Beginner Open Chords for Guitar | Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy | Skillshare
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16 Lessons (1h 20m)
    • 1. Open chords introduction

      1:39
    • 2. What is an open chord?

      1:37
    • 3. Major chords part 1

      6:51
    • 4. Major chords part 2

      9:11
    • 5. Minor chords

      5:34
    • 6. Dominant 7th chords

      7:31
    • 7. Sus 2 chords

      3:44
    • 8. Sus 4 chords

      7:34
    • 9. Add 9 chords

      6:45
    • 10. Major 7th chords

      5:19
    • 11. Minor 7th chords

      4:20
    • 12. Slash chords

      5:28
    • 13. Open chord progression 1

      6:39
    • 14. Open chord progression 2

      1:51
    • 15. Open chord progression 3

      2:40
    • 16. Open chord progression 4

      2:52
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About This Class

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Are you new to guitar and are frustrated with it because you don't know how to play anything?

Let Chris from GuitArmy get you on your path to playing your favorite songs. 

I created this course Beginner Open Chords for Guitar to teach beginner guitar players how to play their first chords. If you are new to guitar this course will teach you the basic chords you will need to play an endless amount of songs. 

This course is not only for beginners. I think all guitar players can find the course useful because it not only shows you basic chords but you will also learn variations of the chords and more advanced open chords.

In each instructional video the chart for the chord is included right in the video making it very easy to learn the chords. 

A PDF chart of all of the chords is also included in the project section of this course. 

You will learn over 30 different open chords in this course. Below are the types of chords you will learn:

  • major chords
  • minor chords
  • dominant 7th chords
  • sus2 chords
  • sus4 chords
  • add9 chords
  • major 7th chords
  • minor 7th chords
  • slash chords

  After you have learned all these great open chords you will play along with Chris on 4 chord progressions. 

This course is designed to be a fun light course that teaches you the basic chords you'll need to know and makes you a better guitar player. 

I look forward to seeing you inside the course!

With GuitArmy guitar lessons on Skillshare you will learn: basic open chords, power chords, barre chords, scales, major scales, minor scales, learn to solo, improvisation, beginner guitar lessons, intermediate guitar lessons, advanced guitar lessons, guitar riffs, rock licks, guitar licks, rhythm guitar, songwriting, modes on guitar, how to read guitar tablature, play a guitar solo, triads for guitar, and much more. 

Testimonial:

Hi Chris, thanks so much for reaching out! I'm about half way through lesson 10 of your Beginner lessons via Skillshare, so I was researching more of your teaching, and what's next... and found GuitArmy! I've gotta tell ya, something about your explanations, your method of teaching, and the detailed resources provided, you've connected so many dots for me -- it's appreciated beyond words! I'm mostly self-taught, regret that I started so late in life, and have tried other online resources, but yours has been the most comprehensive! As a corporate facilitator to adult learners myself, I just wanted to express my gratitude!

Melanie

Meet Your Teacher

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Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy

Your personal guitar teacher

Teacher

My name is Chris Rupp and I'm a guitar instructor and founder of GuitArmy. I am currently teaching live Zoom lessons to students all over the world. I'm a Berklee College of Music graduate and have been teaching guitar full time for over 20 years. I have taught more than 35,000 individual guitar lessons. I love teaching guitar and want to help students on Skillshare become better guitar players. 

