually write zeros for us. Also, the further that we get in to reading music, the less fingers markings we're going to have. Because hopefully we're learning with our eyeballs to look at these notes that we see, rather than looking at these finger numbers. Eventually we'll be able to look at these notes versus look at the fingers and know exactly what to play without having to rely on the finger numbers. So we're at the second measure and we're playing openings on the first string. This is the hard part that we worked on, the 13331 open. It happens again, so it repeats itself. And now we have open three on the second string. All of these notes here on the second string, three, 32222111, Open to open E string again. Open 3.3.3, a string. Three, 2.2.2, a string to 111 open. So I'm gonna play the song for you all the way through. On the second time through, I want you to join in as an exercise. And we're going to play the song rather Sloan. It's very typical in music after there be a rest to start with a down bow. Although because this is a more beginning song, it's not necessary for us to do so. So you can use the bow that you feel most comfortable with when we go through the exercise. So here we go. I want to play this first. You're going to play along with a second time. And I'm also gonna play it a third time. So you have another chance to be able to play along with the song. Before I play this song together with you. When we played this quickly, where we go 1331 open. Here's a little trick that can help us have some success early watched my fingers. So I have 13 and I'm playing the three with my third finger. But now to be able to play the E string, this three that we see, I'm simply going to rock my finger down so that it covers up the E string. That way I don't have to pick it up off the string and set it down on the E string. So let's look at this in slow motion one more time so you can see the collapsing of the finger. Not everybody has joins that can collapse that way. But if you do, don't be afraid to use it, and if you can't get your fingers to collapse, it's okay to take that finger quickly, move it over to the other stream, and move around like normal. Ok, so I'm going to play this song for you all the way through from beginning to end. And then on the second time through after you've had a chance to listen to it the first time, get ready. Because as soon as this note comes by again. But I don't want to pray with me and that I want to play it one more time. So I will put it through. Then you're gonna print was made, were repeat and the new party was given at the end of the song. First. Go. Rest. And the graphs. Rest if you're not able to keep up with the speed that are planned at this exercise. We can take our drum tracks that we have and put it along to speed that feels comfortable to you. Try to sync up those first two beats as long BCE took. And then our bone moves with as fast as the next tick, tick, tick, tick, tick. Alright, so now that we know how to play it along with a drum track, go out their practice this song. Get good at these hard parts first. So when we get to them, we don't have to slow down so it can play in real time with that drum track. And that's your goal for yourself. And as soon as you're ready, we'll be ready for the next lesson and we'll see you there. 58. May Song And Dotted Notes Explained + Example + Exercise Fixed Lecture 59 7: Welcome back. Our next song is going to be Mason. And as always, we're just going to discuss the sun before we get too far into it. And there are some different things than we've ever worked on before. So each sung that we do in consequence, should have a building block that is teaching you some new skill that you haven't learned before, and that's our goal here. So some things to look at in the first thing that we see is these dots. These dots change the value of the quarter notes that you see. So if you see a dot, let's say it's a whole note. A whole notes worth four beats. If I add a dot to it. I'm going to sleep this slow because a little bit confusing into here that for the first time, a dot will simply add half the value. So when I say half the value, half the value of a whole note. If a whole note is four beats, half the value is two. So I add half the value of a whole note, two itself. So when I say to itself to four, because its value as four. So if I add f half the value which is two to four, I really add four plus two equals six. So a dotted whole note equals six beats. If this was a half note. A half note by itself without the dot is two beats. If I add, if I have that dotted half note, that means I add half the value of itself to itself. So if it's two beats, I divide that by two, I get one. So two plus one equals M, three beats. So a dotted half-note is three beats. In the case of the notes that we see in this song that are dotted, it's a quarter note. So a quarter note by itself equals one beat. If I dot that, it means I need to have add 1.5, the value of a quarter note back to itself. So if it's 11 is 1.51 of one is 1.5. So now a dotted quarter note is 1.5 beats. This makes it a little tricky to try to, to count. But how we're going to do it is if I noted before, if I had a bunch of flagged eighth notes together, it would be 1234. And so I wanted to use that and my advantage to be able to count here. So it's going to be 1234. This is common time, so it's a sea. See simply