Beginner Guitar Lessons: Guitar Lesson 9 | Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy | Skillshare

Beginner Guitar Lessons: Guitar Lesson 9

Guitar Lessons By GuitArmy, Your personal guitar teacher

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7 Lessons (30m)
    • 1. Lesson 9 Introduction

      4:05
    • 2. Play a G on every string

      4:34
    • 3. Rhythm 7

      3:06
    • 4. Strum this open chord progression 5

      3:10
    • 5. Power chord exercise 4

      3:28
    • 6. Tune down a half step

      2:51
    • 7. How to play a barre chord

      8:43

About This Class

Are you interested in learning how to play the guitar? Then you've come to the right place. This lesson is the 9th lesson in a series of 10 guitar lessons that the Guitar Training Camp will be publishing. This lesson is designed to be your eight ever guitar lesson. If you've never played guitar before and would like to learn this lesson is perfect for you. 

What will you learn in this lesson?

  • How to play the note G on every string. It's an important skill to be able to find a specific note on every string. 
  • Rhythm 7 - you will learn to strum a rhythm with guitar tablature in the video and w/PDF chart

  • Learn to strum a chord progression with open chords with guitar tablature in the video and w/PDF chart

  • Learn to play a power chord exercise with guitar tablature in the video and w/PDF chart

  • Tune down half a step
  • How to play a barre chord

Why should you sign up for my lesson?

  • My name is Chris Rupp and I'm the founder of the GuitArmy.

  • I've been teaching guitar full time for over 18 years.

  • I have taught more then 30,000 individual private guitar lessons.

  • I teach guitar students online all over the world.

  • I have a bachelors of music degree from the world renowned Berklee College of Music where I studied with some of the best guitar players on earth. 

  • I created a successful line of guitar instruction DVDs that sold very well and garnered the attention of the "As Seen on TV" folks.

  • I love teaching guitar and helping students become better musicians through the guitar.

  • I will answer your personal questions and help you with learning the material in this lesson.

Why should I take your class and not just learn from YouTube?

You can try to learn guitar from YouTube but eventually you'll figure out there's so many videos out there is very hard to put the information together in a coherent way. I have students come to me all the time that are tired of watching random guitar videos on YouTube and don't know how to put the information together. With this lesson you can get started playing the guitar and follow the next 1 lesson to end up with a full 10 lessons for beginners on guitar. If you missed the first 8 lessons make sure you sign up for those courses also. 

Student Testimonial

Hi Chris, thanks so much for reaching out! I'm about half way through lesson 10 of your Beginner lessons via Skillshare, so I was researching more of your teaching, and what's next... and found your GTC Online! I've gotta tell ya, something about your explanations, your method of teaching, and the detailed resources provided, you've connected so many dots for me -- it's appreciated beyond words! I'm mostly self-taught, regret that I started so late in life, and have tried other online resources, but yours has been the most comprehensive! As a corporate facilitator to adult learners myself, I just wanted to express my gratitude!

