Beginner Mandolin Class MANDOLIN Mastery from the beginning - Learn the Mandolin from Scratch! | Lesson Pros | Skillshare

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Beginner Mandolin Class MANDOLIN Mastery from the beginning - Learn the Mandolin from Scratch!

teacher avatar Lesson Pros, Learn from the Pros

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

56 Lessons (7h 4m)
    • 1. Class Introduction

      1:10
    • 2. Introduction To Beginner Mandolin

      1:02
    • 3. How To Hold The Mandolin Pick

      11:21
    • 4. Techniques To Control Your Pick Depth For Easier Playing

      7:28
    • 5. Mastering Your Right Hand Technique With Exercises

      6:09
    • 6. Preparing To Tune Your Mandolin

      1:21
    • 7. Tuning Note E Tuning The E Mandolin String

      1:11
    • 8. Tuning Note A Tuning The A Mandolin String

      0:36
    • 9. Tuning Note D Tuning The D Mandolin String

      0:55
    • 10. Tuning Note G Tuning The G Mandolin String

      0:52
    • 11. Tricks On Tuning The Mandolin

      1:45
    • 12. Diving Into Your Pick Position

      3:55
    • 13. D Major Scale with Examples and Exercises

      6:15
    • 14. D Major Pentatonic Scale More Examples and Exercises

      4:23
    • 15. D Major Pentatonic Scale With Backing Track Exercise

      4:12
    • 16. Using Slides With Your D Major Pentatonic Scale Examples And Exercises

      11:18
    • 17. How To Use Your New Knowledge With Other Genres Of Music

      5:27
    • 18. Hammer Ons, With Examples And Exercises Putting It All Together

      16:28
    • 19. Fundamentals Of The Mandolin Chop

      6:03
    • 20. Mandolin Chop Example And Exercise

      3:48
    • 21. Mandolin Chop To Melody Transitions

      3:16
    • 22. Open D Picking Agility Exercise

      16:26
    • 23. Adding The First String To The D Major Pentatonic Scale

      3:09
    • 24. Example D Chord Boom Chuck 4 3 2 1 Strumming Pattern On The Mandolin

      10:55
    • 25. Example G Chord Boom Chuck 4 3 2 1 Strumming Pattern On The Mandolin

      5:07
    • 26. Example Strumming D And G 4 Cycles On The Mandolin

      6:51
    • 27. Practice Session D And G Boom Chuck 4 3 2 1 Strumming On The Mandolin

      3:56
    • 28. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 40 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      10:15
    • 29. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 50 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      10:07
    • 30. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 60 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      10:02
    • 31. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 70 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      9:58
    • 32. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 80 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      9:53
    • 33. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 90 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      9:54
    • 34. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 100 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      9:52
    • 35. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 110 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      9:51
    • 36. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 120 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      9:50
    • 37. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 130 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      9:50
    • 38. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 140 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      9:49
    • 39. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 150 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      9:49
    • 40. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 160 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      9:48
    • 41. Course Tools #2 Practice With A Band 40 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      10:15
    • 42. Course Tools #2 Practice With A Band 60 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      10:01
    • 43. Course Tools #2 Practice With A Band 80 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      9:55
    • 44. Course Tools #2 Practice With A Band 100 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      9:52
    • 45. Course Tools #2 Practice With A Band 120 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      9:50
    • 46. Course Tools #3 Practice With A Band 40 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      10:15
    • 47. Course Tools #3 Practice With A Band 60 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      10:01
    • 48. Course Tools #3 Practice With A Band 80 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      9:55
    • 49. Course Tools #3 Practice With A Band 100 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      9:49
    • 50. Course Tools #3 Practice With A Band 120 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      9:50
    • 51. Course Tools #4 Practice With A Band 40 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      10:15
    • 52. Course Tools #4 Practice With A Band 60 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track

      10:02
    • 53. Course Tools #4 Practice With A Band 80 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track 26

      9:55
    • 54. Course Tools #4 Practice With A Band 100 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track 27

      9:52
    • 55. Course Tools #4 Practice With A Band 120 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track 28

      9:50
    • 56. Thank you for taking this Beginner Mandolin Class

      0:11
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About This Class

- Learn the basic concepts and building blocks that you will need to play the Mandolin from scratch.

Why take a Mandolin class from this guy?

My passion is inspiring others to feel more confident in themselves  and their playing.  I feel like playing the mandolin can do that. After years of  performing and teaching all over the US. at workshops, out of my home  and through multiple schools, I was asked by many of my students to make mandolin course videos of my lessons.  So here is the result.

I hope you will join me on the inside of this mandolin class where you will learn some amazing mandolin tricks.

Building a strong Mandolin Foundation

  • For the beginner players who would like to learn and/or improve their mandolin skills

  • Learn your basics - I will teach you a shortcut way to play mandolin to make it easier to learn mandolin faster. Every detail will be broken down and explained in easy to understand parts to help you succeed. 

  • You will learn everything to get you started from scratch to learn how to play on your own in the key of D.

  • You will learn the D scale and the Major Pentatonic scale and how to use it to play along with others and or backing tracks. Learn tricks to help you sound like the pros.

  • You will get backing tracks to be able to play along with to help develop your skills

Who is the target audience for this Mandolin Class

  • Anyone interested in learning the mandolin for the first time

  • Anyone beginning the mandolin who wants to play mandolin for enjoyment

  • Anyone who who's never started playing mandolin, or to those who have started and failed, those who play mandolin  now but wish it was better, those who are ingrained in the way they taught themselves mandolin, but realize now that they need to go back and re-learn mandolin the right way.

  • Great for all ages

Straight to the Point

  • All these mandolin videos are all broken down to the smallest detail. It's assumed that a person who has never attempted to play mandolin is watching this course. If you have experience, and it's too broken down for you, simply increase the speed of the video to skim over the topics and discussion points, and/or skip to a video that more suites your needs.

Questions about this Mandolin course?
Feel free to send me any questions you might have on this mandolin course. I  want to make your learning experience the best that it can be.

Thanks
Thanks for taking the time to look at this Beginner Mandolin class MANDOLIN MASTERY FROM THE BEGINNING  course. I look forward to seeing you on the inside and teaching you how to be a better mandolin player. 