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Transcripts

1. Open chords introduction: playing music on the guitar could be one of the most exciting and rewarding things that you ever do in life. I know it has been for me. No matter what kind of mood I'm in, I can find something to match that mood on guitar. I can share my music with just myself, my friends or the world. If you're new to the guitar. One of the quickest ways to achieve success is to learn some basic open chords, open chords or not just some of the easiest cords to play on the guitar but can be some of the best sounding as well. In this course, I will show you how to play more than 30 open chords, many with multiple finger rings. You will learn major minor dominant seventh suss to suss four at nine, major seventh minor seventh and slash open chords. If you learn the cords in this course, you will be able to apply them to an endless amount of songs in practically all genres. In each video, I include a chart for each chord, making it very easy to learn and follow along at the end of the course. I include four chord progressions that you can strum along with me, the cords air highlighted as we play them, Whether you're a beginner or an intermediate guitar player, I think there's something in the scores for you. Enroll now and start learning the open chords that you'll be playing and enjoying the rest of your life. I can't wait to see you in class. 2. What is an open chord?: What is an open court and open chord for the guitar is simply accord that one or more of the strings is ringing open and there is no finger touching it. The open chords are generally the first chords you were ever learned on guitar. By learning the basic caged cords or C, A, G, E and D major and some minor chords, you will be able to play millions of songs. The open chords ring nicer than bar chords, and you don't have to use as many fingers to play them. You'll find that using the open chords is much less tiring than playing other types of cords. As a beginner, you will find open chords and necessity to be unable to play through many songs. As an intermediate guitar player, you will find that the open chords are great to use because they sound great and they give your hands a break from playing physically harder cords. If you're interested in playing and singing at the same time than the open chords or the way to go as you progress as a guitar player, you can then start adding in bar chords and other types of chords into your playing. I created this course because I not only wanted to teach students the basic open chords but also teach the various different finger rings and other variations of chords like Suss to and Suss four chords. I wish I would have been shown all these variations when I first started playing guitar, So let's dive in and get started learning all these open chords. 3. Major chords part 1 : in this lesson, I'm going to be showing you how to play your open major chords. So the first chord that we're going to start with here is a C major chord. Sounds like this. All right, So to build this cord, the first thing we're gonna do is we're gonna take our third finger and put it on the fifth string. Third fret on this note. See, right here they're going to take our second finger and put it on E, which is on the fourth string. Second fret right here. And then the last finger we need to put down is our first finger on the second string. First fret right here on this note. See, So I strum all those together. It creates a C major chord. The notes are C E G C. That's the C major court. I tell people I tell my students that you don't have to. It is preferable that you don't play the six string because that's a low E. It's not incorrect because that e it does fit into a C chord. But generally a kind of muddies up the sound of the corn. So I just suggest that you um, just muted out with your third finger. Got a flesh meat right here. I'm just letting the skin of the my third finger, um, holding this see down on the fifth string. And I'm also letting it mute out the six string by just letting my fingertip touch the string and you're gonna have issues with, um, this finger, your third finger might be touching the fourth string. So you just have to get used to really arching your fingers up a lot to get him out of the way of the other strings. So, you know, don't be don't be upset or frustrated. If it doesn't sound very good right away, you might have to play through it a couple 100 times until your, um your hands get used to it and they start Teoh bend the right way. Um, your this finger here needs the arch up a lot to get it out of the way of the first string just takes a lot of practice, But if you keep doing it, I promise you eventually your hands will get used to it and in the court will sound better . So that is how you play a C major court. Now I'm going to show you how to play an a major chord. I'm going to show you just a plain old a major chord But I'm gonna show you four different finger rings Possible fingering is that people use So the main way to play this chord the way I play it or at least to me it's the main way is I'm going to take my second finger Put it on the fourth string Second fret right here on the new E I'm gonna take my third finger and put it on the third string Second fret on this a I put my pinkie on the second string Second fret on that c sharp on But I'm gonna play the fifth string I'm not gonna play, so I'm gonna mute that out. I typically need it out with my thumb up here. Um, so that's how I typically deal with this cord another way. Sometimes people they don't like doing that, So the other way would be just don't play that string and it don't strum the six string so the fifth string is gonna be open. Gonna have fingers 23 and four and then on the first string is open. So to me, that's how I learned to play it as a kid s. So that's how I like to play the A major chord. But I'm gonna show you a couple different versions and different ways to play it. And you can choose what you one you like the best. Now let's take a look at the second way to play it. All right. The second fingering for the A major chord is the instead of using fingers 23 and four Ah, a lot of books that I've seen on a lot of people will use fingers 12 and three. I'm not used to playing it that way. I feel that my fingers don't fit in there as well as my 23 and four might think he knows. Not very big, but fingers 12 and three is a common way to play in a Major Gordon s. So that's the second fingering. Now let's take a look at the third fingering for the third fingering. What we're gonna do here is we're just gonna take our first finger and barred across strings 23 and four with our first finger. So this finger's gonna cover strings 23 and four on the second. Fret. So instead of using three fingers were just use one finger. If you're playing rock, if you're playing with distortion and you're playing by that that a cord is going by quickly then this is a court that just the one finger method comes in really handy. And with that a major chord The six string is being muted out being meted out by my thumb. The fifth string is open that my first finger is laying across strings 23 and four on. And then I'm just letting any my first finger mute out. I'm just lifting up a little bit on my first finger. Just a mute out the first string play a lot of the C. D. C. You're going to use this thing, this version of this court a lot. Now let's take a look at the fourth fingering for the a major chord. All right, The last fingering that I'm gonna show you is 213 where using your second finger on fourth string. Second fret. Then on the third string second fret You're gonna use your first finger and then you're gonna take your third finger, Put it on the second string, second friend. I think people came up with this thing this fingering because I'm sure some people complain they can't fit all their fingers in their. So if you do it like this, it gives a little room for these two fingers. It kind of puts one back behind the other ones. So if you have big hands, really big, meaty fingers, then this might be a better option for you. I don't like it personally because I'm always afraid my my first finger's gonna slip over on turning into a major seventh chord. But, um, you know, I do know people that use this cord, and as long as the court sounds fine, you're playing the right notes. It doesn't really matter too much how your fingering it, Um, but like I said, if you have big, big, thick fingers, then this might be the best bet for you. But this is the 123 and four is the