Mel

Transcripts

1. Lesson 9 Introduction: Welcome to beginner guitar lessons. Lesson nine. My name is Chris Rope, and I'm the founder of the guitar training camp. If you've never played guitar before or you're a beginner looking to improve your skills than my beginner guitar lessons are for you, this course is going to be 10 lessons in total. I will be releasing each lesson one at a time, so you have the time needed toe work on and learn the material in each lesson. If you like the 1st 9 lessons and you want the last lesson, make sure you sign up is one of my students. Here's some clips of what you'll be learning in Less and nine theme Power cord on the end of three and then we're gonna play a come down again on the on four So that measure goes. Gives one and two and three and four more Time goes one hand. Yeah, that means what you're gonna do is you're going to do ah muted strum todo 12 So what I do to do that muted strum with this hand My left hand I lift up on these fingers and what that allows me to do is asleep. Those strings strings 12 and three are silent. And then what I also do when I want to do them you to strum I'm really using my palm aside . Do that as I strum down Theo finding a g on every string We're going to start here on the six string. That seems to be the best place. Start right here on this g. All right. And if you remember from the previous lesson, we're gonna be going down five or up 77 on each string except for the second string. Okay. To create a major bar chord based off the six string, the first thing you're gonna do is you're going to bar your finger the whole way across the seventh. Fred, I'm doing a B major bark or just cause it's kind of right in middle the neck. Um, So I would bar my finger across all six strings. And when you play this, you need to get used to You have to have your thumb back here. When you play these, you can't have your thumb appear. There's gonna feel really awkward. Why would you ever want to tune down half a step? You ask good questions. If you play a lot of songs by other bands, you will find yourself tuning down 1/2 step all the time. Theo. First measure. What we have here is we're gonna start with a G chord and open G chord for beats one and two. They're just quarter notes. We're going 12 mental beat number three. We're switching to E minor and going three. Some information about May I have a bachelors of music degree from Berklee College of Music and I've been teaching guitar full time for more than 18 years. I've told more than 30,000 private guitar lessons, so I'm very experienced with what students need to get started on guitar. For more details about the course, check out the course description. I look forward to seeing you inside the course. 2. Play a G on every string: in this lesson. I will show you how to find the nog on every string finding a G on every string. We're going to start here on the six string. That seems to be the best place. Start right here on this g. All right. And if you remember from the previous lesson, we're gonna be going down five or up, 77 on each string except for the second string. So I can't. If I start here, I can't get down five. So I'm gonna have to go up. Seven. 1234567 So this is gonna be a G here on the fifth string. 10th fret. I would probably normally just g o would normally just get down. Let's go up just for some different. They're gonna move over and let it go up. 71234567 This is a G way up here. All right, So if I want to find a G on the next string, I could move my finger over, and I'm gonna have to get out. 512345 Makes sense, because it's my third string. This is the G string So I'm right here on this G. And if you remember, when we go to the second string, we get down four up eight. So I'm gonna get down four. So I'm just gonna move my finger over and get out for for it's 1234 So I find a G here. It's exact. Same pitch exact. Same pitch. Is this one. All right? Now for the next string, it's my choice. I can go down five or up. Seven thing. We're gonna get down five. So move over and go. 12345 So I'm gonna get through this one more time. We have g here. Gonna go up 72 here. This G Then I went up seven to this one. E went down five to this one, and then I went down four to this one thing. I went down five to this one. So that is one way to find where ah, all the G's are on your guitar, how I actually do it. This is a great method. Is a great way to find where the G's are. I typically will use octaves, So if I need to know where g is on the say the fourth string e I think of where the octave is here on the think of where it is on the six string and then the active I know the octave is up two frets and over two strings Once again that was This is G right here. If I go up two frets and over two strings. This is Aguilas. Well, so this is these are both Jeez, this is Ah, this G here is an octave higher than this year right here. If I need to find G's quickly in an area I'm gonna get like this go up to and over to know when I go to the second string, the octave is not up to it over toe. That has to be a major seventh interval. So what I do you have to do is you have to go up three friends and over two strings. So the octave then becomes looks like this. So I have this gene this gene in this geo. That's very I can very quickly find where those genes are that I can go up to this G here on the 10th friend. I could start here on the fifth string. If I get up, up to and over two, I end up with this G. I know it's a genius. 