means four over four times or 404 time, which means a quarter note gets the beat and there's four beats in a measure. This measure line and the beginning of the song indicate that this is a measure. If I count, I have to come to for so the way that I'm going to count is one and this eighth note gets the beat on two. So 12341234. So you see how that works? We're gonna continue on to see how this works again. So we have 1234. So if I was gonna audibly haven't a rhythm as bom, bom ba, bye above 121212123121 to 121231212. Another way to think of these notes is simply by thinking of it as just a little bit longer than a long note. And remember In Sonne has passed, we used to. We would take the simple approach and say, well, what's the worse, some different notes here. And we broke it up into two main notes, short notes, these eighth notes, and long notes, these quarter notes. Well, we also have another node that is a half note, which is two beats. And we can call those really long. So a little bit longer. I'm just gonna audibly say long, but I'm going to hold it out a little longer than a lungs. So long, short, long, long, long, short, short 12 long, short long, long. 1212. If I didn't want to use 12 as counting for half notes, I could simply just call them a really long, like this. Long, short, long, long, long, short, short, long, long, short long, long, really long, really long. What ever seems easiest to you to actually count it out to use the short counting method that I've, I've used. Whatever you gravitate towards, that's what you should do. So let's just go ahead and play the first line of the sung a couple times. I'm going to play it all the way through first. So you have an audible on Audible representation of the, of the first line. And then we're just going to repeat through that first line a couple times after that. So I play once, you join are with me for two times. Alright, nice and slow. So when I played that version of it, a couple of times, I decided to use my fourth finger for some of these OpenNotes. That's something that you'll learn later. Just know that if you ever see me playing a four, you can always simply played the open note as you normally would. Open E or I played a four. Happens to be something that I have muscle memory with. So if you again, if you see any claim of forests, just simply that open, open note. Okay, now let's move on to that second line. So we don't have any of these dotted quarter notes any longer. So a lot of these notes that we have are going to be pretty simple for us to be able to count. So we have 1234123412341234. Or if I choose my simplistic method of counting, I have long, long, long, long, long, short, short, long, long, long, long, long, long, short, short written on. Now, some, some things that we look at assymetry in songs. Sometimes these notes that you find in the first two measures of the second line are exactly the same notes as the notes that you see in the last two measures of the second line. So it just repeats itself. Other things to keep aware of in the sun. All the notes that you see in the first line are exactly the notes that you see in the last line. So they're symmetrical to, so as long as I feel comfortable and I've practiced the first line enough, I should automatically say, well, i, and as long as I know how to play the first line, I can just go ahead and play the second line because I already know how to play the first line. Other things to think about in this song is, you'll see that I have less finger numbers. So when you're, when you're playing at home, the expectation is instead of you looking at the numbers, so your eyes where they're trained is instead of on these numbers, they should be down by these notes and saying, OK, what notes are they? What finger am I going to put it on? And the more that your brain figures out which finger it is open to, open. Three, Open to open. By using the simple math that we learned earlier on how to figure out what fingers to use. The better off you're going to be when you're reading music in the future. So the quicker we can get rid of these finger numbers, and the more you can just see a note quickly in your brain. Do that quick math. Just know what it is. Eventually, you're going to memorize the note link. You'll look at this note. Here's a o, it's a three on a. I can see it. I know what it is and it just takes practice and repetition to get there. So that's the idea behind seem less of your finger numbers as we go. So I'm gonna play this once all the way through the second line. As soon as that second line is done, you join them. And we're apart two more times to get comfortable with that senate minor. Go nice and slow. Alright, great work. Now we're going to play the song all the way through to the end. I'm going to count it out as so historically that what we've done is I've played it through first so you could hear this time. I'm going to count it out. I'm going to 12. Ready go and then we play. So after that you're going to join in with me and we're going to play this on all the way through three times in a row. And after that, we'll be ready to move on to the next lesson. So here we go. 12, ready? Go to plus one. Or 21, or two or more too. 1221122212 or two. In the next lesson, we're going to discover playing by broader. And it's gonna be more depth, but I'm gonna go ahead and play the song for you one time through using a vibrato segued into an audible representation. And water might sound like when we applied to song. In the next lesson. 