version that I would suggest using. So that's how you play in a chord and you have four different fingering is to choose from. Now let's take a look at the next chord 4. Major chords part 2: Now we're gonna take a look at how to play a G chord. This may be the most common chord on the guitar in the key of G. I think there's Primor songs written in the key of G Early is using whether if you're using a cape Oh, using the chords G, C and D is probably the three most common chords played on the guitar. All right, so this is how this is. What I would say is the first fingering how I would suggest playing a G major chord. Sounds like this. So we're gonna start here. I consider this kind of the lead finger. I'm gonna put my second finger on the six string third fret. That's the new G right here that my first finger is gonna go on the fifth string second friend on this Be. Then the fourth string is open. The third string is open. Then I'm gonna put my third finger on the second string. Third fret on that D and then lastly, I want to put my pinkie right here on the first string. Third fret on this G So all the notes because G b d g d A. G at the top there. So? So this to me, this is the most useful way to play G chord. There are other finger rings which we're gonna get into. But this is the way I think that is probably the best way for you to learn how to play a G chord. No, let's take a look at the second way. Okay, The next way, Toe finger, a g major chord. I think this way you will see him books a lot. To me, this weighs more useful using two fingers on strings one and two. But this way, I think it's slightly easier for a beginner. So that's why you end up seeing this this version of this fingering, um, in instructional books, we're gonna once again, we're gonna put our second finger on the six string third fret Our first finger's gonna go on the fifth string. Second fret right here. And then what we're gonna do is we're gonna put our third finger on the first string. Third fret where that G is on, then strings three and four. Just open this open D in this open G. So it's going to go, um, 21 open, open, open. And then our third finger right here. And for this court, you want to strum all six strings on That is the second fingering Fergie. Now, let's go ahead and take a look at the third fingering. All right, this next fingering the third fingering that I have here is kind of a kid's way to plant where I'm We're not gonna play the six string or the festering. That's why they're Xed out. But we're gonna let the 4/3 and second string ring open. Those three notes are D G and B. Teoh. Create a G major corden, e g, b and D So we can just let those three strings ring open. And then we're gonna take our third finger here and put it on the first string. Third fret, and we're just strumming strings four through one. Like I said, that's kind of like the kid version. It's the certainly the easiest way to play G corn. Um, so that's that fingering. Now let's take a look at, um, the fourth fingering okay for the fourth fingering of the G chord, we're going to start here on the six string with our third finger on the third fret right here on this J we're gonna take our second finger on the fifth string. Second fret, and then we're gonna put our pinky on the first string. Third fret. We're gonna play like this now, This seems really weird at first, but in reality, if you have a song that's going to go between G and C, and a lot are quickly that this this fingering can actually be pretty helpful because I can go from G to see without a whole lot of work or if I need to go from a G chord Teoh geese us for this kind. That's a very it's a very nice little poor progression. There s Oh, I used to really despise this court. But over time, once you get used to it in your hands and grab it, it can be It's a helpful option. So you don't always have to play G to see like this. You could do this. That's my fourth version of how to play a G. So I give you given you four different options here. This is the 2nd 1 the 3rd 1 in the 4th 1 So now let's take a look at how to play the next court. Now we're gonna take a look at how to play an E Major chord. Looks like this. So the six string is gonna be open. We're gonna put our second finger on what I would call 52 5th string. Second fret. Then we're gonna put our third finger on the fourth string, second friend. I'm gonna put our first finger on the third string on this G 3rd 3rd string first fret which is G sharp pair. Then the first and second stringer open. So it looks like this sounds like this. Ah, it's a great great chord for guitar because your lowest string is an E A lot of songs are written out of a key Be So you gotta now play good e major chord Once again we have open second finger on the second fret on a 42 4th string second fret and we have second finger on third string. First fret waiver, first finger and 1st 2nd string open. That is how you play an e major chord. Now we're gonna take a look at how to play my favorite open major chord. It is a D major court. Just a great sounding chord Might be one of the might be the easiest major chord open major court to play is D chord. So what we're gonna do here is for the six string, we're gonna mute it out with our thumb. Either that, or we just don't play it. You can still play in a discord Your thumb back here strumming strings one through five. But I typically will use my thumb to do Ah, flesh mute or just muted out there So the six string is muted The fifth string is open, the fourth string is open. And then I wanna put my first finger on the third string second friend. Then I'll put my third finger on the second string. Third fret. We're here on this D that my second finger is going to go on the first string. Second fret. So I'm using my first finger, third finger, second finger and I'm gonna because my muting out the six string I'm able to go ahead and strum e construct all six strings on it will sound fine. What I typically do is that when I'm strumming, I tried it target usually strings one through four andan If I accidentally hit five, it's not a big deal because it's the fifth of the chord this open a and it sounds fine on. And if I accidentally hit the six string, it's OK because it's muted out. But I generally try to target Strings one through four, and that's how you play an open D major chord. This is probably might be the first chord you probably wanna learn, even though I showed you a couple other ones earlier, Um, just a really great core. There's so many songs that millions of songs that use this court said, This is a definite must know corn. Now let's go ahead and take a look at how to play the next chord. Okay, The last major chord that we're gonna take a look at is an f chord. This is not an open court, but the reason I put it in is because it's extremely common. And if you play songs with a lot of open chords, Ah, lot of times there's certain bar chords to get thrown in there after is one of them, so I'm gonna show you an easy way to play an f chord. This would be the full bar chord this way. But that's if you're not used to barring your finger across the whole way across like that . It's very tough if you're just beginning. So this is probably the easiest way to play an F court as a beginner. So what we're gonna do here is we're going to start with our third finger. Tell me on the fourth string. Third fret right here on this half. They're gonna take our second finger. Put it on the A here on the third string second, Fred, our first finger is going. Teoh Ah, you're going to bar this first finger across strings one and two on the first fret. Let's call the bar when you have one finger holding more than one string down same time. So what we have here is, um, the notes go and they cf now strings six and five. We're not gonna play. That's what makes this slightly easier playing in the regular bar corn s. So we're just gonna play just strings 123 and four. And that is how you play in f major chord. And that's how you play your basic open major chords 5. Minor chords: in this lesson, I'm going to be showing you how to play your basic open minor chords. For the first minor chord, we're gonna take a look at an A minor chord. Looks like this. All right, So, typically to build this cord, the first finger I put down is my second finger on the fourth string. Second friend. When is he right here? That I put my third finger on the third string Second fret on that at it and on that a and my first finger's gonna get right here on C, which is on the second string. First fret then the first string and the fifth string I'm gonna