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Transcripts

1. Class Introduction: My Name's Chuck Millar and welcome to my beginner mandolin course. I've designed this for specifically, so the person who's never picked up a mandolin before and they've never used to pick can succeed. So we started the very beginning at the basics and fundamentals through the D scale and changing it up so we can play in any genre of music. I'll teach you tricks on the middle so you can start to sound like your favorite mandolin players hear on the radio. If you're willing and ready to the learns mandolin, let's do it together and we'll see you inside. 2. Introduction To Beginner Mandolin: And I'll be your instructor for this course. 3. How To Hold The Mandolin Pick: Hi there, my name's Chuck Moore and welcome to this metal. In course, we're gonna be going over some just real basic things at the beginning just to get our bearings on this mandolin, what it is, how to hold the pick, this kinda stuff. But the things that we have to learn the right way or how to hold this thing. What I have here is a F style mandolin, and it has this curl which my strap is being held by. On the other side, this, the other side of my strap. It's being held by this little button on the tail piece. It's preferable to me to always wear a strap. But because if I get it down on my lap, it sits too low for me to be comfortable when I play. Also ergonomically, It helps me played better with a strap. And here's why. When you decide to get your strap, whether it be an, a style mandolin with out this curl on it, where it will attach. Right here. A loop will happen underneath the strings and then go around your neck plank. So there's also lots of mandolin players who will have their mandolin over one shoulder. And really is going to be a preference thing. Right now. I'm just more comfortable having my strap over my shoulder like so. Because I have my strap on a certain height, I can control the angle of where my strings are at. Now, you can kind of see that my arm is about the same angle as my strings. The reason for that is because this arc system that happens when we play notes on our mandolin. All it means is that I'm hitting all over the strings about at the same angle with my pick. I show you this a little closer up so you can kind of see my pick. I'm going to show you the angle that I generally play it at. Sometimes it's a very flat pick, but just for right now you can kinda see this angle. As I get down to the strings. You can kind of see that the PEC hits the strings at the exact same angle every time. But if, let's say if it was all the way up here and I was holding my mandolin at a different angle. Now, the angle that the bottom note hits the pick at the top are completely different angles. This helps me be able to play more precisely and more even. So, it feels more the same as I'm playing to the strings. Then if I were going to have my mandolin at any other angle. Now that I have my mandolin setup, and again, it's going to be up to you. What do you feel that's comfortable for you to play? There's lot of holding styles for mandolin players and not one is right. It's really going to be up to your body. This is just going to be the most ergonomic way that you can possibly play. But if you find yourself being more comfortable because of an ailment or some other reason. Go ahead and play that way. Now, there's some things that we can do is beginner mandolin players that kind of cheat the system that don't do you any favors. But as long as you're playing in the most ergonomic style for you, then that's, that's a, that's a plus. You know, we definitely don't want to hurt ourselves while we're playing over time. Okay, let's take a look at this. This hand, this is the hand that my pick is going to hold and it's my right-hand. Now most mandolin players are going to be right handed if you happen to have a left-handed mandolin, no big deal is just going to be your other hand. But for right now, just know that I'm using my right hand, much like most other mandolin players. Now, what we're going to take a look at here is our a fist. And when if I, if I make a fist, typically the thermos curl around the knuckles and there's no space that exist in my fingers because it's so tight. What I wanna do is take my fingers in, loosen them up a little bit so that there's some clear space in between where my if I wasn't willing to grab something, there's definitely some space. Therefore it the other thing that's going to happen is I'm gonna make my make my thumb come down just a little bit. So it was great. I'm straight with my my arm analysis is going to come down a little bit. And now my index finger comes down a little bit too. And if you would take a Sharpie and draw this, draw this line really looks like a ribbon. You can kind of see the Ribbon with your eyes, almost like one of the ribbons that you see in the back of a car for various reasons, right? Well, once I have this ribbon, look on my fingers, I wanna make sure that my wrist has no tension and my forearm has no tension in it. And if I really truly have no attention in my wrist, it would just hang down. I don't have enough I wouldn't want to have enough tension in my wrist that I could lift up my wrist. So it would just be that loose. Once I have my wrist this loose, I'm simply going to place my pick inside my fingers. Now, once I have my pick inside my fingers, I can kind of see it in a little bit better against the black background. You can see that I want to have my pick. I want to see that I have my pick pointed towards me. So the pic itself will be pointed directly at. The instrument when you're done on your side, when your plane. So if I lift this up, you shouldn't be able to see the angle of the PEC is pointed towards my mandolin. Alright, now that I have this and we're holding it, I'm going to let a little bit extra space of my pick come out to the side. Now this is quite a bit but so you can see it, but do you see the edge of my pick? And how the side, this side right here, comes out and allows itself to be a little bit longer than what the thumb ids. That's what we're looking forward to. Now. The reason for this is just a little bit of a lever action and makes it a little bit easier for our pick to go through our strings. Here's some other things to think about. If I have a lot of pick showing when I hold my pick is going to be very tricky on the strings. So what I mean by that is I'm going to give you just some notes and I'm going to play. You can hear some of that. Versus if I choke up on the pic, you hardly hear any of that ticking back and forth. We want to have less pick showing when we grab it and our fingers. Now, some people have a two-finger hold where the pick is being supported by two fingers. For this particular lesson, we're going to try to gravitate towards a two-finger approach the thumb and index finger versus having two fingers. What this is going to help with, is this just the simple lever action? If you give this enough time and let's say a few months of playing. And this is still really, really difficult for me to play. And you feel like these two fingers are better for you. Then revert back to this, these two fingers. But really give it a good college try to make sure that we're trying to use two fingers, the thumb and index finger when we're holier pick. Now, some questions about my pick and in general, I have a blue chip pick. It is an LG 60 that I've modified a little bit. The modifications that I've done is I've changed the bevel to fit my playing. So it's not stock, not the way it comes from the company. Now you can play with it a lot of different picks. You can tell that this pick is a pretty thick pick. There's no bend in it. I can't actually bend in it. And it's not necessarily that this means this is the best pick in the world is just the best pick for me in my plane. So checkout blue chip picks, and you'll find that these pics are kinda expensive. And just as these are engraved blue-chip picks with CT in the 55, this is not a pig that I use on my mandolin, but you can also get your name engraved. So because you have a fancy pic, you can pay a little bit extra to get your name engraved. Sophie, ever drop it. And there's any question about who's it is. It'll have your name on it. Alright, so now that I know how to hold this pick, what we're going to try to do is we're going to try to at the beginning and makes sure that point of the PEC is pointed towards our mandolin. Once it's pointed towards our mandolin, we're gonna make sure that our pick is not tilted down. And it is not tilted up. Typically is, it's very, very common for picks to be tilted downwards when we try to strum. This is one of those, more of those cheating things that beginners can kind of get themselves in. What it happens is it makes it pretty easy to do a down, but as soon as I do and up, it gets us in trouble because it gets caught underneath strings. So that's it for how to hold the pick or wrong could be more online's of how to use the pick and how to use it effectively on our mandolin. And the next lesson. So we're going to see you in the next lesson and learn how to make our work for us. 4. Techniques To Control Your Pick Depth For Easier Playing: Now that we know how to hold your pick, here's some guidelines that we want to be able to follow. When we're playing with the pick. You're going to want to take your eyes and look down at your strings. You want to be able to get your mandolin angled. For this exercise, not exactly when you play all the time, but for this exercise, you're going to want to get your mandolin at an angle so that you're only seeing one string. So if you turn it too far, one way you'll see many strings. You're going to want to see all the strings kind of line up in a row. Now, keep in mind that when we're using are picked to go through our strings that are rest is nice and, and pliable. There's no muscular thing holding our wrist up. Also. Our thumb isn't squeezing down on the PEC. That's just kinda how being held there. When when we hold our PEC, we want to make sure if if we go and grab our pick and just simply just almost falls out of our fingers. So if I was squeezing the picket, it wouldn't want to let go. Right. So it should be light enough where I can just set the pic in there and take it away without it, without, without, without it being stuck there. Okay. Some other things that you can see about my thumb specifically is I have one of these hitchhiker thumbs which makes me want to have a hold with my my pick. Leveled upwards towards the ceiling a little bit. It's not very typical for most mandolin players. Most Madeline players is either going to have a slight down. So you can see the angle of our PEC is now down towards the ground a little bit more straight or slightly up. And any way that you decide to do it is going to be okay. Because it has to do with your fingers and whatever's the most comfortable for you. Now back to this exercise, what we're gonna do is we're going to have a ring finger or a pinky, and it won't matter which one it is for you. But you're going to want to try to try both of them. And you're going to figure out which one is more comfortable for you. So would do is we call this a plant. Now, there's all sorts of different ways to hold the mandolin and different styles of picking. But I'm going to teach you this particular style because I find it to be the most effective for the most amount of my students. Okay, so with this in mind, we're going to start out with a pinky and just reached down and touch that mandolin. Know the, that pinkie is going to be real close and touching these strings. Just as a guide for this exercise right now. Now notice where the pinky is. My palm is still face towards the mandolin. Right? Now, if I curl my fingers around, like I'm holding a pick. You can see that my pinky is not straight down, but it's angled forward just a little bit. And if you see my hand come up, if it were to be sticking out as not really forward, it looks like a straight down, but the angle of my hand is that so that you can see a slight angle from the strings. Once I have that, I'm simply going to wave at the strings. That's it. So from this angle I'm waving at the strings from my elbow downwards. Now that I get my pinky and position touching the strings and I curl my fingers around, I'm going to wave at the strings. And if I was going to get my pick, I'm gonna do this again, but make sure that I don't actually touch any strings. Alright, so now what we're gonna do is we're going to just use one of these