12th fret and its third strength so g And then when I do the octave going from the third string to the set the to the first string it's up three and over to eso You have to go up three and over to if I did too, until it would be a major seventh. So I can quickly find this G this G industry right here, uh, so I can quickly find by using the actives I get very quickly. Find all the G's on the instrument and you can go around the circle offense or just picked random notes. But I would definitely practice all 12 different notes. Ah, and use defined using the actives and finding where geez are that way and then also going through and just playing one on each drink. I think for a beginner, I think that's all you need. But as more of a intermediate or advanced player, you wanna be able to find those notes quickly so I would use octaves. That is how you play the new G on every string, using the traditional method and by using octaves 3. Rhythm 7: in this lesson. We're going to be taking a look at the seventh rhythm in this course. Let's take a look at the first exercise for the number seven. What we're doing here for Measure number one, We're playing a d chord and it's 1/4 note coming in a beat number ones we're gonna from down over one, we're gonna get one. And then if you look at number two, you'll see a bunch of axes That means what you're gonna do is you're going to do Ah, muted strum todo 12 So what I do to do that muted strum with this hand My left hand I lift up on these fingers and what that allows me to do is asleep those strings strings 12 and three or silent And then what I also do when I want to do them you to strum I'm really using my palm aside Do that as I strum down I'm dropping dropping my palm down on the strings gets that kind of clicking sound. So you commuting up here and with my palm mute my palm muting the strings 12 and then I'm playing on on the on the end of two. I'm playing a B minor court. If you're not familiar with how to play B minor chord, What you're gonna do is you're going to bar your finger across the second fret, and you're gonna really focus on this note here. This b and then the rest of your first thing is just gonna lay on the strings. Then your third finger here is gonna play. Um, this f sharp here on the fourth string fourth friend, your pinky is gonna play, right? Lay right beside it there on the third string. Fourth fret. And then my second figure is gonna be on this d here on the second string. Third friend. Looks like that we're gonna go on time, wise your going. 12 and 34 Then in the second measure, you're gonna play Joan. Beat 11 Then you're gonna do the mute again. Come up on a corner in the ends. Tuesday goes one two and 34 measured. I'll go ahead and play this again. 12341234 to 3 Kind of has an edge here and kind of sound. You'll hear that that scratching done a lot. Um, personally, I like to use my fingers for this. I just I just got a smack in my fingers down the street with Sounds pretty cool. Did you use, uh, with your fingers or with the pick? Either way, it works. Fine. That is how you play rhythm number seven. 4. Strum this open chord progression 5: This'll, Essen, we're going to be playing the fifth open chord progression in this course for the first exercise. What we're gonna be doing here, we have four measures and I'll go ahead and play through it, and then we'll go through each measure. It's gonna sound like this 34 for the first measure. What we have here is we're gonna start with the G chord and open G chord for beats one and two. They're just quarter notes. We're going 12 men Beat number three. We're switching to E minor and going three more way. We're gonna go to the next measure. We're gonna play a seat to strums of 2/4 notes of C. I'm gonna play to quarter notes of D on for the next two measures. We're just gonna repeat the same thing which is going GTO. That is that that is how you strum exercise number one for exercise number two. What I did, I took the exact same chords. It's almost the same rhythm, except I'm bringing the cords and 1/2 a beat earlier, which makes a little more complicated, but I think it sounds a little cooler. It's something that you can try your playing a chord progression. Just bringing a quart and 1/2 like an eighth note earlier can really change the feel of it . So in the first measure, really, First Kim measures. What we're doing is we're going coming in. It's a dotted quarter note on G, which is 1.5 beats. We're going one skip to then we're coming up on the end of two going one two and skip three . Skip for them. We're coming up on the end of four with a C court goes one, two, and 34 and we're gonna skip one. Then we're gonna come. We're gonna skip to again because it's ah on being number one that is tied to the end of four. So we're going for and skip 12 and then we're gonna come up on the end of two for D. It's a little more time It's gonna go. One, two and 34 and 12 and three for one, 23412 and 34 And that is how you play exercise number two. That is how you play strum this open chord progression. Number five 5. Power chord exercise 4: I think this lesson you'll be learning a power chord progression that uses both six strings and the fifth string power course. If you listen closely, you may recognize the chord progression for this power court exercise. For in the first measure, we're going to start here with the any five power chord. What I'm doing is I'm adding my pinky on the on right here beside my third finger on the third string nine threat. So instead of just a to note the route Phantom putting the root fifth and then the route here are 799 if you look at the tab. So for the first measure, we're gonna go one and 23 and more time. We're gonna go one and two will be number three. We're gonna rest. That gives us time to come down here and play this G Power court on the end