let ring open And then I typically mute out the six string was when I strum this a minor chord I kind of want to hear the A in the bottom. Unless for some reason I don't, then I can put the in the bottom Doesn't sound too bad with the in the bottom. But I generally just meted out you want to get a right. So once again, the six string is muted or don't play it fits string open then fourth string second friend , third string second fret second string, first front and in the first wave, that is how you play an a minor open chord. Now let's take a look at the next chord. Now we're gonna take a look at the easiest open court that there is the play e minor away. All right, so for the six string, I'm gonna have that open. Then on the fifth string second fret. I'm gonna put my second finger here on that would be that I'm gonna take my third finger and put it on the fourth string. Second fret right there. That's an E. And then for strength 12 and three, they're just gonna be open. So I'm only putting two fingers down on strings four and five on the second. Fret. I think this is the fingering I use figures two and three have a lot of students. Sometimes people will use fingers one and two that that doesn't bother me too much. I don't I don't fight people if they want to play this. If you're going from a G de miner, it's kind of the first finger staying the same. So someone to do that I'm not gonna fight him too much on that. But this This is how I would generally play. Because when you play a major, use these two fingers here, Major E minor E dominant seventh. You know, you end up, there's a lot of chords you can play with these fingers two and three. So that's how I suggest that on that is how you play an E minor open court. It's a beautiful chord. Now we're gonna take a look at a D minor chord. It looks like this. So for the six string, I typically will use my thumb. I generally I'm just not going to strawman, but I usually have my my thumb up here on the six string beating it out just in case I accidentally hit it. It ends up getting muted out right to the six string You don't play. The fifth string is open. The fourth string's open the open D since is a d chord. Then we're gonna put our second finger on the third string second fret, and on that a we're gonna put our third finger here on the DE on the second string. Third fret. We're gonna put our first finger on the first string first fret which happens to be an af So this is what's gonna look like it, Sally on that is how you play a D minor open chord. All right, The last minor chord that I'm gonna cover as a B minor chord It is not It's not an open chord like this, like, you know, like a C chord or an acorn where there's a lot of open strings ring Alan g chord because it's basically a bar according just how you would as a professional guitar player, you play like this, but this cord B minor court comes up a lot just like the F court thebe Minor chord comes up over and over and over when you play a lot of chords in the key of G maybe e minor. You know, whatever a major the B minor court keeps coming up, so eventually you just have to learn how to play a B minor on. This is, uh this is a way that there's no barring involved, but there's also no open chords. So what we're gonna do is on the six string we're not gonna play. I'm not gonna muted I that I'm just not gonna play it. And then on the fifth string, I'm not gonna play. And then my third finger's gonna go on the fourth string fourth fret right here. That f sharp, my pinky is gonna get right behind it on the third string. Fourth fret right here, which is a bee. My second finger is gonna go on the second string. Third fret We're here, which is a dean, the dean. Oh, right there. My first finger is gonna go on the first string. Second fret which is an f sharp. Uh, so I have I have My am third thing here is gonna go forth, Fred. Fourth fret third fret second friend right there. And this is how you play a B minor chord. And that's how you're gonna play your basic open minor chords. 6. Dominant 7th chords: thing in this lesson, I'm going to be showing you how to play open dominant seventh chords. So the first dominant seventh chord we're gonna take a look at is a C seven chord e could say a C seven court or a C dominant seventh chord When someone says, ah, letter like C and then has a seven behind at sea seven. Um, that is a dominant seventh chord. So when you hear, see 787 it's implied that it's a dominant seventh chord. All right? And to play that chord, we're going to We're going to not play for this court. I will actually mute out the six string with my thumb. You don't have to, though. You could just not play it. If you don't want to, then we're going Teoh, we're gonna take our third finger and put it on the fifth string. Third fret on the sea right here. Then we'll take our second finger, put it on the fourth string, second friend on the noti. Then we're gonna take our pinky on the that would be the third string third string. Third fret right here. They were gonna put our first finger on the second string. First fret on that. See, right here. And then the first thing we're gonna play open. So sometimes this seems like a kind of a complicated cord to grab. So what, I tell people, it's just the C chord with your pinkie on the third string. Third fret. So don't worry about trying to build this little these, these three notes and then get this finger down. Just grab a C chord, then put the pinky down. It's a much quicker way to play that C dominant seventh chord. Here it is. One more time. Ah, that was a C dominant seventh chord. Now we're gonna take a look at how to play in a dominant seventh chord or in a seven chord . So for the six string, we're gonna leave. We're not We're not gonna play it. If you wanted to play, you could, But we're not going to and eso when I typically will mute this. So if I'm playing the cord, I usually just meet it with my thumb up here. But you don't have to. The fifth string is gonna be open. Then on the fourth string second friend on this E right here. We're gonna play that. Then the third string is gonna be open the open G. Then on the second string, second fret. We're gonna put our third finger and then the first dream eyes open. So this is Ah, pretty easy dominant seventh chord, because you basically it's just two fingers on the second fret on Strings two and four s. So this is how you play in a seven or a dominant seventh chord. Now we're going to play a G dominant seventh chord. We're gonna start here with our third finger on the six string Third fret when this G right here, then we're gonna play on the fifth string second friend when this be 3rd 2nd finger, and then the strings 43 and two are open. And then we're gonna put our first finger on the first string First fret right here on this half. So we put all that together. That creates a G dominant seventh quarter of G seven court G courtroom would normal selling this turn into a dominant seventh chord. We have to put in a flat seven right here, or and 1/2. We have to put in F in there some out. So we change our fingering and then this is how you would play a G seven or G dominant seventh Chord. This is how you play a D dominant seventh chord. All right, so I like to start on the bottom here. So on the six string, I'm gonna mute out my thumb. The fifth string and the fourth string are open. And then on the third string, second friend on this area hearing was starting my second finger that on the second string first fret. I'm gonna put my first finger on dawn. The first strength second friend, my third finger. I think this is kind of like a little a little triangle Kind of makes a little trying to go appear to Here is kind of the opposite of De. Here's a d chord. If you took the d chord and flipped it over, it would look like that. So once again, we have Don't play the six Open open, then second fret first friend and second friend And this is how you play a D dominant seventh chord or a d seven chord. The next dominant seventh chord. We're gonna take a look at is an E dominant seventh chord I showed you before with the major courts to play like this. Turn that into a knee dominant seventh chord. Just take off your third finger. Eso It's ah tonight, easy core to play on any two fingers. So if we start from the six string is gonna be the six string open, Then on the fifth string Second fret. I'm gonna use my second finger on the note, Be right there and then the fourth string is open. Then on the third string, first fret on this g sharp, we're gonna be used our first finger, and then strings two and one are open. It's