strings. And let's go ahead and use the second string. Touch and press down just a little bit. And I'm not going to touch the string yet. But what I am going to do is slowly get my pick closer to the string. Slowly get the pick closer to the string. Slowly get to pick closer to the string. And eventually you're going to hear some of that, the notes. As soon as that pick, it's close enough to touch that string. Stop moving the pick inwards. Once you have that perfect depth of just barely touching those strings. That's all the depth that we need to be able to go and go into our strings with when we're picking her strings. So what we don't want is what we call pick depth. That means when you're picking goes underneath the strings. Now, we want to be writing right on top of those strings without our pick and getting in the strings. So what you wanna do for this particular exercise is just pick, pluck a couple unknowns. But with your eyeballs again, you're only seeing one, the set of strings lined up by changing that angle. And Azure, as you have your plant down, you're going to use your eyeballs to be able to look downwards and make sure there's no pick that. If you see pick depth, then you know that you're going too far into the strings. And also notice that if you have too much picked depth and then you have an effect called pick recoil. We always want to guard against pick recoil. So pick, pick recoil again, is that popping off of the strings? And it's amazing how little you have to work and getting a good sounding note by just barely getting that pick and just barely get through the string. Right? So that's going to be our first step. All we're gonna do for this, for this little exercise, for this, for this lesson, is we're gonna go down and up and down and up on an, a string. After we get through this lesson, go back and practice using your ring finger instead of your pinkie finger. See which one is more comfortable to use some one-year done. Start to figure out which one is more comfortable to you and whatever whatever finger is more comfortable to you is the one that you'll choose. Now, the thing is we never want to have two fingers together because that kind of constricts our motion back and forth. So let's choose one or the other finger. Practice with your pick depth and will be ready for our next lesson. 5. Mastering Your Right Hand Technique With Exercises: Now that we can hold there, pick the right way and we're holding it in the right way for us, that makes sense. We have to figure out what we're doing with our left hand. What we're gonna do is we're going to act like we're holding our hands out, like somebody's going to place something in our hands. And typically when that happens, our palm is face towards the ceiling. In this case, we're going to take the edge of our palm and turn it inwards slightly so that if somebody placed, let's say, a bouncy ball on her hand, it would fall off or roll off, right? When we have this hand out there, we're going to make sure that our wrist is not one way or the other, but straight with our arm. Same things that's gonna happen here. We want to make sure that our wrist is straight here as well as here, so it's not moving one way or the other, is still nice, just nice and straight. What this does is it helps us play better, number one, but number two, it prevents us from holding our hand in the angle that's hard on our joints. So it's very ergonomic. So now that I have my violin here, I'm going to hold my, my thumb out. So that is just hanging out there and there's not really doing anything other than just hanging out there. And that's all we have to do for this exercise. So what we're trying to do on our mandolin is we're looking at this spot right here. And this nut is this white piece of plastic. This white piece, the plastic holds up the strings so that a husband I play a note, it would ring out over these metal things called frets. So what I'm trying to do is get my hand about right here. You can kind of see the crease were the knuckle comes in. This knuckle on the opposite side, there's this little crease that happens here where this point right here, there's a small indentation. It's kinda hard to see on this video here, but there's just a small indentation with most focuses hands. That's small indentation is going to be where your mandolin touches. That tricky is when we grab our mandolin for the first time, is to not allow our fingers to want to try to grab it as a very natural and human thing to do is when you grab something to actually move your fingers and want to try to grab it. But instead, the only thing we're gonna do is get our hand and touch that part of our hand. Now, if you're doing it right, your eyes should be able to see this knuckle, this knuckle, and this knuckle, or this knuckle is hiding underneath the mandolin neck. So if you can't see your hands, your, your knuckles in your hands, you may have to move your hand forward or backwards accordingly. Or really, really want to be able to see pinkie, ring finger, middle finger, and a little bit of our index finger sticking out. It's very common that the thumb wants to try to touch the back of the neck. And we get in trouble because hey, go, well, I can't move my hand forward because my my thumb is touching. So really if that's the case, just lift up the thumb. Push your hand forward without taking your wrist up your wrist and moving it any which way? Just keep it nice and straight so that you can see those knuckles once you have that. Don't do anything with your thumb just yet, but curl your fingers around. And we're going to utilize a pen or a pencil. So I just happen to have a standard that pin right here. And I'm gonna put it where I'm gonna place it is in these knuckles. So these sets of knuckles that you see. So if I take the pin and curl my fingers around it, this is really what we're going for. So my hand touches, I'm able to see this knuckle, this knuckle on this knuckle. Once I can see those knuckles and my thumb isn't touching, I simply just take that pen and curl my fingers around. The tips of my fingers are going to touch the mandolin in some way. And we're really not trying to hit any one of these fret said At this time, there just curled around. And I take the pen away. Once I take the pen away, you can kind of see that my fingers are curled around and they have a nice space in between where the fingers are. Just as if I was holding that pin there. Alright, so our step for this exercise is simply taking her hand, holding it like we're supposed to with a thumb not doing anything, touching it without our fingers are a thumb reacting, then curling the fingers around, then placing that thumb down. Once you have that done, you're simply going to take the fingers away. Hold your hand away. Then set the hand down on the mandolin again in the spot in-between this nut and the first fret. Then the fingers curl around without the thumb doing anything, and then the thumb touches down. Notice the thumb is kind of just resting there on the top. So we're gonna wanna do this 20 times, 30 times, as many times as you can. And that's going to be your exercise due to a lot of times you would over and over get comfortable at it. And we'll see you in the next lesson. 6. Preparing To Tune Your Mandolin: Before we get started playing some of these notes, we're going to want to make sure that our mandolin is in tune. Now, unlike a violin, we don't have fine tuners here that can help us tune our instruments. But we do have, is these geared tuners. Now, when we turn them clockwise, it tightens the string and makes them go higher. And if we turn them lower or counterclockwise, that'll make the note dropping tone. So I'm going to give you some basic notes so that we can hear them audibly. If for some reason you don't have electronic tuner tune with. This is a great way for you to be able to hear if your note is lower or higher than mine. And you'll have some sort of an audible rabbit representations of able to tune your instrument. Now, the strings that we're using, we're going to use as numbers. The names of our strings are e or one, a, or 23, D, or G. The fourth string. 7. Tuning Note E Tuning The E Mandolin String: So here's an audible representation of your E-string. If you're having some trouble tuning your middle and you may want to go and buy an electronic tuner. Just make sure that you buy a chromatic tuner versus a guitar tuner. 8. Tuning Note A Tuning The A Mandolin String: Here's your 9. Tuning Note D Tuning The D Mandolin String: Here's your detuning. 10. Tuning Note G Tuning The G Mandolin String: Here's your G tuning them. 11. Tricks On Tuning The Mandolin: When you turn in your mandolin, you're going to want to make sure that you're only plucking one of these strings at the same time. Note that each one of these strings are the same note. D and a, and a and E. And E. What we can do to only hear one of the notes are one of the strings, is touch the other string with a finger to mute it. That way we can hear the OneNote we wanna tune clearly without the other note getting in the way. Typically when we're plucking our notes to tune them, we want to make sure that we're doing the same direction with our pick. And if we do them all in downs, it makes it pretty easy. So one of the problems that we've run into trying to pluck in tune this outside string is that we accidentally hit both strings at once, and it's really hard to hear what note needs to be tuned if I'm playing both strings at once. So I'll simply take a finger and set it down on the string so it mutes it. And now I can only hear one string being plucked. Second here and here. Clearly, when it comes to the bottom note, I just make sure that I pluck only the bottom string. And now that I get to the next note on the D string, I'll set that finger in there to make sure that only the top string gets plucked. There we go, get to note and we'll be ready for the next lesson. 12. Diving Into Your Pick Position: Our first scale that we're gonna be learning now that we know how to plan with one of our fingers. And hopefully by now we've chosen if it's going to be the ring finger or the pinky that we plant with. We're also going to make sure our PEC is in the right spot. Notice that a bridge holds up our strings so that we can hear them clearly. We have this fingerboard with all of these frets on it. Somewhere in the middle of our bridge and our frets. This open space where pikas gonna go. There's some things that we want to keep in mind when we're playing notes there, they cluster, I get my pick to this bridge. The harder it is to play. Now, what's going to, I'm going to describe this as having pick recoil is really hard to get. The pink is through this strings because there's so much tension at this point. It's doable, but it's kinda hard to do. So we can get our whole arm, our right arm, forward, so that our pick gets closer to these notes right here. In a typical bluegrass mandolin playing hold, we're going to match up our pick to the bottoms of these F holes. So you can see this f L in this headphone. We're gonna enter pick right about where those two apples match. All right, now, that is a very typical Men row style mandolin pick position right about there. If I get too far in, we start to get too tight. So I get a little bit farther and farther and it's a little bit easier for me to play through the string. Noticing that a little bit quieter at that point to the further I get towards my, my frets, though, less loud it's going to be so you're going to want to find your sweet spot. This is just a guide right about there. For a Monroe style mandolin. Even though I play Monroe style mandolin, more often, I play more of a contemporary mandolin style which requires me to make my pick, touch the strings much closer to the frets. So the difference is, instead of having these big staccato type notes or notes that have definite steps, indefinite starts. I make that plant, and then my pick gets closer to being right about there. Notice it's a little quieter and a little more smooth without them. That those robust notes, both are great and both served their purpose. You just want to be able to know how to play each one of them. One of them being that Monroe style, followed by more contemporary Netherlands down. 13. D Major Scale with Examples and Exercises: Now that we know where to place our pick on her mandolin for the style that we want to play. We're all that we're going to do is we're going to play a D scale, a simple d scale all the way through. And for this particular exercise, I'm going to show you in that contemporary