of three two goes three and more. Yeah, one more time. One and do three and more. All right, Now we're gonna take a look at the second measure. We're gonna start with two A's. Uh, it's gonna go one answering one and rest on two. We're gonna play a C five power chord here, based off the fifth string. Third fret comes in on the end of two. We're gonna rest on the end of three. We're gonna go up here and play a D power cord on the end of three and then we're gonna play a come down again on the on four. So that measure goes, uh, gives one and two and three and four. What time it gives one hand two and three and four. So if we put that all together, it's gonna sound like, Ah, uh, now you may find that you can change your hands fast enough, and that's fine. So just take your time, just play you three times. Take your time, get down here and get that G set. The hardest part is going to be ableto move back and forth between strings, so you just have to take it slow, take your time, have some fun with the riff or the power court exercise, and maybe you'll recognize it when you get up to speed. Um, I'll go ahead. And now please go ahead and play it with a little distortion on, uh, that was power cord exercise number four. The court progression that I used was from a huge hit from a German rock band. Do you know which one? What is that? Some over there in the corner. Looks like a scorpion, huh? That's weird. 6. Tune down a half step: I think this lesson I'm going to teach you how to tune down half a step. Why would you ever want to tune down half a step? You ask good questions If you play a lot of songs by other bands you will find yourself tuning down 1/2 step all the time. Bands like Van Halen, Guns and Roses and Stevie Ray Vaughan almost always tuned down half a step Another reason to tune down is the guitar strings have a different field They feel a little looser With less tension on the strings You can bend the strings easier which can be fun Let's take a look at tuning down half a step to tune down 1/2 step What you need to do is you need to take each string and lower it down 1/2 step So I'm gonna start here in my first string My high e string I haven't either. I'm gonna tune it down, take it down So I see a d sharp 20 year Your tuner may display flats. I like flats better, but these snark seem to want to do Sharps. So I just turned this down 1/2 step it wasn't e. I turned it down to a D Sharp. Now we're gonna go to the second string. This is your B string. Take this. I'm gonna tune it down down to an HR. Ah. I going to get the 30 g e o. Uh, the next string of your D string were Take it down to see sharp. Uh huh. Good. Right there. We think you're a They here. Get down the G sharp in the last string. We have e. We're gonna take this down. We're gonna take it down to D sharp. Now, the one thing I would mention is I Usually I don't just assume cause I just did it once. It's perfect. So I'll go. I'll go back through and tweet him a little. Uh, you see the always sharp just a little bit If you find that that keeps happening sometimes what I'll do is I'll tune this string in this. I'll kind of go back and forth. Kind of. It's almost like I'm tricking the guitar with attention. Figure back and forth. You can do it probably quicker and easier. That is how you tuned down half a step on guitar 7. How to play a barre chord: in this lesson, I'm going to show you how to play a major and minor bar chord based off the sixth and the fifth Strength. Let's first start with the bar chords on the six string. Okay, To create a major bar chord based off the six string, the first thing you're gonna do is you're going to bar your finger the whole way across the seventh. Fred, I'm doing a B major bark or just cause kind of right in middle the neck, so I would bar my finger across all six strings. And when you play this, you need to get used to You have to have your thumb back here. When you played, you can't have your thumb appear. There's gonna feel really awkward unless you have gigantic hands. It's gonna feel strange because you need that. You're gonna need to apply a lot of pressure. So you're gonna have to be able to squeeze back here. That's why yet you keep your thumb back there. All right, so we're going Teoh, we're gonna squeeze hard and you can practice this. I usually suggest for people to start getting used to bar chords to go ahead and to squeeze , See if you can strum through all six strings and can you hear each six? Need to the six strings. That's a good practice exercise. Just kind of get yourself up to speed with your strength for doing bar chords. All right, so we're gonna bar across the seventh, fret for this be major chord. Then we're gonna take our third finger, and we're gonna put it on the fifth string ninth Fret right here, E Then we take our pinkie, put it right behind my third finger on the fourth string ninth, fret and then we're going to take my second finger here. I'm gonna put it on the third string. A threat right here in the first insect ID string are going to be the reason they're Rainey's cause I'm squeezing down. So I'm playing the 1st 2nd on the six string. Like I said, that backwards is the 6th 2nd and first they're gonna be ringing. And you might say, Well, why do I need to bar then? Well, there's no way you're gonna play this this all those notes without barring it. You can't do some kind of arch, So basically, you put those things down and you squeeze and you strum beginning. You're probably not going to hear all of them. So you just have Teoh do the best you can. It's gonna take a while. You probably have to play these hundreds of times, so you build up the hand strength to be able to do him. And so they sound nice and clear. Eso I say Just embrace him to squeeze him and half muted. Oh, well, just keep Just keep playing and practicing, squeezing building up your muscles and eventually your hand will get used to it. So this was a major bar chord based off the six drinks. Now let's take a look at how to play a major bar chord based off of the fifth string. Okay, To play a major bar chord based off of the fifth string, I'm gonna start right here on this D. So what I'm gonna do is going I'm going to bar my finger across strength. 