a nice, easy court. Apply Ah, different version. That court. If you I wanted Teoh put your pinkie on the second string third friend, you're basically doubling up this d here instead of kind of kind of adding another date. It's the fourth string open that your flat seventh of the dominant seventh chord way could put this d here in a swell. Do you play like this that this is the normal way to play it most common way, I should say. And then with this d in here. It's a little more advanced. It's kind of it's cool sound. It sounds good. That is how you play an E seven or any dominant seventh chord. The last open dominant seventh chord we're gonna take a look at is a be dominant seventh chord. Kind of a tough cord to grab. All right, let's go ahead and build it on the six string we're going to Uh uh, we're not going to play the six string. I use my some here, like, own a lot of the other ones to mute it out just gets meted out, but you don't have to strum it. And then on the on the fifth string second fret we're gonna put our second finger. Will that be right there That our first finger's gonna go on the fourth string? First fret on that d sharp and on our third finger is going to go on the third string. Second fret on that a right here with second string is opened. And then our pinky is gonna go on the first string. Second fret right here on that f sharp. So, like I said, this is kind of a tricky court to grab. Typically, what I would do is train your hands to grab these This little triangle here, this on threats to 12 on strings 54 and three. Here. I usually tell people Grab that first, and then if you can get your pinky down, more power to you because if the court progressions gone by, you might go by really quick. So if you can at least grab these three notes and maybe hit the second string open, then you already have four out of the five notes covered already in the court. But this is how you play a B seven or a be dominant seventh chord, and that's how you play your open dominant seventh chords. 7. Sus 2 chords: Does anybody want to learn how to play some suss two chords? I'm guessing you might, because you're here. Let's go ahead and take a look at how to play them. So for the first suss to cord that we're gonna learn we're gonna play a DCs to cord. Here's how you play D chord and play decides to cord You just take off your sect finger All right, So if we're gonna build that the six string, we're gonna mute it out or don't play it the fifth and the fourth string, they're open. So you could just let him bring open. Then we're gonna put our first finger on the third string. Second fret, and that's where a is. Then we're gonna take our third finger and put it on the second string. Third fret on this D and then the first thing we're gonna let that e ring open So this would be a D chord D major, and then assess to cord is basically a suspended chord. So what I think of that is we're getting rid of the third, the third in the court. This is the root third and the fifth of the chord we're getting rid of this. Third, we're putting in the second basically a major second above this. The whole stepper above this d would be an E or this that first ring up. So we're getting the suspended. We're getting rid of the third note in the court putting in the e, which is the second, and that is how you play a decides to cord. This court gets used commonly. When you're playing a D chord on and you'll hear people just take your finger off. It's a nice sound. It's a way to vary up. If you get kind of bored just playing a D court a lot, you can take your finger off, fancies it up a little. And that is how you play a d suss to cord. Next, we're gonna take a look at how to play an ace Us to cord. It sounds like this. I think this is a pretty great sounding chord. So it build it, we're going to mute out the six string. We're gonna let the fifth string open. Then we're gonna put our second finger on 42 the fourth string second friend on this E I'm gonna put our third finger on the third string. Second fret and say they were going to leave the second string, the B string open and and then the first string open as well. So it sounds like this. You would typically playing any major chord like this with the getting a C sharp on the second string second friend. But you could take that finger off, put in the open be or the second turns into a really nice embellishment. It really compliments works well with the Accord. The reason I like the suspect ords is when you hear it, you can't tell. Is it a major corn? Is it a minor chord you can't tell? Because there's no third in the court. You just have, like a root fifth runes a second and then the fifth again, the substitutes and the suss fours, I think, are pretty cool cords. And that is how you play an ace us to court. And that is how you play your open suss two chords 8. Sus 4 chords: in this lesson, I'm going to be showing you how to play some open suss forecourt. All right, for the first suss four chord, we're gonna take a look at probably the most common one. And that is a D. C s four chord. It's a very cool chord. Normally, you know, you play d like this on, uh, with the substitution. Take your finger off. Now what we're gonna do is you can add your pinky on the first string third friend, and it turns it into a D. C s four core. Because here's the third of the cord from here to here is a major third interval from this deed F sharp, eh? So what we're doing is we're putting our pinky down and it's just putting the This is a major forth from here. Teoh. It sounds like a free fallen from Tom Petty. What other songs? How about Stairway to Heaven? Ah, there's a lot just tons and tons of songs. I wanted dead or alive Bon Jovi, where he's, you know, it's very, very common, um, to use the d chord and the DCs for record. Any time I know that someone's playing a D cordoned, and I hear something changing with the D chord. Either take this finger off. I put my pinkie down on and trying 99% of the time. That's what's happening. They're doing something with these fingers. It's not guaranteed, but that's probably what's happening. So this is a very cool sound, cool sounding chord and it's used a lot. And that is how you play a d suss four chord Next, we're gonna take a look at how to play an ace US four chord This is how you play in a cord like this. Three aces to we took the pinkie off Now for the aces four. We're gonna put the pinky dad back down, but we're going to slide it up to the third fret. But this D in here, which is Ah, fourth above in a so to build that we're going toe We're gonna not played the six string or muted out fifth string Open, fourth string. Second fret we're going to use our second finger. Then we're gonna use our third finger on the third string. Second fret, Then we're gonna put our pinky on the second string third fret and on the first string. It's open. So we get this. It's a lot times This is used in conjunction here with with an a chord. So if I hear something where I'm looking pretty pretty sure, I think it's an accord. But something about it slightly different. Then normally I'll try. Well, usually try a suss forecourt, see if that's it. And then maybe I'll try this us to. But, ah, lot of times I find that it's, uh, you know, the people are changing it to a suss forecourt. So this is how you play in a suss forecourt. Very nice chord. The next suss four chord that we're gonna take a look at is a G suss forecourt. Sounds like this. All right, so how we're gonna build that is on the six string, I'm gonna put my third finger on the six string third fret, Then on 52 5th string second fret. Gonna put my second finger. Then the fourth string is open. The third string is open. I'm gonna put my first finger on the second string. First fret on this. See, right here. That's where the four is. Because the B is the open third B is 1/3 major third interval above a G. So when I put that see in there, it turns. It basically turns it into the suss foreign, putting it for in there. And then I'm gonna put my pinkie on the first string. Third fret to get this G right here. So that court sounds like this. The cord works really well with if you play g court, I think he was hammered this finger down to go from Jean Jesus for that. Just just a great sound. You hear this occasionally in songs, But this is one of those things where no one taught me when I was young. How to play G chord like this s o. I was always confused with how are they claim the GCS four. They must be going planet like this one. In fact, there are a lot of times we just playing it over. That's a great little