style. So I'm going to pick my, my pick on those. Put my pick on the string is right about here. And then the notes that we're going to play, R, these open D or open third string, followed by my index finger, pointing finger, my first finger. So these are our fingers, 1234, just like kid mass. And my first finger or index finger, is going to be on the second fret. Then my second finger is going to be on the fourth fret. Third finger is going to be on the fifth fret. Now, keep in mind that when I place my fingers on these frets, I'm not having any space in-between the thread itself and where my fingers, so it slides up and touches the fret. I'm not on top of it because the edge of my finger goes over the top of the fret. I wanna be right behind it and still touched that middle part. Okay, now that I know where to put my fingers on my Madeline, we're gonna play that first part of our nodes of our scale. We're gonna play that. D. Second fret, fourth fret, fifth threat. I'm going to call out finger numbers again. This is the first finger, second finger, third finger. I'll then three. Okay, now that I have these notes, I want to do something else. I want to make sure that my pick is going down, then up, then down, then up, then down, then up. While I played through the notes. Down on the D, up on the one, down on the two, up on three fingers at just the numbers that I've just mentioned are my fingers 123. And whenever we start any group of notes, we're going to start with a down on our mandolin. So down, down. Okay, so now we've just played notes on the D string. We're going to move over to the a string and play the exact same pattern, exact same fingers and everything. So open. 1, first finger on the second fret, middle finger, which is the second finger on the fourth fret. And then the last node is going to be the third finger on the fifth fret. So we're going to play those a couple of times together. One more time. Okay, so now the whole scale from the d all the way to a real slow, opened the first finger. Second finger. Third finger. Move it over to the a string. Second fret, fourth fret, third finger on the fifth fret. Little faster this time. Make sure that we're only barely touching that string. We're not digging into the strings, are digging into the strings. So we're just barely riding that pick on a tablet, a string. So here we go again. And when we're picking these notes, are making sure that we're going from the elbow and our planets. So remember when we waved at the instrument. So we're not moving with I rest at this point. And we're also not moving with earth from either all of the entire movement, motion as coming from our elbow k. So we're going to try that scale again with keeping that in mind, we're gonna go down, down, down. First finger, finger, finger, finger, finger, finger backwards. Go up the scale again. Back down the scale. Okay, we've successfully played a D scale, DO RE, MI, FA, SO LA, DO. Take some time and practice that, practice those fundamentals. The just riding on top of the string, moving with your elbow and not your wrist and not your thumb. Making your plant, sending your plant down, putting a little bit of pressure on it so that you're controlling your pick depth. Once you're able to do that and play your notes cleanly. Dude, at a speed that's congruent for you. So if you see me playing notes really fast and you're not able to do them, is okay. Most of the folks that are going to be taking this class are very beginner. And we're not going to be playing any faster than Right. So give yourself a break. Practice those things, play them cleanly once you're ready to move on and we'll see you in the next lesson. 14. D Major Pentatonic Scale More Examples and Exercises: Ok, we've just played our D-major scale. We're going to break it up into some smaller parks and play a D major pentatonic scale. And what that means is that I'm going to play instead of seven notes that I played before dome or 123456. I can count that as a, but it's really a D note. And I started on D notes. I don't count it twice. So it's really 12345671. Instead of those seven notes that we just got done playing, we're going to play a couple of less notes and only going to play five penta, meaning five notes. So I'm gonna play the tone, a two tone, the 3t. And I won't play the four tones. So on my D string, I won't play the third finger where I had before. So it's really open second fret or threat, or open 12, which is a little bit easier to think about them. Then I'm gonna move over my a string, which is my fifth town, 12345. And I skip that for, but I play five or six. But I don't play seven. That's the second finger on the fourth fret of the a string. But I will play eight, which is really the one again. So we're going to play, you know, three, no third finger. And then followed it up on the, a string with open. Let's play that a couple times together. So we have the threats are. And then I'm gonna move over to the a string, 04 fingers. If it's frets, it's okay. We're gonna put those all together and we're gonna make sure that our pink is going down then up and down and up. And I'm gonna get my plant. After I get my plan ready, we're gonna go. Second thing, open a first thing. And third finger. Brand do that one more time from the beginning. All right, let's go forwards and backwards. And when we go backwards, we're never going to play the top part of our scale, which is typical in a school system and a school system, we again generally go except we're not gonna play that top node again, we just go right back down like this. So we're gonna do it together real slow. 1, second fret, second fret, fifth fret, second fret. Fourth fret, second fret, open. Alright, we're going to do that a couple more times. And so I'm gonna count 321 go and then we place, we're going to 321. Go. Again. I'll write in the next lesson, we're going to be using what we've learned with our D major pentatonic scale. And we're going to be playing along with a backing track. 15. D Major Pentatonic Scale With Backing Track Exercise: In this lesson, we're going to be playing along with a backing track, and I've included these backing tracks in the course for you. Now. When we hear that backing track the first time. And what you want to know is that we are playing out of the key of D. So you'll choose backing track that says key of D. And to start with, I'm choosing beats per minute of 60. You can choose any beats per minute that you feel come from playing. So let's say if this is too fast worry, you might choose one that's a little bit slower. If it's too slow and you're ready to, ready to kinda get up to speed. You can choose a faster backing track. And what we're gonna do is we're going to listen to this at the, at the beginning, but I want to prepare you for what you're about to hear. You're going to hear two notes, a click followed by a long click, followed by four clicks, click, click, click, click. So at some long note, click, long note, click, fallen by, click, click, click, click, then the music is going to start to play. So now you know, by, after hearing those first two long notes, the very next thing after those next shorter for clicks is one than music plays. That's also an award under wanna start playing R D major pentatonic scale. So here we go. Here's the two slow clicks, followed by those four clicks. And here we go. Two. Alright? Now that we've played along with 60 beats per minute, for those of us who are more advanced or feel like they can play a little faster. We're gonna play in double speed. And if you find that you can't plan double speed, no worries, just continue to play in regular, the regular speed that we just worked at turns into. And we're going to play along with the backing track. Here we go. There's those two notes followed by the four quickness hearing. All right, we're getting familiar with our D major pentatonic scale. Take some time, practice it along with your backing track of choice. And I'll see you in the next lesson. 16. Using Slides With Your D Major Pentatonic Scale Examples And Exercises: Welcome back. Now that we know how to play our D major pentatonic scale cleanly. We're going to learn a couple tricks on how to make some fun. Mandel Leni sounds, things that are really unique to Mandel. And even though we can do a MAN separate instruments really makes the mandolin sound like a mandolin. And the first one that we're going to do is a slide. So Kp, pay careful attention to what fingers are being played. On our D-string, we have, on our D major pentatonic scale, we have open D, followed by a one. And then the numbers that I'm calling out our, our fingers. And what we want to be able to do is either slide our index finger to the destination of where our second finger is, or slide the second finger back to where our first finger. Okay, now those seem simple, but there are some technique that's involved there. In order for me to get a good sounding strum, I need to first plot the note. And then my finger has to be able to move up without it bending forward. So I'm not reaching with my finger. Instead, my whole arm is going back and forth. And that's the thing that moves everything with my, with my slide. So if I see that in slow motion, I'm get I'm not reaching with my index finger. My wrist is not doing the thing that's doing doing the reach is all coming from this back part of my elbow. And I'm simply moving my arm this way and this way keeping my finger on the same spot and having enough pressure backwards on my mandolin. So again, it's not pressured downwards with my index finger. Instead, it's hooking my finger in and then pulling down K. So I'm being pretty exaggerated about that. So just so you can see the movement of it. So really it's this. Now, I make sure that I get my thumb off the back of the neck. I'm getting my index finger away from not touching anymore so that I have a free reign to be able to slide without touching any part of this bottom and my hand to the mandolin, once I have that, I'm able to slide my index finger from the second fret of the fourth threat. Now notice my destination point was still touching that fourth fret. I monitor make sure that my destination, I don't have this extra space in there. I want to make good all the way up and touched that friend. Okay. So I want to be able to do that with my index finger, go back and forth because I have an index finger and middle finger. I also want to slide back down. I want to do this with both fingers. Now, there's two different types of slides that I want to have. One is what we call an immediate side. So there's no time spent on the first node after I plug it. So really as I pluck the string, my finger moves to its next destination point. Immediate slide. Now the second type of slide that we have is going to be what we either call an equal times slides. So spends the same amount of time on OneNote as the next. So here that in slow motion, you here, nope. Nope, that initial note being heard before the slide. We also call it a dental leads slide. Little faster. All right, so those are the notes that I can play on my D string. I wanted to use both the index finger and middle finger. And on the a string or the second string, I want to be able to play my one and my three the same way. Some moving from my index finger on the second fret to the fifth fret. Or immediate slides. Or using my third finger to move up from the second fret of the third premise. Or immediate slides. Delayed slides. Someone to start on the open string. All right, now, as an exercise, just together we're gonna play this nice and slow. I'm going to use my middle finger as an exercise. So everything that we do is going to be what that middle finger or the second finger, someone played, followed by a two. And then we're going to hear that note for a while. So this is a delayed slide. And then I'm going to pluck it again. I'm going to slide back plus here the note then slide back and followed by o. So the whole thing sounds like this. So listen first. Alright, let's do it together in 321. Go, oh, good. Now let's do the same thing, but with our index finger. Here we go one more time. Now on the a string we have stood together in 321. Can now do the same thing but with a third finger. Okay, now that we know how to use those slides to our advantage, we're gonna play at 60 beats per minute and we're going to hear what does slides sound like. So I'm going to give you an example of something that like I would plane and as an example, and then you go ahead and practice on your own using a D backing track. I'm using it to 60 beats per minute. And all you're doing wanting to try to do is move that finger and it doesn't matter what note you play or when you plant, it's your choice of when you, when you decide to move or what string you decide to move, and what finger you decide to slide from. So here's an example for you to be able to have an audible example, visual example. And then you'll go back and practice with that backing track by herself at a speed that's suitable to you. Here we go. Okay, there's an audible example for you. Take some time, practice your slides and practice just playing regular D major pentatonic scales along with a backing track. And if 60 beats per minute is too slow for you, then speed it up and choose one that's a little faster. If it's too fast, three, choose one that's bring it back a little bit. Choose one that's a little, a little slower so that you can play something that's comfortable for you. Alright? Do some practice and I'll see you back here in the next lesson. 