59. Intro To Vibrato On The Violin 65: This is going to be our last lesson out of discourse. And it's going to be most likely your most important lesson that would go through. And what we're going to do is work on by bravo. So an example of vibrato is it's going to be that wiggly motion. And you get a lot of feeling out of the musicality that's being played versus straight notes. So there's some tricks to be able to do vibrato. And some of us may have learned by vibrato in correctly. And this is going to be more of a classical style playing vibrato. So here's some exercises that we can do. The first step is getting the right motion. So by vibrato, starts with your elbow and it's kind of like walking up to your neighbor's door and knocking on it. So from the elbow is going away from you and then coming back to its original point, and then going away from you and then coming back to its original point. Now that we have the right motion, we're gonna get into how our fingers flex. And typically when we do this, our hand is going to be faced towards us. But I want to show you this way with my palm faced out so that you can see it on the screen. Now, when we're pressing down on our strings, it's less pressing down and more of the arm hanging down. And that pressure from the arm hanging down, creating the pressure enough so that our finger doesn't slip them. And what I mean by that is you're gonna set your finger down so that the fingers are curled down. And then your arm is simply going to pull down slightly. And what I mean by slightly is like a centimeter. And that centimetre of pressure with that down pressure is going to be what you need to have your finger not slide as we move her arm back and forth. Here are some exercises that we want to try to do with our fingers. Now. We want to make sure that our knuckles are loose. So that means we're not pushing down with a lot of force. Because if we push down with too much force, the finger won't flex. But instead, if I loosen my finger and I'm just taking my fingers, the muscles in my fingers and losing them 100%. You're going to be looking at it as though your eyeballs are looking at your fingernail. Now, if I'm gonna get my hand this way so you can see on the camera. But notice that I have no pressure in my finger whatsoever. And you can see this if I grab a hold as a picture from my thumb and my index finger. Grab a hold of the middle finger and I simply just gently rock it back and forth. Now if I get a hopefully this doesn't get too bright on you. But you can kind of see that it flexes from disjoint and it flexes from this joint. I'll do it in slow motion. So if I had too much pressure, I wouldn't be able to move it. And but I'm not getting a whole lot of down pressure from this knuckle, fewer climbing a mountain and you got to the very top, and you've had to get your fingers over the ledge and then pull yourself up. So right. So you're pulling yourself up. If you had your fingers and they were flat, they would simply fall off. Right. But so in order for your your hand to get a good grip, you'd have to get your fingertips on the top and then pull down. And that pressure downwards with your arm is the thing that you put your pressure with, not the, the pressure of your finger. Tenth sitting. Right. So I hope that makes sense to get yourself to be able to be as loose as you need to. You're going to have your right hand and your right arm out in front of you so that your palms face towards you. Like you're reading a book right? Now. Your hand that you do vibrato with, which is your left hand, is going to be in front of your right arm. Scene. You're going to curl your middle finger around so that it sits right in the crooks of this knuckle and this novel in the middle right there. There's just a little bit of a did it and that middle finger's going to set there. Okay. And so that you can see it. I'm going to turn my finger around, but it's going to be looking towards you. You're going to move your hand this way. Well, this hand stays put. What I meant when I say this hand, it's going to be your left arm stays put. Your right arm, moves back and forth this way. Okay. And when that happens, and you have the right amount of pressure, your finger will wiggle back and forth. And so you can see it, I'm going to do it. And you can see what I'm doing it and putting the proper pressure on that. These knuckles are allowed to flex. And with that flex, your getting that by vibrato motion that we're looking for. If it's too tight, it won't flex or if I loosen that pressure but it is allowed to flex. Okay. So now that we have the right part of our handling, it. And again, for you, instead of me showing you how to do it. Palm face towards you, the other palm face towards you, but it's a high in back of your hand. But you're seeing mine in front of my hand. So it's behind. Right. And then the finger curls around. And then we do the motion. The second step, if you can do that correctly, is to instead of moving the right hand back and forth, you're going to have the right hand stationary. Ok. Now that we have the right-hand stationary, the finger is going to come up and we're going to move from our elbow side to side like a windshield washer. And that finger is going to do all of the work law. Our right hand stays