combination there the G major to Jesus for that is how you play a open GCS four chord. The next US four chord we're gonna take a look at is how to play a cease us for. I just think that's a fantastic sounding court. So to build that we're gonna start with the six string Don't play it or mute it. I'm personally going going to mute here with my thumb and then on the fifth string third fret on this. See here we're gonna use our third finger than the pinky is going to go right beside it on the fourth string. Third fret. The third string is open the second string first fret on on this. See right here, play that in. The first string is open on that e. So this is another just like the other ones where you could go from the C chord but your pinky down put the fourth down this F hair to get between the two. You wouldn't even have to raise this finger up second finger. You could just go e I find it very nice and comfortable with my finger off. But this how you play a cease us four chord? Another great sounding court The last US four chord we're gonna take a look at it is an e suss forecourt. This how you play an e major cordoned than Teoh. Add in the fourth there for the suss for which gonna put a pinky down on the third string. Second fret right here. Put this a here. In a way, we're gonna build that for the six string. Wanna Go six string, Alban. Then our second finger's gonna go on the fifth string. Second fret, then we're gonna put a second finger on the fourth string. Second fret, then we're gonna put our pinky on the third string. Second fret on. And then the second and the first string just ring opened like the other suss. Four chords. You could play the major and then dropped pinky down toe. Create the suss for a lot of times. That's what you'll see in a song. It'll say. He says 40. And that just means they're putting their pinky down and lifted it up on That is how you play an e suss four chord That's how you play your open suss forecourt 9. Add 9 chords: in this lesson, I'm going to be showing you how to play some ad nine cords. All right, The first ad nine chord that we're gonna take a look at is a C at nine. It's a very cool chord. It's used a lot. A lot of singer songwriters. The book. The reason I believe this court came about was If you're playing G and you want to go to sea, that's kind of a tough transition. You have to change the whole shape of your hands. You have to, uh, you know, in the direction of your hands kind of going eso I think at some point someone realized that if I just went like this and move these two fingers over things the G chord and this is most of us see court, the anything that's not a C is this No. D right here where you'd normally be playing playing like this, You would have to see here if you just leave this note in here. All the notes are in a that belonged. All the notes in the court belonged to a C court, except this Dean. And that is the ninth because this ninth happens to be 1/9 above this. This, uh, see right here? What that means is, if I played the scale 123456789 So this this note is 9 9/9 major, ninth above this. See here this route. So All right. So let's talk about how to build that chord. All right? For the six string, we're gonna mute it out. E I usually do that with this finger right here. My thumb might touch it, but I'm gonna do a flesh meat there so I don't have the work when I'm strumming, I don't have to worry about hitting the six string. It gets muted out automatically, so the six string is muted. Then I wanna put my second finger on the fifth string. Third fret, and my first finger goes on the fourth string. Second fret way. Have that right there. This see? Does he The third string we play open, which is G Put my third finger on the second string. Third fret on that d right there. That's the at nine. No, I put my pinkie on the first string. Third fret, which is G, which is the fifth That is how you play a C at nine board. That court is typically like if you're playing a song where it has been in the key of G. You might be a lot of singer songwriter type songs. We'll just keep these fingers down little time. So they're going to go for G. Leave a C at nine, maybe e minor seventh, maybe for ah, you see that a lot in those types of court progressions, so see at nine is a very useful little cord to know the next ad nine chord we're gonna take a look at is an E ad nine. So this is how you play an E major court. They were gonna take our pinky and just put it on the first string. Second fret e Firstly, don't use this court a lot, but it's not a band. Sending toward E probably would might. Maybe I would add my pinky right now. Ah, it's not bad in court. I just first thing. I just don't use it very much. That is an e ad nine. Let's take a look at how to build it. The six string is gonna be open. Then our second finger is going to go on the fifth string Second fret And on that be right There are Third Finger's gonna go on the fourth string. Second fret e r First finger's gonna play the third string First fret which is a g sharp The's second strings opened and then we're gonna put our pinky our fourth finger on the first string. Second fret like that. That is how you play an E at nine Chord. Now we're gonna take a look at a great sounding chord. It is an E minor nine or any minor add nine. So what we're doing here, Is this what it looks like? It sounds like Z really a pretty incredible sounding chord, and it's very easy to play. That's why I included Normally, I don't think of this Court has an open court, but four out of the six strings air open, so I think that I think that's good enough. So to create this court that the six string is gonna be open. We're gonna put our first finger on the fifth string, second friend. Then we're gonna take our third finger and put it on the That would be the fourth string, fourth fret and then strings 12 and three Which is gonna let it let them bring open way End up with the sound. Ah, it's pretty great sound. You play a minor like this Thats f sharp pair that when you add that nine makes a pretty incredible sounding chord. I'm sure you've heard. Maybe not, but songs will do this just awesome sounding chord. And that is an e minor at nine Chord. Then we're gonna take a look at how to play in F Add nine Chord. Previously in the class I tell you how to play an F court mef major looks like this to switch it to the ad nine. What we're gonna do is we're just going to take off our second finger. And basically what we're doing is we're taking this a here, which is the third of the cord, and we're gonna lift up and then we're gonna play the third String Open, which is the G, which is the 9th 9th that we're adding eso it's going to go. That's how you how you gonna play? That is the fifth and sixth string. We're just not gonna touch him. The just don't play those on the fourth string. Third fret. Um, we're gonna play this f here, the second string. We're gonna play open, which is open G. And then on the first and second string, we're gonna play the first fret by barring across there for both of those, that's that's an Afghan ISI. So it's selling really cool setting cord. It seems to me like it would be great. Teoh go between 1/2 And that court, that would be really good in a court progression. And that is how you play an F at nine. And that's how you play a couple different ad nine cords. 