17. How To Use Your New Knowledge With Other Genres Of Music: We just got done learning and a little tiny bit in the key of D using our D-string and are a string. And we learned some fun trick how to do these slides, immediate slides and equal times slides. Or sometimes we call them delayed slides. In this exercise, what I want to show you is that what we're learning can be applied to many different genres of music. And I've got a couple here that we're just going to listen to and kind of see that we can apply to things that we've learned to different genres. Okay, so what we've learned so far is this d scale as D major pentatonic scale. And we learned how to slide from one fret to the next in that scale. Now, even though if we were not able to play that up to speed yet, that's the ideas, the musical ideas that we're going for. Okay, so when we come back, I'm going to be just reiterating what we've, we've learned with a bluegrass backing track in 321. In her country. Here's some pop music. Here's some white rock. Those are some examples of being able to play with a lot of different genres of music. Along with just the simplistic things that we've been able to work on and learn so far on our mandolin. So what I've done is I've included those genres along with this course. So whenever we learn something and you'll typically hear that bluegrass backing track being the main focus here in this course. But as soon as we learned something, go back and see if you can apply it to Country, to folk, to rock and roll. And you'll see how similar those different genres of music are and how we, we can fit those notes into those genres pretty seamlessly once we learned a couple of tricks and a couple of things on our mentor lend. So enjoy those and we'll see you in the next lesson. 18. Hammer Ons, With Examples And Exercises Putting It All Together: What we learned so far is that we can play a couple fun things and use it across all sorts of genres of music will be learned. So cars or D major pentatonic scale. And we slid in between the notes of D major pentatonic scale. All right, we're going to learn another trick using the same notes that we've learned in D major pentatonic. And those are gonna be Hammurabi. John's. A hammer on is simply a finger that gets lifted up in the air and slam down on the strings. And typically it happens after a plucked note. Now, in order to get my tone to ring out like that, notice how high my finger was up in the air. I have to generate enough speed to get this note to ring out. Because if I only have a certain distance, I'm likely going to get a dead note because I didn't get enough speed and power on the fret. Not going to get this up here a little bit. Notice that my finger was striking down on the string is touching that fret. Just like before. We're making sure that there's no space in between where the fret isn't my finger, I wanna reach up and touch it. I'm not on top of it where the finger hangs over, but I just touch the edge of that fret. So what we're gonna do together is we're going to play this D open D string, third string. Then the index finger is going to come down on the second fret. And all we're gonna do is we're going to make sure that the finger, it comes up or a high. And it's going to be real typical if this is the first time you've ever done a hammer on, is that your finger will kind of hit in some different places where you don't want it to hit. If you need to do this in slow motion couple times, we're going to do that. Just take your finger and curled around really slow. Makes sure the finger sets down in the right spot. We're touching our fret. And by doing this, we can kind of train our fingers to hit the same spot every time. Then slowly speed it up. So that after you have a couple of repetitions of doing it real slowly, slowly speeded up until we're at the point where we can finally move our finger fast enough, where it starts to slam down. And when it starts to slam down, you'll hear a little tick that comes out of them, the string, if we're doing it hard enough. And at that point when we're hearing that note ring out, we know that we're doing a hammer on it the correct way. So we're going to pluck a note followed by a hammer. Pluck a note followed by a hammer on plug ins, followed by a hammer. Now we're gonna do this little faster, the distance in between the node that's plucked, then the hammer on and becomes slower. So we're gonna have a big long notes. So big long space and a hammer. And a hammer, plus than a hammer. A hammer and then go ahead and do this with me now. So 321 and a hammer, camera. Camera. Then a hammer. And we're gonna do a little faster. Hammer, hammer. Good and a little faster yet. Now, it's pretty difficult that for those of us who are playing, sometimes for the first time you can see that I am pressing hard enough where I do this over and over and exercise. You can see some of these little marks of my, of my strength, especially if it's on one of these lower frets, there tends to be more tension here. So if at anytime your fingers start to get sore and they start hurting and take a little break. Eventually over time you'll get calyces on the end, the ends of your fingertips and they won't be fatigued anymore. So if you need to take a break, go ahead and do so and come back to this lesson, but we're just going to continue doing hammer runs. And the next part is going to be especially a little bit stressing on that index finger because we're going to hold it down. Now remember you don't have to squeeze these notes are hard, just touch them light enough so that you make a tone out of them. So here's a good exercise before we move on how to make that happen. So we're going to just play D string, and we're just going to pluck those notes real soft. And we're gonna get that index fingers slowly down until it just touches those strings and mute them. Now, I'm going to curl the finger around just a little bit more and put just a smidgen amount of pressure until I hear a good sounding known. Once i here and good sounding note there's no need to put any extra pressure than that. Any extra pressure is just going to simply be hard on your fingertips. Okay, so now we're ready to hold down this second fret. Because my next exercise, what we're gonna do is I'm going to hold down this second fret while my second finger, my middle finger ridges up and does the hammer on. So we're going to pluck the e note, or the second fret of the D string. Let's do that a couple times. Alright, so now after we pluck this note E, that index finger is going to slant, is gonna come up pretty high because they have to generate enough speed and power, slam it down. And again, if you have to do this in slow motion, Go ahead and do that before we move on to get it to land in the same spot over and over again. So once we're able to do that, then we're ready to move on and lift up that finger. We pluck the D string that note them. First finger on the second fret. By slamming down of that second finger in the fourth fret. Little faster. A little faster yet. Okay, so now notes that are on the a string, we have this open to one hammer on. And we have an index being held down. This first finger on the second fret or my third finger reaches up and does that hammer on. Keep in mind my fingers coming up pretty high. And generating a lot of force downwards to be able to hit that note. And again, if you have to need to do this in slow motion to be able to come down and hit at the right spot on your fret. Do that before moving on. Also, if you still feel fatigue and your fingers, take a short break and come back to it. Okay, these are the different options that we have for hammering runs in our D major pentatonic scale. And what we're gonna do is just simply used the nodes in our scale without doing slides this time. And try to use an eventual hammer on. And it doesn't matter where it is. In the one that I'm going to use as an example, is going to be an index finger hammer on, on the D string, second fret, index finger. So I'm just playing around with this D scale. And then every once in a while, when I choose to, and that means you get to choose when you put that index finger hammer on in. You're going to just do it every once in a while and then continue to churn through your D pentatonic scale. So all we did is we just did it every once in a while. We did that hammer on every once and awhile. Now the next thing that we're going to do when we're practicing, as we're going to include the index finger hammer on, on the a string. So as you're playing along, what we'll do is we'll stop doing the index finger hammer on, on the D string, but we'll trade it out for the hammer on, on the a string. So here's an example of me just playing and adding that finger in there every once and awhile. Okay, there's a nice example of choosing to put that hammer on, on our index finger. Okay? Now that we have. 19. Fundamentals Of The Mandolin Chop: Welcome back and let's learn how to chop. One of the things that we have to understand about this video series, this course, is that it's specifically designed for beginners. So with that in mind, we're going to learn a beginner chop. And there's lots of chords that we can plan the mandolin, lots of versions of chord, but we won't be learning that in this particular setting because we're trying to get the beginner to succeed as fast as possible. So the kind of shot that we'll be learning is called a dead-end chop. And what that means is that we're not hearing any, I'm strings ring out. So in, when we finally here, this didn't chop. None of those strings that you heard bring out will be ringing out at this point. So let's do a deep dive into it. All right, and let's get started on a deadend shop or a muted chop. What we're gonna do first is we're basically, we're just going to take our fingers and set them on the strings. Now, it's different than what we did before, before we did our fingers curling around. And remember alluded that pen exercise where we put it in our fingers and curl the fingers around. That fingers are pointing directly towards the strings. This is a little bit different. Notice my fingers aren't going to be curled around anymore, but they're going to be flat. So if I take my hand away from my instrument, you can see that my hands and my fingers are creating this flat surface instead of a curl around surface. And that surface is going to be very pliable. What that means is your fingers aren't going to be pressing down very hard. They're just going to be padding the strings very gently. So what we wanna do is just take those fingers with a thumb on the back and just set them down on the strings like so. And what we wanna do is for the very beginning of the very first time was we're gonna get those fingers and not touch the strings. So they're just hanging out there. And we're just gonna strum down the strings like so. And you can hear him all ring. What we wanna do is be able to eventually get those fingers down and just set them down without squeezing the fingers. Notice you can see the tension on my fingers when I squeeze and when I let off. In this this relaxed fingered grip is what we're looking for. Notice when I put my picture the strings now, you don't hear those ringing out Sounds like we did before. And you'll want to make sure that all of the fingers are touching in all of the strings. So if there's a random string that's being touched by these fingers, it'll still ring out. So if that's the case, we're just going to want to be really pay attention to where our fingers are touching the strings. And just make sure that all of the strings