put. So for you, I'm going to just show you on this side, my right hand and my right arm stays put, doesn't move. So you're going to see it stay put. Your arm has been to move side to side. Now you're going to be able to see that my fingers wiggling in that vibrato motion that we want. And I'm not trying to move my finger. It's not actually doing anything except just dangling there. And all over the movement is coming from my elbow back and forth. Right. And if I have that right, if I have the right pressure on my finger than you'll see that movement. And you're going to want to try to practice moving each finger so that you can get each finger to wiggle in the same way, in the same manner as m. Now that we have that, we're gonna do the same thing except you're doing it on a violin instead of your fingers. And it's the same movement, the same, same feel as you did on your fingers, but you're just transferring it to the violin. Once we have that and we feel comfortable about it, the next step. And it's going to be a slightly different movement because what we did before, as we had our arm and we move it side to side to side like a windshield wiper. And this is like first a couple of steps, right? Though the thing that's going to be different for us is what we talked about before. Where our hand goes forward away from you, the straight line, and then comes back to its original point. And I'm over exaggerating this motion so that you can see it on a camera, right? Was actually going to be about this much. It's very small and it's hard to see from here. So I'm actually doing it for the side for you. Very, very, very small. Now, what we're going to try to do is get our finger same thing or that you feel most comfortable with. For me, I'm going to use my second finger. And what I'm doing, vibrato, everything that we've done so far, we've touched our index finger to the side of the violin so that it had a good solid base and didn't move, so that would be more in tune. Now, when we ever do vibrato, we're going to take that finger and move it away slightly so it's no longer touching. Just clearing it so that we have a little bit more range of motion when we decided to do by vibrato. Okay? So this is our first by broader move that we do. We're gonna make sure that our finger doesn't slide on the string. So it's enough down pressure with her arm pulling it down so that it stays in spot. In the spot and our fingers are curled around enough so that it doesn't flatten our fingers when we pull down. Now the motion is going to be directly back and I'll over-exaggerate it for you here. So you can kinda see it all comes from the elbow. None of it comes from arrest. So the wrist isn't moving. The fingers aren't moving. Everything stinks stationary. I'm having a straight rest is not curl to the side one or the other and it's just moving straight back. Back. Just like you're knocking on wood with your knuckles. Alright. Now that we have that idea, we're just going to move back and then back to its original spot. And when I say original spot, it means we don't push the hand forward so that it comes sharper toward us. One cycle of vibrato looks like this. We're going to go away and I'm back to its original point. That's it. So if I do that and I finish off a long note or one that I'm trying to play up as long as I could get that motion that warm and I'm doing it correctly. I have one cycle cycle. The cycle that I'm talking about is just one movement backwards and then back to its original point. Once you get comfortable using one cycle, my grottos, you move along to two cycle vibratos. So it's going to look like this. So two times, one more time. It doesn't matter what notes you're playing. Those are just example notes, alright, ended. And I used to cycles of eyebrows. Don't get comfortable with that. You start going to have to start to do by Brian slightly faster. And you're going to do three cycles of vibrato. So it looks like this. Okay? So I'm going to do the same notes and with three cycles of vibrato. And eventually you'll do four cycles and five cycles and six cycles. Alright? So that's how we build one cycle, two cycles, three cycles until eventually you're doing by bravado. And it sounds good at some things that you're going to want to try as an exercise isn't doing what? When you finally get up to doing several cycles of vibrato, starting slow and then speeding your Bible vibrato. And then adversely taking your vibrato and make them go fast and starting up fast and then going slow so that you can control your vibrato to make it have more feeling and have more control over what you want your vibrato to sound like. An example of playing your vibrato slow to fast. So it looks something like this. And an example of playing your vibrato fast in ending enough slow would look like this. Okay? Alright, well that's some, some tips and tricks on how to play vibrato. And I really appreciate you taking time to go through this lesson. If you ever have any questions about what we weren't worked through, what we learned. And if there's just something that you're not getting or I went through too fast, just let me know and I'll be glad to help you out. So thanks again. And we'll see out there. 60. 50 BPM (Beats Per Minute) Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick: 15 beats per minute. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. 61. 