1234 and five and really focusing on playing this No d since I'm gonna play a d major for one. So I'm focusing on this D What? I'm letting my finger down, letting my first finger touch the six string. It's got a flesh mute so that when I from the court just getting muted out that way I don't wanna hear cause I don't hear an e in the booth that doesn't belong there. So I just move this finger over to meet it out. All right, so then the next thing I'm gonna do is I'm gonna take my third finger and I'm going Teoh, Bart across strings 23 and four. You don't want I don't want to hear it on the first string. I don't hear a thing. Basically, you're putting 1/13 on the top on that doesn't belong in a the this major chord D major court. So what I do is I actually just lift this my third finger up just a little bit, and it ends up muting out the first string. So when I strum this, I'm strumming all six strings, but I'm only hearing strings 543 and two. Strength six and one are getting meted out. This is a much harder bark or to get used to. It's very common. Um, So if you ever need to play, you know, if you're gonna play D Chord tried to play like that, but if you had to play D Flat Major, you can't Dio doesn't sound good, so you would have to probably play this one or, you know, there's many other ones, but this is what we're doing now. So here's a D major. More record. Once again, Um, there's other finger rings. You'll see this fingering. I'm not used to playing that it kind of works. I find it to be too stretched out between my first and 2nd 2nd finger s event. So I just learned to just kind of suck it up and learned this cord. And eventually you get this one down, your hands get strong enough to do it. And this one just seems easier than this fingering. But that is ah, different fingering that is possible. That's how you play a major bar chord based off of the fifth straight. Keep in mind these are movable. So here's ah dee dee sharp E f sharp g going to be flat B C c sharp. That was the major bar chord based off of the fifth string. Now we're gonna take a look at a minor bar chord based off of the six string. Remember this that we played Major? The only thing you have to dio to turn it into minor is we just take our second finger off , because what you're doing here, this is a major third interval. Like, from here to here. Thing is your major third. That's what makes it sound. Major, if we take that, we take this note, move it down here. We're putting in a minor third. So now so it goes from kind of happy sounding sad. Mm. So this is all you have to dio. You have to make sure you bar the across all six and just put these two fingers down on strings four and five and then you have this is an a minor bar chord sharp, a flat. That's how you play in a minor bar chord based off the six string. Now, let's take a look at a minor bar chord based off of the fifth string. Okay? I just showed you how to play in a minor bar chord, so I'm just gonna move it right over, and we're going to play a d minor bar chord. So what happens here is, um like, if this is a thing, this is a minor. You can't just move whatever court it is over, that would be awesome. Like, here's a major, a major chord. Barb Warden, you can't just move it over. And now it's a d major. It just doesn't work like that. The reason is the distance between the second and third string is a major third where the distance between all the other strings it's a perfect, perfect fourth. Theo. Interval between strings two and three is different, so you can just move chords over. They sound need, but not the exact same type accord. That would be awesome that that worked like that. So what happens is when I play this major corn, get that f sharp here to turn it into a D minor court. I have to play this f here so it ends up so you end up having to do a completely different fingering. So to play a minor Bork bar chord based off the fifth string, when a bar the whole way across strings one through five, just like we did with the D major court. I'm gonna put my third finger here on the be the fourth string seventh fret My pinky is going to go right behind it on the third string. And then my second finger is gonna go on the second string six Threat right here. Now, in this one you do want to hear and I do want to hear this A here on top, that's the fifth of the chord. So I want to hear strings 5432 and one. So this fingering you might think, Well, this feels like I just played it right here. It's major here. When I move it over, it becomes minor on the base off the fifth string. So by being able to play these different chords, I have major, minor, major and minor. You actually have 24 different major minor bar chords that you have access to instantly by being able to play these bar chords, which is pretty awesome. Knowing how to play these four bar chords will enable you to play 24 different chords based off of the fifth and the sixth string. These cords are by no means easy and will take a while until you're able to play them well . But they are necessary for guitar players because every chord can't be in open court