are being touched. So there is a common mistake, is taking these fingers and pressing too hard. And now you're hearing notes being threaded and they wring out. When that's the case, we just take our fingers and relax the fingers. And all we're looking for now is if we get all of the strings needed, a nice buddy tone when we take our thick and move it to this things. All right. When we do a chop, all we're trying to do is get a percussive sound. So it's really a snare drum, a snare drum effect. So you hear a big based on bone. And then the snare drum is that, boom, boom. So we're creating the sound of a drum effect. And what we're going to try to do to be able to create that is we're going to use part of our arm. Our arm is going to smash through the strings is going to happen fast. The other thing that's going to happen is our wrist is going to take to the fulcrum point and flick it down as our arm comes through the strings. So you'll want to try to get this in slow motion first. So without actually hitting any of the strings, you're going to get through the strings and take the risks and pull it through the strings. And when we create the chalk for the first time or a chap, we're going to get the hand up above the strings quite high because we want to create enough force. As we get through, the risk comes down and SNPS strings. So about half speed is about like this. Up high. Notice that my pick is actually coming up off the screen as that high. And then the arm comes to the strings in the risk smacks down. Alright, from this angle, you can see my arm coming up. You can kinda see that pick coming away above the strings. And then as it comes down, the rest comes down and flux through the strings. And when you do it in fast motion, it's really a more of a controlled down where if you could think of it like snapping a towel or flicking water off of your wrist or off of your hand. It's kind of that same motion. So if we put that together again, we're trying not to have it any of the strings during out, or trying to have them muted or dead end. And we're going to take the hand, move it up. And this time we're actually going to hit the strings. So 321321. All right, and the next exercise in the next video, we're gonna do some exercises together and figure out how we chop to music. So we'll see you there. 20. Mandolin Chop Example And Exercise: Here's an example of what your chap sounds like in real time and it'll break it down. Any four beats system or common time. That means they're going to be four beats and any measure. And we don't have to know much about that at this point because we are beginners. But what we do have to know is there's typically a bass note bomb. And then there's another effect which is that snare drum sound. When it comes to the third tone, one to 41 to 412341234, bom. Bom. So let's just listen to this without me chopping and I'll point out the bass note so that we can hear the audible and get a good example of a user clicks n. But now in this case, there's a base. Now, in our case when we're counting, we're going to be one wanting to chat on the two. So bomb or accountant 111, 12. Okay. So this is at 80 beats per minute. And all we're doing is, is holding our fingers down and we're just getting the strings to be muted or deadened. And we're just taking our hand coming up all the way up pretty high and then slamming it through the strings on the two tone. So I'm gonna audibly say what's happening first, and then I will start to play. When I start to play, I want you to start to play to you, okay? All right, let's do it. One, Chang, Chang. Chang. Chang takes no chat. So let's do it together and makes no breaks down things now. Next, now, thanks. You guys. One, based on race narrow, makes no bass note chart, makes them a step. One. 21. Mandolin Chop To Melody Transitions: Now that we know how to chat, we're going to want to spend some time working on our chops, working on our backing tracks, and choosing a speed that's works for you. As you master a certain speed, just makes sure you move up and speed as you feel comfortable to. And we'll be able to continue on with our progression in our mandolin plane. So now what we wanna do is we want to be able to get out of a chop and play melodically our scale that we've learned, the D major pentatonic scale or the D major scale. So what we want to be able to do is get in rhythm this chalk and get used to the shop and we're gonna shop together. How we get out of the chop. Remember that we use a plant typically when we're playing this scale. And that plan is that third finger or the ring finger being set down to be able to gauge our epic depth so that we can play easier, right? Okay, well what that means for us is that as we're playing a song when we're sitting around a campfire in Gemini with friends, somebody is going to start the song and they're going to sing part of the song. And they might look at you and say, hey, it's time for you to do a solo. Well, when they first start to sing the song, how're backing them up is by this chap. At least they're beginners chop right now when we're doing that shop where we're kind of this percussion instrument along with the rest of the people that were playing along with whether it be in a band or campfire, or just playing along to the radio or YouTube, bed home, whatever it might be, right? So when it comes for you to time to do your solo, how we get there is after we get our chopped done, we're gonna get our chop. It will loop through the strings. And then whatever finger you're using for your plant is going to reach down and touch. We see that how it touches. I'm using my third finger here, right? So it comes down through the strings. We chop, the finger comes down, and then we're going to suck it up to the strings as a fake ups and we're not going to actually going to play on this note. Comes through the strings, sex up to the strings, and now we're ready to play in a down. So what we're going to want to do for your part of an exercise is to strum down with a dead end or muted job. And then the next thing that happens is that finger comes down and touches. So the whole motion looks like this in slow motion. Now if he happens to be your picky eaters, use your pinky instead. And now you're ready to play your down. Make sure you practicing that at home before I move on to the next step and we'll see you in the next lesson. 22. Open D Picking Agility Exercise: Welcome back. Worker on to work together to get our pick. To have a little bit more agility. We're going to use an exercise. It's going to sound kind of fun. And eventually a sound like this. Alright, we're going to break it up into small little steps. If you ever feel like something's moving along too fast. And so okay, you can just simply play it slower. Our practice, one thing, little more and a little, a little longer, and a little more in depth before you move along in the course. Also, you can practice these things with a slower beats per minute backing track. And when we practiced it along with a slower backward track, it helps us gain confidence to go five beats faster and that in that backing track so that you can always increase your speed for whatever level you're at. So we're gonna get this nice sounding strum, but without any fingers first, all we're gonna do is we're gonna get our PEC without a plant. So it's just floating from the elbow down. So the only part that's touching is this part of my hand as it sits on the tail piece, nettle part of the tail piece. And all I'm gonna do is start at the fourth string and drop my pick through the strings. I'm really trying to only barely grazed the strings. Self, my pick gets to fluorine. And I had that pick, recall again or want to guard against that. So we're going to make sure that our PEC is just barely touching those strings and do a fair amount of this practice first so you can hear all of the strings are alright once we can get all the strings during out without any pic recoil, our index finger's gonna go on the second fret of the fourth string. And I want to curl my finger around so that the dino can ring out. We're just going to hear that a nice, good a note. This is the type of note that are playing in a node. First finger on the second fret of the G string, on a good sounding note. And then when I stretch them, I want to make sure the D string can be heard so my finger isn't muting it. Alright? Now after I get that done, I had my finger and place. I'm simply going to do the same thing with I pick as if it was going to be open, except I have my first finger down and I strum. And notice my pick is kind of a drag strings. It's making sure that it's not so fast that I don't hear the individual notes. I kind of want to hear each one of those tab. So let's do it a little bit slower together in 321. Go or write. The next note that we are going to play is our middle finger on the fourth fret of the G string. We're going to make sure that our D-string in right now together in 321, go. Okay, the next note that we're going to play is a high three. High three is going to be on the 12345 sixth fret. Wearing hearing. Nice can solid note. And I also want to hear the D-string bring out. So then by making sure not touching it with their finger. And then we're gonna strum down all the way through the strings. So 321, go. Alright, so at the beginning here, all we're gonna do is we're gonna do an index finger on the second fret of the middle finger on the fourth thread, and third finger on the sixth spread. And we're all we're gonna do is we're just going to walk on from these drums, walking up and then going back down the scale. Okay, now the next thing that we're gonna do is we're gonna get our pick. We're not doing any planned at this moment. So we're going to go down on the fourth string. And up on the third string, down on the fourth string, up on the third string. And we're going to do this as a exercise, do it over and over in 321, go. Alright, now we're gonna do the exact same thing, but it's going to be on a string and the E string, or the second string in that first string. So down on the a string, up on the E string in 321, go once we can successfully do to strings at once. But I'm trying to put all of the strings together. So first down on four upon 32, up online. So we're gonna do together in 321. Go. Okay, now we're gonna do is we're gonna make this just a little bit faster. So it's going to be about this bean. So 321, go each node. So they should be about the same loudness. Do you feel comfortable? And let's go a little fast here. 321. And even a little bit faster yet and three-to-one. Okay. After we're able to do our gown down at a at a pretty good rate of speed or whatever rate of speed that you feel comfortable. Eg. We're simply going to now do a strum, followed by down, down. So now if I put the two together, it looks like this really sleep together in 321. Go. Okay, now we're gonna do that with the second finger on the G string, the fourth string on the forthright. In 321, go. And now that high three on the sixth fret of the G string. Once we are able to achieve that, and were able to play one set of nodes at a time. And we're now going to move from one to the next and the next and then go back down. The scale. Sound like gets real Sloan. Or indeed at much slower than that in 321. Go 43214321 or three to 4321432143214321. A little faster in 32132321. Take some time and practice your new GOD exercise, and I'll see you here. Next lesson. 23. Adding The First String To The D Major Pentatonic Scale: Now that we know how to use these two nodes and apply them to D, we're going to use these two nodes now. And they're going to be on the E string, and it's going to be simply the second fret and the fifth fret. I'm also going to use my East string open, E, first string open. So some commonality still apply with these two notes. I can still use slides. I can hammer ONE. Here's an example of me playing along with the backing track, including the open ie, the one in the three fingers or the open to fret, and the five cred, along with our D major pentatonic scale. 