55 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick: 55 beats per minute. Yeah. Okay. Okay. 62. 60 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick: 60 beats per minute. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. Mm-hm. 63. 65 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick: 65 beats per minute. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. 64. 70 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick: 70 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. Yeah. 65. 75 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick: 75 beats per minute. Okay. Oh. Oh. 66. 80 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick: 80 beats per minute. Yeah. Okay. Right. 67. 85 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick: 85 beats per minute. Okay. Yeah. Okay. Oh. 68. 90 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick: 90 beats per minute. Yeah. Oh. Okay. Oh. 69. 95 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick: 95 beats per minute. Okay. Yeah. Okay. Okay. 70. 100 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick: 100 beats per minute. Okay. Yeah. Oh, okay. Right? Okay. 71. 105 BPM Metronome For Scales, play one note per tick: 105 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. Oh. Okay. Okay. 72. 110 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick: 100 beats per minute. Okay. What? Right. 73. 115 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick: 150 beats per minute? No. Okay. Right. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. Yeah. Okay. 74. 120 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick: 120 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. Okay. Right. 75. 125 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick: 125 beats per minute. Oh, okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. Oh, okay. Oh. Ok. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. 76. 130 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick: 100 beats per minute. Yeah. Okay. Okay. Okay. 77. 135 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick: 135 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. Ok. 78. 140 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick: 140 beats per minute. Yeah. Okay. What okay. 79. 145 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick: 145 beats per minute. Yeah. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. 80. 150 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick: One? Yes. Yes. 81. 155 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick: 155 beats per minute. Yeah. Okay. Okay. Okay. 82. 160 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick: One. What Okay. Okay. 83. 165 Bpm Metronome For Scales, Play One Note Per Tick: 165 beats per minute. Okay. Yeah. Okay. 84. 50 Bpm (Beats Per Minute) Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 50 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. 85. 55 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 55 beats per minute. Okay. 86. 60 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 16 beats per minute. Yeah. Ok. 87. 65 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 65 beats per minute. 88. 70 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 70 beats per minute. Okay. No. 89. 75 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 75 beats per minute. 90. 80 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 80 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. 91. 85 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 85 beats per minute, right? Yeah. 92. 90 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 90 beats per minute, right? 93. 95 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 95 beats per minute? Yes. Okay. 94. 100 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 100 beats per minute. 95. 105 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 105 beats per minute, right? 96. 110 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 110 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. 97. 115 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 115 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. 98. 120 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 120 beats per minute? Yes. Okay. Okay. 99. 125 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 125 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. 100. 130 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 130 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. Okay. 101. 135 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 135 beats per minute. Right? Okay. Okay. 102. 140 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 140 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. Okay. 103. 145 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 145 beats per minute. Okay. 104. 150 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 150 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. Yeah. Okay. 105. 155 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 155 beats per minute. Okay. So okay. Okay. 106. 160 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat: 160 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. Okay. And 107. 165 Bpm Drum Track For Scales, Play One Note Per Beat 1: 165 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. Okay. 108. Thank you for taking this Violin Class: Thanks so much for being a part of this class.