10. Major 7th chords: in this lesson, I'm going to be teaching you how to play some major seventh chords. So the first major seventh chord, we're gonna take a look at its A C major Seventh court Sounds like this. So what a C major seventh court is is it has 1/7 a seventh above a sea is gonna be this. Be right here If you play a C major scale goes 1234567 So we're gonna dio instead of playing a regular see court like this with the sea here, second string, we're gonna take our first finger off. Play that open be and that is a major seventh, same nose right here. Build that cord. We're not gonna were gonna mute out the six string or not play it. I tend to meet it out my third finger once again doing a flesh meat right there. So that would put my third finger on the fifth string. Third fret, and then I'm gonna put my second finger on the fourth string. Second fret on this E right here. And then that's all. I'm gonna do it strings 12 and three. I'm just gonna let him bring open and then I'm gonna strum strings one through five on That is how you play a C major seventh chord. Next, we're gonna take a look at how to play in a major seventh chord. This is how you play in a major court, and then to turn that into a major seventh chord. What we're gonna do is we're going to take our third finger, move it over to the second string second fret we're gonna put our first finger on the third string. First fret. Sounds like that. Let's go through how to build it. The six string, What I like to do. I'm not gonna play the six string, So I like to meet this one with my thumb. You can do that are just not strong. It set the fifth string. That second string. The string is over, and then we're gonna play this. I need this key here. Right on the fourth string second friend that our first finger's gonna get g sharp on the That's the seventh there on the third string. First fret right here. Then our third finger is gonna be on the second string. Second fret, which is playing the C sharp right here. Then the first string is open. So the major seventh chord it's a jazzy record. Its fans here if you want it If you're playing a song and a just isn't getting it done for you you just want something that sounds a little different Then you may want to try a major seventh chord A little fancier, a little prettier But you spend time with kind of songs typically in, like, pop songs like they don't use a lot of major seventh chords But this is how you play in a major Now we're gonna take a look at a D major seventh chord. It sounds like this right to build that. What we're gonna do is we are not gonna play the six string, so we're just not just not strum it or you commute with your thumb The thin in the fourth string. We're gonna play open this nay in this dean. Then we're gonna take our first finger, and we're gonna bart across the second fret on strings 12 and three way. You just have to hold this down. So it's a pretty easy core to play. Obviously you can see. I'm just using one finger, and this is what it's gonna sound like. Um, uh, that is how you play a D major. Seventh chord. Now we're gonna take a look at how to play a G major seventh chord. You play a G chord like this was one of the ways. Give it your pinkie and put your first finger on the first string, second friend, You end up with this beautiful G major seventh chord. I first remember discovering this court playing a song by the Eagles. I don't remember which song it is, but they go to Jordan right from the G chord to a C major seventh and then to a C corn. I thought I thought that was just a great, great way to go to that court without going toe like a jazzier corridor like this. Thats one. I just thought that was a beautiful way to go from G Major, the G major seventh. Let's go ahead and take a look at how to build that. What we're gonna do is we're going to put our second finger on the six string third fret. That's where G is. And then the fifth string. We're gonna We're gonna meet that out. And how we're gonna meet that out is this Finger is going to make sure that that is touching the fifth string. All right, so that's gonna meet that out, All right? And then for strings for the open d. We're gonna let ring and then the third string open, we're gonna let that ring. They would have our third finger on this d right here, which is on the second string. Third friend is the fifth of the chord thin this f sharp here on the first string. Second fret. That is the seventh note. That's seven there. So this is how you play in G major. Seventh chord and open G major, seventh Chord. It is just a great sounding chord. And that's how you play a couple of different open major seventh chord 11. Minor 7th chords: in this lesson, I'm going to be showing you how to play some minor seventh chords. Let's go ahead and take a look. So the first minor seventh chord we're gonna take a look at is an E minor seventh chord. If you remember back earlier in the class, you learn how to play an E minor chord. Change that to an E minor seventh chord. All you have to do is take off your third finger here. What we're doing here is we're getting rid of this e here and putting in a d, which is a minor seventh above this e under seven interval. So this is about probably the easiest open court that you can possibly play, and all you have to do is put your second finger on the fifth string second front, and then all the other strings you can just let ring up on this is an E minor seventh chord . Another way you can play an E minor. Seventh chord is you begin with their e minor that you had on and then you just put your pinkie on the second string. Third fret where Dia's can play any minor seven court like this which is super easy, but I actually I almost like this other One second one where you have that up, That d higher up in the court. Just a higher pitch. I think that I think it stands out more so. That is how you play two different versions of an E minor seventh chords. The next minor seventh chord we're gonna take a look at is an A minor seventh. So this how you playing a minor court and then the change that into any minor seventh chord I just have to take off my third finger and get rid of Take this, give it to this day and put it in the open g to build that we're going to not play the six string. In this case, I generally muted out with my thumb like I've said a bunt 1,000,000 times. At this point, I need it out with my thumb. But you can just not strawman if you want s so we have the open and the fifth string open that open a Then your second finger is on e here on the fourth string, second fret third string is open that our first finger is going to get play to see here, which is the minor. Third, we're gonna play the high E string open the first ring open that he is the fifth of the court on. This is how you play in an a minor seventh cordon. Think I keep saying that this is a great sign in court, But this this really is a great chord, Just great. It just adds a little more color than just a plain old miner. An a minor chord. The A minor court is my favorite open court. But the the A minor seventh just adds a little more depth to the court. And that is how you play in a minor seventh chords. The next minor seventh we're gonna take a look at is a d minor. Seventh chord. Sounds like this and build that. We're not going to play the six string because we don't want that Ian there, we're gonna play the fifth string and the fourth string open. Hey, in this day, they were gonna put are gonna put our second finger on the third string. Second fret on this day right here, we're gonna bar our first finger across strings one and two on the first fret. Get this evidence saying this would be the F would be the flat third. This see here would be the minor seventh interval. So it sounds like this. It would be an option if you don't want to play D minor just to try. It's a slightly different sound. You're writing a song. You trying a D minor seventh. See if you like that better. And that is how you play an open D minor seventh chords, and that's how you play a couple of different minor seventh chords. 12. Slash chords: in this lesson, I'm going to show you how to play some slash cords. And I'm not talking about the guy in guns and roses. So the first slash court we're gonna take a look at is a C over G. Basically what it is, it's a C chord with G in the booth. So any time you see a letter slash and then another letter, uh, the letter after the slash is what is supposed to be in the base of the cord. So what? It's a CIA regime. I know I'm supposed to play a seat for it, but the lowest note the court should be a gene. All right, so here's how we're gonna build that. All right, We're going to start with our third finger on the six string third friend G. That's the slash G part over G C. Over G. There. We're gonna put our pinky on the fifth string. Third fret on that. See? Our second finger's gonna go on the fourth string. Second fret Well, that e third string is opened open. G r First finger's gonna play the sea on the second string. First fret, and then the first string is open. That's open E. So that is how you play a C slash g. Personally, I just say, See, ever g. It's just it's ah like a heavier sounding court just on the bottom. And it's a fuller, a thicker sounding, warmer sounding court. So I would suggest you try a C chord in the song. But, you know, if you're playing by yourself playing acoustic, you wanna warmer, fatter sound Try playing the sea over G. It sounds very nice. Now we're gonna take a look at how to play a G Overbey This how you would play a G chord. I show you a couple different ways in this course how to play a G chord. But this the one I'm kind of used it now and demonstrate this court. All right. Basically G ever be is just getting rid of the six string here. And I'm just taking that off. Let's go toe go through how to