24. Example D Chord Boom Chuck 4 3 2 1 Strumming Pattern On The Mandolin: We've been learning how to do things with scales. And then we've learned some stuff with pick control. We've learned some tricks that we can do with our scales to make it sound. Mandolin leg. And now we're going to learn some of these chord that exist on the mandolin, at least in the key of D. And the first chord that we're going to learn is a D chord. Now, depending on your ability and your agility of your fingers at this time, there is a couple of different ways that we can play D And we're going to learn them, all right now. So having a piece of paper and writing them out will be great. L0 into your benefit at this one because we're going to go through quite a few of them. So the first one that we're going to do is this index finger on the second fret of the fourth string, which is an a note. And just like we did the exercise where it was an agility exercise, we're going to want to make sure the fingers curled enough, curled around enough. So the D string. And then we simply strung down. Okay, there's going to be our first version of a D chord. D dog, dog d are other version of a D chord is gonna be our index finger still there on the second fret of the G string. And then our middle finger, or our second finger goes on the second fret of the first string, ie. So I'm going to want to hear this ring out note, a ringing out again, a wringing out a, and this f sharp tone. And when I sum them all together, this is a D chord. Okay? So these two chords are ringing out chords. Now. They're useful for when I want the mandolin to renounce or add value to an ensemble or playing by myself that I want to hear these ringing out long notes. In example, of a chord that is the D chord that we can play. And depending on how long your fingers, you're going to choose what fingers to be able to put it. But I'm gonna give you a basis of baseline to work off of and then give you your variations and what you can use. So my index finger is still going to go on the same second fret on a note on the G string for right now. And this can change. Your second finger or your middle finger is going to go on the second fret of the D string or the third string. So this is the fourth fret here, second fret, fourth fret. And then lastly, your third finger is going to go on the fifth fret of the second string. So second fret for threat, fifth fret. Fingers are 123. At this point you can have E sound out. But if we decide to move this chord and make it movable down the road, not necessary necessarily right now. This is a movable chord. If we're moving with the chord or choosing different strings to play it on, we're going to make sure that E string is muted. And how we meet that is by muting this little blurry there. But what's happening is this finger, this third finger as touching one of the E strings. And then the meaty part of my finger is touching one of the ISS strings here. So I make some small adjustments with my hands so that it touches the bottom of that E string. So I roll this hand up a little bit to touch the bottom part on an E string. And then this finger role is just a little bit down. And then I should have an E string that doesn't sound out anymore, or is a dead sound or a fronting the sound. At that point. They E-string doesn't ring out. So when you're down here on just the D chord by itself, it certainly can't wring out and becomes a DCIS to chord. For those of us who don't want to play that SAS to chord or the, that really kind of a theory ALL sounding D chord. We're going to make sure that e goes away. Okay, so here's our different chords. Again, we have the one finger D. And again that's a disservice to our other ringing out. D chord is index finger, index finger on both sides leading the two middle ones open, and you're on the second fret for both. And then the D chord disclose D chord. Frets are 245, fingers are 123. And you can either have the earring for a DSS chord or mute, and then become a just array. By muting the eastern. Each and every one of the chords have their own unique values and are helpful to play in different ways. In this particular case, for the exercise that we're going to do, we're going to use this D chord. And now we're going to get used to this D chord because we're going to use it for just a little while. And we're going to strummed downward before, followed by and down, down, down, just like we did before on the fourth string, up on third string, down on two upon one. Alright, now we're going to add one more thing. Do it. We're going to add what we call a Czech citizens. By another little downs Trump on three bottom stream. Now that we have our D chord, strum is going to look like this. We're going to have a, a bass note that rings out. And it's the only note that's being played as the fourth string, followed by a strum of the three bottom strings. So third string, second string, first string. If you're playing guitar, it would sound like a boon Chuck's Trumbull. And that's what we're going to call this as a big long note. And then followed by a scrambled and bottom three strings. So let's do that together. So we're going to play example first boot shot in three, 21 a little slower and check. One note colonized strum of great. Now that we have that boom check, we can practice it by ourselves until we get good at that Boone check. And then we're going to have what we call a rolling strum. And we've already done the rolling strum in our exercise before. It's simply down on for fun three, down on to, up on one. And if I put it all together, it sounds like this. So let's do that together. Just that Rawlings trump over and over without the boom check attached. So three to really slow. Alright, so now this rolling strum, and it's going to happen after this boom check certainly played a role in Trump. Slow it down so that we can practice it together. So we have rolling strummed, faster. Some alternatives to using our full d, which is the two-finger D. For those of us who might have some arthritis in her hands and you can always do just the index finger and play that DSS coordinator works the same. So now that we know how to do our Boone shock with a forward roll. And we can also do just simply the boondocks drum. Practice those and make sure that you practice them long enough so that you get a nice, good sound there, clean sounding, and you can play it in time. Once if you're comfortable with the cards, we'll see you back here at the next lesson. 25. Example G Chord Boom Chuck 4 3 2 1 Strumming Pattern On The Mandolin: Now that we're starting to get comfortable playing are open D chord. We're going to start playing. They're open G chord. And this is what it looks like. Your g string is going to be opened, the fourth string, your D-string is going to be open. Your first finger is going to go on the second fret of the a string or the second string. And your middle finger or your second finger is gonna go on the third fret of the E string or the first string. And make sure when we set our fingers down, our D can bring out and are the rest of the notes we want to have a good solid tones, no dead notes. And after we have our chord in place, we're simply going to strum down. Now what we're gonna do is we're going to use R for right now. We're just letting everything. We're not yet to the point where we're doing chumps. And that'll come later for right now we're again these nice open sounding chords. We wanted all of the notes to wring out. So the boom check strum looks like this. We go to the lowest sounding note, which is G, followed by the three bottom strings. So let's do that together. Nice and slow. So 321, a little faster. Okay, now that we have this Boone checks drum, We're also going to attach the rolling strum to it deep down on the fourth string, third string, down on the second string, up on the first dream. And we've done this a couple of times. So if we've practiced, it, should get a little easier as we go. So we're just gonna do this nice and slow down. Alright, now for little faster about this speed. So 321. Ok, now that we have the forward roll or the 4-3-2 one row weren't going to do a boon check fallon by net for three-to-one realm. So it looks like this. We're going to do that together. Nice and slow. 321, go a little faster and faster. A little faster yet. And little faster yet. Alright, take some time to practice your G chord. You're open to it. And if you can, and you were drawn to it. And after that, we'll see you in the next lesson. 26. Example Strumming D And G 4 Cycles On The Mandolin: It's time for us to do some strumming patterns. And these Struggling patterns look like this. We're using our D chord and our new open G chord. So far we've learned this week also, just did the Boone chump part without the 4321. And that's what we're focused on right now. So we're going to be doing and we're going to use a term called a cycle. So every time I do a shot, that's just one cycle. Two cycles, it sounds like this. Two cycle. I want to do four cycles. It sounds like this. For this particular exercise, we're going to be doing four cycles of d with a boon checks from r. I can count them. After I get done doing four cycles of my open D chord, I'm gonna do four cycles of open G, one. And when I get done with that, I'm gonna go back to D and do it all over n. And now to get good at this, we want to be able to move our fingers in the right way at the right time. So first what we're gonna do is we're going to get our fingers down in slow motion and then get our fingers to the next chord in slow motion and makes sure both fingers set down at exactly the same time. And that happens again. I'm going to move back to G, but they're moving in slow motion, trained both fingers set down at the exact same time. Once we can do this effective, effectively, then we can slowly start to speed it up. Now the trick is getting both fingers down at the same time so that we're not adding one finger than the other. And then one thing going in the other. Whatever finger it might be, we want to be able to set both fingers down at the same time after I get done doing boom shock on my fourth cycle, while I move my hand up to do the next boom. In slow motion washed them happen together. I'm also going to move my fingers into the position that I need to for my D chord. So as this guy goes up, these guys are going to go up to, so wash them happened in the same time. One more time they're going up in the position and the same time as this hand comes up to do my next boom. Alright, so now, now that we know how to do that, we have to practice it in slow motion. And we can't practice it in time quite yet because we have to be able to get that movement down. What we're gonna do is we're going to play a D chord. And then after the decor and after my strings, my pick is going to come up. And as it comes up, my fingers go in slow motion down to this D chord. And now I'm ready to play that. Check again. And now my fingers come up and I'm going to play that D chord as my pick comes up. And I'm ready to play that. Boom, check again. And we'll just do this in slow motion over and over and over until you've got them together at the same time. Or depict comes up and my fingers are ready at the same time. Before we move on to this next little step, they come up and moved together. And they moved together. And move together. And I moved again. There. Are write, take some time and get that down. Make sure that you can move your fingers at the exact same time. And then once you're ready, come back to this video and we're going to do a shock strum in four cycles for each chord, but we're gonna start with a D chord, is D coordinate 1234 then switched. Okay, let's do a little faster. Or switch to switch one. Or switch. Switch. Switch. Switch, switch. Little faster. 33333. Alright, go ahead and practice your D to G exercise using four cycles each, using a boon check strum. And I'll see you in the next lesson. 27. Practice Session D And G Boom Chuck 4 3 2 1 Strumming On The Mandolin: I'm right. Strum with D chord, G chord. We're going to add one thing to it. We're going to add that forward roll. So now we're going to start just like we did before. But now we're going to round up to, so each cycle looks like Here's the fourth one, noise switched. Alright, so in this particular gene just repeated on each other. 32. Ready go. So 3211234, D and G with Boone shock, 42 angstrom, and practice that. We'll see in next lesson. 28. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 40 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 40 beats per minute. Thank you. Right. Ok. Ok. And I don't know. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Right. Now. If you look at this oh, yes. This is good. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. 29. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 50 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 50 beats per minute. And I did that. Just one. At this point. Then eight. But so what does a good job? I didn't know that to do that. And that's one of the top. All right. Good. Good. So the total here. Oh, to do that. What this does for us. 30. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 60 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 60 beats per minute. You're good. Okay. But there are two parts that I prefer. So look for that. They can't think of it like that. A big part of the book, but they don't know. Welcome back to the document. And in fact, they could. The third effect. Or you go home for two days in the past. That doesn't look that good. And there are different things. Thanks. 31. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 70 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 70 beats per minute. And OK. No. Like that. What does it do? That what they did? The hope. Is that good. And if you'd like to, the use of hope. I can choose. What is that? And for those people, good. Good. Good. Three. 32. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 80 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 80 beats per minute. The purpose of that. Now that we've got that took effect, the project that took on that stuff. The other people. They repeat be local. And what did that look like? Look at that. And then go think about that. And the people that come up. But the bigger part, the fact that the chemicals take a look. And with the public. Let's go. 33. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 90 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 90 beats per minute. Audience. They look like. And look, look, look, look, look. Look. It's difficult to get to that. That looks good. We're good to go. And what that would look like. Well, that doesn't look good. If we could do that. And with that comes with it. Look them up but they often don't look. The more that I didn't even know. That's up to you. And he took the picture, split open. 34. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 100 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 100 beats per minute. And what that does, that. But the people that do that, look at that. The Doppler effect. The people that did that. And I think people are pretty good. And it looks cool. Look, look, look, look. Look. Before. I do that. And I think that that, that that but most people didn't go home. Good, good, good, good, good, good. And that did help. 35. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 110 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 110 beats per minute. It's optimized for that. And we'll look into that though about that. If you believe that people don't do that. And then we'll go over that. I think that in the book. Because of it, I hope that they will vote for the negative. Okay? Then the formula for the multiple of the people. Now that we've got to do the lookup and take a look at that. They don't like about it. But if you look over the whole format, I mean, look at that. 36. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 120 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 120 beats per minute. That, that, that, that didn't look. So. Good luck. Think of it as being the liquid that go with that. They took it off the books. Let's take a look at that. But one of the things that go with it. The public. Public good, good, good, good, good, good. Now, the good news is that the costs of college, since it's the contract, look like good, good, good, good, good, good. If you look in the book, the ethics of divinity. Look, look, look, look. Look. This thing on the top of it. Good. Good. Good. Good, good, good, good, good, good. Good. Good. Good, good, good, good, good. Good, good, good, good, good, good. Good, good. Tokyo was a system that could. Just take a look at what depth. Good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good. Good. 37. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 130 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 130 beats permitted. Your drip drip drip painting. Pretending that the report for the day after that? They did that. They looked at the depth of it. I think that the that the job that it doesn't look that up and put that into the block that he took. It's the book that looked good. Good, good, good. Because it is not that good. The good news is that if we get back the data that comes after the treatment, which is good for the positions of good. Good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good luck. With that of the connective tissue of the body. And all the things that doing that give the money to the competitors. And that is the idea that included. Which means that if the other end of the bar on top of it, which means that it is perfect for you. I didn't know that the people that they don't look that good. Don't put too much. But look, look. Look, look. Look. Look. Look. Look. Look. Because of the work that they do with that data. 38. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 140 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 140 beats per minute. Put that depend on different communities. I think that it was reported that the way that the influence within the party look look, look look, look. Look. Look. Look. Look, look, look. Look. Look. Look. Look. Look. Look. Look. Look. Look. Look. Look. Take a look at that. Look. If you don't have to get back. The culture of that. If you give it a little bit different. I think that if you're looking to get into pretty quickly. But again, if we look at that, look at the case of the cutoff frequency, that is good because that's the path that you would think. That they can pick it up. Good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good, good. Good, good. This is a picture that looks good. But that was the first to document that the New York City. But that would be a good thing that he did. That. And then you get the book with good people. Electrical device that gets rid of the technical details that for different businesses. 39. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 150 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 150 beats per minute gives us could look, it's complete that that's reflected. That that, that, that that that the difference here with the with the with the people. The book that he did, that with the people that came with it. That is the truth. That it detected that young people, for the people in the country, there tends to be given to the public. Good. Good, good, good. Good, good. Good. Good. Good. Look. Look. Look. Look, look. Look. Look. Look different than the typical with it. The other groups that go with it. And they can look for that. The hope is that they didn't do that for the two different groups. What do you think? It could have a brief look into? The deny that the spike if you look at that, and they can live with that. The problem is that if you look at the trend of the people that created the depth, the depth. And then we'll conclude with two things that protected the contention that the defect, because people in the fifth, with respect to the nucleus. 40. Course Tools #1 Practice With A Band 160 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 160 beats per minute. And the book is that the people could inflict the kinds of problems. I would like to get the equipment that they detected, that it's completely different. But the good thing with the equipment that lets me do that in the plot, that looked good. But the key is that it's likely that, that, that, that, that, that that, that, that that you look at it. The topic today is about the particular people that does differently within the team that did, that. If the object was that, that was pretty good. And the protected groups, depending on who people look, that hit the Detective Holmes didn't like that. After that, they didn't think that the people who founded the development of public good, good, good, good, good, good, good. The, the, the, the, the, the, the, the, the topic of the book. Let us look at the proof of that is again, difficult. Look. Look. Look. Look. Look. Good. Good. Good. Good. Good. Good, good, good, good. Good, good, good, good, good, good. Get the good. Protective differently. Because that is that if young people become dependent. So if you're looking to get a different perspective on that, good, good, good, good, good, good. Detected that the good. That looks good. 41. Course Tools #2 Practice With A Band 40 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 40 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. Okay. With us today. Okay. Okay. Okay. Right. You with me. Okay. Oh, no. Okay. 42. Course Tools #2 Practice With A Band 60 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 60 beats per minute. All right. Okay. And we're going to do here. We go. Okay. So okay. Okay. Okay. Yes. Ok. But all of us. Okay. Okay. 43. Course Tools #2 Practice With A Band 80 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 80 beats per minute. Okay. And what they do. Ok. Right. Let's see. Today. The funny thing. Yeah. Yeah. Yes. Okay. And you could say okay. Okay. 44. Course Tools #2 Practice With A Band 100 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 100 beats per minute. The other way. Wonderful. Okay. All right. Okay. I don't know. Okay. And why not? Okay. Okay. Right. Okay. We are all on top of them. Okay. 45. Course Tools #2 Practice With A Band 120 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 120 beats per minute. I know. Okay. Okay. So mitosis. Yes. And the US. And it doesn't happen, right? Yes. Yes. Okay. What do I do? No. 46. Course Tools #3 Practice With A Band 40 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 40 beats per minute? Yes. Okay. Good. Okay. This is the surface resistance. Thank you. Mm-hm. All right. In this case. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. 47. Course Tools #3 Practice With A Band 60 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 60 beats per minute. Okay. Thank you. It could right. Good. So if you get sick, so if we take this picture, 1666. Okay. Yeah. Now, if this is 50. Cool. Okay. 48. Course Tools #3 Practice With A Band 80 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 80 beats per minute. Oops. Good. Okay. Okay. So typically what people do a very different picture in the past. Just like that. So. The people that we can continue. It doesn't make much difference. Just to give you a little bit different. So to do that typically. Okay. 49. Course Tools #3 Practice With A Band 100 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 100 beats per minute. The difference between the 250. But it's progress. The big difference. Look at the picture that we get for the purpose of this video. Okay. Let's take a look at a picture of the difference between the two. It's different because it shows us that. But because it's personal. If the capability is there, That's it. Because it is difficult to predict. If the difference is that they didn't think of that. They look different because typically. 50. Course Tools #3 Practice With A Band 120 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 120 beats per minute. That is the condition. Okay. The difficulty is that we can do it. The difference between the two. It's just that the literature is that difference. The key here is that the big picture. If it gets into difficulty with the Jews. But if you look at it, if it's specific to the content, It's going to be significant. If it doesn't. Look right. This is particularly interesting because it was difficult to get. Typically, if it is indicated here, is a bit difficult. For example, if it's a particularly difficult thing to do. 51. Course Tools #4 Practice With A Band 40 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 40 beats per minute. Okay. Yeah. Okay. Okay. So yeah. Okay. So the question is right? Yes. Right? Okay. Yes. Right. Okay. 52. Course Tools #4 Practice With A Band 60 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track: 60 beats per minute. So yeah. Right? Yes. Right? Okay. No. Thank you. Okay. Right? Okay. Okay. Okay. 53. Course Tools #4 Practice With A Band 80 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track 26: 80 beats per minute. Okay. Right. Okay. Thank you. Okay. Okay. Yes. Right. Okay. Okay. Right. Okay. But spec okay. 54. Course Tools #4 Practice With A Band 100 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track 27: 100 beats per minute. Okay. Right. Okay. Okay. Okay. Okay. 55. Course Tools #4 Practice With A Band 120 Bpm Jam Along Backing Track 28: 120 beats per minute. Okay. Okay. Thank you. Okay. Yeah. Okay. Okay. Okay. Right. 56. Thank you for taking this Beginner Mandolin Class: Thanks so much for being a part of this class.