build that? The six string I'm gonna mute out with my first finger. Right. Here s what I strong. I'm not hearing that six string. My first finger is gonna go on the fifth string. Second fret the fourth and the third stringer open. Then you can see here. My third finger is gonna be on the second string. Third fret when this D year might think he's gonna go on the first string. Fourth, fret which is G the root of the court. So it sounds like this. You may be thinking, What do you need that court for? What will you use that for? Um, a lot of times this court is used a lot when going between the courts C and a minor. Um, so I could play like a C at nine. By just switching to this G over B. I end up with this walk down sound about walking bass line. I went down, went from C at nine down to G over bay, down to a minor. I think that's a good example of how you would actually use the G Overbey. It's typically used with, um, kind of a walking bass line at the bottom of the cords. The lowest note of the cords and that is how you play a G Overbey and the last slash cord we're gonna take a look at is probably the most common one. Basically, it's a deal for F sharp. So you have your d chord and know what you're gonna do is you're just going, Teoh, take your thumb here, put this f sharp in the bottom of the court. It's a d chord within f sharp in the base. So to play that and you can see I'm gonna use my thumb. That's why it says T thumb on the six string Second fret. The fifth in the fourth string are open. Then where then the rest of it's just a d chord, Our first fingers on the third string. Second friend, our third fingers on the second string Third fret, and then our second thing is gonna won the first string. Second, it's really cool Chord. This court is typically used when doing a walking bass line when you're going from a G chord and you want to hear, uh, so I can play G. And then I played Deaver of Sharp on maybe minor or the opposite direction from me. He o r um, that's usually what that is used for, and this is how you play a D over F sharp chord, and that is how you play some slash cords 13. Open chord progression 1: in this lesson, we're gonna play through a court progression using some basic open chords. This court progression is gonna be G C E minor D. And what we're gonna do is we're gonna play through it nice and slow, and we're gonna play just using quarter notes. So 1/4 notice, Basically, every time you tap your foot, if this is the beat, every time your tap your foot, that's gonna be 1/4 note. So we're basically just gonna strum afford four times we're gonna get to the next court. All right, Now, let's go ahead and play through the court progression G c E minor D Right now we're going to strum through this quote progression G c E minor D. The first thing we're gonna do is we're going to start with whole notes. Ah, whole note is basically replaying forward and you let it ring for four beans. All right, so here we go. G C E minor D 3434 Not so I'm playing again and I will do any counting. I'll just count us in 34 Theo. Now we're gonna play through that core progression using quarter notes 1/4 is basically Every time you tap your foot, you just gotta strum ones. So we're basically just gonna strum the court four times for measure. We get 34 right now, I will go ahead and play through it. Say, two times you can play along with me 34 and that was using quarter notes. That's the basic core progression. I generally, if I wanna start with the student and practice to a core progression, I generally just used quarter notes and then, if they're unable to keep up with the quarter notes that may about I'll goto half notes or whole notes. All right, now we're gonna play through that core progression using eighth notes. Basically, what an eighth note is is you have 1/4 note, which is one beat, and we chop that quarter note in half. We're going Teoh, get to eight notes. So you're strumming when your foot comes down and then you're starting. When your foot comes up, you're basically on 13 and for let's play through that core progression 34 way. Now I'll play through it two times without me. County, I'll just count in 34 on . That was playing a core progression using eighth notes I for this last rhythm that I'm gonna show you for this core progression. This is my favorite core progression, that strong. It's kind of just might go to if I just grab a core progression and I want to hear what it sounds like. This one's a little more technical, so it's gonna be a little harder to strum. But it's basically I'm going to go one and then go on. And, uh, this is an eight followed by 2 16 notes. But more importantly, you could just think of it is down, down down on, then we basically just double. That's going on two and three. So if you don't understand what 16th notes are in eighth notes, what they look like, how to read him, Then you can just practice by going down, down, down, down, down, down. Just a great sounding court progression sounds much more advanced than just order notes. It's boring, all right, So now let's go ahead and play through that chord progression two times using this fancier core progression 34 that was playing that core progression, using my favorite basic to intermediate chord progression So that was the first of four open corporations that we're going to go over in this class in the next three. I'm not going to go over about all the different types of rhythms that we did like half no toll notes coordinates eight notes. I'm just going to do quarter notes for the rest, but in this first, when I want to show you just some different rhythm options that you could practice these court progressions with. 14. Open chord progression 2: in this lesson, we're gonna be strumming through a core progression. D g b minor A. We're just going to be using just plain old quarter notes. Let's go ahead and I'll go in through the one toe I count. Uh, sorry. With D, he would get 34 three b minor, which is tricky. So if you find that these cords are very tough for you to grab, go through in practice, the cords, you get your hands. Ah, accustomed to playing them and then try to play through along with me right now, I'm gonna play through it two times. Just, uh, without me counting him to go 34 on that is how you play D g b minor. A very common core progression in the key of D major. 15. Open chord progression 3: in this lesson. We're gonna take a look at the court progression E minor D. C A minor B seven. And this is what it sounds like with some embellishment. All right, so that's how you play that chord progression. I fancied it up a little secret here. What it would sound like if you just put in some extra things like some walk down that's going from sea walking down Teoh putting this be. What we're gonna do is we're gonna play through it. We're gonna play E minor. Four beats de for two on C for two. It's a minor more and then be seven for four. All right, Now, I'm gonna go ahead and play through that and count. Here we go 34 than any minor four b seven, which is a tougher grab for now. I'm gonna play through that chord progression two times without any counting. Here we go. 34 So that is how you strum the core progression. E minor D. C. A minor B seven 16. Open chord progression 4: theme this lesson we're going to strum through a really common songwriter. Court progression that is. Jean Key Minor seven D. C. For C at night In this core progression I use in this e minor seventh rare. I don't show you how to play that earlier in the course. That's why I'm putting the chart up right now so that you can quickly learn the cord and then we can play. You can add it to this court progression. Now we're gonna go ahead and play through the chord progression with me counting. We get three for each one of us. For now, let's strong that core progression without me counting. We get 34 So that's how you strum the court progression G e e minor seven d suss for to see at night. The reason I say this is a very common songwriter. Court progression is thes cords, air kind of easy to use. The cords. The G chord is the one chord in the G that the miners six court the D corn is the five corps in the sea. At nine is the four chord, so you can you can actually just mix and match these chords like I could G maybe e minor c d. Couto on that sounds just good. Is the first court that we did the first court progression so you can mix and match these cords. Songs like Wonderwall by Oasis is a perfect example. Using these cords, you may want to check that out. So that was the fourth open chord progression G E minor seven DCs for see at nine.